Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted
Page 1 of 4

Help and advice for Inquests 1865-1874 - from the North Devon Journal

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it. We have a number of people each maintaining different sections of the web site, so it is important to submit information via a link on the relevant page otherwise it is likely to go to the wrong person and may not be acted upon.

Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1865-1874

Articles taken from North Devon Journal

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included:- Adams; Aggett(2); Allen; Angel; Anstey; Ashford; Ashton; Avery; Baker(7); Bale; Balkwill; Balmond; Barnes; Barry; Bate; Bates; Beer(2); Bennett(2); Berry(2); Bevens; Bird(3); Bishop; Blackmore(2); Blatchford; Blunt; Boatfield; Bond; Bovey; Bowden(3); Bowen; Bracher; Braund; Braunton; Brayley; Brewer; Bright; Brimley(2); Brook; Brookes; Brooks(2); Brown; Browning; Bryant; Burgess; Burrows; Butler; Byne; Cann(3); Cape; Carew; Carter(3); Chace; Chambers; Chappell; Chapple(6); Chugg(4); Churchill; Churchward(2); Clark; Clarke(3); Clatworthy; Clement; Clements; Clifford; Cobbledick; Cockings(2); Cockram; Cocks; Cole(3); Coleman; Coles(2); Collacott; Collamore; Comer; Congram; Cook(2); Cooke(2); Coombe; Cossins; Cotty; Courtney(2); Cousins; Cox; Crick; Crocombe; Crook; Cummings; Cutcliffe; Cutland; Cutts; Daniel(2); Darch; Dart(2); Davis(2); Davey(2); Davy; Dendle; Dickenson; Dicker(2); Discombe; Dockett; Dodd; Dodds; Down(2); Downing(2); Drew; Dunn(3); Dunning; Dyer(4); Dymond; Eade; Easterbrook; Eastman; Eastmond; Edwards(3); Eldridge; Ellicott; Elms; Enwright; Essery; Esworthy; Evans; Facey; Fewings; Fisher; Fishley; Flashman; Flay; Folland(2); Ford(2); Forester; Forward; Fowler; Fox; Francis; French(2); Frost(3); Furneaux; Furse; Furseman; Gabriel; Galliford; Gardener; Geary; Gent; George; German; Gibbett; Gibbings; Giles; Gill(2); Gillam; Gillard; Glover; Gloyne; Goaman; Gordon; Goslin; Goss; Gould; Gourd; Govier; Graddon; Gratton; Greenaway; Greenslade; Gregory; Gribble; Gubb; Hake; Hamlyn; Hammett; Hancock(5); Harding(5); Harris(7); Hartnoll(3); Harvey(2); Hawkins(2); Haynes; Heal(2); Heale; Heard; Hearn(2); Heddon; Hellyer; Hemmacott; Henley; Henry; Hernaman; Hewett; Hexter; Hickley; Hill(5); Hine; Hoare; Hobson; Hockridge; Hodge; Holdsworthy; Hole; Holland; Holloway(2); Holwill; Honeywell; Honeywill; Hooper(4); Horn; Horne; Hoyle(2); Hunt; Hutchings(4); Huxford; Huxtable(2); Ireland(2); Isaac(2); Isaacs; Jackson; Jago; Jarman; Jewel; Johns; Joint; Jolliffe; Jones(4); Joslin(2); Joy(2); Kellow; Kenworthy; Key; Keynes; King; Kingdon(2); Kirwan; Labbett(2); Lake(4); Land; Lane(6); Lang(2); Langdon; Lapthorne; Laramy(3); Leaman; Lee; Lempriere; Lethaby; Lewarne; Lewis(4); Leworthy; Ley(4); Limebear; Lintern; Liverton; Lock(4); Lockyer; Long; Loosemore; Lord; Lovell; Lovering(3); Lugg; Macvitty; Madden; Madge; Manning; Marles; Marlow; Marshall; Martin(3); Mathews; Matthews(3); Maynard; Mayne; Meade; Mears; Medland; Meyrick; Miffin; Mildon; Milford; Millar; Miller; Mills(2); Mitchell; Moore(4); Morgan; Morrish(3); Moses; Mountjoy; Mulcahy; Munday; Newberry; Newman; Nichols; Norman(4); Norris; Norrish(2); North; Nusbery; Oatway; Oldham; Olding; Orchard; Oxenham; Paddon; Palfrey; Palmer(3); Parkin(2); Parsley; Passmore(3); Patrick; Patterson; Payne; Pearse; Penberthy; Quick(2); Pady; Parkin; Pederick; Pepperell; Perkins; Perrin; Perry(2); Petherbridge; Phare; Phillimore; Pike(2); Pitts(2); Plaice; Poll; Potter(2); Priest(2); Prouse; Prout; Pugsley(3); Pyke; Quicke; Rabbage; Randall; Rawle; Redmore; Redwood; Reed; Rice; Richards(6); Rickard; Ridd(3); Rider(2); Roberts; Robertson; Robinson; Rodwell; Rook; Rooke; Ross; Roundsley; Routcliffe; Rowe(3); Rudall; Rudd; Ryder; Sable; Sanders(2); Saunderdock; Saunders; Scotford; Sellick(2); Selwood; Sercombe; Seymour; Shapland(2); Shelley; Sheriff; Shillabear; Short(2); Shrimpton; Shute; Skinner; Slater(2); Slee; Sleeman; Sloman; Smaldon; Smale(2); Smallridge; Smith(4); Snell; Sommerwill; Southcomb; Squire(2); Stacey; Staddon; Stapledon(2); Stediford; Steer; Stephens(2); Stevens(5); Stoddart; Stone; Sussex; Symons(2); Tancock; Tapscott; Taylor(4); Terrell; Thomas; Thorne(3); Tilbrook; Tinckham; Tom; Toms; Tossell; Townshend; Tozer; Trick; Trigger; Triplett; Tucker(7); Turner; Upham; Verney; Vickary; Vickery; Vooght; Vosper; Wadling; Wakely; Waldron; Walk; Walkey; Walsh; Walter; Walters(2); Ward; Warren(4); Watts(2); Way; Webb; Webber(4); Weeks; Wensly; Westacott(2); Western; Whitefield; Willcocks; Williams(2); Wills(2); Winsor(2); Wood; Woodhouse; Woodlock; Woodrow; Woodward; Wotton; Wreford; Wrey; Wyatt; Wyborn; Wyndham; Yeo(4)

Thursday 5 January 1865
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - A Coroner's Inquest took place on Tuesday, at Exeter, touching the death of JOHN ESWORTHY, aged 76, a retired farmer. The deceased and a man named Atkins were erecting a shute on a house in Blackboy-road on Friday last, when both had occasion to ascend the ladder at once, causing it to break in two parts about five feet from the top. Esworthy was taken to the hospital and expired. The house-surgeon gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from fracture of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Atkins was on the lower part of the ladder, and escaped serious injury.

BAMPTON - Extraordinary Suicide. - A remarkable case of self-destruction was committed in one of the public streets of this town, on the night of Wednesday, or early on Thursday morning last. MR RICHARD SLEEMAN, an old and eccentric farmer renting "Dipord," at Shillingford, had been suffering for some months from a depressed and deranged state of mind, said to arise from an action at law pending between himself and a neighbouring farmer. Shortly after 11 o'clock on Wednesday night the unfortunate old man secretly left his house, apparently for the purpose of destroying himself by drowning, but instead of taking the advantage which a deep and secluded river within gunshot of his house afforded, he preferred to walk to Bampton, and there, in the much frequented public thoroughfare, of Little Silver Street, with inhabited houses on both sides, he appears to have deliberately lifted a small grating just large enough to admit his body, and descend into a shallow, but somewhat swift stream, called the "Shutern," only 11 inches deep, to gather stones enough from the bottom to fill two capacious coat pockets, one on each side, as if to keep his body stationary, and having taken off his hat and put it into one of his pockets, he carefully laid on his back, and thus drowned himself directly under the grating, apparently that his body might be discovered by some passer-by at daylight. On Saturday, R. J. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body (which lay in a shell in an empty cottage belonging to Mr Catford) at the 'White Horse Hotel,' Bampton. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased drowned himself while in Unsound State of Mind.

CULMSTOCK - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the 'Ilminster Inn,' before Robert Brent, Esq., M.D., on the body of MR ROBERT LOVELL, parish schoolmaster. The deceased, on the 26th instant, about half-past five in the afternoon, was passing by the river, when he accidentally fell in, and was drowned before assistance could be rendered. The evidence of John Fry, Robert Potter, and Mr Shears, with Mr Wheaton's medical opinion, satisfied the Jury that death was accidental. The foreman of the Jury was instructed to draw the attention of the Surveyor of Highways to the dangerous and insecure state of the fencing. This is the second accident at this place.

Thursday 12 January 1865
STOKE RIVERS - Suicide Of A Farmer. - On Friday last the parishioners were alarmed by a rumour, which proved too true, that MR RIDD, of Horridge Farm, in this parish, had hung himself in his stable. At the Inquest which was afterwards held on the body, it was shown that some little time since he had been obliged to leave a farm in which he was doing well and saving money, when he took the one in which he was lately living, and laid out a considerable amount in improvements, &c. The speculation had not turned out so favourably as he anticipated, and the deceased got into a desponding state of mind, under which he had been labouring for some months past, but it was not supposed that he contemplated self-destruction. The workman of deceased deposed that on Friday morning, about 7 o'clock, he went to the stables to feed the horses, as usual, and on opening the door saw his master just in front of him, hanging from the loft with a rope round his neck, quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind." Deceased was aged about 50, and has left a widow and several children. It was stated that deceased's father hung himself a few days ago.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To A Policeman. - John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, on view of the body of JOHN FORD. The deceased was a policeman, belonging to the County Constabulary, stationed at Staddon Heights. On Monday, the 17th October, he was riding with another man in a truck which was being drawn up an incline by a stationary engine, and when about twelve yards from the signal house he jumped from the truck and fell against the signal wire. This having thrown his right leg on the rail, a second truck which was coming up passed over it, and smashed his foot to pieces. He was at once brought to Plymouth and placed in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where his leg was amputated the same day. From loss of blood he became very weak, and after lingering until Wednesday last, death relieved him from the great sufferings his wound caused. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was a single man, and about 32 years of age.

Thursday 19 January 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Shocking Death Through Neglect And Destitution. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the 'Rose and Crown Inn,' Newport, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN HUNT, who was supposed to have died from starvation. In consequence of the former position occupied by the deceased, who was at one time landlady of the 'King's Arms,' in High-street, of this town, the news of her untimely end caused much sensation. For several years past, however, the deceased has been known as a woman of loose and profligate habits.
The first witness examined was EMILY ELIZABETH HUNT, who said:- The deceased, whose body the Jury have viewed, is my mother She was 71 years of age. We came to live in the present house last Midsummer; before that we lived in Vicarage-street. My brother has now been living with us about a month. Mother had a little property, but since my brother has been out of a situation, he has been of great expense to her, and it has dwindled away. She has now no longer any property; during the last twelve months or so she has been obliged to pledge her articles of jewellery and other things. I have now worked at the gloving for several years. Before she had any "pull" on her, my mother was ins tolerably comfortable circumstances. I have been in the habit of taking things to the pawn-shop for her, both at Moon's and Gammon's. My brother was formerly a Comptroller of Customs at Lyme Regis. He has no means of living, and has consequently been a heavy charge on mother. She has fitted him out, and provided him with money to seek a situation. Taking a fair average, the most I have been able to earn in gloving has been 2s. 6d. a week. My mother for some time past has been failing, but only in her intellect that I could see. She used to sleep upstairs, but sometime last week she said she would like to have a bed made up down stairs, and I made up a bed there. I did not think she was very ill, or I should have sent for a medical man; I regret now that I have not done so. She has not been out of doors since Christmas day; for three weeks previous she was out several times. She slept down stairs on a mattress, on the floor; there were two blankets on the bed; no sheets, but some other things that I put on her, including a large curtain. The bed was near the fire. During the last two or three days she has taken a little arrow root; also some tea and toast. She never expressed a wish for me to call in a medical man; she did not think herself ill enough. The only complaint that I remember her make was that the bed galled her back. She died on Wednesday morning. On Tuesday night, about 12 o'clock, I settled her in her bed; she said I might put a few crumbs of bread into some milk for her, which I did. I gave her about a pint of milk; the bread was not much. She never took any beer or spirit. I stayed up with her till half-past three o'clock Wednesday morning, when I went to bed at her request. She then said she was very comfortable. My brother had gone to bed just before. He came home that night about 12 o'clock, and somebody had given him something to drink. I got up again a little after seven, and when I came down stairs I at first thought my mother was asleep. I raised up the blind, and even then I could not tell; she appeared to be exactly as I had left her. When we found out that she was dead, my brother immediately went to see Mrs Ann Rawle, of Congram's Row, who formerly was a servant in my mother's family. Mrs Rawle was at breakfast when my brother went down, but she came up very soon after. My mother, brother and myself always lived happily together; my mother never fell out or quarrelled with either myself or brother. She always entertained an aversion against my applying to the parish authorities for assistance.
HENRY ARTHUR HUNT, was next examined as follows:- I have been a Comptroller of Customs at Lyme Regis, in Dorset. I lost that appointment about four years ago. I was struck off the list in February, 1861. During the interval that has since elapsed I have occasionally been employed in travelling with books, and doing anything that I could get to do. I have now been home with my mother about a month, and last came from Cornwall. During that month I have given her all I can afford, and I have myself lived almost on charity. I thought, when I came back, there was a great change in her, but I attributed it to the infirmities of age. My sister has worked very diligently; she has got on the average about 3s. a week. I have hinted to mother about applying for parish relief, but she was very averse to this, fearing that she would be put into the Union. I last saw her alive on the morning of Wednesday last, about 3 o'clock. She was then lying on the mattress; on the floor of the kitchen. There was a little fire in the bodley. I think there was only one blanket on the bed. I had occasion between five and six o'clock to come down stairs again, and I then opened the door and said, "Granny," (that is what we called her) "do you want anything; are you all right?" Receiving no reply I thought she was asleep, and felt very glad of it. With the same I went away to bed again. Just before seven o'clock I came down stairs again, and though I could hardly reconcile myself to the fact till I put my hand to her, I then found she was no more. I ran upstairs, and said to my sister, "For God's sake come down; Granny is dead." About a quarter of an hour afterwards I went down for Mrs Rawle, who came up in about ten minutes.
Mrs Ann Rawle deposed:- I am the wife of John Rawle, a weaver, of Bishop's Tawton. I was acquainted with the deceased for a number of years - ever since she lived at the 'King's Arms.' I lived there with her when the children were all little. One evening, about three weeks ago, the deceased came to my house to borrow some coals and a bit of candle. I let her have these things, and she then asked me to let her warm herself by the fire. I made up a good fire, and I dare say she remained there for an hour and a half. I had occasion to go somewhere, and I left her there. I observed that she was very thinly clad; in fact, I really believe she had on scarcely any under clothing. She left, carrying the coals and candle with her, taking the former in a sort of carpenter's basket. She did not make any complaint to me of her poverty, nor was I then aware of it. She conversed with me about bygone days. She said her son had cost her a good deal of money, but nothing more about her circumstances. She said the coalman had not passed her way, and that was the reason she borrowed of me, so I had no reason to expect she was in want. Another evening afterwards she came again just as it was getting dusk. She was shivering and shaking so that she could hardly speak. I made an extra fire for her to warm herself by, and gave her a few sticks that she asked me for, to light her fire. I again observed that she was very thinly clad; she had no shawl or anything over her shoulders. I think she wore a black skirt; whether anything besides I can't say. I said to her, "Why did you come out in this manner?" She did not reply to that, but said, "I thought as I had no one home, I would come to sit with you a little." I did not see her afterwards alive. On Wednesday morning, I was called about half past eight, by the last witness, who told me his mother was dead. On going to her residence, I found her lying on her side, on the floor. the mattress was wet, and had been pulled away from under her. She was not quite cold, but "cooling away." Her daughter and son were in the room. The deceased still had on the remnants of the old black dress; her stays were on, besides one blanket. She had nothing else to cover her but a few rags. She wore legs of a pair of worsted stockings, but no feet in them. She had something on her head, what, I suppose, was once a night-cap,.
A Juror:- Had she got on a shift? - Witness: She had on something that once was a shift perhaps, but it was then all rags. I only saw one blanket in the room. She had not been moved after her death until I came to touch her, I am quite confident. Her body was very much emaciated; strictly so, and very dirty. It has been washed since, and I have put on a cap and night-dress, and done the best I can. The rags she had about her were so filthy that I was obliged to take them away and bury them. They were a mass of wet rags, and had not been touched for - God knows when. I saw a dreadful sore on her abdomen, and another on her back. I know these were caused by her being allowed to remain in such a dirty, wet state. Her body would never have presented the appearance it did, had she not wanted the necessaries of life. I am confident she had not proper treatment and care.
The daughter of the deceased was again called, and produced several pawn tickets in corroboration of her statement; the last being dated December 1st. The ticket was marked "bandbox, 8s." Witness said she could not charge her recollection as to the contents of the box. She admitted having "pulled out" the mattress on Tuesday night, and said her reason for doing so was because it was very damp. Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, said: This morning I examined the body of ANN HUNT. It was in the coffin, and had, I understood, been washed and dressed. I found the body in a very emaciated state; on the buttocks was a large sore, I suppose about nine inches in diameter; and on the front part of the abdomen was another large sore about four or five inches in length. The stomach and bowels appeared to be quite empty, and from the pallid and emaciated condition of the body I should judge she had died from complete exhaustion, produced apparently by a want of proper care and attention, from exposure and want of sustenance. There is no apparent disease, but of course I could not positively say death was not caused or accelerated by any bodily disease, unless I made a post mortem examination.
The Coroner said as this was an important case, and it was highly essential that the Jury before giving their verdict should be made acquainted with every detail, he considered a post mortem examination should be made. The Jury fully concurred in this suggestion, and the Enquiry was postponed till half-past four o'clock.
At that hour the Inquest was resumed, and Mr Cooke's examination was proceeded with. He said:< Since the adjournment I have made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. I found the different organs deteriorated in character, apparently from want of power in the system. There was no actual disease in any of the principal organs of the body, but a softening of the structures. That would be caused by depression of the system. In the stomach there was a small quantity of fluid - about a tea cup full, and there was some fecal matter in the intestines; so that I do not think the deceased had been kept entirely without sustenance. There was a small abscess in the cellular tissue adjoining the stomach. From the description of the condition the deceased had been in, I did not consider it necessary to open the brain The opinion which I have formed is that the excoriation on the surface of the body shows a great want of care and attention; that she had not had sufficient and proper nutritious food; that she had been too much exposed to cold from not being properly clad; and that these circumstances, combined with her advanced age, had accelerated her death.
The Coroner then summed up the case, and said he did not hear of the occurrence till the previous evening, when he was brought acquainted with it by the police. He could not understand, however, when the relieving officer was applied to for the coffin, not having had a medical or any other certificate of the cause of death, how it was that that official did not send him word, or make some inquiry into the matter. He was the more surprised at this because Mr Gaydon, the relieving officer, was also the registrar of births and deaths.
The Jury returned the following verdict, "That on Wednesday, 11th January, the said ANN HUNT died in Barnstaple, and that her death was accelerated, if not entirely caused by want of proper care and attention, exposure to cold, and insufficiency of proper food and nourishment." The Jury also considered that grave censure was attributable to the son and daughter of the deceased in not making their distress known to the parish authorities.

APPLEDORE - Sudden Death. - It is seldom that we have to record a death so sudden as that which occurred here on Sunday last. The facts as given at the Inquest held at the 'Royal George,' Appledore, are these:- WILLIAM GLOYNE, thirty years of age, mariner, son of MR JOHN GLOYNE, mason, of West Appledore, arrived at Newport, on Sunday, the 8th, in the ship Louisa, Captain Howes (W. Yeo, Esq., owner), from Valencia. Having a matrimonial engagement with a respectable young woman of this town, he came here on Saturday evening last, with the intention of being married on the following Thursday. On Sunday he dined with his intended; after which they visited their friends, took a walk, &c., returning home between 10 and 11 o'clock in the evening. After he got home he had some conversation with James Jewell, brother of his sweetheart, with reference to the voyage; when he (deceased) suddenly laid his head on the table close to where he was sitting, and apparently went to sleep. The brother was about to retire to rest, when his sister called to him to come down, remarking "that WILLIAM was faint." He went down and found deceased in the same posture as when he left him. He sent immediately for the doctor, and Mr Pratt was soon in attendance, and opened a vein, but no blood came; his pulse had ceased - he was a corpse! Dr Pratt gave it as his opinion that deceased had ruptured a blood vessel on the brain, which caused instant death. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes." A more sad and melancholy occurrence has not happened here for a long time; and it has naturally created a solemn impression on the public mind.

FRITHELSTOCK - Suspicious Death. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held by the County Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of a young woman named FRENCH, residing with her parents at Milford, in the parish of Frithelstock. It appeared that the child died on Tuesday morning, without any previous illness and no medical man was sent for till the child was dead; and then the gentleman who attended refused to give a certificate as to the cause of death until an Inquest had been held and a post mortem examination of the body had taken place. A woman named Charity Squire said she was sent for by the mother of the child, "to come and see it, because it was ill." On her arrival the child was dead and cold; and she told the mother so. The doctor was sent for. She (the witness) sat with the child on her lap until the arrival of the doctor, which was in about two hours. Mr E. Rouse, surgeon, of Bradworthy, said he could not tell the cause of death unless he made a post mortem examination. This was accordingly done; when the child's stomach was discovered to be in an inflamed state, and that it did not contain above a tablespoonful of food. The back was also much bruised. He thought it possible that the deceased child was five weeks old - might have suffered from diarrhoea, and that its death might be caused by suffocation, in consequence of being overlaid by the mother. Both of these suppositions the mother denied, and in the absence of any known cause of death, the Jury, after consultation, returned a verdict that deceased "Died from Natural Causes."

BIDEFORD - Death By Drowning. - A fatal accident took place during the storm, on Saturday evening last. A yacht belonging to Mr C. Hopson, of Bideford, had broken adrift in the morning, and was in danger of receiving damage against the quay wall near the railway station. Two men, named THOMAS LEE and Samuel Sanders, entered a boat lying at Bideford quay, and placed in her a kedge anchor and warp, and attempted to cross the river to bring away the yacht. They had got within 30 ft. or 40 ft. of the other side, when the boat, which is said to have been leaky, was swamped and sank in deep water. Sanders swam ashore; but he neither saw nor heard anything of LEE. Men employed at the limekiln went in search; but it being then high tide, the body was not recovered till one o'clock next morning, when it was grappled by a crew consisting of Henry Griffey, Jacob and Thomas Lane, and John Hooper, who had obtained the apparatus from the Bridge Hall. Supt. Vanstone directed the body to be taken home; but of course any attempt at resuscitation would have been of no use. The anchor and warp were recovered near the spot where the accident happened, but the boat was missed. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased at six o'clock on Monday evening, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., and a respectable Jury who returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

CHUDLEIGH - Death By Fire. - An Inquest was held at the 'Ship Inn,' by F. B. Cuming, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of ANN DYMOND, aged 80, who, it appeared, was sitting at her fireside, last Wednesday morning, and arose to take her tea kettle off the fire, and in doing so set fire to her apron. there was no one present but her aged husband, who was incapable of rendering her any assistance. He, however, raised an alarm, which brought some neighbours in, who succeeded in quenching the flames, but not before the deceased was seriously burnt about her face and arms. She lingered until Saturday evening. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 26 January 1865
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Friday evening last, an accident, attended with fatal consequences, occurred to MR ROBERT MILDON, aged 21, son of the late MR WILLIAM MILDON, of Halswell Farm, Chittlehampton. It appears that on Friday evening, about eight o'clock, the deceased, accompanied by a young man named Walters, left Barnstaple on horseback, to return home. On their arrival at the Plain, beyond Coddon Hill, both horses, by some unaccountable means, fell together. Walters, who was thrown but escaped with slight injuries, quickly rose and caught his horse, which was about twenty land-yards ahead. He then walked back in search of his companion (MILDON) and was alarmed to find him lying on the ground insensible; his horse was laid on its back in the trough. Walters raised MILDON to a sitting posture on the hedge, but, finding that he did not return to consciousness, he ran to the nearest house - Mr William Brailey's, of Downrew - to procure assistance. Some of Mr Brailey's servants immediately repaired to the spot, and conveyed the deceased to their master's house. MILDON was laid on the sofa, and received every kindness and attention the inmates could bestow, and a messenger was despatched on horseback to Barnstaple for Mr Gamble, surgeon. That gentleman attended with all possible despatch, and, after an examination of his patient, the latter was undressed, and put to bed. Notwithstanding every exertion to relieve the sufferer, he died the next morning at half-past eight o'clock, of concussion of the brain.
An Inquest was held at Mr Brailey's on Saturday evening, at 5 o'clock, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner; the jury (of which Mr John Robins, of Bishops Tawton, was foreman) being composed of farmers.
The following evidence was given by the surgeon Chas. H Gamble, Esq.: I am a surgeon and reside at Barnstaple. Last evening, shortly after nine o’clock, I received a message to go to Downrew Farm to see the deceased, who had met with an accident. I went with the messenger, and found the deceased lying on Mr Brailey’s sofa in a state of insensibility. I examined him and found no bones broken, but over the right orbital bone there was a very severe contused and lacerated wound. The upper lip was also very much bruised and cut. Blood was flowing freely from his mouth and nostrils. The right side of his body seemed paralysed, but the left, particularly the left arm, was subject to convulsive movements. The mouth was clenched very tightly, so that there was no possibility of giving him anything. I assisted in undressing him, and then had him carried up into one of Mr Brailey’s bed-rooms. I ordered what I considered necessary for him, but I thought there was very little hope of his recovery. I stayed more than an hour by his side, and this morning I was informed of his death and that it took place about half-past eight. I believe the immediate cause of his death was a rupture of a blood vessel upon the brain, occasioned by the fall from his horse.
The jury returned the following verdict: - “Accidentally killed by falling from his horse.” The deceased was a young man of excellent character, and much respected. He had but very recently completed his term of apprenticeship with Mr White, draper, of Southmolton (now mayor of that town), and intended, in a few days, to proceed to London.

BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by the County Coroner, on Thursday last, on the body of WILLIAM BRIMLEY, of Wrafton-lane, Braunton, carpenter,. aged about 50. The deceased was last seen alive on the Monday evening previously, when he appeared the worse for liquor. The wife of the deceased deposed that she had for some days before his death been nursing a sick person. She went home on the Sunday and made his bed. On Wednesday a neighbour went into his house, and found the deceased lying on his back across the bed in an upper room; he had his clothes on, but was quite dead. A medical man, who was called in, said the deceased had been dead nearly two days, and considered he died from apoplexy. - Verdict accordingly.

EXETER - Death While Drunk. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at Exeter, before the City Coroner concerning the death of ELLEN LINTERN, who was killed by falling down stairs and fracturing her skull while in a state of intoxication. The Coroner commented on the conduct of the persons living in the house with deceased, who did not call in medical aid until five hours after the accident.

STARCROSS - Alleged Child Murder. - An Inquest was held at the 'Mount Pleasant Inn,' on Friday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female infant which was found in a box belonging to HARRIET VOOGHT, a nursemaid, living with M. Strickland, Esq. The girl was taken ill on Monday, and placed under the care of Mr Cann, surgeon, of Dawlish. He saw what was the matter and charged her with having given birth to a child. She denied it, of course, but on search being made, the body of the dead babe was discovered in her box, with a piece of tape tied round its little neck. Mr Cann's opinion was that the infant was born alive. The girl is about twenty years of age, and in a dangerous state. A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was given against her.

ASHBURTON - Intoxication and Death. - On Tuesday, the 27th December, GEORGE FRENCH, a mason, aged 44, was knocked down by a horse in North-street. He came out of Mr Wills's beer shop tipsy, and went into the middle of the road, when a young horse, ridden by Mr Meatherell, of the Town Mills, shied at some wood and came in contact with FRENCH, who was afterwards picked up insensible, and bleeding from the head. He was so much better two days after as to be able to walk about, though in pain. He took to his bed on Friday, and, after remaining in a comatose state, died on Saturday morning. On Monday, at an Inquest held before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, these facts were related in the evidence of George Pomeroy, Sarah Tapper, and John Meatherall, and the surgeon who attended deceased stated that he knew the deceased to be addicted to drinking. The blow described might have caused death, but not to a person of regular habits. He considered that death was caused by apoplexy accelerated by drinking. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TIVERTON - Suicide Of A Boy. - On Saturday JOHN FEWINGS, aged 13, son of JOHN FEWINGS, grave digger at the cemetery, committed suicide by hanging himself. On the day above named the lad was reproved by his mother for fighting his younger brother, and was afterwards missed till Sunday evening, when his body was discovered suspended behind the door of one of the chapels. An Inquest was held, when a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned. The lad was of weak intellect and subject to fits.

Thursday 2 February 1865
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Mine Accident Near Tavistock. - On Monday afternoon, a miner named JOHN STEPHENS, employed at the Wackham and Poldice Mines, about two miles from Tavistock, was killed by falling from a ladder in the shaft. He and his comrade were nailing a plank in the shaft, and were standing on the ladder about two fathoms below the 26 fathom level. Instead of placing one hand around the ladder and nailing with the other, it is supposed that he merely trusted to his feet on the ladder without taking any other precaution from falling. His feet slipped and he fell to the 38 fathom level, a distance of 10 fathoms. He did not speak after he was taken up, and died in a few minutes. He was subsequently taken to his home at Tavistock, where an Inquest was on Wednesday held before A. B. Bone, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Capt. Lean, manager of the mines, attended the Inquest and stated that there was a good footway in the shaft, which was in first-rate condition, so that to the poor fellow's own carelessness alone is to be attributed the accident, and his death has been the penalty. The Jury kindly gave their fees to the widow, and entered into a subscription for her.

EXETER - Frightful Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Wednesday afternoon, on the body of HENRY CHACE, a young man, 20 years of age, who met his death under very distressing circumstances. The deceased, who lodged at the 'Three Crowns'. in King-street, was assisting the brewer at the 'Bull Inn,' on Monday night, and while mounting some steps, he accidentally fell into the mash-tub, which was full of hot water and malt. He was taken out as speedily as possible, and his clothes stripped off him; and was conveyed at once to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was received by the house-surgeon, Mr Huxley, who did all that was possible for him. The scalds, however, were so severe that it was foreseen from the first that the accident must terminate fatally; and after lingering for a day in great suffering he died early on Wednesday morning. The body presented a frightful appearance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 March 1865
ASHBURTON - Death From A Fall. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at the 'Golden Fleece Inn,' Ashburton, on view of the body of WILLIAM JOINT, a mason, aged 74 years, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., District Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr T. Pearse, butcher, was foreman. From the evidence it appears that on the 17th instant deceased had fetched some coal which was being rendered to the poor at a reduced price; and, on proceeding through Browse's court, he was seen to fall by a girl, named Whiddon, and a woman, called Beer, the latter of who9m ran to his assistance. Deceased was taken to his lodgings, and appeared to be much shaken by the fall. Medical assistance was sent for, and, although medicine was administered, nothing went through him. The Jury gave their verdict that death was caused through injuries received from a fall in Browse's Court, on the 17th inst.

NORTH TAWTON - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday a fatal accident occurred on the North Tawton and Okehampton Railway, now in course of construction through this parish. Whilst some men were working in a cutting a quantity of earth gave way, whereby JOHN PRIEST, a labourer, of North Tawton, was buried. From the injuries he received he died about two o'clock on the following day. An Inquest was held on Friday, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., and after hearing the evidence of Dr Budd, and a\ witness of the accident, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The foreman, Mr Hugh Pyke, sen., asked the latter witness whether it was not a part of the duty of the sub-contractor (Mr James Daniel) to keep a watch for the purpose of warning the men when danger was near, and if so, whether such a watch was present on the occasion in question. Witness said there was no watch kept on that part of the line where the accident took place They did not consider it necessary, as the cutting was not a deep one. Deceased has left a wife and four young children wholly unprovided for.

DEVONPORT - Child Murder. - A woman is now in custody of the Devonport police charged with the murder of her infant child under peculiarly revolting circumstances. Her name is MARGARET ENWRIGHT, and she lived in service with Mr Archer, of Victoria-place, Stoke. She had always borne the character of a well conducted person; but her mistress having her suspicions excited by ENWRIGHT'S sudden and peculiar illness, called in the assistance of a relative, Dr Archibald Archer, R.N. When accused of having given birth to a child, the prisoner denied the charge; but on Dr Archer making a search, he found in a carpet bag - which was locked and which he had to cut open - the still breathing body of a newly born child. On examination he found that its skull had been frightfully fractured in two places; and from the effect of the violence which had been used, it shortly expired. An Inquest on the body was opened on Saturday, and adjourned until Monday, at two o'clock. ENWRIGHT is about eight or nine and twenty, is a married woman and has two children. The murdered infant, however, is illegitimate.

WOODBURY - Fatal Quarrel At Woodbury. - The quiet little village of Woodbury was on Thursday thrown into a state of commotion by a rumour that a murder had been committed. Unfortunately the rumour turned out to be a truthful though painful fact - a man named Tucker, having in a moment of anger inflicted fatal blows on a man named MOORE. The perpetrator of the deed is named William Tucker, residing in the village of Woodbury, and earning his livelihood by keeping a coal store. His victim is named HENRY MOORE, who lived at East Budleigh, and who earned a livelihood by drawing timber with his horse and truck. Both are said to have been industrious, and, generally speaking, quiet and inoffensive men. Neither of them was addicted to intemperance, and before the present painful affair Tucker was looked upon as an exceedingly harmless man. Both were about the age of 40. The circumstances which led to the quarrel arose out of some transactions which it appeared had taken place between Tucker and the son of the deceased. The boy is apprenticed to Mr Hutchings, a carpenter, residing in premises adjoining those of Tucker. Mr Hutchings had reasons for suspecting that the boy disposed of his clothes to Tucker, and he communicated his suspicions to the deceased. On Thursday the deceased was passing through Woodbury with his timber waggon, and he called on Mr Hutchings. He went out into the yard where Mr Hutchings was for the purpose of speaking to him. A low wall divides the yard of Tucker from the yard of Mr Hutchings, so that a person can easily look from one yard into the other. At the time deceased entered Mr Hutchings's yard, Tucker was in his yard employed about some coal. On catching sight of the latter the deceased went over to the wall, and began accusing him of having had dishonest dealings with his (MOORE'S) son. The deceased also told Tucker that he had better not harbour his son in his house, to which Tucker replied that he should if he liked. Angry words passed, and both men became excited. At last the deceased got on the top of the wall dividing the yards, for the purpose, it is conjectured, of going in to fight with Tucker, but before he could get off the wall Tucker came forward and struck him a heavy blow on the head with a shovel which he had been using about the coals. This blow, alone, would doubtless have been fatal, but Tucker, who seemed to be mad with rage, again struck the deceased two cruel blows on the head with the same weapon. At the time the second blow was given the deceased was lying insensible on the ground. Two or three persons witnessed the savage act, but their intervention came too late. They, however, conveyed the deceased to his father's house in the village. Medical aid was sent for and Dr Brent was quickly in attendance, and dressed the wounds. From the first it was, however, feared that poor MOORE was beyond all human aid. After lingering in an unconscious state for about three hours he expired. One of the wounds is said to have been terribly severe, and calculated to cause instant death. The shovel with which the blows were struck is such a one as is generally used by scavengers and in coal yards. One edge of it is broken so that a sharp point projects, and the wound the deceased first received corresponds exactly with the point of the shovel. Tucker was apprehended on the charge of murder by P.C. Watts, stationed at Woodbury, as soon as MOORE was dead. The shovel was afterwards secured by Sergeant Ryall. Both the prisoner and the deceased are married men, and the fathers of families. On Friday the prisoner was taken before W. C. Coles, Esq., at the Magistrates' Clerk's Office, at Exmouth. The examination was merely a formal one, and he was remanded. The Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.), has been communicated with. The prisoner has made a statement to the effect that the deceased came over the wall, threatening to twist his (Tucker's) neck, and he thought that he was justified in striking him to prevent his carrying out the threat. The melancholy event has cast a deep gloom over the village, and much commiseration is felt for the families of both men, who, by the unhappy event, will be left in a very distressed condition.
At an Inquest held on the following Saturday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter." The Coroner said the Jury had taken a very merciful view of the case. The Coroner's warrant was then made out, and he was removed in custody. During the Enquiry the prisoner did not seem to at all realise the awfulness of his position and during the whole of the proceedings retained a look of almost indifference. On Monday, the prisoner was taken before the magistrates at Woodbury charged with feloniously killing HENRY MOORE, and the evidence being read over, he was committed for trial on a charge of "Wilful Murder."

Thursday 9 March 1865
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - Death From The Bursting Of A Varicose Vein. On Monday last an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DUNN, at the house of deceased, there laying dead. A respectable Jury was impanelled of which Mr Philip Widgery was foreman. The following witnesses were sworn, and William Warren stated as follows:- I am a woolcomber, residing in East-street, in Southmolton. I have known the deceased for the last 20 years and have been frequently in the habit of seeing him, and know he has had a bad leg for many years past. I saw it once about eight years since, when there was a large wound in it. On Saturday last, the 4th instant, I was in the company of the deceased, at the 'Exeter Inn,' a public house in South-street, in this borough. I went there about 8 o'clock, and left there about 11. I found the deceased there when I came, and I left him there when I went home, he appeared in his usual health and spirits. I had been talking with him the whole of the night and was drinking by himself; he drank several glasses of beer, and when I left about 11 o'clock or a little after, the deceased appeared in very good spirits, and walked out of the room we were in, and returned again all right. When I left the house the deceased was in the company of Nicholas Carter, Jacob Alford, and John Hodge.
Nicholas Carter on his oath, said: I am ostler at the 'Exeter Inn,' in South-street, and was there as such, on Saturday last. I saw the deceased in the house sitting in the settle, by the fire, in the kitchen. I first saw him about 9 o'clock in the evening. I sat in the same settle with deceased, opposite him; he drank three or four glasses of beer, and about half-past eleven we all left the house to go home, and on coming into the street I offered to conduct the deceased home, as he appeared rather the worse for liquor, but could walk; I accompanied the deceased as far as the bottom of Duke-street, where he stumbled and fell, and pulled me down with him. I immediately rose and got the deceased on his feet, and I said, "Never mind WILLIAM you sha'nt fall again, put your arm round my neck:" he did so, and I put my arm round his waist, and we went on again very comfortable, but found him losing his legs, and getting very helpless, so that I was obliged to carry him; after doing so, I rested for a short time to get a better hold, and when taking him up I saw something on the flagging, after going a little farther, I again rested him, and on taking him up, secondly saw blood running freely out of one of the boots of the deceased. I then became frightened and called for assistance, when Gilbert Knill immediately came, he assisted me, and we conveyed the deceased to his house, which is situated in Cock's buildings, in Steppa-lane. Having placed the deceased in a chair, I went for Mr Furse, a medical gentleman, who accompanied me to the house of the deceased, and on our arrival, found him dead; he never spoke after falling. I asked him several questions, but could get no mouth speech from him; after leaving the deceased's house, I returned to the spot where he fell, and I saw a large quantity of blood which extended from the bottom to the top of Duke-street.
Gilbert Knill was sworn, and said:- I am a labouring man, and live in Duke-street. On Saturday night, between the hours of 11 and 12 o'clock, first as I was about to go to bed, I heard a noise in the street, and some one saying they wished to God, some one would come to their assistance. I went out, and immediately recognized the voice of Nicholas Carter. I went to them and asked what was the matter, he said he did not know, only that the deceased was bleeding very much, but did not know where it came from. I assisted the last witness, and took the deceased to his house, and waited there until the surgeon came who found him dead; the deceased breathed, and attempted to speak after being placed on the chair, but was dead before Mr Furse came. After leaving deceased's house, I went down Duke-street, where I found a great quantity of blood.
Mr William Henry Fisher was next sworn, and said: - I am the superintendent of police of this borough. I was on duty on Saturday night last, about a quarter before 12. I was passing across the bottom of Duke-street, and when by L. S. Pearse's, I saw Nicholas Carter in company with another man, whom he was leading, they appeared going on very comfortably and friendly, and just as they turned the corner to go up Duke-street, I heard a fall, and halted; I saw them get up again immediately, and Carter said, "All right my boy" and they went on; I heard footsteps going up the streets, and went on towards new walk. About three quarters of an hour afterwards, I was informed by Warren, the police constable, that an accident had happened at the bottom of Duke-street. I went there accompanied by Warren, and with the help of his lanthorn I examined the spot where I had heard the men fall, and found there some blood and on examining up Duke-street, found the further I went the more blood there was, until I arrived at Mr Flexman's double doors, where there was a very considerable quantity; there was an immense quantity in the street, and I should judge that the deceased could not have a thimbleful left in his body. The deceased was 53 years of age, and has left a widow and two children.

CHALLACOMBE - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, the 1st instant, at the 'Ring of Bells' inn, Challacombe, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY ELIZABETH RIDD, who died on the Saturday morning previous, under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Mary Webber, deposed:- I am a widow, and keep the 'Ring of Bells,' at Challacombe. I knew the deceased, MARY ELIZABETH RIDD; she was about four years of age, and was the child of JOHN and CHARLOTTE RIDD, of Challacombe. I last saw the child alive about eight o'clock on Saturday morning; she was then very poorly. About half-past five o'clock in the morning the father came to me and said the child was very ill, and desired me to bring up a drop of brandy; but I did not carry up any, as he came down again and said the child was worse and he did not think she could take any brandy. I then went up to the house and saw the child; I thought she was very ill, and persuaded the father to get a certificate and fetch the doctor as fast as possible. He went away, appearing to be in a very distressed state. My impression was that the child had an inflammation in the bowels. I remained until the father went away for the doctor. He had to go a mile to get the certificate, and from there to Lynton, where the doctor resides, is about eight miles. The child died about half-past eleven o'clock on Saturday morning last.
JOHN RIDD, deposed:- The deceased was my child, and was nearly four years of age. She had been pretty healthy since her birth. On Tuesday evening last, on my return from work, the child complained of being unwell in her stomach. I had my supper and then put her to bed. She lay quiet for several hours, but in the night she asked me to light a candle, which I did, and, seeing she was very ill, I went out and called in my wife's sister. Fancying she was still worse, I went for Mrs Webber, who came up. She persuaded me to fetch the doctor as quick as I could. I immediately went to Challacombe Town and got a certificate. I then got a pony and went off to Lynton as quick as possible. I got there a little after eleven, and delivered the Overseer's order to Dr Clarke's servant girl, who informed me that her master was not in, nor did not known where he was. I desired her to send on Mr Clarke as soon as he returned. I got back to Challacombe between twelve and one o'clock, when the child was dead. Mr Clarke did not come, but on Sunday last, about twelve o'clock, his partner, Mr John Elliott, came.
Joannah Dalling, deposed:- I live at Challacombe, and am a singlewoman. I knew the deceased, MARY ELIZABETH RIDD. Between three and four o'clock on Saturday morning last, I was sent for to see the deceased. I saw the child was very ill, and we sent for Mrs Webber, who came and requested that the doctor might be sent for as soon as it could be done. The father went for a certificate to carry to the doctor, and afterwards proceeded to Lynton for Mr Clarke, who attends to the poor of Challacombe. I remained with the child until she died. She died about half-past eleven o'clock on Saturday morning last, before the father returned from Lynton
J. R. Elliott, Esq., surgeon deposed:- I reside at Lynton, and am a surgeon, in partnership with Mr John Clarke. My partner has the care of the poor at Challacombe. I have occasionally seen the child on passing through Challacombe. I have this day seen the body. I was not able to ascertain the cause of death without making a post mortem examination. I have done so by the direction of the Coroner. I found the internal organs of the body healthy. The stomach contained a small quantity of bile; the intestines were empty; the brain was quite healthy; and I have little hesitation in saying that the child died from infantile convulsions. I saw Mr Clarke last Saturday evening, between six and seven o'clock. He told me there was a parish order from Challacombe, and that there was no message left with it, that he had seen no one, and that it would do to attend to it in the morning. On Sunday last, about mid day, I was at Challacombe, but found the child had died the previous day. Mr Clarke has told me that his agreement with the Board of Guardians is, that all cases to be visited for the district must be at his house by nine o'clock in the morning, except in urgent cases and confinements.
The Jury returned the following Verdict:- "Sudden death from infantile convulsion; but the Jurors, without casting any reflection on any medical man, consider it to be the paramount duty of every medical man having the charge of the poor of any parish to attend to any urgent case as soon as possible after he receives notice of such."

WESTLEIGH - A Man Suffocated On A Lime Kiln. - On Monday last an Inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner (J. H. Toller, Esq.), at the 'New Inn,' Westleigh, on the body of a man named THOMAS HARVEY, who was found lying dead on the previous morning under the following circumstances:-
Thomas Jennings deposed:- I belong to the Devon County Constabulary and am stationed at Instow. I have this day seen a body which I believe to be that of THOMAS HARVEY, of North Heale, near Launceston.
John Darke deposed:- I live at Bideford, and keep the 'Swan Inn,' East-the-Water. On Saturday night last, about half-past eleven o'clock, a man came into my house unknown to me, but who, I have been since informed, was a man named THOMAS HARVEY, of North Heale, near Launceston. He was not the worse for drinking. He had some beer at my house, but he only drank about a quarter of a half-pint. He stayed about twenty minutes and then left. I have this day seen a body which is that of the man who was in my house on Saturday night last. He walked out of my house steady, as far as I could perceive, and said "Good night to the people."
John Tucker deposed:- I am employed by the South Western Railway Company in looking after the road between Bideford and Instow every morning. I was on my duty, as usual, yesterday morning, and when I came opposite Turner's lime kilns, in the parish of Westleigh, I saw a man lying down upon the top of the kiln; I called to him but he did not answer. I approached him and called again but he did not speak. I went and put my hand to his arm to try to awake him, but after a time I saw he was dead. He was lying with his face northward turned to the ground, and his hands on each side of him. He was very black in the face, and was lying about two feet or two feet and a half from the top of the kiln.
William H. Ackland, Esq., deposed:- I am a Doctor of Medicine, and reside at Bideford. I have this day seen a body, which I am informed is that of THOMAS HARVEY. I made an external examination of him. There were no marks of violence about the body In my opinion death was caused by his respiring carbonic acid gas. Verdict: "Found Dead on the top of a lime kiln from having inhaled carbonic acid gas."

BRAUNTON - Sudden Death Of A Child. On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Braunton, before the Deputy County Coroner (J. H. Toller, Esq.) , on the body of an infant child, named LEWIS. the circumstances of the case will be gathered from the following evidence:-
Elizabeth Dyer deposed:- I live at Knowle in the parish of Braunton and am the wife of Richard Dyer, labourer. I have this day seen the body of a child. The child was illegitimate, and was the child of ANN LEWIS, of Knowle, single woman. On Monday, the 13th day of February last, George Kieft, the step father of ANN LEWIS, came to me about half-past four o'clock in the morning and asked me if I would come in and deliver ANN LEWIS of her child. I told him I was not in the habit of doing so, but that I would see what I could do. After dressing myself, I went to Kieft's house, but found that the child had been born. It was lying on the hearth stone, with a flannel petticoat and shawl about it. It was a very healthy looking child, and I remained there until Nanny Slocombe, the midwife, came and relieved me, and I left. I saw nothing more of the child alive, but on Friday, the 24th of February last, Sarah Kieft, the mother of ANN LEWIS, came to me in much distress and said the child was dead, and asked me to do the last by it. It was between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I went in and found the child was dead; I took it up and carried it down and washed it and dressed it. I did not see any blemish about the body, and I believe the child died from natural causes. On the following day it was put into a coffin. It was not baptised, and on Monday evening, the 27th of February last, I assisted in taking it to Braunton churchyard. A woman named Mary Kieft, but who is not a relative of the mother of the mother of the child, assisted, and she proposed, in order to avoid the public gaze, that it should be taken by a private way, for a short distance, which was done, and after avoiding Knowle village, we got into the public road, and the child was taken to Braunton churchyard and buried.
Elizabeth Chapple deposed:- I am a widow and reside at Barnstaple. I am at present with Mrs Martin, of Knowle, as a nurse. On Friday, the 24th of Feb., last, about two o'clock in the day, Sarah Kieft, the grandmother of the child, came to me and asked me if I would come in and look upon the child, as it was very ill. I accordingly went in and found it upon the lap of its mother by the fire. It appeared to be in a dying state gasping as it were for life. I did not see anything but kindness to the child whilst I was there. The grandmother had from Mrs Martin some oil and magnesia.
Stephen Orson Lane deposed:- I reside at Braunton, and am a surgeon. Last evening I received an order from the Coroner to make a post mortem examination on the body of a female child, which has been identified as a child born of the body of MARY ANN LEWIS, single-woman. I accordingly did so. It presented, externally, the appearance of a very fine healthy child. I then examined it all over to see if there were any marks of violence, but I could not detect any. I opened the body. The chest, and both the lungs and heart were very healthy. The stomach and bowels were very healthy, as well as the liver. There was very little food in the stomach. There were slight traces of inflammation in the lining membrane of the bowels, but very slight. I also examined the brain, which was very healthy, but the outer membrane was very much gorged with blood. I found no traces of any foul play whatever about the child, and I believe it died from natural causes. The child had been ill for several days, which accounts for the small quantity of food within the bowels. Had it wanted food the child would not have presented the healthy appearance which it did.
Verdict:- "Sudden Death from inflammation in the lining membrane of the bowels."

