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Help and advice for Blunham

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Blunham

BLUNHAM

[Transcribed and edited information from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland - 1868]

"BLUNHAM, a parish in the hundred of Wixamtree, in the county of Bedford, 8 miles to the east of Bedford. St. Neot's is its post town. It lies between the rivers Ouse and Ivel, the former of which bounds it on the west, the latter on the east The hamlet of Moggerhanger belongs to this parish, and has a district church of its own recently erected. Blunham was formerly a market town, the inhabitants having obtained a grant of a market and fair early in the 14th century. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Ely, of the value of £731, in the patronage of Earl de Grey. The church contains some monuments of the Longuevilles and Bursalls, and is dedicated to St. Edmund. There is a chapel belonging to the Baptists. The principal seats are Blunham House, the residence of Sir C. Payne, Bart., and Blunham Park."

"MOGGERHANGER, (or Muggerhanger or other spellings) a hamlet in the parish of Blunham, hundred of Wixamtree, county Bedford, 4½ miles north of Biggleswade. It is situated between the rivers Ivel and Ouse. Colonel Godfrey Thornton is lord of the manor.

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013

Cemeteries

Census

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Blunham area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • Church of England (Blunham)
    • The church of St. Edmund is a building of sandstone, partly of the Norman period, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and a lofty embattled western tower, with pinnacles, containing a clock and 5 bells : in the south wall of the chancel is a monument with recumbent effigy to Susanna (Grey), daughter of Charles, 7th Earl of Rent of that family, and wife of Sjr Michael Longueville, 17th century: there are also memorial slabs to the Bromsall family, including one to Margaretta Bromsall, 1664: the church was restored and entirely reseated in 1860, and in 1862 the organ was considerably enlarged at the expense of Miss Polhill of this place, who also contributed largely to the refitting of the church: the church plate includes a paten of silver given by Dr. Archer, of Blunham, in 1862: there are 350 sittings. The register dates from the year 1571. [Kelly's Directory - Bedfordshire - 1898]
  • Non-conformist (Blunham)
    • There are two Baptist chapels. [Kelly's Directory - Bedfordshire - 1898]
  • Church of England (Moggerhanger)
    • The ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1860. The church of St. John the Evangelist, consecrated July 31st, 1861, is an elegant building of stone, in the Early Pointed style, and consists of apsidal chancel, nave, aisles and a central tower with pyramidal roof, containing one bell: the church was erected at the expense of the late Mrs. Dawkins, formerly of Morhanger House, as a memorial to her husband, the Rev. E. H. Dawkins (d. 1859), who is buried in the chancel: the chancel windows are stained, and th ere are memorial windows to Lieut.-Col. H. G. Thornton and Jeremiah Titmas, first parish clerk: the church affords 180 sittings. The register dates from the year 1861. [Kelly's Directory - Bedfordshire - 1898]
  • Peter Holden has researched the link between Our Lady of Messines (Mesen) and the connection with St Edmund's Church Blunham.

Church Records

Description and Travel

  • There are two Web sites maintained by people who live in the village of Blunham:
    • One, maintained by Colin Hinson, contains a short description of the modern village, backed up by over 50 photographs from the year 1905 up to modern times.
    • The other, maintained by Steve Harris, has some more photographs along with short histories relevant to the village and links to interactive maps showing where the village is.
  • Moggerhanger Park is the seat of Richard Mercer esq. who is lord of the manor; the mansion, a building in the Classic style, stands in the contre of a very picturesque and thickly-wooded park; the approaches are lined with some fine elm trees, and the rivers Ivel and Ouse form the boundary. St. John's is the residence of Mrs. Thornton. The principal landowners are Richard Mercer esq. H. F. Dawkins esq. and Arthur Thornton esq. of Bedford. [Kelly's Directory - Bedfordshire - 1898]
  • "The Park" is owned and being restored by The Moggerhanger House Preservation Trust.
You can see pictures of Blunham which are provided by:

Directories

Gazetteers

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Blunham has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TL152511 (Lat/Lon: 52.146144, -0.317833), Blunham which are provided by:

Memorial Inscriptions

  • A transcript of the War Memorial for WWI in St. John's Church, Moggerhanger

Military History

  • The BFHS Project in conjunction with Roll of Honour contains the Blunham War Memorial transcription for WW1 and WW2 with details of the men found on it.
  • The BFHS Project in conjunction with Roll of Honour contains the Moggerhanger War Memorial transcription for WW1 and WW2 with details of the men found on it

Societies