PINXTON, Derbyshire

Bibliography

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Census

Census
Year
Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 195
1861 R.G. 9 / 2425
1891 R.G. 12 / 2651
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Church History

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Church Records

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Civil Registration

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Description and Travel

"PINXTON, a township, parish, and scattered village, near the western verge of the county, 3¼ E. by S. from Alfreton. It contains 943 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Helen, is a small edifice on an eminence in the centre of the parish. The living is a rectory, the Rev. Ellis Williams is the rector. Here is a new school. The Methodists have a chapel here. The Erewash Valley branch of the Midland Railway has a station here, and with the canal opens an extensive market for the coals of this neighbourhood to all parts of the kingdom."

[Description from Harrison, Harrop & Co.'s Directory & Gazetteer of Derbyshire, 1860]

The parish is 132 miles north of London and 6 miles south of Mansfield. In the late 1800s, this place was famous for its Porcelian, most of which was shipped via the Cromford Canal to various railheads. Coal travelled out from this parish via the same transports.

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Directories

WHITE's 1857 Directory of Derbyshire reports:

PINXTON, a township, parish, and scattered village, near the western verge of the county, 3¼ miles E. by S. from Alfreton and 6 miles S.W. from Mansfield, extends partly into Nottinghamshire, which is rateable to the poor, but not titheable to the rector. It contains 1223A. of strong land, and in 1851 had 175 houses and 943 inhabitants, of whom 504 were males, and 439 females; rateable value £2,179 5s. 9d. The principal owners are Wm. S. Coke, Esq., Mr. John Coupe, Mr. John Coupe, jun., and Mr. Wm. Cutler, the former is lord of the manor, and patron of the living. The Church, dedicated to St. Helen, is a small edifice on an eminence in the centre of the parish. It was rebuilt about a century ago, and has a nave, chancel, and tower, with two bells. The tower, supposed to be 500 years old, is a distinct building on the south side the chancel, in which are monuments to the Coke and Lillyman families. The living is a rectory, valued in the King’s book at £6 0s. 10d., now £280.

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Gazetteers

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History

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Military History

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Military Records

The one World War I casualty buried in St. Helen's Churchyard:

  1. G. GILBOURNE, priv., King's Own Yorks Light Inf., age 18, died 20 Nov. 1918.

The three World War II casualties buried in St. Helen's Churchyard:

  1. Ernest MILLINGTON, srgt., RAF Vol. Rsv., died 9 March 1942.
  2. Francis V. M. SLATER, flight srgt., RAF Vol. Rsv., age 32, died 28 Nov. 1943.
  3. Ernest Reader SMITH, priv., Corps of Military Police, died 27 March 1941.
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Politics and Government

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Poorhouses, Poor Law, etc.

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URL of this page: http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/DBY/Pinxton/index.html

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