Thursday 16 March 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Child Scalded To Death. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Infirmary, before the Borough Coroner (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.), on the body of a child named MARY ELIZABETH WALTERS, who met with her death under the following distressing circumstances:-
Maria Dymond, wife of George Dymond, of Barnstaple, deposed:- I occupy part of the house in Aze's-lane, in this borough, with the parents of the deceased. She was about five years of age. On Tuesday last, the 7th inst., she came into my parlour; I was working at my lace pillow, she spoke to me and then went to another part of the room. I heard her scream, and, on going to the child I found her in a pan of hot water which was in the room. I took her out immediately and carried her into her mother's house, the other side of the passage. Two children of mine were in the room; one of them, a girl aged thirteen, was about to wash the dishes in the pan. We had just finished our breakfast. The pan was standing on the floor, and there was about three quarts of hot water in it. I assisted the child's mother to undress the child; we applied some flour to the burns and then took it to the North Devon Infirmary. The child was burnt severely on its back. My other child who was in the room is a boy aged about two years and a half. The deceased was in the habit of coming into my room. The children had not quarrelled.
MIRIAM WALTERS, wife of THOMAS WALTERS, deposed:- The deceased was my child, and was five years old on the 22nd of November last. I occupy the same house with the last witness. On Tuesday last the deceased complained of a headache, and I did not send her to school with my other children. I sent her an errand about nine o'clock on the morning of Tuesday last, and after she had returned about a quarter of an hour, the last witness, Mrs Dymond, brought her to me. She was screaming violently and appeared to be in great pain. I undressed her, assisted by Mrs Dymond, and then I found she was severely scalded on her back and other parts of her body. I applied some flour to the wounds and then took her to the North Devon Infirmary. After she was put into bed at the Infirmary, she told me that little James Dymond pushed her in.
Mr Anthony John Newman, House Surgeon, of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased was brought by her mother and the other witness to this Institution on Tuesday morning last, about half-past ten o'clock. I examined the child and found she had received severe scalds over the lower part of the back, the sides of the belly, the private parts, the thigh, and on the right leg. She was put into a bed here, and I applied the necessary remedies. The child did not appear in robust health, and was suffering much from the shock. She appeared to rally during the day, and was much better the following morning. On the Wednesday evening she threw up some worms, and she died about half-past one o'clock on Thursday morning. Her death was caused by the injuries she received as before described. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "Accidentally Scalded to Death."

BISHOP'S TAWTON - A Farmer Killed By A Fall. - On Saturday an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN JONES, a farmer, of New Bridge, in this parish, who came to his death under painful circumstances. On Friday morning deceased got up at his usual time and went to feed his horses, for which purpose he ascended a short ladder to the loft over the stable, and threw down a supply of hay. It is supposed that he was about to descend when he slipped his feet and was precipitated to the floor of the stable, thereby breaking his neck. A few minutes afterwards his daughter discovered her father lying at the foot of the ladder quite dead. There were a few slight bruises about the head and shoulders occasioned by the fall. The deceased was 73 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 March 1865
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Fatal Accident On The North Devon Railway. - An Inquest was held at the 'Ring of Bells' Inn, Bishop's Tawton, on Wednesday (last week), on the body of WILLIAM HOLWILL, a farm servant, about 62 years of age, in the employ of Mr Walrond, of Bishop's Tawton. It appears that the deceased was engaged on Monday evening in driving some sheep along a level crossing of the line near Bishop's Tawton, and that while doing so, the 5.28 train from Barnstaple hove in sight, and the engine driver - Robert Whitehorn - seeing the danger deceased was in, blew the whistle, but the deceased had not time to get out of the way, and he was knocked down, and run over. The train was stopped, and the deceased was found lying on the rails quite dead. The boy was taken home, where it was afterwards seen by Mr J. Harper, surgeon. The poor fellow's skull was completely torn away, and the face was much mutilated. There was a compound fracture f the right leg, and several cuts on his hands and shoulder. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that the place where the deceased crossed might be made safer and more secure.

BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Poisoning Of A Child. - On Wednesday (yesterday), an Inquest was held at Lock's 'Railway Hotel,' Boutport-street, before the Borough Coroner (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.), on the body of PERCY VICTOR HILL, a child five weeks old, the son of MR W. HILL, hairdresser, of High-street. It appeared that on Sunday night last, about half-past eleven o'clock, the child cried very much, and MRS HILL, its mother, requested the nurse - Mrs Elizabeth Parkin, to give it some "infant's cordial." By a sad mistake the nurse took a bottle from the mantelpiece labelled "Poison" and which contained laudanum, a small quantity of which she administered to the child before discovering the fatal error she had made. The laudanum, it was said, was used by MRS HILL for the purpose of rubbing her gums when they ached. On the discovery of the mistake, Mr Parsons, chemist, was instantly sent for, and that gentleman soon arrived. He gave the child a strong emetic, but without effect, and then went for Dr Budd, and both gentlemen remained with the child nearly all night. Various remedies which were applied, were of no avail, and the child died on the following afternoon (Sunday) shortly after four o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased on the 26th inst. by mistake had administered to him by Elizabeth Parkin half a teaspoonful of laudanum from the effect of which he died on the 27th inst., and that his death was caused accidentally and by misfortune and not otherwise." On the suggestion of the Foreman, and with the unanimous concurrence of the Jury, a rider was appended to the above to the effect that Mrs Parkin and more especially MRS HILL had been guilty of carelessness; the former in administering a potion from a bottle the contents of which she had not made herself acquainted with, and the latter for causing to be left in so exposed a place a bottle containing poison.

PLYMOUTH - Horrible Suicide. - On Friday morning, between 9 and 10 o'clock, MARY TRIPLETT, a married woman, 64 years of age, was seen to go to the coal-house of her residence, 16 Green-street, Plymouth, and shortly afterwards was found with her throat cut, both perpendicularly and horizontally. The deceased has had two seizures, the second about two years ago, and since that she has been low spirited and nervous. During the last three months she has been worse, and yesterday morning her husband observed her pacing to and fro in her room. They had that morning received a letter from their children in London, but it contained nothing unpleasant. The deceased put the letter into a pocket-book in which her husband kept his razor. This razor was afterwards found by Sergeant Daw covered with blood in the coal-house. Deceased was then lying with her legs in the coal-house, and her head in the court. There were two pools of blood - one under the head, and the other under her feet. At an Inquest held before Mr J. Edmonds, evidence to this effect was given by Jemima Mortimer, Elizabeth Thomas, and JAMES TRIPLETT, and the Jury returned a verdict "That the Deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Four Children Suffocated. - A Coroner's Inquest on the bodies of the four children who were suffocated on Saturday morning in a lodging-house in King-street West, Plymouth, was held on Saturday afternoon by Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, at the Octagon Cellars Inn, Octagon-street. The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said that during twenty-five years' experience as Coroner he had witnessed many distressing sights; but he did not recollect one more distressing than that involved in the present case, where a father who had lost his wife, was now bereft of his whole family of four children at one fell swoop. The children were left by their father, who travelled from place to place to earn a livelihood, at a lodging-house in King-street, and mostly in the care of the eldest, CHARLOTTE, though it appeared a woman, a lodger in the house, attended to them occasionally, for she made their bed on Friday night, and left them apparently safe, with no fire or candle. All was quiet until about four the next morning, when the neighbourhood was alarmed by P.C. Shepheard, who saw smoke proceeding from the room where the children "had slept the sleep of death." He could not speak in too high terms of the policeman's exertions on that occasion. The four bodies were with great difficulty found by the policeman stretched out dead upon the bed in the room, and taken down stairs. The fire seemed to have originated in the cupboard in the room, and might have been occasioned by the eldest little maid getting out of bed for something to quiet the youngest, or from necessity, and in striking a match - for it did not appear there was any candle - dropped a spark, which fell upon some material that smouldered, and filled the room gradually with smoke, that at length stifled the little sleepers. Mary McList, a married woman, was then called, and stated that she lodged at Solomon's lodgings, 129 King-street West. She had seen the father of the children in the house, and believed he was an itinerant seller of fruits and sweetmeats. She heard he went away on Saturday. CHARLOTTE KEYNES was about twelve years of age, WILLIAM about 10 years, BESSIE 4 ½ years, and EMMA, the youngest, about one year and eight months. The mother of the children was dead. Witness made their bed on the previous night for them, the room being upstairs. She saw three of them in bed, and CHARLOTTE, the eldest, locked the door when witness came out of the room, where at that time there was neither fire nor lights. This was just before nine o'clock, and soon after witness went to bed, directly under the room where the children were sleeping. Witness did not hear any noise in the night. P.C. Shepheard woke her shortly after four o'clock that morning. She and her two children got out of window. There was much smoke in her room. By the Foreman:- did not know whether a fryingpan or the like was used by the children, but believed there was not. The father was very kind and attentive to his children. P.C. Shepheard, who was on duty in King-street West on Friday night, stated that shortly after four o'clock on Saturday morning his attention was attracted to Solomon's lodging-house by a smell of fire and of smoke. Previously to that he had passed several times, but neither saw nor smelt anything of fire. He proceeded to the back of the premises, but could not get to the spot, and returned to the front of the house, knocking at several doors, when some one on the opposite side of the street cried out "Policeman, I think the fire is at Solomon's house, I see smoke." On getting into the back court witness saw where the fire was. He knocked at the two doors inside, but could get no answer, and rushed upstairs alone. Mr Solomon came up shortly after and said there were children in the room. The room was full of smoke, no candle would burn in it, and no one could stop there. After many attempts witness succeeded in finding the bedpost, and discovered the children in the bed. Witness shouted as well as he could, "I have the children," and one by one handed the bodies out to some one, but could not see for the smoke. He had frequently to get out into the fresh air, and was nearly overcome once or twice. Witness soon afterwards went downstairs and fetched Dr Pearce, who pronounced the children dead. He believed the fire originated in the cupboard at the corner of the room. It was his opinion the children were stifled by the smoke while asleep. The Jury returned a verdict "That the children were suffocated by smoke occasioned by a fire in a cupboard in their room while they were asleep, but there was no evidence to show the origin or nature of the fire."

Thursday 6 April 1865
INSTOW - A Man Drowned In The River Taw. - An Inquest was held at the 'Marine Hotel,' Instow, on Thursday last, before John H Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HUXTABLE, mate of the barge Ann, who met with his death by drowning. William Adams deposed:- I live at Bickington, and am a bargeman. I am the master of the barge Ann, belonging to Mr Lauder, of Barnstaple. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM HUXTABLE; he was the mate of the barge. We plied daily between Barnstaple and Appledore, for lime stones. On Tuesday morning last, we came down the river as usual. We got to the end of our voyage about nine o'clock, when the deceased threw the anchor overboard, at my request. In doing so, the chain did not stay round the post, and the deceased stamped upon it to stop the barge, and in doing so he was drawn out over the side, and immediately sank. He stayed under water about two minutes and then rose, but he appeared to be quite exhausted. I immediately on his sinking, called out lustily for assistance, but he could not be discovered until he was left on the beach dry after the tide has receded. At the time he fell overboard the tide was running very strong, and he was carried along under water some little distance before he rose. He was about thirty years of age. He could not swim. George Shaddick, another bargeman, corroborated the last witness's evidence, and proved the finding of the body after the receding of the tide. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

STOKEFLEMING - Suicide Of A Clergyman. - An Inquest was held at Hilfield House, on Saturday afternoon, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, concerning the death of the REV. A. W. HOBSON, who committed suicide on Thursday by shooting himself. Ann Ferris, who lived as servant with deceased, said that on Thursday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, MRS HOBSON left home, and about an hour afterwards witness saw deceased in his bedroom dressed. He took breakfast, and told her not to come to him until he rung. He did not then appear excited. At eleven o'clock witness heard a noise, apparently in the part of the house where deceased's bedroom was, like the report of a pistol About twelve o'clock she went up and knocked at the door, but received no answer. The door was not locked. There was no one in the house but herself. About three o'clock she again went, knocked, and opened the door. Not seeing deceased, she felt alarmed, and called assistance. A Mrs Allen came, and then witness opened the dressing room door and saw deceased lying n the floor on his right side. This evidence was corroborated by Mrs Mary Ann Allen, who also said she found in deceased's right hand a pistol, which appeared to have been recently discharged. Mr S. N. Elliott, surgeon, of Dartmouth, said he had known deceased for about nine months, and had attended him professionally He was called to see him on Thursday evening, and found him quite dead. There was a pistol wound on the right temple sufficient to cause death. He considered the wound was inflicted by deceased himself. Deceased had been in a desponding state ever since he had known him, and at times his mind was affected. Witness's belief was, that deceased destroyed himself while in an unsound state of mind. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Thursday 13 April 1865
MERTON - Fatal Accident. - A most distressing and fatal accident occurred to EDMUND CLARKE, second son of MR CLARKE, butcher, on Monday night last. He jumped on a pony for a short ride, and had not proceeded far when he was thrown, and his foot having become entangled in the stirrup, he was dragged for a distance of 60 poles. A gate stopped the further progress of the animal, and, assistance being at hand, the foot was disentangled, but life was found to be extinct. Dr Jones, of Torrington, was sent for, who pronounced death to have arisen from concussion of the brain. An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the 'Globe Inn,' by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict in accordance with the circumstances was returned.

EXETER - A Shocking Accident. - which we regret to say, terminated fatally, occurred to MR JOHN ROBERTS, who resided at Exwick, where he formerly carried on business as a gardener. It would appear that the deceased, who was 82 years of age, was crossing the Bristol and Exeter Railway, at the St. David's Station, on his way home to Exwick. A goods' train was on the rails at the crossing, with an engine attached to it. The train was stationary, and MR ROBERTS attempted to pass between the trucks. Before, however, he could accomplish his intention, the engine backed, and the unfortunate deceased was thrown under the trucks, the wheels passing over his legs. His screams brought the "switchman" and others to his assistance, and, the train being immediately stopped, the deceased was taken from under the wheels, his legs being mangled in a frightful manner. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died the same evening. At an Inquest held at the 'Valiant Soldier,' on Wednesday, the Jury were of opinion that additional means should be provided for the safety of passengers crossing at this point; but Mr Mears, the station master, hinted that it was not a public crossing. He would, however, convey the views of the Jury to the directors. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

ILSINGTON - Suspicious Death At Ilsington. - An adjourned Inquest was held on Thursday, at the 'New Inn,' before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WILLS, aged 67 years, who died a week or so previously, under rather suspicious circumstances. We understand that Professor Herapath, of Bristol, was examined, and deposed that he had analysed the contents of deceased's stomach and the small intestines, and that though he had been unable to find any poison in them he had no doubt that oxalic acid had been taken. Deceased's house was searched by the police, and a packet of salts of lemon was found on the mantelpiece in one of the bedrooms. the Inquest was further adjourned until next Thursday.

Thursday 20 April 1865
NEWTON - Murder By Poison. - An Inquest was held at Newton, on Wednesday and Thursday last, on the body of MR JOHN WILLS, an old man, an invalid, who resided with his daughter and her husband, MR and MRS BEARN, the landlord and landlady of the 'New Inn,' Ilsington. The deceased was found dead in bed, and on a post-mortem examination of the body traces of oxalic acid were found in the stomach. A poison of that character, salts of lemon, was found in the house. The daughter and her husband succeed to some small property on the death of the deceased. The Jury returned the following verdict, "That the deceased died from poison not administered by his own hand; that the person or persons who did administer it were unknown."

Thursday 27 April 1865
ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held on the body of MARY COTTY, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, who died suddenly on the Barnstaple road, on the day previous. The Jury, after viewing the body, heard the evidence of Robt. Slee, which was as follows:- I was working on the Barnstaple road about a quarter of a mile from Ilfracombe, between the hours of three and four, when I saw a man and woman walking comfortably along the road. The man I knew to be JOHN COTTY, but the woman I did not know. About a quarter of an hour afterwards the woman returned alone, walking very hurriedly and appearing much excited. She had scarcely gone eight land yards, when she fell against the bank. I ran up to her and lifted her up and called for help; Thomas Petherick, who was at work on the road, came up almost immediately, and George Roberts, of the turnpike gate at Two Potts, came very shortly afterwards. We put her into a conveyance and took her to COTTY'S house. - By a Juror:- I believe she was dead on her arrival. At the request of MRS COTTY, I got a horse and rode after MR COTTY, whom I overtook at the Two Potts gate. I persuaded him to mount the horse and then brought him into Ilfracombe. Thomas Petherick, labourer, was then called, and stated that as the deceased passed the first time he heard her begging the man to go back, and when she passed him on her return, she said, "How that man has frightened me!" In other respects the evidence corresponded with that of the former witness. Mr Stoneman, surgeon, deposed that he had inspected the body and found no marks of violence. He was of opinion that the cause of death was disease of the heart, accelerated, most probably, by excitement. the brother, JOHN COTTY, had been under his care for some months; he was suffering from softening of the brain; and he believed him to be too weak to inflict violence on any one. The Coroner then summed up the evidence, and the Jury at once gave a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SILVERTON - Melancholy Death. On Saturday last, RICHARD HODGE, aged 74 years, a retired cowkeeper, lately residing at Up-exe, in the parish of Rewe, had occasion to go to Cruwys Morchard on business, and was last seen alive on Thorverton bridge, about half-past eight o'clock p.m., by George Beedell, of Thorverton. It was very dark, and it is believed that when on his way through the marshes - a near route to his house - by some means or other, the poor old man got into the river Exe, at what is called the Thorverton weir-pool. He was found on the Sunday morning following, at 11 o'clock a.m., by James Greenslade, a farm labourer, who was in search of him. On Tuesday an Inquest was held before. R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, at Millhayes Farmhouse, Mr Robert Bater, sen., Foreman. The Jury considering it a case of misadventure, returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 4 May 1865
KINGSBRIDGE - Fatal Accident At Kingsbridge - Four Persons Drowned. - On Saturday morning last, five workmen in the employ of Mr Willis, builder, named HUTCHINGS, LAPTHORNE, SHERIFF, HELLYER, and Elliott left Kingsbridge in a boat to go to their work at Salcombe. A sail was hoisted and they proceeded in safety as far as Halwell Point, about four miles down the river, where the boat became unmanageable. While running for the shore for the purpose of lowering the sail the boat upset, precipitating the men in the water. Captain Davis, of the Lucretia, witnessed the accident, and immediately went to the assistance of the drowning men, but was only in time to save Elliott, the other four having sunk a minute or two before. Two bodies have been recovered and are now awaiting the Coroner's Inquest.

BABBICOMBE - A Fatal Fall Over Babbicombe Cliff. - A little boy, four years of age, named TOM ADAMS BOVEY, was killed on Thursday evening, by falling over the cliff at Babbicombe. An Inquest was held on Saturday, at Turner's Royal Hotel, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner and a Jury of whom Mr Churchward was the foreman. A coast guardman named Perry stated that on Thursday evening, about six o'clock, he was on Babbicombe beach; his attention was arrested by a little boy who said there was some one falling over the cliffs. Witness went over to the spot pointed out, and where the cliff was about three hundred feet high, and climbed up about fifty feet, when he saw the deceased, whose further descent had been arrested by a furze bush. The poor little fellow was moaning; witness picked him up and carried him home to his mother's house, where he died soon after. The child was covered with blood; and his skull was fractured on the left side. John Thomas, a boy nine years of age, said while on the beach he saw the deceased fall over, and he called the last witness. The deceased, it was said, was very fond of flowers, and it is supposed that while in search of cowslips, he reached too far over the cliff and fell over. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 May 1865
SLAPTON - A Gentleman Fatally Stabbed at Slapton. - MR PHILLIMORE, a gentleman residing at Slapton - a village about six miles from Kingsbridge), was stabbed on Friday se'nnight, by one of his workmen. MR PHILLIMORE employs a crew to work a fishing boat at Torcross, and one of them, named Knowles, had been absent. MR PHILLIMORE, on his return, asked him the reason. He replied that he did not intend to go again, and demanded the sum of two shillings, due to him, which was immediately paid. Knowles then asked for some cider, which was refused, and he became very abusive, and would not leave the house. MR PHILLIMORE went to push him out, when a scuffle ensued, and both fell. Two workmen in the house, hearing the noise, came to their master's assistance. The whole party, with the house dog, were down on Knowles, who drew a knife to clear himself from the grasp of the dog, when MR PHILLIMORE was stabbed in the thigh, and severely cut below the knee, severing the arteries. On Tuesday last, his depositions were taken before Mr J. Allen, magistrate, and on Thursday night the unfortunate gentleman expired. Knowles is safely lodged in the lock-up, at Kingsbridge. At the Coroner's Inquest subsequently held; the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Robert Knowles.

Thursday 18 May 1865
WINKLEIGH - Accidental Death. - SAMUEL HERNAMAN, a carter, in the employ of Mr A. B. Isaac, farmer, of this parish, was accidentally killed last week. Riding on the shafts of his wagon, over Bondleigh Moor, he fell, and was run over. Messrs. Brook and Partridge rendered assistance; but death soon put an end to his sufferings. At an Inquest held before Mr Vallack, evidence was given by T. K. Dingley, Esq., surgeon, as to the nature of the injury, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

TAUNTON - Alleged Manslaughter Of An Exeter Man By A Taunton Auctioneer. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Taunton, on the body of MR JOSEPH WEBBER, a fly proprietor, of Exeter, who died on Sunday last, from injuries received through a collision on the 21st of March. It appeared that Mr White, of Bridgwater, had driven to Taunton, accompanied by two friends, named Wilkins and Kenway, Mr White's business being to procure an auctioneer's licence. They arrived at Taunton in the afternoon, and having partaken of some champagne at the 'George' hotel, they visited another inn, and a "private house," where they obtained several glasses of brandy and gin. They returned to the 'George' about eight in the evening, and then, in a "spreeish" state, as one of the witnesses described them, they commenced the journey homeward. The horse set off at a good pace, and two witnesses deposed that Mr White drove with great speed from the 'George' hotel into Fore-street, where the dog-cart swerved from side to side, till it came into violent collision with a fly driven by the deceased. A terrible smash ensued, both vehicles becoming in an instant complete wrecks. The deceased had driven two women of Torquay, from Ilminster, and they escaped unhurt, but deceased himself, who fell on the ground, pitched on his head, and sustained a severe scalp wound. He was removed to the hospital, where he lingered till Sunday, when he died of inflammation of the brain. A few days after his admission he made a deposition before a magistrate, in which he stated that Mr White endeavoured to prevent a collision. The Jury, however, returned a verdict to the effect that there had been culpable carelessness on the part of Mr White, and he was then committed by the Coroner on a charge of "Manslaughter," but admitted to bail. The investigation lasted eight hours.

Thursday 25 May 1865
EXETER - Suicide. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the 'Port Royal Inn,' by Mr Coroner Crosse, on the body of RICHARD EDWARDS, shoemaker, of the West Quarter, who committed suicide by drowning himself in the Exe. The deceased had been in a desponding state of mind ever since his wife died, about three years ago., He was last seen alive at the 'Port Royal' on Thursday night, about 10 o'clock. The next morning his hat was found, and a scrap of paper with the following words on it:- "Edwards, Dick Edwards is in the water." His body was found about 11 o'clock on Friday morning. The Jury found "That the deceased drowned himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident. - A little child named SAMUEL DENNIS VOSPER fell out of an upstair window in his father's house on Thursday last, and received such severe injuries that he died about twelve hours after. The poor child never recovered consciousness after the accident. The Inquiry into the circumstances attending his death was held before the Deputy Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Guildhall yesterday, when, after a few witnesses had been examined, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday evening last, at the 'Ring of Bells' inn, touching the death of a little girl named LEY, daughter of a cabinet maker, of Ilfracombe, who was severely injured by her clothes accidentally catching fire, on the 3rd ultimo. In attempting to light a fire in the grate her dress ignited, and before the flames were extinguished, she was severely burnt in the side and one of her arms. She lingered in pain for three weeks, when lock-jaw supervened and forbad all hopes of recovery, death finally put an end to her sufferings. Verdict:- "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 June 1865
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Fatal Accident On The Moretonhampstead Railway. - A fatal accident occurred on the Moretonhampstead and South Devon Railway on Wednesday. Two men named WILLIAM LONG and John Major, excavators, were "tamping" a hole for blasting in Wrey cutting, between Lustleigh and Moreton, when the powder became ignited and exploded, blowing LONG into the air and dreadfully injuring him, so that he died shortly afterwards. Major was also seriously hurt, and it is feared he has lost the sight of both eyes. An Inquest was held on Thursday afternoon by Mr F. B. Cuming, at the 'White Hart Inn,' Moreton, on the body of LONG, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. No blame is attached to any one, but the Coroner strongly recommended the use of copper "tampers" in future, which would prevent the powder igniting. The deceased was 32 years of age, and leaves a wife and three young children. Major lies in a very precarious state.

