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Cornwood (and Ivybridge)

from

A Topographical Dictionary of England

by

 Samuel Lewis (1831)

Transcript copyright Mel Lockie (Sep 2016)

CORNWOOD, a parish in the hundred of ERMINGTON, county of DEVON, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Earl's Plympton, containing 1057 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, in the archdeaconry of -Totness, and diocese of Exeter, rated in the king's books at £33. 4. 7., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Exeter. The church, dedicated to St. Michael, contains three stone stalls. The ground is hilly, with several small mountain streams, encompassing the parish, the river Yealm running through it, and the Erme separating it from the adjoining parish of Harford. A charity school is supported by subscription, aided by an endowment of £10 per annum, left by the late vicar, the Rev. Duke Young, who also bequeathed £20 per annum,for medical assistance to poor people not receiving parochial relief. Cattle fairs are held on the first Monday in May, and the fourth Monday in September.

IVY-BRIDGE, a chapelry partly in the parishes of CORNWOOD, ERMINGTON, HARFORD, and UGBOROUGH, hundred of ERMINGTON, county of DEVON, 2 miles (E.) from Plympton-Earle. The population is returned with the respective parishes. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry of Totness, and diocese of Exeter, and in the patronage of the Impropriators. The chapel was erected by subscription in 1799. The Wesleyan Methodists have a place of worship here. There are manufactories for paper and ship blocks. A priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was founded by Henry II., for four canons of the order of St. Augustine, which, by the favour of succeeding sovereigns, rose to considerable opulence and distinction.