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Help and advice for Bicton: The manors of Bicton and Kingsteignton: index

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Name Index

To

The manors of Bicton and Kingsteignton

Trans. Devon. Assoc. vol. 37, (1905) pp. 462-464.

by

J.B. Pearson

Prepared by Michael Steer

Founded in the early 8th century by the kings of Wessex as the centre of a vast Saxon estate extending from Teignmouth to Manaton, Kingsteignton was a key settlement in Saxon times and gave its name to the hundred of Teignton. Until the 13th century the Manor of Kingsteignton was a crown demesne. In 1509 the manor passed to the Clifford family who still hold the title of Lord of the Manor. The manor of Bicton was granted by Henry I to Henry Janitor, Keeper of Exeter Castle. In 1229 it was held by the Alabaster family, then purchased by Sir Robert Denys of nearby Holcombe Burnel, who built a new manor house and created a deer park on the estate. The estate passed to the Rolle family in 1613, following the death of Denys. It devolved then to the Trefusis family, Barons Clinton. Google with the Archive Organization has sponsored the digitisation of books from several libraries. The Internet Archive makes available, in its Community Texts Collection (originally known as Open Source Books), books that have been digitised by Google from a number of libraries. These are books on which copyright has expired, and are available free for educational and research use. This rare book was produced from a copy held by the New York Public Library, and is available from the Internet Archive.

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Acland family 463
Alabaster family 463
Balistarius, Ralph 463
Copleston family 464
Dennis, Anne 464
Dennis, Sir Richard 464
Dennis, Sir Thomas 464
George I 463
George III 462
Henry I 463
Janitor, John 463
Johnson, Rev A 462-3
Lysons 462-3
Milles, Dr 463
Portitor, William 463
Risdon 463
Rolle, Anne 464
Rolle, Mr Denis 462
Rolle family 462
Rolle, Sir Henry 464
Rolle, John 462
Satcheville family (also Sackville) 464
Whitby, Daniel, DD 463