BISHOP'S TAWTON - An Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Downrew, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, on Saturday last, the 27th instant, on the body of a little boy, one year and nine months old, son of MR JOHN RICHARDS, who accidentally fell into a well on the Thursday previous. It appears the deceased and two of his sisters were in the yard at play, and in the temporary absence of the former the little fellow accidentally fell into the well, but how n one can tell. An alarm was given, and a search made and the body was found in the well quite dead. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 June 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary on Saturday last, before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on the body of ELIZABETH WYBORN, of Marwood, who died on the previous day under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Mary Ley deposed:- I reside near the deceased, who was a widow living by herself, at Whitehall, in the said parish of Marwood. On Thursday, the 25th of May last, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, she came into my house and sat down for a little while; she appeared in her usual state of health. She was crippled in one knee, and was above seventy years of age. Between four and five o'clock the same afternoon, a neighbour, called Elizabeth Jenkins, requested me to go over to the deceased's house, as she was afraid something was the matter, as she had heard BETTY WYBORN screaming. I went directly, and saw the deceased sitting on a chair inside her door; her dress was on fire, and the flames had reached as high as her arms Elizabeth Jenkins came in just after, and we extinguished the fire. I procured further assistance, and then left her in charge of Sarah Joslin and other neighbours., I saw her several times afterwards in bed; she was much burnt in the left side and arm, and appeared to suffer a great deal. She was attended by Mr Fernie, the parish surgeon, the same evening. She was in receipt of 2s. a week from the parish.
Mr A. J. Newman, house-surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased was brought to this institution on the evening of Monday, the 29th of May last. She was put into a bed, and I examined her. I found severe burns n the outer side of the left hip and thigh and on the left fore-arm; she was partially delirious. She remained here until yesterday, when her death took place at two o'clock p.m. She was, her sister informed me, seventy-three years of age. Her death was occasioned by exhaustion caused by the injuries she had received from the burns. Verdict:- "Accidentally Burnt."

BARNSTAPLE - A Boy Drowned In The Taw. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Saturday, before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on the body of a boy named WILLIAM TUCKER, aged between 8 and 9 years, son of a cabinet maker living at Dolton, and who has been for sometime past living with his grandmother in Barnstaple. The following was the evidence adduced:-
John Colelough deposed:- I live in Litchdon-street, and am the son of Robert Colelough, a pensioner. I am ten years of age. I knew WILLIAM TUCKER, the deceased, very well, and used to play with him. On Saturday last, I and the deceased, Charles Avery, and Samuel Colelough, went up to Black Rock, about half-past nine and then took off our clothes, and went into the river to bathe. TUCKER, the deceased, could not swim, but he went nearly across the river. We called to him to "come in" but he did not answer, and we saw him floating down the river towards the bridge. We thought he was drowning, and all three of us then got in, and dressed as quick as we could, and went to call Mrs Paul, at Mr Lander's lime kiln. She s[poke to some men in the timber yard, who tried to saved him, and one of them pulled TUCKER out of the water with a boat hook.
Thos. Dart:- I am a sawyer, and live at Landkey. On Saturday last, about 12 o'clock, I was working in Mr How's timber-yard, adjoining Chanter's green. We received information from Mrs Susan Paul that a little boy was drowned, and I ran to the river, and saw the deceased floating on the top of the water down the river towards the bridge. He was about twenty feet from the Black Rock, and in deep water. It was too deep for me to reach him, and another man, named Robert Liverton came behind me with a boat hook. With that I pulled the body in to the beach. We laid the body on a sheet that was brought by Mrs Paul and turned it over, when a lot of water ran from the mouth. We rubbed the body a good deal, but could not see any sign of life. We then took it to Mrs Paul's house and then again rubbed the body, and afterwards brought it to the Infirmary, where we left it in charge of the house surgeon.
Anthony John Newman, Esq., house surgeon to the Infirmary, said:- About 12 o'clock on Saturday, the witness Dart brought the body of deceased to the Infirmary. I was away when it arrived, but on my return a few minutes afterwards I found the body on a plank in the rear of the Infirmary. I examined the body, and found it was quite dead, and saw that further efforts at resuscitation would be useless. From the appearances, I should judge it had been dead at least half an hour. I consider the cause of death was suffocation by drowning. The Coroner summed up, and alluded to the great number of deaths that had taken place in the same way, and the danger of children who are unable to swim bathing in that part of the river. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BROADCLIST - Suicide. - MR NEWBERRY, of Trow, a small farm in this parish, committed suicide on Sunday morning. He complained of being unwell, and wished his wife to fetch a neighbour, who lived at the distance of a field or two, and during her absence he cut his throat. The deceased had occupied the farm only a short time, and married about ten days ago, though, it is said, his circumstances were much embarrassed, and he had been pressed for money lately. An Inquest was held on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The widow was deceived as to the pecuniary circumstances of the deceased.

SIDMOUTH - A Fatal "Experiment." - An Inquest was held at Witt's 'London Hotel,' on Tuesday, before Spencer Cox, Esq., touching the death of a young man, named SAMUEL RICKARD, who was found suspended to the post of his bed by a buckle-strap, on Sunday afternoon. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was living with his brother-in-law, Mr Horn, a baker, near the Gas House. The last time he was seen alive was between two and three o'clock. About half-past six o'clock, James Horn, on passing saw his brother's door open, and thinking all was not right, went in and proceeded up stairs, where he found deceased hanging. He immediately raised an alarm, when John Perneaux and David Cotterell came and cut him down. Medical attendance was sent for, but he was found to be quite dead. Several witnesses, who had known him from a boy, stated they had considered him to be of weak intellect. The Jury were of opinion that deceased came to his death accidentally, believing he was only experimentalising, as he had been known to have done before, and returned a verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY - Suicide By Hanging. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at Mr Baker's Country House Inn, Ellacombe, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE BREWER, a general porter, about 38 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself to his bed post with a pocket-handkerchief, the previous afternoon. The deceased had been ill for some time and on the morning of Friday, about nine o'clock, he returned home in agony of pain, caused by an obstruction in the bowels. The medical officer at the Infirmary, under whose care deceased had been as an out-patient for a little time, was sent for, but he, however, did not attend immediately. Sarah Martin, sister of the deceased, with whom he was residing, attended him the whole of the day and carried him up some corn flour only about a quarter of an hour before he committed the rash act, which was about three o'clock in the afternoon. Deceased breathed once after being cut down. The medical officer was again sent for but did not arrive until six o'clock. The Coroner remarked that the medical officer might have paid a little more attention to the matter, as it might have been possible to save deceased's life after he was cut down. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 22 June 1865
NEWTON ST. CYRES - Fatal Wagon Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at North Farm, before R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN HARDING, nine years of age, whose death was caused by the upsetting of a wagon. A verdict was returned of Accidental Death. A lad named Hammet was also much injured at the same time.

Thursday 29 June 1865
EXETER - Sad Accident. - A melancholy and fatal accident occurred at Exeter, on Monday last, by which HENRY TAYLOR, only son of MR C. M. TAYLOR, iron-founder, lost his life. The deceased, who was about ten years of age, went with his companion, a little boy, named Hartland, and some others, to bathe in the river where it runs through the Shilhay. There are some slanting timbers by the hedge of the river, on which the bulks are landing; and the deceased was sliding down these timbers, and, losing all power to stop himself, he slid into the water at a spot where it was nine or ten feet deep. His companions called for help, and some sawyers, who were at work near, came; but it was nearly an hour before the body was recovered. Life was then quite extinct. The unfortunate boy was taken up with the grapling irons, by a sawyer, who went out in a boat, and conveyed by him to his father's house. Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body at the 'Blue Boy Inn,' in the Quarter, on Wednesday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 July 1865
BEAFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq., at Woolleigh Barton, on the body of JOHN HOOPER. It appears that the deceased, who worked for Mr Wm. Leverton, was engaged on Friday last, working near an old cottage adjoining the Barton. Mr Leverton saw deceased at work during the afternoon. Deceased did not return home to Woolleigh at the usual time for leaving work, and it was thought he might have gone away on some business. On the following morning, finding that deceased had not returned for the night, search was made, and in going to the spot where he had been working on the previous day, it was discovered that an old wall had fallen down, and the jacket belonging to the deceased was found lying near by. In making further search the mangled body of deceased was found buried in the debris. The Jury, having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - Deceased, who was a person of imperfect intellect, and unmarried, was a son of the late MR JOHN HOOPER, of Ramscliff Farm, in the above parish, and was in the receipt of an annuity of 10s. per week. He was a strong, muscular man, and had only been at Woolleigh for a short period.

LITTLE TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Buckingham Arms Inn,' at Taddiport, in this parish, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of JAMES SMALE, who met with his death on Saturday last, under the following painful circumstances:-
Thomas Short sworn:- I am a labourer, and work at the Apps Brewery, at Littleham. I knew JAMES SMALE, the deceased, whose body the Coroner and Jury have now viewed. He was a labourer and worked for the Rolle Canal Company, and is about 50 years old. On Saturday last, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was placing some empty casks in a cart and the deceased was helping me. The cart was standing by the road at the bottom of Mill-street, in Great Torrington. Whilst we were there, I observed a cart coming down the hill, drawn by one horse, a gallop. There was a woman in the cart, holding back the horse as hard as she could. The horse appeared unmanageable and ran up out of the road into the footway. The deceased tried to get out of the way, but he was knocked down with great violence. The near wheel of the woman's cart came in contact with the further wheel of my cart and threw my horse down. I went instantly to the deceased, and Mr Wannell and others came to the spot. The body was taken up by Walter Heywood, and was shortly afterwards removed to his own house. No blame is attached to any one; it was quite an accident. Walter Heywood corroborated the evidence of the last witness.
J. O. Rouse, Esq., Surgeon, sworn:- On Saturday last, about half-past four in the afternoon, I was requested to see JAMES SMALE, the deceased. I hastened towards the village of Taddiport and found the deceased being removed to his own house. He was insensible, and I found him suffering from concussion of the brain; no other injuries were apparent. I believe it to be a pure accident. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 20 July 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Crown and Anchor Inn,' before I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ELIZA PERKINS, a respectable married woman, and the wife of WILLIAM PERKINS, brick maker and sexton of the Barnstaple parish church, who was found drowned under the distressing circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
WILLIAM PERKINS sworn:- The deceased was my wife. She was about seven months advanced in pregnancy. For the last three or four months she has at intervals been desponding and out of her mind, and particularly so during the last six weeks. I have, for the last month, engaged a Mrs Alice Burgess to assist in managing my house. My family consists of six children; they all reside with me. Last night, on my return home, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I found my wife was in bed. I went to bed soon after. She was not asleep, and we chatted together for some time. I was awoke about half-past four o'clock this morning, and then found my wife had left my bed. On going down stairs I saw policeman James Gliddon in the kitchen; he asked me where my wife was, and on my replying she was not in the house, he said he was afraid she was no more. I dressed myself and went with Gliddon to the New Road, and there I saw the body of my wife. It was on a stretcher, near the slip, not far from the Albert Tower. She was quite dead. I sent immediately for a surgeon, and Mr Harper arrived soon afterwards. We lived very happily together, and have not had any disagreement of any kind lately. We have been married nearly 21 years. About a month since she left my house in the night whilst I was asleep, and went to her mother's, at Pilton. She remained there several days.
James Gliddon sworn:- This morning, about ten minutes before four o'clock, I was on duty in the New Road. I looked out over the wall just by the slip, opposite Mr Law's garden, and saw something dark lying on the beach, just below the Albert Memorial. It was nearly low water. On going opposite to it I saw it was the body of a woman. I went to the station-house, provided a stretcher and, assisted by policemen Jones and Molland, brought the body up into the New Road. I then, in consequence of what John Turner, the lamplighter, who was passing, told me, went to the house of the last witness at Hardaway Head, and he accompanied me directly to where the body was in the New Road, and identified it as being that of his wife. The deceased had on a black dress, no cap or bonnet, stockings, but no shoes or boots on her feet. She was quite dead when I first came to her. She was lying on her side.
George Morris sworn:- About half-past one o'clock this morning, I was going to my boat, which was moored outside the first slip in the New Road, and I picked up the shawl I now produce. It was lying just outside the iron gate; and half-way down the slip I picked up the bonnet I now produce. I took them down the river with me. There was about three feet of water outside the wall when I picked up the above-mentioned shawl and bonnet.
Alice Burgess sworn:- I reside at Hardaway Head, near the witness, WILLIAM PERKINS. I was well acquainted with the deceased. For the last month I have been engaged in assisting her in the management of her house. During that time she has been in a very low and desponding state. She was far advanced in pregnancy. She often told me she was afraid she would never get over her confinement. She lived very happily with her husband and children. I identified the bonnet and shawl produced by the last witness as having belonged to the deceased. I last saw her alive about nine o'clock last evening; she then appeared to be in low spirits.
Joseph Harper, Esq., surgeon, sworn:- I have known the deceased for several years past. She has been under my treatment for the last four or five months. She has been suffering from a kind of partial insanity, known as "Melanchola." She was about seven months advanced in pregnancy, which sometimes produces this kind of low spirits. This morning, shortly after seven o'clock, I attended at this house, and saw the body of the deceased. She was on a stretcher, partially dressed, and had been dead several hours. Her death was produced by drowning. Verdict:- "That the deceased drowned herself, being at the time of Unsound Mind."

Thursday 27 July 1865
CHULMLEIGH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on the body of JOHN PALMER, whose death was mentioned in our last, before G. Doe, Esq., Torrington, Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. It was stated by Mr Dingley, surgeon, that his death was caused by a rupture of a blood vessel of the heart.

CLOVELLY - Melancholy Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Red Lion Inn,' on Monday, July 24th, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN BEER, who was found drowned on the beach. It appears from the evidence that the deceased was strolling on the cliff and that on going round a wall at the edge of the cliff he must have missed his footing and fell down to the bottom into the water. The height where he fell from was 150 feet; there being about six feet of water at the time. Oliver Ebsworthy sworn:- I am a carpenter, and reside at Clovelly. I knew deceased from a boy; and as he was missing I went in search of him, and found him on the beach, lying on his face quite dead; and on looking up the cliff saw his hat about 100 feet from the bottom. The water had just left him. James Tickle sworn:- I am a coast-guard, and live at Clovelly. I was walking on the beach yesterday (Sunday) and saw deceased's hat about 100 feet from the bottom of the cliff. I then went round the road to the cliff's edge, and saw a place where some one had slipt out over, and it must have been the deceased, as it was directly over where his body was found. Dr Ackland sworn:- I am Dr of Medicine, and was just leaving the village when P.C. Kemp came after me, and said that JOHN BEER was found on the beach; whether dead or alive he did not know. I directly went to the spot and found men carrying him to the nearest house. I examined him and found he was quite dead. The Jury after summing up, returned the verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - Sad Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Topsham Inn,' on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq.,. Coroner, on the body of a man, named DUNN, who died on the previous day from injuries received in the head. Deceased was engaged at Mr Drew's paper mill, Bradninch, and while assisting to lift a cistern, the rope broke, and the cistern fell on him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their strong disapproval of the use of weak ropes for such purposes.

EXETER - An Infant Suffocated. - An Inquest was held at the 'Bude Haven Hotel,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on Monday, touching the death of the newly-born male child of EMMA KENWORTHY. The mother was a servant with Mrs Lane, of 5, Dix's Fields, and was a married woman, but separated from her husband, who is in Australia. On Friday she was seized with premature labour, and she was found on the bed thoroughly exhausted, and the child lying dead underneath her. Mr A. Cumming, surgeon, had made a post mortem examination, and came to the conclusion that it had lived, and had died from suffocation, but he could not say how it was caused. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - An inquest was held on Friday evening, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Philip Widgery was Foreman, on the body of SAMUEL BLACKFORD PAYNE, late of Starcross, who was killed on the morning of the above-named day on the Devon and Somerset Railway, by the falling of a quantity of soil while he was at work in a cutting, the particulars of which will be found in the following evidence:- The Jury having viewed the body which presented a shocking mutilated appearance, John Tucker was examined and deposed as follows:- This morning about half-past seven, I was at work with the deceased in a cutting on Hacche Moor - the cutting was an open one on the Devon and Somerset Railway, the deceased was filling a truck, and as he stooped to take up a shovelful of dirt, a large quantity from above fell on him and crushed him; he was buried except a small portion of his back. I should think the weight fell on him was about a ton and half. I assisted in removing the dirt from off the body of the deceased; he had the shovel firmly clutched in his hands; he never spoke, and died about an hour after the accident. John Dymond, after corroborating the previous witness, said that the deceased had only been working with them two days. - JOHN PAYNE, deceased's father, said:- I went to the works with my son at six o'clock this morning. I was loading the waggons, my son was digging; we were within sight of each other; I did not leave the cutting before the accident occurred. I considered there was danger. I did not caution my son in particular. I gave a general caution to the ganger that the ground was insecure, but he said that it had set; there was a line of clay which ran into a bed of shale, which separated and fell; the part that I considered the most dangerous did not fall. I assisted in taking my son home. I had in the meantime sent for a doctor, who came shortly after we got him home, soon after which he died; he could not swallow anything, and the doctor said that his neck was hurt. - Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 August 1865
EXETER - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Saturday WILLIAM VICKARY, a plasterer, living at Stepcote-hill, sustained fatal injuries by falling from some scaffolding on which he was at work at his master's (Mr Mitchell's) premises in Paris-street. Deceased, it seems, was lathing and plastering the front of a shop. A scaffolding was rigged up with some ladders, and between three and four, having finished the lathing, he was about descending when he chanced to tread upon the hand of the lad working with him, when the under ladder tripped up and he fell on his head a depth of ten or twelve feet, the boy saving himself by holding on to a bar of the window. The unfortunate man was taken to the Hospital, where his legs were found paralyzed, proving that the spine was fatally injured. He lingered a short time. At an Inquest held at the 'Valiant Soldier,' on Monday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased, who was 47 years of age and greatly respected by his employer, leaves a widow and six children in great distress. A subscription list has been opened on behalf of the afflicted family, and donations will be received by Mr Wm. Bird, auctioneer, or by Mr Mitchell.

TIVERTON - Sudden Death. - MRS BETTY NORRISH, wife of MR THOMAS NORRISH, of Belle Vue Cottage, died suddenly on Tuesday afternoon last. It appears in the afternoon of that day she had been in the kitchen making some preserve, and feeling very warm, she left the room and went out to wash her hands, and whilst in the act of doing so, she fell and knocked her head against a window cell. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, but before Mr Mackenzie, surgeon, arrived, she had ceased to exist. An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon last, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 10 August 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Suffocation Of A Child - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday before the Borough Coroner, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of the infant male child of EDWIN and ELIZABETH LEY, living in Newington-street, which was found dead in bed the previous morning under the following circumstances:-
ELIZABETH LEY, mother of deceased, sworn:- The deceased child was born seven weeks ago last Thursday, - it was a boy. It was a healthy child. I went to bed on Saturday night last shortly after twelve o'clock. The deceased was brought up to me by my little girl, and placed between me and my husband. A little girl of ours had the measles and slept the other side of me, near the wall. My husband and I had a quart of beer between us before we went to bed. The next morning, about half-past six o'clock, I awoke and discovered that the child did not move, and on looking at it I found it was quite dead and cold. My husband rose at once and went for the nurse and for a doctor. The nurse (Mrs Goss) came directly, and Mr Harper arrived soon after. The child was not asleep when I got into bed. I was quite sober when I went to bed. My husband got into bed after me.
Mr Joseph Harper, sworn:- yesterday morning at about 8 o'clock I was called to see the deceased at Newington-street. I found the child in a cradle in the kitchen; it was quite dead and cold, and had, by its appearance been dead several hours. Its death was caused by suffocation. I examined its body and it had no marks of violence on it. A verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was, therefore, returned.

Thursday 17 August 1865
EXETER - Fatal Railway Accident. - On Tuesday evening at 5.30 p.m. as the 12 a.m. up goods train was standing at the Queen-street Station, Exeter, a pointsman, named THOMAS COURTNEY (who had just been discharged from the Exeter Hospital, where he had been some time, from the effects of a former accident which cut off two of his fingers), jumped across the buffers and alighted upon the rails just as an engine that had been in the rear of the train came up on its way to the engine-shed. Before he had time to move he was knocked down and killed on the spot, being literally cut to pieces. The young man resided at Barnstaple with a widowed mother, who is inconsolable under her severe and sudden bereavement. He was much respected by his fellow servants, and bore an excellent character. An Inquest was held on the body on Wednesday, at the South-Western Station, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a young man, named GEORGE BURGESS, a shipwright, who met with his death under the following circumstances:-
Mr Wm. Westacott said:- I am a shipbuilder, and my building yard is in the parish of Tawstock on the river Taw. The deceased was in my employ. On Friday, 11th August, he was employed in unloading some timber from a raft. About 9 o'clock, as the tide was at high water, and while unloading the raft he was thrown into the water. He sunk, and rose once, and I immediately endeavoured to save him. I saw him taken out, and deceased did not speak afterwards.
Mr Cooke, surgeon, was soon in attendance, and used every effort a t resuscitation, which, however, proved fruitless.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The deceased, who was about 22 years of age, was a native of Fremington, and much respected. He was buried on Sunday, the funeral being largely and respectably attended.

Thursday 24 August 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident To A Child. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the 'Union Inn,' Derby, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES LIMEBEAR, a child three years of age, whose death took place under the following circumstances:-
William Heathfield deposed:- On Saturday afternoon last, about four o'clock, I was fishing near the Tucking Mill, near Frankmarsh. I saw two children running away from the bridge close by the mill, and I saw a child in the water. I immediately called out, "A child drowned," and ran to the spot. The water-wheel belonging to the mill was in motion, and I saw the stream carry the child under the wheel, which stopped. Mr Anthony Nutt then came out of the mill, and went inside the wheel. In a few minutes, Mr Nutt succeeded in extricating the child from under the wheel, and brought it on to the bank. I opened the child's mouth, and it breathed. Mr Nutt then took it into Derby. The child was very much bruised about the head and face by the wheel.
Anthony Nutt, of Barnstaple, deposed:- On Saturday last, I was at work at the Tucking Mill; I noticed the machinery suddenly stop, and ran out directly to ascertain the cause. I was told by some persons that a child had fallen in under the water-wheel. I put down the fender, and stopped the water from turning the wheel. I then stopped my machinery inside, and went into the wheel, and after a little while extricated the child from the wheel; it was firmly jammed between the wheel and the ground work of it. The child appeared to be dead when I first brought it out, but it breathed within a few minutes afterwards. I observed it was much bruised about the head and face. I carried it to Derby and found it was RICHARD LIMEBEAR'S child. I placed the child in the house of Thomas Garland, in Union-street, and remained with it until Mr Morgan, the surgeon, came. It cried as I came up the road, and revived considerably before the doctor came.
Mr Morgan, surgeon, deposed as follows:- On Saturday afternoon last, I proceeded to the house of Thomas Garland, in Union-street, and found the deceased on a woman's lap, wrapped in a blanket I examined it, and found it was much swollen and bruised; it was breathing feebly and pulseless. I used means to resuscitate it, and in the course of an hour its breathing improved, and it revived considerably. After some time the child was identified as being the son of RICHARD LIMEBEAR, of Lower Fields, Derby. It was placed in a cradle, and taken home. I attended it until its death, which took place on Sunday evening. Its death was caused by the injuries it received from the water-wheel, its ribs being fractured and serious internal injuries, and external bruises having been received by it.
SARAH LIMEBEAR, wife of RICHARD LIMEBEAR, deposed that the deceased was her child. It was called JAMES, and was three years and five months old, and was a strong, healthy child. On Saturday last, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him take his cap and go up Princess-street. I afterwards saw him standing by the corner, and then he went away with two children called Sanders. He was brought home in a cradle about six o'clock the same evening, and remained under the doctor's care until Sunday evening when he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 31 August 1865
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last an Inquest was held before J. T. Shapland, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN STEVENS, a railway navvy, aged 54 years, who met with his death in the manner detailed in the following evidence:-
Arthur Westcott, on being sworn, said:- I am a labourer living in this parish. I know the deceased JOHN STEVENS, and have done so for five years. He is one of Cornwall. On Monday last, I was working with the deceased on the same piece, on the Devon and Somerset Railway, in a cutting near Lower Beer House in the parish of Filleigh, about four o'clock in the afternoon, when I saw him in the cutting before mentioned partly buried with earth. I helped him out, put him in a cart, and took him to my house in West-street. I was in constant attendance on him from the time of the accident to the time of his death, which took place on Wednesday last, about 6 o'clock in the evening.
William Briat deposed:- I am a labourer residing in this borough. I have known the deceased 15 or 16 years; he is a Cornishman. I do not know that he has any friends or relations. On Monday last I was working with the deceased at a cutting on the Devon and Somerset Line as stated by the last witness. About 4 o'clock in the afternoon of that day I was working close beside him in a cutting of about 10 feet, when four or five feet of clay, which was on the top of some "shillett" fell over and caught the deceased against the cutting we were driving, and buried him up to his hips. I assisted in digging him out and came back with the cart in which he was driven home. I believe it was purely an accident.
Edwin Furse, Esq., deposed as follows:- I am a surgeon of this town. On Monday evening last, about 7 o'clock I was called to see the deceased at his lodgings in West-street. I found him suffering from severe injuries in the lower part of the abdomen. I continued to attend him till Wednesday evening, when he died from rupture of the bladder, which was the immediate cause of death. He was perfectly sensible up to that time. The Jury, of which Mr P. Widgery was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
The deceased was in a shockingly decomposed state and was most offensive to the neighbours. The Mayor, J. white, Esq., had, previously to the Inquest ordered the body (which had actually bursted) to be placed in a coffin. The burial took place the same afternoon.

Thursday 7 September 1865
ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - On Monday last a vessel named the Hope , of Bideford, entered the harbour. The master, JOHN SLATER, left the vessel in order to sleep at the 'Parade Inn.' He retired to rest in good health, but expired in the middle of the night. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday, but as Dr Stoneham could not assign a sufficient cause of death, it was adjourned until Wednesday, in order that a post mortem examination might be made.

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the 'Ship Inn,' Martin's-lane, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM AVERY, a thatcher, of Southmolton, who died suddenly in Martin's-lane the same morning. SAMUEL AVERY, livery stable keeper, Southernhay, said the deceased was his brother, and was about sixty-four years old. The deceased had been staying with him for the last month, and was better in health than he had been for four years, during which time he had been suffering from heart disease and consumption. He ate a good breakfast in the morning, and started to go to the station for the purpose of proceeding to North Devon. A boy accompanied him as far as Martin's-lane, where he sent the boy on saying he did not feel very well. Witness did not see him alive after he left home. Mr G. B. Carlisle said he saw the deceased fall, took him up, placed him on a chair and sent for medical assistance. He died about five minutes afterwards. Mr De la Garde, surgeon, said from the appearance of the body he had not the slightest doubt the deceased died from apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Sudden Death. - On Saturday, as MR RD. COSSINS, builder, Gandy-street, Exeter, was going up Castle-street he staggered and fell down. A man named Legg carried him into the 'Castle Inn,' and laid him on a sofa. After he had rested for a few minutes, he recovered and exclaimed, "Oh, lift me a little higher, I can't breathe," and immediately expired. An Inquest was held the same evening before W. H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when Mr Warren, surgeon, said the deceased had died from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The deceased was 65 years of age, and was much respected by his fellow- citizens.

TIVERTON - Awfully Sudden Death at Tiverton. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY COOK, hall-keeper and town sergeant of this borough, who died suddenly on the previous night. It appears that on Tuesday evening deceased went to bed about ten o'clock in his usual health - he had previously partaken of a hearty supper of bread and cheese and drunk some beer. Just before twelve o'clock his wife awoke and heard him moaning and breathing heavily. She spoke to him but received no reply. She then called up one of her sons who slept in an adjoining room, and at once dispatched him for Mr F. S. Gervis, surgeon, who quickly attended, but on his arrival deceased was quite dead. Mr Gervis stated at the Inquest that in his opinion deceased died of apoplexy, occasioned by the heavy supper he had eaten. The verdict of the Jury, in which the Coroner concurred, was "Death from Natural Causes." The deceased, who was a very steady, well conducted man, was 40 years of age; he leaves a wife and seven children. After the Inquest the Jury very kindly entered into a subscription on behalf of the family.

SIDMOUTH - Suicide at Sidmouth. - On Monday an Inquest was held at the 'London Hotel,' on the body of LEWIS SOMMERWILL, aged 70, who committed suicide on the Saturday morning previous. There was a touch of novelty in his method of doing the awful deed he tied the rope around his bed post and then swung himself out of his bedroom window where he was first seen by a boy going to the pump for water. No cause can be assigned for the rash act. Deceased is said to have been in a very low state of mind lately. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 14 September 1865
CLOVELLY - Melancholy Suicide. - An Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the Parsonage House, Clovelly, on Monday, September 11th, on the body of the REV. JOSIAH RODWELL, a clergyman of the Church of England, and curate of St. Mildred, in the city of Canterbury, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat. The following evidence was taken:-
REV. J. M. RODWELL, rector of St. Ethelburgh, city of London, deposed:- I am a brother of the deceased, and have been residing at Clovelly for five weeks. I have charge of the church for the Rev. J. Chichester. The deceased came to me on a visit ten days ago. I was at Folkestone about four months ago, and my brother was staying with me there; he appeared in his usual health and spirits, but on his arrival here, I observed a marked difference in deceased; instead of his usual open and communicative manner, I found him silent and reserved and exceedingly depressed. When addressed, he was incoherent in his answers. On Saturday last he accompanied me to visit a sick person in the parish, and his demeanour was still the same, and in the afternoon he, and others, went with me to Mouth Mill, all of whom noticed his strange manner. We returned home, and I dressed for dinner at Court House (the seat of Col. Fane, M.P.). Before I left him I asked him to wait up for me; that was the last time I saw him alive. I returned home about eleven o'clock, and saw a light in his bedroom window. I then went to bed. On Sunday morning deceased did not come to breakfast, so I requested my son to call his uncle; he went and returned immediately, stating that his uncle was lying in bed and looking very pale. I ran up and saw him in bed with his throat weltering in his own blood. I touched his face and found it was cold; I also saw a razor on the bed close to his hand. I immediately sent for a policeman, and C.C. Kemp was soon on the spot. I believe my brother was in easy circumstances, but he complained that the work in his parish was killing him; he complained in his head; he is about 50 years of age.
Maria Findell sworn:- I am a servant of the REV. J. M. RODWELL'S. I last saw deceased as he was going to bed. He asked me if I was going to wait up for them (meaning my master and his daughter). I said, "Yes, I must wait," and then he went to bed.
C.C. Kemp, sworn:- I was sent for and found deceased in bed lying on his right side, with his throat cut, and a razor was lying close to his hand.
Dr W. H. Ackland, sworn:- I am a doctor of medicine. I have examined the body, and found that the deceased had cut the main artery, thereby causing death. I believe he was suffering from an attack of melancholia, which in certain temperament brings with it a strong predisposition to suicide. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Insanity."

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday), at the North Devon Infirmary, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of ELIZABETH LEWIS, who died on Monday, 13th instant, at the above Institution. The following was the evidence adduced:-
Miss Charlotte Trist deposed:- I reside at No. 7, New Buildings, in this borough. On Friday, 25th August last, about half-past 11 o'clock in the morning, I was passing through Vicarage-street and saw the deceased going into a neighbour's house, when she caught her foot in the kerb-stone and fell down. I ran to her assistance, and several other persons who were passing assisted her into her own house. She said she could not stand. I left her as she was being assisted into her own house.
Mrs Susan Harding deposed:- The deceased resided next door to me in Vicarage-street, opposite the Baptist Chapel, and was 86 years of age. She received 3s. 6d. a week from the parish. On Friday, 25th August last, I was called to the deceased, and found her lying in the street, near Mrs Hunt's door. I assisted her into her own house, and placed her on a chair. She said her thigh was broken. I sent directly for Mr Cooke, surgeon. The deceased was then undressed, and taken upstairs and put into her bed. Mr Cooke arrived in about half an hour. He examined her and said she had broken her thigh. At his recommendation she was taken - shortly after he saw her - in a cart to the North Devon Infirmary, and I accompanied her.
Mr Anthony John Newman, house-surgeon at the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased was received an in-patient of this Infirmary about two o'clock on the afternoon of August 25th. She was put into bed. I examined her and found that she had sustained a fracture of the upper part of the right thigh-bone. The necessary appliances were used. She was very feeble, and almost imbecile. The day after she arrived symptoms of inflammation of the bladder appeared. She had a very severe attack followed by haemorrhage. For the last few days she gradually became weaker, and she died on Monday night last. Her death was caused by the shock her system sustained from the fracture of her limb. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an adjourned Inquest was held at the 'Parade Inn,' on the body of JOHN SLATER, master of the Hope, of Bideford (whose almost sudden deceased we announced in our last). From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased had for some time been suffering from an internal complaint. On Saturday last, he left Bideford in his vessel, and anchored off Ilfracombe on Monday, when, feeling unwell, he came on shore. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was called in, and found his patient in a state of collapse. Stimulants were administered but without effect, and he died the same night. A post mortem examination disclosed that death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel. The Jury returned as their verdict: "Death from Natural Causes."

DEVONPORT - THOMAS PEARSE, pensioned seaman, residing at 119, Navy-row, Morice Town, met his death by hanging. He was a very tall man - six feet one in height - and must have tied the end of a piece of rope round abeam in the back kitchen of the house, in the front kitchen of which he lived. The bight of the rope was made into a running noose, and the deceased must have stood on a stool, which was found there subsequently, and putting his head into the noose, swung off. Philip Slee, a seaman of H.M.S. Indus, was passing the house at twenty minutes after seven yesterday morning, when he was attracted to the house by the screams of a Mrs Profit, who resided there. He went in and found the deceased hanging by a rope as described. He immediately cut him down and sent for assistance. Deceased then appeared to be alive, and drew breath once, but, when, three minutes afterwards, Mr Ryder, chemist, of Navy-row, arrived, he was dead. An Inquest was held before Mr Bone, Coroner, on Tuesday evening, when these facts were given in evidence. Mrs Davis, landlady of the house in which deceased lived, stated that he had told her that some years ago, when at sea, he had received a blow at the back of his head, and occasionally felt queer in his head. She knew that drink affected him in his head, but never thought him insane. The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that there was no real evidence of insanity before them, but following the usual and indiscriminating custom, they returned a unanimous verdict, that "The deceased hung himself while in a State of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 21 September 1865
NEWTON ABBOT - Disappointed Love and Suicide. - On Saturday, F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Jolly Sailor' inn, Newton Abbot, on the body of SARAH CAPE, a native of Tiverton, who had poisoned herself on the previous day. The deceased, who was about thirty years of age, was a domestic servant in the employ of Mr Lawe, manure manufacturer of East-street. On Thursday morning, shortly after eleven o'clock, Miss Lawe left her alone in the house to prepare the dinner, and on her returning home about one, the deceased was missing. Mr Lawe, jun., returned home about a quarter of an hour afterwards and went with Mr Wotton up to the deceased's bedroom. They found her in bed dead. Dr Jane was then called in. He considered she had been dead about an hour, having died from the effects of some irritant poison. On the kitchen table was found a cup containing a small quantity of oxalic acid. It was, therefore, considered that the deceased took a quantity of this poison very soon after Miss Lawe left the house, and then went to bed and died immediately afterwards. Her dress, found at the foot of the bed, was stained as though she had been sick after taking the poison. That she had previously intended to destroy herself there is no doubt, as she purchased the oxalic acid of Mr Poulton, chemist, on Thursday, saying that she required it for cleaning brass. She had been in the service of Mr Lawe about eighteen months, and was considered a very eccentric character. Mr Lawe said that he had been informed that she had been promised marriage by a young man, and that he had since deceived her. She had attempted to destroy herself a few years ago. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased poisoned herself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 28 September 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JANE BAKER, wife of MR WILLIAM BAKER, of the 'Rising Sun,' public house, Newport. The evidence proved that the deceased was 65 years of age, and had been subject to fits for some time. On Friday morning MR BAKER rose at his usual hour, 6 o'clock, and went on with the duties of the house. Shortly after 8 o'clock, as his wife did not come down to breakfast as usual, he proceeded upstairs, where he found her partially dressed and dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly from Apoplexy."

BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, on Monday last, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of PHILIP PUGSLEY, an agricultural labourer, of the parish of Loxhore, who met with his death under the following circumstances. - Mr Abraham Mogridge deposed:- On Friday, the 15th day of September instant, about 8 o'clock, or half-past, in the evening, I left the 'Lamb Inn,' Barnstaple, in company with the deceased, William Delve, John Seldon and William Parkin. Wm. Delve was driving my horse and cart; William Delve, myself, and the deceased sat in front on a board tied by a rope to the cart, and John Seldon and William Parkin sat in the cart behind on a bundle of straw. When we had proceeded about five miles on our road home, the deceased arose from his seat, put his hand to a piece of iron in the front of the cart, placed his foot on the shaft and one hand on the horses back, and leapt off; I saw him pitch on the ground on his chest, and the wheel of the cart passed over his body. William Delve stopped the cart directly, and I got off and went to him; he was lying in the road at the tail of the cart. I asked if I should take him to the Infirmary, and he said "No, master, take me home." After lying on the ground a few minutes, I assisted in putting him into the cart, and he was taken home to his house, at Lower Loxhore. I assisted him to his bedroom, and helped to undress him. He had jumped off the cart in the same way three times as we were coming in; he did so to lighten the load. At the time the accident happened we were going a little joggling trot, certainly, not more than five miles an hour. He was not sober when he jumped off, as above described. I was perfectly sober and so was William Delve. He was a labourer, in my employ, and was about thirty-two years of age. He has left a wife and four children. - REBECCA PUGSLEY deposed:- The deceased was my husband. He was thirty-two years of age. He left home on Friday, the 15th inst., about half-past nine o'clock, a.m., to go to Barnstaple, where he had been taking poles for several days previously. He was brought home the same night about half-past 10 o'clock, by the last witness, and John Seldon. When he came in he appeared to be very ill, after a short time he went to bed; he was in great pain all the night and had no sleep, and he sat on the side of the bed. He complained of pain in his chest. He was removed to the Infirmary the following afternoon. Mr Mogridge and myself went with him. Mr Anthony John Newman, House Surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, on his oath, said as follows:- The deceased was brought to this Institution on the evening of Saturday, the 15th inst., about seven o'clock. He walked to the ward. He was put into a bed. I examined him and found he had fractured one or more ribs. There was a swelling of his belly and tenderness there. He complained of pain in his side and across his stomach. He was treated for fractured ribs. The next day inflammation of his bowels appeared. He continued to get worse, and died here on the morning of Saturday last. I have this morning made a post mortem examination of his body. On opening his chest I found the heart and right lung healthy; the left lung was collapsed. I found five of his ribs were fractured. I found his intestines very full of gas, and the cavity of the belly containing much bloody fluid. The intestines were glued together - the result of inflammation. The liver was somewhat diseased, but uninjured. The spleen was much torn, and surrounded by coagulated blood. The left kidney was much torn and surrounded by a great deal of blood. Much haemorrhage had taken place from the spleen and kidneys. The death was caused by inflammation of the peritoneum caused by the injuries of the spleen. There was a slight bruise externally on the left side of the belly. There were no other external mark of injury on his body. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and kindly presented their fees to the bereaved widow.

EXETER - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday, at the 'Custom House Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS BYNE, a seaman, of Exeter, 33 years of age, which was found in the river Exe on the same morning. The deceased, it appeared, was on Wednesday night drinking with a sailor belonging to the Shields collier Donegal, now lying in the Basin, and accompanied his friend on board his ship. BYNE was not drunk. His friend "turned in" leaving deceased on deck. When he left cannot be ascertained, but the next day he was missing, and a boat belonging to Mr Edwards, the ferry, was picked up, bottom upwards, near Trew's Weir. On the same evening deceased's cap was found in the river, which was dragged, and the body found. It is presumed that the deceased took the boat to cross the river, and from some cause or other it capsized. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

TAVISTOCK - Unprotected Mine Shafts. - On Saturday an Inquest was held before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on the body of BENJAMIN HOLE, who was killed by falling into a mine shaft on Whitchurch Down on his return from the Tavistock races on Tuesday week. The Jury viewed the body, which was recovered on Friday, and the Coroner gave an order for its interment, but the formal inquiry was adjourned for a week, when it is understood that there will be a thorough investigation, not only into the immediate causes of the accident, but also into the question as to who is the person on whom the responsibility rests of leaving the public at the mercy of the abandoned and unprotected mine workings. The deceased HOLE is a young man about thirty years of age and leaves a wife and four children totally unprovided for.

Thursday 5 October 1865
SILVERTON - Shocking Death. - An old man, of rather eccentric character, named WILLIAM SANDERS, has for some years resided with Mr William Dymond, of Moorland Farm, Silverton. He received board and lodging from Mr Dymond (with whom he was previously acquainted at Topsham), in return for what work he felt inclined to do; frequently stating that he required no wages, as he had £200 in the Savings' Bank, and had no relations to whom to leave it. He also expressed a desire to make his will, but never did so. On Saturday evening last SANDERS was seen by Mr Dymond to go into the cider cellar, and draw some liquor, of which he had partaken rather freely during the day. This was the last seen of him alive. He did not return during the evening, and the family concluded that he had gone to Bradninch, and on retiring for the night the door was left unbarred, in order that he might come in quietly if he arrived during the night. On Sunday morning his continued absence created a little uneasiness, and enquiries were made which proved that he did not go to Bradninch, but from subsequent circumstances Mr Dymond thought he was gone to Topsham, as he had done several times before, without informing anyone of his intentions. In the course of Sunday evening Mr Dymond had occasion to go into the "pound house," with adjoins the cider cellar, and on opening the window he discovered the poor man lying on the ground, by the side of the cider-press, on his face, quite dead, the body being cold and stiff. It was subsequently found that deceased had sustained a fracture of the skull, behind the left ear, which must have caused death to ensue very quickly. It was supposed that, from some reason or other, he went into the apple chamber above, and fell from thence into the pound-house below, striking his head against some projecting part of the cider-press. At the Inquest held on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, at Moorland, Mr Spencer, surgeon, of Broadclist, stated that such a supposition was quite consistent with the nature of the wound and the position in which the body was found. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 12 October 1865
UPLYME - Dreadful Accident - Three Lives Lost. - An accident of a most serious character occurred near this little village on Thursday morning last, when three men named HUXFORD, GOSLIN, and COX, were suddenly killed by the fall, into a pit in which they were quarrying, of a huge mass of stone and earth. The bodies were dug out and removed, and on the following morning an Inquest was held before Spencer Cox, Esq., County Coroner, when the following evidence was taken:-
Simon Fowler said:- I am a farmer, and I rent the Limestone Quarry in Uplyme, the site of this accident. The deceased COX worked for me about twelve years; he was 28 years old. HUXFORD worked for me about 14 or 15 years; he was about 46 years old, GOSLIN had worked for me about two or three years; he was about sixteen; they were all farm and quarry labourers; my landlord is the Rev. Charles Vickstead Ethelstone, the rector of the parish; I, and my father and grandfather before me, have worked these quarries for lime stone, and building stone for more than 50 years. About the year 1829 two men were killed in them, and another about twelve years ago, in the same manner as at present. I saw the quarry on Wednesday evening last, about half-past four. I staid as long as I could, as the cliff was overhanging, and some stones were likely to fall; about four or five feet were overhanging. There was a small crack in the stone on the top, from which the heading of earth had been removed, which showed that a fall was going to take place. I did not think they were going to work next day in my absence. I told them to dig stone for the others to take next morning to the kiln, and the men to whom I spoke, James Collier, Edward Batley, and GOSLIN, were to dig potatoes next day. The boy GOSLIN, was not engaged in digging, but in hauling. About a quarter after ten yesterday morning I came to the quarry and saw the fall had taken place. About 100 tons of stone and "rubble" had fallen; this was a middling fall. I saw the horse and cart, but one "put" was missing, and no person nor any tools were to be seen. I felt alarmed, and ran for help, and fetched George Burridge, and found that HUXFORD and COX had been at the quarry. I set people digging, and the bodies were found about two or half-past; they were quite dead and under about five feet of stone; they were mangled as the Jury have seen them. [The bodies were horribly mutilated, and presented a most frightful spectacle.] The rules are for one to watch when there is any crack. - William Job Fowler: - I saw HUXFORD and GOSLIN at the quarry yesterday morning. HUXFORD was loading the put, which GOSLIN was to drive; neither were digging or undermining. I told them they were to haul the stone that was down until it was all gone. They clearly did not do so, as some remains yet. I did not consider they were going on digging. I heard of the accident after my father. - George Burridge:- I work as quarryman for Mr Fowler, 39 years; I have known three people killed there before. I was in the quarry yesterday morning before the accident, preparing the stones that had been dug for loading. I saw COX undermining, and I watched to see any sign of danger. I left him working, and left HUXFORD to inspect. HUXFORD is not a quarryman, and he was only there as a watchman. I never heard that no more was to be undermined that morning. There were cracks on the top, but not sufficient to cause a fall in dry weather, without more undermining. From the place where HUXFORD'S body was dug-out, it was clear that he had disregarded my orders to watch, and had been loading instead. I attribute the accident to this. We undermine generally four or five feet. - David Shorter Skinner, M.R.C.S.:- I attended yesterday at the quarry after the accident, in order to render any surgical assistance that might be necessary. I saw the three bodies dug out: all were dead and mutilated. Death must have been instantaneous. - The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and expressed a wish that some mode might be found of working from above, and strict orders given that the quarrying should not be proceeded with without the presence of a competent inspector.

Thursday 19 October 1865
CREDITON - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday, a little boy, aged one year and nine months, fell into the mill stream, at Salmon Hutch (Uton) and was drowned. The parents of the child, named PLAICE, reside near the mill stream. On Wednesday the mother went into the garden for the purpose of digging potatoes, telling the child to go into a neighbour's house. On going to look for him an hour afterwards, she found he had not been there. A search was made in the mill stream, and the body was found under the Park, and was taken out by Mr Gregory, jun. An Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr Coroner Cox, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned. The Coroner suggested that a fence should be put up to prevent further accident, and that the owner of the property, J. H. Buller, Esq., should be brought acquainted with it.

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - Another instance of the uncertainty of human life occurred here on Saturday afternoon last, as will appear by the following evidence given the same evening, before James Flexman, Esq., the Borough Coroner, who held an Inquest at the 'Red Lion' inn, on the body of MR ANTHONY MANNING, yeoman, of Higher Beer farm, in the parish of Filleigh, aged 77 years, there lying dead. Mr William Nutt was the Foreman of the Jury.
William Burgess, on being sworn said:- I knew the deceased quite well for many years. I reside in Chittlehampton. I stop at the 'Red Lion,' Southmolton. As I was going into the yard belonging to the above premises, today, I saw the deceased sitting on a "maund." I passed up the yard, and when I returned a woman was holding the deceased. She said, "I cannot hold him any longer." I assisted in holding him; he was then speechless; he breathed three or four times and then he expired. This was about ten minutes before I came back.
John Land, of Hawkbridge, gave similar evidence to that of the last witness.
Elizabeth Blackford, sworn:- I assist the ostler on Saturdays, at the 'Red Lion.' Deceased spoke to me in the morning, when he came into the inn. I took his whip and market basket; he appeared in perfect health then. I did not hear him complain; it was about 12 o'clock. I did not see anything more of him until between 3 and 4 o'clock when he wished to have his horse to go home, and sat down on the upping stock. He then went over the other side of the yard and sat on a hamper for about five or ten minutes. I saw him fall back and caught him immediately and held him until I could support him no longer, and called for some one to assist me as he was so heavy. A glass of cold water was sent for but he did not drink it.
Miss E. Shapland, on being sworn, said:- I came in this morning with deceased from his own house about 12 o'clock. I then left him in the yard of the 'Red Lion.' He came to my house and asked for a basin of water and washed his forehead, and afterwards went and laid down on the bed. I asked him to have some tea but he refused, and said, "I will go in the 'Red Lion' yard; I can have some fresh air there." On hearing that the doctor was sent for I went into the yard of the inn, and the deceased (who is my uncle) shortly afterwards expired.
The Coroner said that the deceased died of Apoplexy without the shadow of a doubt, and the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from Natural Causes."

ATHERINGTON - A Woman Burnt To Death. - Between one and two o'clock on Monday afternoon, the inhabitants of this village were startled by a report that a poor pauper woman, named PRUDENCE STEDIFORD, residing with a labourer and his wife in this parish, had been almost burnt to death. The report was too true, and the result proved fatal. On Tuesday (the following day), the County Coroner, R. Bremridge, Esq., held an Inquest on the body at the 'Carpenters Arms' inn, the same night.
Mary Newcombe was the only witness examined. She said:- I am a married woman, residing at Atherington, with my husband, Thomas Newcombe, who is a labourer. The deceased, a single woman, who is 77 years of age, has lodged with us for two years. On Monday, about one o'clock, I had occasion to leave my house on business, the deceased then being the only inmate. I had not been absent above ten minutes before Susanna Clatworthy called me, and said PRUDENCE STEDIFORD was on fire. I immediately went home and saw the deceased on the floor with all her clothes on fire; her gown was made of cotton. As quick as possible I got what little remained of her burning garments from her body, being assisted by my sister, ELIZA STEDIFORD, and other neighbours who were present. I saw she was much burnt, mostly on the left side and arms. We sent off for Dr Barr, and he attended immediately. She (the deceased) told us just before she died that she stood near the fire and her clothes caught behind, and being very dry it burnt very fast. She died at ten minutes past ten on Monday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 26 October 1865
BIDEFORD - A Bideford Captain Drowned At Newport (Monmouthshire.) - Verdict Of Manslaughter Against The Dock Master.
CAPTAIN GEORGE MILLS, of the Susannah, of Bideford, came to an untimely end on the 16th inst., by drowning, in Newport Docks. On the evening of the day named, he had gone to the town on business, and, returning to his ship, lying at the Coal Wharf of Sir Thos. Phillips, Q.C., fell into the lock which conveys the water from the canal into the docks. In falling, it is presumed that he was stunned, as there are marks of a severe blow on the forehead. This, it was considered, rendered him powerless in the water, for, although assistance was very near, and the splash into the water was heard, and the unfortunate man drawn out in a very short time, yet life was found to be extinct. the body was conveyed to the 'Queen Hotel,' where W. H. Brewer, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest which commenced on Tuesday and was adjourned to the following Thursday. An intelligent Jury had been summoned to hear the evidence which was adduced as to the cause of death, and many unpleasant questions were asked of the jurors which tended to throw great blame on the Dock Company, represented by Captain H. R. Fook, R.N., the secretary and manager. Charles B. Fox, Esq., solicitor to the Company, attended, and endeavoured to show the jury, by the plans which were produced, that the deceased had no business on the Dock Company's premises, and, consequently, no one but himself could be blamed for the circumstances which led to his death. This remark did not find favour with the jury ,who contended that the dock premises were, to all intents and purposes, public, as no notices were erected to prevent persons from walking to or alongside the docks. Although the Susannah was not lying in the dock, the jury held that the captain might have business there, and thus have walked into the lock, which was totally unprotected, and within narrow walls contained water to the depth of 14 feet. The jury designated the lock a "man-trap," and numerous instances were mentioned of persons having fallen in there, some rescued and others drowned. In order to show that the spot was one of great danger, posts and chains had been erected some four years ago, when a sad disaster occurred there, but so negligent had the dock officials become, that these chains were seldom if ever hung up. After a great deal of argument between the Coroner, the solicitor, and the Jury, the room was cleared of the public, and the Jury locked up for an hour. Upon the Coroner re-entering, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the secretary and manager - Cap. Fook, who was then committed for trial at the next assizes. He was released on bail, himself in £200, and two sureties of £100 each. We may add that the Jury felt that remonstrances and caution by casualties, and through the medium of the Press had proved of no avail, and they consequently felt it their duty to arrive at the conclusion they did. The verdict has caused a considerable degree of excitement in the town.

TOTNES - Fatal Accident. An Inquest was held on Saturday evening by F. B. Cumming, Esq., at the 'Bridge Inn,' on the body of WILLIAM POTTER, a navvy, who had been working on the Totnes and Buckfastleigh Railway. Daniel Peake a lighterman, deposed that on the previous Thursday night, deceased, himself and another man had been drinking together, and returned to sleep on board witness's lighter lying at Bridgetown Quay. Both having got on board it was found that one of the planks was missing, and witness told deceased to get out again to look for it. In doing so deceased fell overboard in five feet of water. Witness could not save him, being unable to swim. On the body being picked up soon afterwards, life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Death From Lock-Jaw. - On Monday afternoon an Inquiry was held at the Guildhall, by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for the District, touching the death of GEORGE MORRISH, a boy about 11 years of age. The deceased fell out of a cart in Bannawell-street, five week ago, and the injuries which he then received in his back ultimately brought on lock-jaw, of which he died on Friday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from lock-jaw, caused by injuries accidentally received."

Thursday 16 November 1865
BROADCLIST - Fatal Accident at Broadclist Railway Station. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held before Mr Brent, Deputy Coroner, at Broadclist, on the body of THOMAS SMITH, aged 67, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Brewer, of Honiton. Deceased, on Friday last, was unloading a cart at the railway station, when the express luggage train passed and so frightened the horse that it bolted, knocking deceased on to the line, where he was run over, and received such injuries that he died in a few minutes. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PANCRASWEEK - Fearful Accident. - On Saturday last two men, named J. HORN, and R. Hancock, were at work in a pit, quarrying stone for the roads, when the pit fell in, entirely burying HORN, and partially burying Hancock. The latter managed to clear HORN'S face and call for help. When poor HORN was extricated it was found that his chest was completely pressed in. Dr Rouse, of Bradworthy, was promptly in attendance, but medical aid was unavailing. The poor fellow died within twenty-four hours. An Inquest was held before Mr Vallack, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 23 November 1865
CLYST HONITON - The Charge of Poisoning At Clyst Honiton. Verdict of Wilful Murder. - The adjourned Inquisition respecting the death of WM. ASHFORD, a master boot and shoemaker, who resided at Clyst Honiton, near Exeter, was resumed yesterday by Mr Deputy Coroner Brent, in a large room at the 'Duke of York Inn,' Clyst Honiton. MARY ANN ASHFORD, the wife of the deceased, who was in custody charged with having poisoned her husband, was present, and evinced great interest in the proceedings, though she maintained comparative composure. Mr G. De C. Hamilton, chief constable, and Mr Maxwell, deputy chief constable, represented the police authorities on the part of the prosecution, and Mr Friend, of Exeter, watched the case on behalf of the prisoner. A large number of persons occupied the lower end of the room. The prisoner appeared pale and weak on her entrance, and was assisted to her seat.
William Pratt, journeyman shoemaker, who has been pointed out as the paramour of the prisoner, stated that the two letters marked 1 and 2 (these have already been published) were in his handwriting and that of the accused respectively. Witness also stated that No. 3 letter was in his handwriting. It was sent to MRS ASHFORD, and was of the same amusing character as the previous letters. Another letter was handed to witness marked No. 5, which he admitted was sent to him by the prisoner, and was in her handwriting:-
"Clyst Honiton. - My Dear Frank, this comes with my kind love to you and I was so glad to hear from you and I hope you will soon get better to come home again. I am almost broken hart. I should like to see you My dear frank. I thought you had quite forgototon me in not wrighting to mee before I have shaed many tears since you been home then for meney years and no one to tell my trouble to your in my mind all the day long and I hope you will right to me as soon as you cann and tell me how you are Getting on for I shall want to know I am in so much troble a bout you. My Dear frank when you right to me deriek to Mrs Cowley and I shall be all right. - M. A. ASHFORD. - You will laught at my righten."
The Coroner here cautioned the witness not to crimidate himself in his answers, as the Court expected him to answer the questions put to him. - Q. In letter No. 1 what did you mean by "I hope he will not die, as you were speaking to me about the old man." A. I do not recollect anything about that nor do I know what it means. - Q. Did you ever have any conversation about MR ASHFORD dying? A. Yes; a day or two previous to his death I said, in answer to MRS ASHFORD, "if master lives over tonight I think he will recover." MRS ASHFORD replied, "No, Frank, he is very ill indeed." The witness here stated that he had assisted in getting the deceased into bed once or twice during his last illness, having been sent for to do so. On one occasion he said he could not go, as his master looked so fierce, and he did not like to see him. He had had some conversation with a lad aged 14 years, named Blackmore, who said to him when talking about his master, "Oh, he'll never live to die." He did not notice anything in the expression. When he heard of MR ASHFORD'S death he was frightened and stopped work. He was a journeyman shoemaker, not an apprentice, and had worked for the deceased more than four years. His wages were 8s. a week, with board in the house. He went to live at Dawlish at Christmas, 1863, and stopped there for 8 months. While staying at Dawlish he visited Clyst Honiton two or three times, and stayed at his late master's house, and did so by invitation. Deceased had called upon him three times at Dawlish; was alone once, once with two young men and once with MRS ASHFORD. On all occasions witness said deceased asked him to return to Clyst Honiton. MRS ASHFORD also asked him to come back; but witness replied to both that he had a very good situation where he was, and the work was lighter. Witness refused to return as long as MR ASHFORD lived in the same house, when deceased replied he would change houses if witness would go and live with him. On one occasion witness replied he did not like to return, as "things had been said" about him and MRS ASHFORD. Deceased replied "Never mind, Frank, if you come back with me people may say what they like, it shall make no difference to you. You may come with me, and I'll behave as a father to you; and you may live with me for life if you like Frank." [The witness here became affected.] He was always on good terms with the deceased, and never had three angry words with him during the four years. During the past few months he had not been on such good terms with MRS ASHFORD as he had been some time previously, as she objected to his keeping company with a young woman. (Sensation.) He did not like to name the person. He broke off correspondence with MRS ASHFORD in consequence. MRS ASHFROD had quarrelled with him about his courting, but witness said it did not alter his determination. He had never heard the deceased and the prisoner quarrel about him, but within the past few months he had heard them disagree amongst themselves about a will that was drawn up unknown to MRS ASHFORD, for THOMAS ASHFORD, a brother of his master, and NICHOLAS ASHFORD, the father. He believed each one had a will. Since that time deceased made another will, which was in favour of MRS ASHFORD. He had never heard MR and MRS ASHFORD threaten each other.
By the Jury:- Did MRS ASHFORD alone ever visit you at Dawlish? A. Never.
By the Coroner:- Did you ever visit MRS ASHFORD at Clyst Honiton when her husband was not at home? A. Not that I am aware of, sir.
AGNES ASHFORD, widow, sister-in-law to the deceased, described the symptoms of the deceased when suffering from the fits on the 4th instant. His eyes, she said, appeared wild, his head was thrown back, and his hands were clenched. He took very small quantities of gin and brandy and water to wet his lips. MRS ASHFORD prepared the gin and water in the bedroom. When deceased had no fits he complained of great pain.
Mary Brewer, a widow, employed as a nurse by the prisoner during the deceased's illness, described the symptoms she noticed, which were similar to those noticed by Mrs Butt, related at the previous inquiry.
Selina Ann Ponsford, a little girl nine years of age, deposed to fetching, on two different occasions, some jalap for the prisoner about a week before the deceased was taken ill.
The Inquiry was here adjourned for half an hour.
Mr Wm. Herepath, senr., professor of chemistry and toxicology, residing at Bristol, stated that on Nov. 8th, he received portions of the remains of WM. ASHFORD for chemical analysis, which he was instructed to make by the Secretary of State for the Home Department. He found the stomach tied at the two extremities. There was but a small quantity of contents, which were mostly of a bloody character. The stomach itself was in the highest state of inflammation. He cut out a portion of it, washed it, and put it on a piece of glass. The appearance shewed him he had to seek for an irritant poison: He first sought for arsenic by Rienshe's process, and discovered it to be present; a specimen of the deposit he now produced. He described various tests he applied to the solution to prove the presence of the poison. He also tried Marso's test, which also shewed a deposit of metallic arsenic. Supposing it to be possible that the irritant now more frequently restored to strychnine, might be present, he tried for strychnia, and by tests which he applied to the fluid contents of the stomach he saw unmistakeable indications of strychnia. He had, therefore, no doubt from the inflamed state of the stomach that the person died from the effects of one or more irritant poison. (Sensation.) Arsenic and strychnia were the poisons in this case. He could not bring the proofs of the presence of strychnia, owing to the colour of the tests being of a varnishing character. Having found poison in the stomach, he wished to discover whether it had entered the system. He therefore took from jar No. 3 a portion of one of the lobes of the liver. He treated for arsenic, and found undoubted proofs of it. He took a larger portion of the lobe, and treated for strychnia, and found undoubted evidence of that poison. As he, therefore, had found both poisons in the stomach and in the liver, he did not think it necessary to analyse the smaller intestines or the kidney. He then proceeded to analyse the last vomit, and in the sediment he found arsenic, and on evaporating it down found strychnia. In No. 6, marked Hunter's vermin powder, on which was a printed label describing it as poison, he found starch and strychnia, slightly coloured with Prussian blue. The next packet contained the sediment from a wine glass in deceased's bed-room. The sediment he found to be white arsenic with a small quantity of black colouring matter. The next packet was the bed sheet, which he did not analyse, as he thought it unnecessary. The packet No. 5 contained some powder given to P.C. Butt by Mrs Butt. The powder contained a very small quantity of white arsenic coloured by Prussian blue. Another parcel with no number was composed of white arsenic and Prussian blue. The other packets were numbered in a fresh series. The first was a purse taken from MRS ASHFORD'S pocket by P.C. Butt. Under the catch he saw a little dust, and the microscope showed him the starch grains of the same character as he afterwards found in the pocket. The next packet contained a pocket and a pocket handkerchief, but nothing could be seen on the surface of either. On introducing each separately into a conical glass containing water, and allowing deposition to take place, he found in the sediments arsenic and strychnia. After describing other articles which had been forwarded to him, but on which he found nothing suspicious, Mr Herepath said No. 8 contained four pills of about a grain each, in which he found a metal that he could not yet identify, but certainly it was not arsenic. No. 9 was marked "Found in MRS ASHFORD'S house." In the packet he found a vermin powder, composed of strychnia, starch and a black powder. The other package was sent by post from the police authorities, and contained the powder that Mrs Butt found in the room of the deceased on November 10th. It was marked outside by a printed label "poison," and was entirely white arsenic, coloured with Prussian blue. - By the Coroner:- Did you find enough poison to destroy? - A. That is another matter; in all the cases I have had I have not found enough poison to destroy life, but the effects of poison. I am confident that the man died from an irritant poison. The symptoms described by AGNES ASHFORD and Mrs Brewer are those attendant upon poisoning by arsenic and strychnia.
P.C. Butt, who resides at Clyst Honiton, gave evidence of various conversations which he had had with the accused concerning the illness of her husband.
The Coroner having carefully summed up, the Jury retired, and on returning into Court, after a quarter of an hour's consultation, said that they had decided unanimously to return a verdict of "Wilful Murder against MRS ASHFORD." The prisoner on hearing this announcement fainted.

Thursday 30 November 1865
IVYBRIDGE - Supposed Suicide By A Boy. - A boy named WILLIAM HENRY WINSOR, twelve years of age, the son of a small farmer residing at Rutt, near Ivybridge, committed suicide by hanging himself under extraordinary circumstances on Saturday night or Sunday morning last. The lad for some time past had been in the employ of Mr R. P. Adams, of Broomhill, Harford, and on Friday night last he returned home to his parents and complained to them of the hind, called Maddock, threatening to cut him down with a cleaver, and also of a servant fastening him to a chair and blistering him about the face and neck with mustard. He also said that his master had beaten him. He remained with his parents that night, and on the following morning his father took him back to Mr Adams, who refused to take him into his employ again. On the boy's head the father observed a contused wound; and he was also marked on his nose and fore finger, which he (the boy) said had been occasioned by Maddock knocking him with the back of the cleaver. This, however, Mr Adams told the father was false, as the wounds were caused by a set of harness falling on him. The father afterwards sent him to Mr Langworthy's, of Modbury, with a view of getting employment. As the boy did not return that night, as he expected, he went in search of him on Sunday morning, and in one of his outhouses on his farm he found him suspended by a rope around his neck to a beam and quite dead. An Inquest will be held on the body today.

DARTMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. M. Puddicombe, Coroner, at Strike's Sun Hotel, on Friday evening, on the body of MR JOHN TOZER, a journeyman mason, of his town. On the previous day the deceased went to his work as usual, and at breakfast time stooped to pick up a few chips to take home for lighting his fire, when he was seized, blood rushing from his mouth and nose. He was immediately taken to his residence by his fellow workmen, but expired before medical aid could be procured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 7 December 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden And Singular Death of a Child. - An Inquest was held on Saturday before the Borough Coroner, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of a little girl, four years of age, named ANNIE HORNE, the daughter of MR W. HORNE, builder, living in Alexandra Place. It appeared that the deceased had enjoyed perfectly good health until about a week previous, when a swelling was detected under the right ear, which was considered to be what is called the "mumps." On Friday night she slept with a sister, who, about three o'clock in the morning, aroused her mother, and acquainted her of the apparent illness of the deceased, who looked very pale, and appeared to be faint. MR HORNE immediately fetched Mr Cooke, surgeon, who accompanied him back to the house, and on examining the child found that she was dead. Mr Cooke being unable to account for the sudden death, at the express desire of MR HORNE, made a post mortem examination in the course of the morning, the result of which he now stated was as follows:- I found the only diseased structure of the child's body to be in one of the small intestines, in which there was an intersusception producing considerable inflammation. Within the part affected was a large worm, which, I believe, had caused the disease. There was a slight ulceration of the throat. In my opinion, the cause of death was a sudden faintness from which the child never recovered. This syncope or faintness was most probably produced by pain caused by the affected part in the bowels. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death: Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday an Inquest was held at Newport, on the body of JAMES BEER, before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq.
Sarah Ashby deposed:- I lived with the deceased as his servant. He was a married man, but his wife did not live with him. She resides a few doors up the street. the deceased was afflicted with asthma, and during the last few days had been very ill from that complaint. No medical man has attended him lately. He rose up about half-past four yesterday morning, and sat in a chair by his bedside. I gave him some tea. He appeared to have a difficulty in breathing, and, by his desire, I went for Mr Cooke, surgeon. His wife was there with me at the time I left, and when I returned she went to breakfast. Very soon afterwards I left the room, and on returning shortly afterwards, I found him laid on the bed. He was unable to speak to me. I ran for his wife immediately, and she came to him. Mrs Ireland also came in, and they said he was dead. Mr Cooke arrived a few minutes afterwards. Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, had known the deceased for several years, and had frequently attended him. He suffered from frequent attacks of spasmodic asthma, and, from the evidence given by the witness, he believed that was the cause of death. Verdict:- Died suddenly from Natural Causes.

BRAUNTON - The Late Gun Accident. - Fatal Result. - We last week briefly recorded the facts of a serious gun accident, which occurred on Wednesday last, to MR JOHN HARTNOLL, son of MR JOHN PERRYMAN HARTNOLL, yeoman, of this parish, and we have now to record the melancholy intelligence of his death, which took place early on Monday morning. An Inquest was held the same day, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the dwelling house of MR HARTNOLL, father of the deceased, at which the facts of the unfortunate occurrence were deposed to in detail by George Mitchell, farm servant, and James Cowler, tailor, both of whom were in the company of the deceased at the time. Mr Stephen Orson Lane, surgeon, described the nature of the injuries received by the deceased, which he stated to be the immediate cause of death. The Jury returned the following verdict: "That the deceased died from injuries accidentally received by the discharge of a gun, but the jurors cannot separate without impressing upon all those persons who may at any time carry guns, the great importance of using them with the utmost caution."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident On The Devon And Somerset Railway. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at Chittlehampton, before the Deputy Coroner - J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of JAMES COOKE, a navvy, who met with his death under the following circumstances:-
John Slee deposed:- I live at Chittlehampton, and am a labourer. I am at present working on the Devon and Somerset Railway in the parish of Chittlehampton. I knew the deceased - JAMES COOKE. He also worked on the Devon and Somerset Railway. The deceased and myself were at work there together yesterday, about twelve o'clock. The deceased was throwing up muck upon the stage and I was throwing it off on the wagons. About eight landyards off, men were engaged in blasting the rock, and whilst so doing a stone, about eight or nine pounds in weight, flew into the air, went over my head and struck the deceased, who was behind me, in the head. He was knocked down insensible. I held up his head until the rest came, when he was taken to his lodgings. I consider it was an accident. Mr Edwin Furse, surgeon, of Southmolton, who was immediately sent for, was soon in attendance, and found the deceased suffering from severe injuries in the head. He died about half-past eight o'clock in the evening. He (witness) believed death to have been caused by a fracture of the skull, and compression of the brain. Verdict:- "Accidental Death."

LITTLEHAM - Sudden Death Of A Child. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held before the Deputy County Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of a child, fourteen weeks old, named WILLIAM HEYWOOD MOORE, son of MR JAMES MOORE, farmer. It appeared that the deceased had been in good health from its birth, but that on Thursday night it seemed to be troubled with the wind in its stomach, and its mother administered to him a tea-spoonful of gin, with some hot water and sugar. The child slept with its parents. About two o'clock in the morning, the mother felt that the child was "beautiful and warm," but at six o'clock, on again awaking, she found the child cold and quite dead. - Mr C. C. Turner, surgeon, of Bideford, had examined the child… There were no marks of violence on the body, and, from the examination he had made, he was of opinion that death took place from natural causes - probably from internal congestion. - Verdict accordingly.

MONKOKEHAMPTON - Sudden Death Of A Farmer. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at Monkokehampton, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner for the District, on the body of MR WILLIAM HILL, who had been found dead in his own court-yard on the previous evening. Mr James Risdon was foreman of the Jury. The evidence of Emma Susan Buckingham, aged 18, and John Cardew, aged 16, servants in the employ of the deceased, established the following facts:- MR HILL, who was upwards of fourscore years, occupied Wood Barton, and for the last eighteen weeks he has had a man in his employ, named James Lugg. He discharged this man on Tuesday evening, and paid him his wages. Shortly after, MR HILL found that he had paid Lugg 3s. too much, and he went to the stable and told him so. Lugg said, "I shan't pay back any of it." MR HILL then took the man by the collar, pulled him out of the stable, and said, "Let me have the money." Lugg handed over 2s., and said, "I shan't let you have any more." At the same time Lugg took up his bundle and boots, and MR HILL seized the man's hat (not the one he was wearing). Lugg ran down the court, and his master ran after him, saying, "You blackguard villain, if you don't go out of my court I'll take the gun and shoot you." The men were both sober, and the witnesses said they had not heard their late master make any charge of dishonesty against Lugg. Cardew was in the stable when he heard his master threaten to shoot Lugg if he did not leave, and he did not see what became of the parties, as it was dark at the time. Lugg shortly after returned to the back window of the stable, through another court, to obtain some brushes he had left behind. About a quarter of an hour after Lugg and MR HILL passed down the court, MRS HILL inquired for master, and Emma Buckingham took a lantern and went to seek him. She found him in the road a few yards from the courtyard lying dead; there was a heap of dung close to him. The body was removed to the house by John Huxtable and others. Sergeant Cooksley, D.C.C., apprehended Lugg the same night at the house of his aunt, Elizabeth Manning, who lives near Wood Barton and charged him with unlawfully killing his master. Lugg said he had not seen MR HILL from the time he ran away from the stable, and heard him call after him. Mr J. Gould, surgeon, of Hatherleigh, gave the following evidence:- I know the deceased well. He was a patient of mine until within the last two years. I have today examined the body. Externally, I found the face very dirty, and also the front part of the clothes, with a wound about one inch above the right eye, which extended into the skull, half an inch in diameter, and rough at the edges, as if torn. Around this wound was a bruise, with a few deep scratches here and there, more especially in the centre of the forehead. On examining the wound, I found that the skull was not fractured. The mouth contained a quantity of dirt. I have again examined the body since the Inquiry began, and I find no other marks of violence upon the body, nor any embrasure of skin on the knees. I believe the primary cause of death to have been affection of the hart, and I believe the excitement of last night subjected him to an attack; and while following Lugg through the court he fell and received the blow in the forehead, which stunned him, and falling with his mouth in a puddle of mud and water, he was, while insensible, suffocated. My opinion is that suffocation was the cause of death. The Coroner having summed up, drawing his conclusions in accordance with Mr Gould's views, the Jury, without hesitation returned the following verdict:- "Found dead in his own court-yard, but by what means deceased came to his death there is not sufficient evidence to show." - Lugg was brought before the magistrates at the Petty Sessions at Hatherleigh, on Wednesday, on the charge of manslaughter, and was discharged.

Thursday 21 December 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Ring of Bells,' Pilton, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES DISCOMBE, toll-collector at the Braunton Turnpike Gate, who met his death by drowning. The evidence was as follows:- John Vile deposed:- I have known the deceased for about three months. He was a gate keeper at the Braunton Turnpike gate. Last evening, about 8 o'clock, he came to my house - the 'Ring of Bells,' and ordered a glass of beer for himself, which he drank at the bar door; and he took away a pint of beer in a bottle. He remained altogether about five minutes, paid for his beer and appeared to be in a hurry to get home. Deceased was perfectly sober. This morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I went down to Pilton Quay, and saw the deceased lying on his back in the river, close to a coal cellar, now used as a manure store by Mr How. The body was in between three and four feet of water. I assisted to bring it to the land, and it was then taken to my house, where the Jury have just viewed the body. When it was landed, I took out the bottle of beer now produced, from his coat pocket; it is, I believe, the same beer I supplied him with last night. It is his own bottle.
Henry Ridd deposed: This morning, about ten o'clock, I went into the manure stores at Pilton Quay, belonging to Mr John How, and saw the body of the deceased in the river Yeo, close to the wall of the manure shed. He was lying on his back, with water about half-way over him. I assisted to get the body to the land, and he was then brought to this public-house. He was quite dead. I did not perceive any marks of injury on his face. He was lying about two land-yards from the end of the quay adjoining the coal cellar. There is no rail or fence of any kind on the quay, or any light near. The nearest light is on Pilton Bridge.
Verdict: "Accidentally Drowned." The Jury appended to the verdict a recommendation that the Quay be fenced with posts and chains.

Thursday 28 December 1865
DEVONPORT - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday morning some bird-catchers found in the military trench, in the Brickfields, Devonport, the body of a man which proved to be that of WILLIAM WALTERS, an officer of the Exeter Bankruptcy Court, residing in Paris-street, Exeter. WALTERS was in possession of the effects of a bankrupt at Morice Town, and as he was last seen alive in Stonehouse, on Sunday evening, it is presumed that while going back to Morice Town he missed his way, walked into the trench, which is unfenced and within two hundred yards of the footpath, and was killed. The Inquest was held on Wednesday, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner. After the evidence had been taken, the Coroner directed the Jury to return an open verdict, or one of accidental death, as there was no suspicion of foul play. In reply to a juryman, the Coroner said that a verdict of manslaughter against the officials of the War department would be most absurd and ridiculous. They must take their law from him; their province was to decide on the facts. The court was cleared for a quarter of an hour, when the foreman announced that seven were in favour of a verdict of "Accidental Death," and six desirous of returning one of manslaughter against the War Office officials. The Coroner said he had never met with such a difficulty before, during his experience of 40 years. There was nothing to justify a verdict of manslaughter. The room was again cleared, and on its being opened, the foreman gave in a verdict of "manslaughter against Colonel Owen" as that of twelve of the jurymen. The Coroner declined to receive the verdict and locked up the Jury, who at six o'clock returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and appended to it the following:- "The Jury have returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death' because the Coroner has charged them, or has declared to them, that the evidence does not by law authorise a verdict of manslaughter, and the Jury desire to express their opinion that did the law so permit - and they throw the responsibility of the law on the Coroner - they would have returned a verdict of manslaughter against the officers of the War Department."

Thursday 11 January 1866
OKEHAMPTON - Death On The Moor. - A man, RICHARD ALLEN, was found dead on the Moor, last week, near the Island Rocks. At an Inquest held at Ward's 'London Inn,' before Mr Vallack, on Tuesday, the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Dead, but by what means deceased met his death there was not sufficient evidence to show." It appears that deceased had been to Belstone Mines to try to get work. He was a sort of sub-agent for Mr Doble, to watch the dues exacted from parties carrying off stone or sand from the Moor. It is supposed that being exhausted by exposure to cold, he sat down, and was overcome. He had no stockings, and nothing but a calico shirt, a waistcoat, trousers, and a calico slop - no coat. He had £2 12s. in his pocket. He was found leaning against a ledge of rock by Mr Gard, of Youlditch Farm, who was out in search of sheep.

Thursday 8 February 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Extraordinary Case of Suicide. Coroner's Inquest. Our readers will recollect that, in our last week's impression, we reported that a woman, named ELIZABETH PROUT, a widow, had been found in her house the previous Tuesday morning with her throat cut; that the wounds were, in all probability, self-inflicted, and that she had been removed to the Infirmary. We have now to add that, after lingering till Saturday morning last, death put an end to her sufferings. During this interval, rumours were freely circulated about the town to the effect that the supposition above-named was incorrect; that, in fact, the deceased had met with foul play; and with the news of her death, some degree of anxiety was manifested to learn the truth of the matter. The Inquest was appointed to be held at the Infirmary the same evening, at six o'clock, before the Borough Coroner (Incledon Bencraft, Esq.). Mr Parry was chosen foreman of the Jury.
The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said:- Gentlemen of the Jury, - This is a case, as most of you have doubtless heard, of the reported suicide of a woman, named ELIZABETH PROUT. I may remark, however, that this case differs somewhat from general cases of this kind, inasmuch as rumours have reached me - whether there be any foundation for these rumours I am unable to say, and our duty here this evening is to elicit their truth or otherwise - to the effect that this, after all, may not be a case of suicide, and that other persons have been implicated in the cause of death. I propose to call in the witnesses and have them examined separately, in order that you may, by paying particular attention to the evidence, see if their stories tally or differ, and find out whether or not they are speaking the truth. I should tell you also that it is a matter of notoriety that the deceased and the daughter with whom she lived were not on good terms; that the life of the deceased was insured for a large sum in the Bratton Club; that sometime since the deceased was induced to make a will in favour of her daughter; that some time after this the deceased was induced to destroy that will, and that the daughter had since been anxious to obtain another to the same effect, not being quite certain whether the former will was in existence or not. Naturally these matters have given rise to grave suspicions, and our duty here will be to investigate all the matters, and ascertain what the facts really are. No doubt, I believe, can exist that the deceased died from the wounds inflicted on her throat, and the question you will have to consider is whether she inflicted those wounds herself, or whether anyone else did it. Our first duty will be to view the body, and I feel assured that you will afterwards give the attention to this case it properly deserves at your hands.
On the return of the Jury, after viewing the body, the evidence of FREDERICK PROUT, was first taken. He said:- ELIZABETH PROUT, the deceased, was my mother. I lived with her in Queen-street, in the same house with my sister, in which the latter carried on a small grocer's shop. My sister's name is ELIZA PROUT. I have not recently observed any change in the health of the deceased. On Tuesday morning last, when this affair occurred, I was lying in bed, in my own room, when I heard the deceased and my sister go down stairs, almost together. This was somewhere between 7 and 8 o'clock. My mother and sister slept in a room over mine, and I heard them pass my door. I have been driving the Ilfracombe mail cart for Mr Pridham, until within the last fortnight, since which time I have been out of employ. I had no necessity therefore for getting up early. After they went down stairs, I heard some conversation between my mother and sister, first of all about a box that my sister had sent off from the station, and the amount of carriage paid upon the same. On her return from the station, I heard mother say she had sold the large loaf that was in the shop to Jemima Stevens. My sister said she was very sorry mother had sold it, because it was intended for another regular customer, and she added "I'll go up to Mr Pearce's, at Newport, and get another." We always get our bread at Mr Pearce's. I heard my sister leave the shop, and my mother was "all right" then. That was sometime after nine o'clock I think, but I could not say exactly. My sister had been gone about a quarter of an hour, as nearly as I could guess, when I heard some one come into the shop, and ring the bell twice. I heard the voice of a child call "MISS PROUT, MISS PROUT!" twice, and, thinking it was a little girl's voice, I called down stairs and said "MISS PROUT is gone out, little girl; go into the first kitchen, mother is there perhaps; she is hard of hearing, and might not hear you." In half a minute, or so, almost immediately, I heard the little boy (for I afterwards found out it was a boy) run back through the kitchen, into the shop and into the street, without closing the door. Hearing no voice, and thinking that mother, perhaps, was in a fit (for she has had several fits), I jumped out of bed, put on my trousers, and ran down stairs. I went into the first kitchen - that is, where we live - and there was nobody there, but I heard something like somebody vomiting. The door between the first and second kitchen which opened towards me was tight to open; but when I did open it, there I saw mother on her both knees with a razor in her right hand, while she was holding her throat with her left hand, and rasping the razor across her throat. She was working it to and fro. I saw blood flowing from her throat; her hands were covered with blood, and by her side was a dirty cloth or towel also covered with blood I said "Mother, mother, what are you doing that for?" Upon which she threw her hands away, and the razor fell down on the floor by her right side. She made no answer to me at all, but she looked at me very hard. I put on an old pair of boots, and ran into the street. The first person I met was a Mrs Rood, and I said to her, "For goodness sake, go in; mother is cutting her throat." She said "Give me the word. I could not go in;" and I then ran in for Mrs Jarman, who lives on the opposite side of the street, who went in directly; and she was the first to see her. Mrs Rood came into the shop and went out again, without seeing my mother. I also fetched Mrs Westacott, and she came, too; when I returned, I saw Mrs Jarman in the inner kitchen, standing behind my mother, holding her hand to her throat, and trying to stop the blood. Then other persons arrived, among them P.C. Jones, and Mrs Wilkey. Some one then said "Fetch your sister; where is she gone to?" I said "She is gone to Newport." I first went and fetched Mr Fernie, surgeon, and he came directly. I then went for my sister, and found her right outside Mr Gamble's door, near the Infirmary. she had a large loaf in her hand; I took the loaf from her, and she ran home. I first told her what had happened, and she began to scream. She arrived at the house before I did, and when I came home, I met some persons coming out with mother in a chair, in which she was at once carried to the Infirmary.
By the Foreman:- It was somewhere about twenty minutes after my sister left the shop to go to Newport that I first made the discovery; from quarter of an hour or 20 minutes, I should say.
By the Coroner:- I heard no quarrelling that morning between my mother and my sister, nor had there been any the night before. In fact, for the last three weeks, since mother came home from London, there has been scarce any angry words pass between them. Mother went to London with my other sister; she went there because she was not very comfortable at home; but even when in London she could not agree with my sister there, and she sent home three letters, in one of which she said "I'll come home and die with you." I have seen her sometimes, when in a very excited state, kick and strike my sister. There had been a great many noises before she went to London, but they have not fallen out since she returned - three weeks ago.
By the Jury:- During the 20 minutes that elapsed from the time of my sister's departure to Newport and the child's coming, I heard my mother moving about. No person was lodging in the house at the time. Mr Galliford had got a room which he kept locked. There was a girl who slept in the house from one Saturday night till the following Tuesday morning, but that was a fortnight ago. The razors have been generally kept in a chest of drawers. I am not aware that there had been any altercation between my mother and sister in consequence of the girl living there. My mother's life was insured in the Bratton Death Club. Of course, I should think the insurance money would come to the children.
George Mills, an intelligent-looking and respectably-dressed boy, nine years of age, was next examined, but he was considered too young to be sworn. His statement was as follows:- I know where MRS PROUT lived. On Tuesday morning last, I went there after some salt, about half-past ten o'clock. I went into the shop, but didn't see anybody there. The front door was not locked, and I pushed it open, and went in. I rang the bell, and then some one called from upstairs, "Go into the kitchen." I called "MISS PROUT" when I came in; I only called that once, and then it was - while I was standing in the shop, when the voice from upstairs called to me. The first kitchen door was open and there was no person there. I then opened the door of the second kitchen and saw MRS PROUT lying down on the floor, sideways. She was covered with blood all over. She did not say anything to me. I ran down to mother and told her, and she said, "Go down and tell Mrs Hicks of it; and I did so."
By the Coroner and Jury:- I stopped at the kitchen door, before I ran back, but I did not see MRS PROUT move. I did not scream. She was lying sideways on the floor. I could not see where her hands were. Her head was toward the wall and her feet toward the fire place. I am quite sure she was not on her knees. I saw her face; it was covered with blood; I did not see where the blood came from; I saw blood on the floor. I at first thought it was Miss Norman lying there. Mrs Norman lives next door. I told my mother that Miss Norman was down at MRS PROUT'S covered with blood. I didn't see any razor. The door of the kitchen where MRS PROUT was, was shut. When I ran out, I left both doors open. The inner one opened inwards. It might have shut back again; I can't say whether it did or not.
ELIZA PROUT was next sworn. She said:<- I am a single woman, and live in Queen-street. The deceased was my mother, and resided with me. She returned from London three weeks ago next Thursday. Her health recently has not been very good. She has been weak in her head. I can't say whether she ever did attempt suicide before, but she was once found in a pit of water. It was last summer. I cannot say whether she did go into it by herself, or what. I was the first to come to her then, sir, and then young Heddon. Mr Fernie attended her at that time. Since her return from London, she has slept in the same bed with me. On Tuesday morning last, she rose at half-past seven; we both rose together almost, and went down stairs just about the same time. I lit the fire, and I think she swept the house. We afterwards had a cup of tea, and some bread and butter together. I then went to the station to send off a box, and stayed away about half-an-hour. On my return, she asked what the box came to; I told her 5d., and she thought it would have been less. She then said, "I have sole that large loaf of bread in the shop," and I replied, "What a pity," as I wanted to keep it for some other person. I then said, "I will go to Newport, and get another." She said she would not; but I said I would, whilst I had my clothes on, and I did so. I was absent, I think, about half an hour. I went to Mr Pearce's, at the top of Newport. On my return, I stopped to speak to Mr Gamble, outside his house, opposite the Infirmary, and whilst doing so, my brother came up, and said, "Come along, mother is cutting her throat. Quick, quick!" I then gave him the loaf, and ran home, and found them putting my mother in a chair to take her away to the Infirmary. They pulled me away, so that I should not speak to her.
By the Jury:- I have been on the best of terms with my mother, ever since she has been home; there has not been any quarrelling since. My mother was a very excitable person, and sometimes very cross. I used, when she began to be quarrelsome to go across to Mr Jarman's. It is true that mother went away to London on account of our disagreements. She left me on the 13th November, but since she returned we have lived more comfortably together. Before she went away, she was making up a noise, and as I could not stand her abuse, I considered we had better part. She went to London with my sister, and there she could behave herself no better than she did with me. She then wrote letters begging to come back again; I answered none of her letters, but I answered other people who wrote to me saying she should not come back again. I never consented to take her back, but one day she came here quite unexpectedly. When I saw her come into the passage, I said she should not stop. She went on her knees, and said, "An angry word I'll never have more; it is all my fault." She asked for some tea, which I kindly let her have. On this Tuesday morning, after coming down stairs, mother went upstairs again to make the bed. She passed my brother's bed-room, and, of course, he must have heard her, if he was not asleep. There had not been any altercation between us about the girl who slept in our house from the Saturday till the Tuesday. The girl was recommended to us to take in as a lodger by Mrs Jarman. My mother afterwards said it was one of the "ladies on the town." She did not appear to be so. On Monday she went out, and stayed some time, and on her return, mother said to her, "Go to doors at once." I said she should remain till the morrow, and she did so. I never gave my mother an angry word on the morning when this happened. Mother had got some money when she went away to London, but she only brought back 30s. In her pocket was found 3s. 3d., and 11s. more in the drawers. As far as I know, that is all she had got.
A Juryman:- What was the occasion of the quarrel between you and your mother some time since when you ran into the street screaming, and calling her a "d---- bitch?"
Witness:- She then pulled off my hat, upon which I turned round and gave her a "smack" in the face; but that was four months ago.
The Juror:- It was only two months ago, I am quite certain.
Witness:- My mother was in the Bratton Club; my father put her there, and I have worked hard, and paid for it myself. she made a will when she was at Pilton, giving her property to me and my brother. Other people seem to know that an alteration has been made since she has been in the Infirmary, but I don't know it. The will had been kept by Mr Thomas, of Pilton; it was made back in last May or June. Mr Thomas told me today that the will is destroyed; that she told him to destroy it, and he did so. When I left the shop on this Tuesday morning, I left my mother in the middle kitchen; I cannot say whether the door f the inner kitchen was then open or shut. I put the razors in one of the under drawers in the first kitchen, on the 14th November, the day after my mother went to London. I told my brother they belonged to him. When my mother returned she asked me for the key of the drawer, for she kept her clothes there. I let her have the key.
Anna Jarman was next sworn:- My husband is a baker, and resides in Queen-street; a few doors on the opposite side of the street to MRS PROUT'S. I knew the deceased perfectly well, and have known her nearly 30 years. I have seen her on two or three occasions since her return from London. She seemed to be quite lost at times. She was very excitable; and she was "not right," I think. I wished her daughter, only last Monday, to get a doctor to inspect her. the daughter asked me to come across, "because mother was very troublesome." When I went over, and asked what was the matter, the deceased replied, "Bad, bad;" and added, "They say I am out of my mind; do you think I am?" I replied, "You had better get Mr Morgan, and he will set you to right, perhaps." At that time she appeared to be suffering in her head, and was looking very wild. I don't know who she meant by saying "they." When this happened, FREDERICK - her son, came across to me between 10 and 11 o'clock, and said, "Mother Jarman" - for that is what they usually call me - "quick, quick, Mother is cutting her throat." It was after 10 o'clock, I know. I ran over directly and found her in the back kitchen, on her knees. She was then stooping forward, I saw the blood running, and held her by the throat till some one came to me. She did not speak, but wanted to rise up. I said, "Bide as you are, and I'll assist you to the best of my power." A razor lay by her right hand on the floor. She was leaning forward, apparently for the purpose of letting the blood run freely. There was a pool of blood in front of her. Policeman Jones came in about three minutes after, and another woman. Mr Cooke was the first medical man that came, and he was followed by Mr Fernie. I think the deceased, since her return from London, and her daughter have lived pretty comfortably together. Perhaps there has been a little fault on both sides. The deceased has many times threatened, and once attempted to take her own life. I have heard so, at least, from her children. All through life, I understand they have lived together in this unhappy way. Last Thursday week, she had got her daughter by the ear, making it bleed. I had not heard any previous quarrel, and she afterwards told me "it was all in play."
P.C. Jones next gave evidence of his visiting the house on the morning of the occurrence, just after the deceased had been lifted up from the floor. He also produced the razor found by her side in a pool of blood, stains of which were still visible upon it, although it had since been washed.
Elizabeth Hicks, wife of a pensioner, said:- I live in Queen-street, next door but one to MISS PROUT'S. I knew her mother - the deceased. I saw her on Sunday evening last, when she came to my house. She then appeared to be low in spirits: the truth was she wished me to take away her clothes from her daughter's house, as she wished to leave there. She said she was going to her brother JAMES'S to live; I don't know where that is. She wanted to stay with me that night; I told her she could not do that, but that I would help to remove her goods anywhere else. After that, I went into Mrs Norman's for some time, in order to keep out of her way. I did not see her on the Monday, nor do I think I heard anything of them on that day. On Tuesday morning, however, when this happened, I heard them talking, but I could not tell a word that was said. There were hard words passing, but what they were I could not say. The voices appeared to come from the kitchen, behind the shop. It was like the noise of people quarrelling; the conversation appeared to be carried on in an angry tone. I did not listen to catch the words; I was drawing water from a tap under the window, and could not help hearing something of it. I should think this was about nine o'clock; it might be a little before or after. I could not say that I heard the deceased, but I heard the daughter.
By the Foreman:- On the Sunday night, the deceased appeared very desirous to leave her daughter, and stay with me for the night. She clung to me, and also cried; and she seemed very distressed because I would not let her stay.
By the Coroner:- She said that she was not comfortable at home, and that she could not stay to have her face slapped.
By the Jury:- She told me that she was slapped about at home, and that she could not put up with it. She had complained to me before of being slapped by one and the other. She has done this more than once since her return from London. One night, when putting up the shutters, she ran over and caught hold of me, saying, "I want to get away; you will help me away, won't you?" and I said "Yes," to get rid of her. She also once told me not to fear, for she would not be "there" long. My belief is that she was as sane as I am at this moment; my conscience would tell me so. When I said that she was in "low spirits," I meant that she was distressed on account of my not helping her to get away.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, sworn:- On Tuesday morning last, shortly after 10 o'clock, I was desired by a lad, who called on me, to visit MRS PROUT, in Queen-street, who, he said, had cut her throat. I immediately went, and found the deceased seated in a chair, in the front kitchen, supported by Mrs Jarman, who was holding a cloth up to her throat. I examined the throat, and found a large wound immediately in front, opening into and dividing the upper portion of the windpipe. There was a transverse wound, and also a longitudinal wound; the former pretty nearly two inches in length, and the latter about an inch-and-half in length. They were wounds that were likely to be inflicted by such an instrument as the razor I have seen produced, and such as the deceased might have inflicted herself. I should say, if they had been inflicted by any other person, they would have been of a different character; because it appears to me that she must have got the razor in the windpipe, and twisted it about. If it were done by any other person, the probability is they would have been simply transverse incisions. There was a small pool of blood in the back kitchen, not more than a tea-cup full. She had not divided any large vessel in the throat, and so there had not been much haemorrhage. I saw, from the character of the wounds, that they were likely to prove dangerous, and so I directed her immediate removal to the Infirmary; indeed, I accompanied her here.
By the Jury:- She made some little attempt to speak, but could not articulate distinctly, so I requested her to be silent. She was perfectly sensible, and there was nothing at the time to denote that she was insane; in fact, she was quite quiet and collected. The daughter came in whilst I was there, and she appeared to be in a very excited state.
Mr Anthony John Newman, house-surgeon to the Infirmary, said:- The deceased was brought here shortly before 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning last; I received her from Mr Cooke. I had her put to bed, and at once sent for the surgeon of the week - Mr Morgan, who attended shortly afterwards. The external character of the wounds was precisely that stated by Mr Cooke. Mr Morgan and myself afterwards examined the wounds carefully; the longitudinal wound extended from the transverse in a downward direction, and the transverse wound extended a little to the right side. It was one large, very deep and very jagged wound, in the form of the letter "T." We found several portions of cartilage, which had been cut off, lying loose, and as this somewhat obstructed the breathing, we removed three or four portions so as to allow the free ingress and egress of air. All this time she seemed quite sensible, and after coughing up a large quantity of blood, her breathing became better. She remained in the hospital till this morning, when she died, at about half-past eight. She had been sinking since last night, and has been in a dangerous condition many times. The immediate cause of death was inflammation of the lungs, caused by the wounds. It is possible she might have inflicted these wounds herself, that is all I can say. Whoever did it must have been very determined in the act, for it was not merely one or two gashes that did it. Since she has been here, I have asked her - in the presence of Mr Blanchard (Superintendent of Police), if she inflicted those wounds herself, and she said "No." I asked if she knew who did it, and she replied she did not know. The same questions have been asked her since, and each time she has stated the same. At those times, I believe her to have been quite sensible. The witness here added:- With your permission, Mr Coroner, I should like to make some explanation of another matter for the benefit of the Jury, and as I am on my oath, I doubt not it will be a satisfaction to the relatives of the deceased as well. The other evening, Mr Baker and Mr Hartnoll called on me here, introducing themselves as representatives of the Bratton Death Club, and requested to be allowed to see the deceased. I said one might see her, and Baker was elected to go up. I and he went up together. We found the woman very quiet, and apparently sensible. I explained to her that she was dangerously ill, and said Mr Baker had called to know about the disposal of her club money. I put to her many questions by his dictation, and we elicited her wish to be this: that her son should have £35, that she should be buried with the remainder, and that what was afterwards left should be equally divided between her three daughters. Upon this Mr Baker said there were only two daughters, but she made us understand by her fingers there were three. We have since found this to be true, so, from this circumstance, I am certain she was at that time sensible. Perhaps I also ought to state that on the night before last, the daughter of the deceased - ELIZA, called on me with a will, ready drawn up, in favour of herself and her brother, which she was anxious to get signed. The mother, I expected, was at that time dying, and, as I did not think it right for her to be disturbed in this matter at such a time, I refused to let her be so disturbed.
This was the whole of the evidence, but two or three letters, said to be written by the deceased while in London, were produced for the inspection of the Jury with a view of proving, by their contents, that she was of unsound mind.
The Coroner then summed up, remarking:- You have all heard the evidence, and it will be for you to say, taking the whole of the circumstances into your consideration, whether you think this to be a case of suicide committed by the deceased at a time when she was not accountable for her actions, or otherwise. I thought at first that there was an extraordinary contradiction between the evidence of the son of the deceased and the little boy, but the boy is of so tender an age that I did not feel it right to administer the oath to him, and I certainly think that FREDERICK PROUT'S evidence was afterwards very much corroborated. It will be a matter for your consideration whether you could safely rely upon the evidence of a boy of such a tender age - who was, doubtless, greatly frightened at such a horrible sight, as to the position of the body. From the description of the wounds, and the evidence of the medical men, it does seem probable, I think, that the poor woman inflicted the wounds on her throat herself. I certainly do not think, myself, that there is sufficient evidence to implicate anybody else in the matter, and I think, moreover, from some letters, that she could not have been in a right state of mind. If, gentleman, you would like to make any examination of the premises, or think an adjournment necessary for any other purpose, I shall be happy to adjourn this Inquest until such time as you think fit.
The Jury then consulted, and ultimately agreed to the following verdict:- "That the deceased destroyed herself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."
Some of the Jurymen, thinking that the conduct of the daughter was deserving of censure, the Coroner, addressing both brother and sister, said:- You have been examined separately, and I am bound to say that there is nothing to find fault with in your evidence. I am afraid, however, from what I have heard, - and the Jury quite agree with me and desire me to express it to you that they also are very much afraid - that there has been fault on both sides, and that you did not make that allowance for the frailties of your poor mother's temper that you should have done. If that is the case, now she is gone, you may have cause to regret it. She may have been of an excitable temperament, and, perhaps, not quite right in her mind; but these are reasons why she should have had greater consideration paid to her. The Jury desire me to express that they do not think she received from you all that kindness that you ought to have shown her. [The above proceedings lasted three hours. Mr Supt. Blanchard was in attendance.]

BRIXHAM - Child Scalded to Death. - SAMUEL ROBERTSON, aged sixteen months, was scalded to death at Brixham last week, having pulled a basin of boiling water from a table, the contents of which fell upon his stomach. Notwithstanding the attention of Mr Green, surgeon, death ensued in 48 hours. An Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 15 February 1866
BURRINGTON - Death Through Fright During The Thunder-Storm. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of ANN LIVERTON, aged 34, wife of a farm labourer, of Burrington. Mary Webber, a midwife, stated that about twelve o'clock at noon on Sunday last, the deceased's husband called on her, and requested her to come to his house, to attend his wife. Witness went and stayed with her during the remainder of the day. About twelve o'clock at night a violent storm of lightning and thunder commenced and deceased was much frightened and became very pale and faint. Her husband immediately went for Dr Ford, of Chulmleigh, but she died almost directly after he had left the room.
Dr Ford said the deceased was quite dead when he arrived. He had since made a post mortem examination of the body, and was of opinion that death was caused by a rupture of the uterus probably accelerated by the shock to the system from the thunder-storm. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Thursday 22 February 1866
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at the hamlet of Whitehill, within this borough, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an infant, named CHARLES LOOSEMORE, aged seven months, there lying dead. the child was the son of a labourer, named WILLIAM LOOSEMORE, and died suddenly between ten and eleven o'clock on the Monday previous. A respectable Jury was impannelled, of which Mr J. Smith, builder, was foreman. The verdict arrived at was "Died by the Visitation of God."

DAWLISH - Melancholy Suicide. - MRS TERRELL (24 years of age), wife of MR JOHN TERRELL, tailor, carrying on business in High-street, Dawlish, committed suicide on Monday afternoon by hanging herself, under painful circumstances. For some time past she has been in a desponding state. During the morning of Monday MR TERRELL was from home, and when the apprentice (Robert Cornelius) left for dinner he observed MRS TERRELL sitting by the fire engaged in writing. On his return, about an hour afterwards, he found she had hanged herself with a clothes line to a hook in the wall. She was quite dead. In her pocket was found a letter, stating, among a number of other things, that she was converted into something different to a human being, and that she had been slighted by her sisters. With regard to her husband she said he had been very kind to her, and had in no way caused her to destroy herself. The deceased was highly respected. Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body yesterday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

TORQUAY - Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, Torquay, before Mr Frederick Kellock, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, on the body of MINNY CLARK, aged six years, the little girl who was run over by a carriage in Fleet-street. The child and her father were crossing the road together just as the carriage, which was being driven at a very moderate pace, came towards them. The child sprang in the direction of the pavement directly in front of the horses' heads, and was knocked down by one of the horses, and received a blow in the head from the front wheel of the carriage. She was immediately taken to the Torbay Infirmary, and expired shortly afterwards. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

COLATON RALEIGH - Distressing Suicide Of A Father And Son At Colaton Raleigh. - On Monday last, R. Brent, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held two Inquests at the Commercial Inn, Colaton Raleigh, on the bodies of MR HENRY MATTHEWS, farmer of that parish, and his son, MR ELLIS MATTHEWS, who committed suicide under the following painful circumstances. It appears that MR MATTHEWS, some two months ago, had a dispute with his landlord respecting some timber and this seems to have had such an effect on his mind, that on Saturday last he committed suicide by drowning himself in the River Ottery, close to Dolton Bridge. The dreadful circumstances so affected his son, MR ELLIS MATTHEWS, who lived with his parents, that he went into the barn on Monday morning, about half-past seven, and cut his throat in a most determined manner. He did not survive more than half-an-hour.

Thursday 1 March 1866
STONEHOUSE - Death In A Police-Cell - An Inquest was held on Monday, in St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, before Mr Allan B. Bone, County Coroner, concerning the death of AGNES PATRICK, who died in one of the police cells of the Stonehouse Police-station, on Sunday morning. Mr R. G. Edmonds appeared on behalf of the family of the deceased, and Mr Dawe (Elworthy, Curtis and Dawe) on behalf of Mrs Admiral Thomas, the lady in whose house the deceased had been working. It appeared from the voluminous evidence that Mr Hughan, draper, Stonehouse, on Saturday night at about ten o'clock, was going home from the railway station, Plymouth, when, in Emma-place, he saw a woman lying across the footpath on her side. He sent for the police, and Police-Constables Cross and Robins came to the spot. Cross asked her name, and in reply she mumbled something indistinctly. The two policemen lifted her up, and she then became sick and vomited. P.C. Cross said he smelt some intoxicating liquor - he believed gin - in the vomit. As the woman appeared to possess no consciousness or power of motion, the constables took her, one by each arm, and bodily carried her to the station house, about 150 yards distant. She was carried down into one of the police cells where she was placed on the wooden floor, with a rug placed under her head for a pillow, and other rugs covering her. She was not placed on the bed for fear she might fall off, as the policemen supposed her to be drunk. She was visited by P.C. Parsons every half hour from that time until the next morning at half-past 5 o'clock. During that time he noticed no alteration in her condition, except that she vomited a little. She breathed regularly, and like a person fast asleep. At half-past five on Sunday morning, when Parsons went to the cell, he found her to be dead. She was lying on her back. He immediately ran for Mr Perry, parish surgeon, who followed him to the cell, but of course nothing could be done. Mr Perry found the hands and face of the deceased cold, her mouth was covered with froth. He thought it was a case of epilepsy from the frothy state of the mouth. P.C. Parsons entered the time of each of his visits to the deceased on a slate kept in the station house, but not the condition in which she was, as ordered by the chief constable. During Saturday afternoon the deceased had been charring at the house of Mrs Admiral Thomas, No. 6, Lower Darnford-street, Stonehouse. She left at quarter to ten in the evening, having had one half-pint tumbler moderately full of ale, carrying her supper with her. This was by her side when she was found by Mr Hughan, in Emma-place, some five or ten minutes afterwards. She was paid for her work six-pence in coppers. On being searched at the station house these coppers were found in her pocket. Deceased was 65 years of age, and the servants of Mrs Thomas, and her own son and daughter bore testimony at the Inquest to her sobriety. She was, however, they stated subject to tightness of breath, and palpitation of the heart. - A post mortem examination of the body of the deceased was made by Mr Charles Bulteel, M.R.C.S.E., who stated that he found no marks of violence externally. He first examined the head. On removing the skull bone he found a small quantity of blood between the bone of the head and the dura mater. On cutting into the brain he found a large clot of blood in the centre, completely filling the right lateral ventricle. This constituted apoplexy, and was in the opinion of the witness the cause of the death of deceased. the lungs were healthy. The right lung adhered to the side, the result of an inflammatory attack. The heart was slightly larger than it should have been naturally. The liver was healthy. The stomach was nearly empty, containing about two ounces of cremous fluid. There was no alcoholic smell. The deceased died from apoplexy. Early medical assistance in those cases was most important; it often prevented fatal results. He believed, however, that in this particular case from the amount of blood extravasated, no medical assistance would have averted death. He believed that the appearances resulting from intoxication and from apoplexy were similar. He also thought that any person medically uneducated might mistake one for the other, the more so if a small quantity of intoxicating drink had been vomited. The Coroner having summed up, the court was cleared, and on being re-opened, the Foreman of the Jury, Mr Friend, read the verdict of the Jury, which was "That the deceased died from a severe fit of apoplexy, arising from Natural Causes." We (the Jury) also believe the deceased to have been perfectly sober at the time she was taken ill."

Thursday 8 March 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Suffocation. - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held at the 'Rising
Sun,' Boutport-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH TUCKER, aged 75, who met with her death under the following distressing circumstances.
James Essery deposed:- I am a moulder or iron-founder, and live in Boutport-street. The deceased was my mother, and she lived in a house belonging to herself in Litchdon-street. She received, I believe, parish pay. She was in the habit of dining with me on Sundays, and yesterday (after leaving church, where she stopped to partake of the Sacrament) about one o'clock she came to my house to dine, as usual. When she sat down to table she appeared to be in her usual state of health. I gave her some roast pork, and my wife helped her to some potatoes and turnip greens. While she was eating her dinner I heard her cough, and seeing that there was something the matter with her - for she appeared to be choking - I ran towards her and shook her, and held her by the waist to prevent her falling off her chair. She could not speak, and feeling alarmed my wife sent one of my boys for Mr Cooke, surgeon, who came within five minutes. One of my neighbours ran for Mr Fernie, and he also came about the same time. On the arrival of Mr Cooke that gentleman pronounced her to be dead. Both the medical gentlemen examined her, and I saw Mr Fernie take from her throat the piece of greens I now produce (nearly four inches in length). She never spoke after I first went to her.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, said:- Yesterday, about half-past one o'clock, I was desired by a little boy to come to the house of the last witness, and I went there immediately. I found the deceased seated in a chair, supported by her son, and, on examination, I found that life was extinct. On putting my finger down her throat I found some substance lodged there. Mr Fernie came in almost directly after me and I desired him to fee it. On doing so he removed the portion of greens produced, which was partly lodged in the windpipe, into which I have no doubt it was drawn during a fit of coughing, which opened the orifice of the windpipe, and then an inspiration of air doubtless drew it in, completely plugging up the windpipe, and prevented breathing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SILVERTON - Death From Fire. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at Voisey's Lamb Inn, by R. R. Crosse, Esq., on the body of the infant son of JOHN THOMAS GARDENER, aged sixteen months; the mother left home in the morning to go in the country on business, and left the child in the care of his sister, aged 11 years, and a neighbour. During the mother's absence the sister left the child in the house, and went in the garden to play with some other children, and during that time the child set fire to himself, and finding himself in a blaze, was frightened, and ran into the garden. The neighbour, hearing the cry of the child, went to its assistance, and extinguished the flames. E. C. Cutcliffe, Esq., surgeon, was sent for, and was quickly in attendance. Every assistance was rendered, but to no purpose. The child lingered several hours, and died the same evening. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 22 March 1866
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES MOUNTJOY, a boy about 15 years of age, who met with his death under the following circumstances:- A fortnight ago the deceased and another boy went into a hay loft, where they had no special business, and the deceased stepped on a bundle of straw to jump to the floor below, and accidentally slipped his foot and fell headlong to the floor and broke his spinal cord. Deceased lingered in great pain until Friday night, and then expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 March 1866
Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday), at the 'Role's Quay Inn,' before the County Coroner (J. H. Toller, Esq.), on the body of a young man named HENRY CHARLES TILBROOK, in the employ of J. R. Riddell, Esq., of Spreacombe House, who met with his death under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
John Reginald Riddell, Esq., was first sworn. He said: - The deceased has resided with me between seven and eight years in the capacity of servant. I believe he is about 21 years of age. He looked after my race horses. On Monday last he left my house at Spreacombe, in the parish of Morthoe, about one o'clock, in a cart with one horse, which used formerly to hunt and was very spirited. The deceased was an experienced driver, and understood horses thoroughly. When he left my house he was perfectly sober. The horse was not at all vicious. He was a very trustworthy lad, but had one fault - he drank.
William Vicary, groom, deposed:- I knew the deceased very well, and last saw him alive about a quarter before six o'clock on the evening of Monday last, near the Rolle's Quay. He had a horse and cart with him, with some tiles in it; also two hampers and other parcels. He appeared to me as if he had been drinking a little, but I did not consider he was tipsy. He was quite capable of driving the horse. I was with him for about an hour previously, and saw him drink two glasses of beer. I parted with him near the Rolle's Quay, and saw him some distance on the road, going slowly along.
James Cann, mason, deposed:- On Monday evening about twenty minutes past six, I was coming from Ashford into Barnstaple, in company with two other men, and met the deceased by the mile post. He was standing up in the cart driving, and I saw that the back chain was unhitched and swinging under the horse's belly. He pulled up, and I assisted him to hitch it up, when he again drove off at a trot, and I lost sight of him at the turn of the road. A woman in a donkey cart then passed me, and in about a minute afterwards I heard her screaming. I returned to the spot and found the deceased lying on the road on his left side. He could not speak, and I only saw him move his lips once. He was lifted into the cart, and we supposed him then to be quite dead. He was then driven into Barnstaple.
Grace Parkhouse deposed:- On Monday evening last, shortly after six o'clock, I was going towards Braunton in a donkey-cart, and just after passing the turnpike gate, I over took the deceased in the cart which was not then moving. Deceased was holding the reins. After a few minutes he passed me again, and I saw the last witness hitch up the back chain. After that, when the horse started again, I saw him fall back into the body of the cart. He jumped up, took hold of the reins, and went off again at a trot. I did not see him afterwards until I found him lying on the road, just below the first mile post. He was bleeding at the mouth, and appeared to be dead. I called to the man who had passed me, and they returned. The coach also came up at the same time.
William Mitchell, a passenger on the coach, also gave evidence as to the finding of the body, and its removal in the donkey cart into Barnstaple, whither he accompanied it.
P.C. Jas. Molland deposed that he received the body from the last witness at the Police-station, and sent immediately for Mr Cooke, surgeon, who came and examined it.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, detailed the result of his examination of the body of the deceased. Blood was flowing from his nose, and he found that the deceased had received an injury in the chest and a bruise on the right side, and one of the lower ribs was fractured. Almost all the ribs in the posterior part of the chest were fractured, and in his opinion some heavy pressure, such as the wheel of a laden cart, had gone over the deceased by which his chest had been broken in, and which had paralysed the organs of respiration and caused his immediately death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. Death By Hanging. - On Sunday morning last considerable consternation was occasioned in this town, particularly in East-street, on its having become known that MR SAMUEL CROOK, a farmer and coal dealer, had hung himself in an outhouse behind his dwelling. On Monday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq. (Borough Coroner), and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Chapple, of Broad-street, was foreman, on the body of the deceased, when the following evidence was adduced, which will shew the distressing circumstances attending the death of the unfortunate man. The first witness examined was William Henry Fisher, who deposed as follows:- I am Superintendent of Police of this borough, and reside in East-street, in sight of deceased's house. On Saturday night last, the 24th inst., about 9 o'clock, I was informed by some person whom I did not know, that cries of Murder were called at MR CROOK'S house. I went there immediately and saw the deceased, his wife, and several other persons whom I did not know; the deceased seemed in a great rage, and wanted me to go upstairs to look into a box he was going to break open. I did not do so, and his wife being present asked me to take the deceased out of the house; for, she said, he had nearly broken her head with the tongs, and she asked me to look, but I did not see any mark or blood. He would have broken my head, she said, had I not caught hold of the tongs. the deceased wanted me to remove his wife out of the house, and the wife requested me to remove the deceased; the deceased accused his wife of infidelity, and several times called her a --- and that she was a --- to a man called ----. At this time the deceased was in a very excited state and appeared very angry. The deceased then went upstairs, and in about five or six minutes came down again bringing some glasses in his hand and some cloth, saying, "Look here; these are the things the --- was going to take to Tiverton with ---." I endeavoured to calm him and persuaded his wife to leave the house for half an hour or so until his anger had cooled down. She did so, and left with a person called Susan Jury. It was raining very hard at the time, and the wife wanted to have a shawl to put on, but the deceased would not allow it, saying, "You sha'nt have anything out of this house." He also accused her of running him into debt without his knowledge. The wife having left the house, he became more calm, and I also left. This was about 11 o'clock. I called again at the house of the deceased about an hour and half after to see if all was quiet, and finding all so, I left. I did not see the deceased nor his wife. On Sunday morning, about a quarter to 7 o'clock, George Kinch came to the police-station and informed me that MR CROOK had hung himself. I went to the house immediately and went into the linhay at the back of the premises, and there found deceased hanging by the neck from a rope suspended to the cross piece, and, with the assistance of William Harris, cut him down. I then placed deceased on his back, and went off for a medical man. Dr Wight visited the spot immediately and pronounced that the deceased had been dead for four or five hours. I searched the deceased's pockets and found money amounting to £2 11s. 2d.
MARGARET CROOK said:- I am the widow of the deceased; we were married in 1840 and have eight children. My husband had a little ground, so he kept two cows and a horse. He was in the habit of going to Barnstaple for coals, and sold it from door to door. On Saturday last he went to Barnstaple for a load of coals and returned home between 5 and 6 o'clock in the evening. He came into the house and asked for his watch; I said it was in the drawer. He ordered one of the children to fetch it, and it was brought to him. He then left the house in company with John Webber. He seemed in a very indifferent state, not as he had been for days before. He spoke very cross and was very unkind to me. He was absent from home about two or three hours, and when he returned I met him at the door. I said to him "I was coming to seek for you." Mr Warren had been there to speak to him about some work he had done for him, and to obtain some poor's rates. He said, "Warren, what's Warren want?" I said "He wants to make a bit of a reckoning with you." He replied, "What did you say? that I might go and shake myself?" "No," I said, "I did not say any such thing as that." He replied, "You did say so." I said, "Whatever is the matter with you?" He made no reply but flew away to the tongs, and with both hands made a blow to my head. He did not strike my head as I caught hold of the tongs with my hand. With this he caught me by the hair of the head by both hands, and seemed like a mad man. I screeched "Murder!" and asked him "What is this for?" His reply was that he had been told something. My cries brought a mob about the house, and Mr Fisher came in and begged him to be quiet, but he was in a very excited state. I have more than once left my husband. Nine weeks this day I left him and was absent for six weeks; during this time I saw him but not to speak to him. The evening before I left him he came to the linhay where I was milking, and beat me violently. He did not give any reason for so doing. I returned to him again three weeks today. My husband came to Bishopsnympton where I was on the Sunday, and desired his brother to ask me to come back. The following day my son came out, telling me his father had sent him out to ask me to come home which I did. He received me kindly, not giving me any angry words. We had some angry words last Tuesday night. I went out to get some tea and stayed longer than my husband wished, and on my return he locked the door against me. He kept me out for a good bit and at last let me in. I then went to bed; he was not particularly angry.
George Kinch deposed:- I am a labourer, and work on the Devon and Somerset Railway, and have lodged for the last five or six months at the deceased's house. On Saturday night last, about 11 o'clock, I went home to my lodgings, having heard there was a row, but found all quiet. The landlady, CROOK'S wife, was not in the house, but she returned shortly after; she then talked with her husband, not quarrelling. Five other lodgers lived in the house. They were all home at this time, and we sent out for two quarts of beer, which were brought and drank; the deceased took very little of it. The deceased and his wife did not quarrel in my presence, and she only remained in the house about a quarter of an hour. After finishing the beer all of us went to bed; the deceased following immediately after. When he came upstairs he got into a passion and went down again. I heard nothing more of him: he was perfectly sober and seemed much as usual. During the time I have lodged in deceased's house, there have been several rows between him and his wife, about a young man who lodged there, that she was great with him; all the rows arose from the same cause. They were about Charles Evans, one of the lodgers, whom the deceased ordered to door, and he left. I never saw him at the house afterwards. I slept all night, and in the morning, about 7 o'clock, the daughter of deceased came into our room stating her father had not been in all night. I got up immediately and went to the privy; in doing so I saw the legs of deceased hanging, and in going into the shed saw the deceased suspended from the cross piece. I went immediately for Mr Fisher who accompanied me, and we cut him down. He was quite dead. The beer we drank was the result of a toss; the deceased would toss with me for a quart of beer, which I won. He then challenged one of the other lodgers for another quart, and lost that also. The deceased gave the money, and one of the lodgers fetched the beer. On Saturday night I heard the deceased say two or three times that if MRS CROOK came into his presence he would kill her, and that he had heard more on Saturday night than he had ever heard before.
William Harris sworn:- I am a miner, and live at the deceased's house; have lived there a week last Saturday. During this time never heard any angry words between the deceased and his wife. I returned to my lodgings on Saturday night, about half past eleven; the landlord and all the other lodgers were in. I had my supper, and the deceased would toss for a quart of beer with the last witness; we had two quarts of beer between us. The deceased was not at all drunk, and I heard him say that if ever he met with the landlady again he would murder her, meaning his wife. He did not state any reason for saying so. I then went upstairs to bed, with all the other lodgers. We all sleep in one room - six of us - two in each bed; we left the deceased and his daughter, JANE, downstairs. I heard them come upstairs; JANE went to her bed-room, and the deceased to his. I dropped off asleep and heard nothing more for the night. Deceased talked rather angrily; he had drank a little, but was not at all drunk. In the morning JANE opened our door, and said father had not been in bed for the night, and that he had gone out somewhere. I got up and so did all the others; before I had got out of bed word came that deceased was found hanging in the linhay by George Kinch.
JANE CROOK deposed:- I am a daughter of the deceased and reside with my parents; shall be 17 years old next May. My father takes in lodgers and we had six last week living with us. My father, on Saturday last, went to Barnstaple for coal; he left about half-past seven in the morning, and returned about half-past five in the afternoon; he deals in coals and had cleared out by the time he returned. He came into the kitchen, and talked with another man, John Webber, the tailor, about selling a watch which my father had, and they left together. I left home about 7 o'clock, and when I returned I found the deceased holding the kitchen door. I did not go into the kitchen as my neighbour, Mary Waldren, called me to come over as she wanted to speak to me. I went over and she told me she had not seen anything of the row, but had heard "Murder" called. After hearing this, I went into our own house, where I found my father, Elizabeth Gould and my brother; the former asked me if I had seen my mother; I said, "No." He then left, and when he returned, my mother was with him. My father was in a very excited state and told mother that if she did not leave the house, he would murder her. My mother left the house and I saw nothing more of her until Sunday morning, about half-past seven o'clock. When mother left the house, my father, about five minutes after, went to the front door, and came back again. He sat in the kitchen for an hour or so, during which time, I went upstairs and put my brothers and sisters to bed and when I came downstairs I found all the lodgers had come home. They all then went to bed leaving my father and self downstairs. We followed immediately after; my father to his bed-room and I to mine which is close by. First after getting into bed, I heard my father go down-stairs and up again in a minute or so. About five minutes after he went down again and I did not hear him come up. I dropped off asleep, as it was very late. My mother was not in the house at the time. There were frequently rows between them. I got up on Sunday morning, and went into my father's bedroom; he was not there. I then went into the stable and coal house, and I then returned and told the lodgers that my father was missing. George Kinch got up immediately and went down to the linhay, I following him. There we found my father hanging. After my father went into his bedroom, I heard he was very angry and talking very loudly. I went as far as the children's door and saw him throwing about the children's things in a very excited manner, and on many occasions I have heard him threaten he would murder, and have also heard him say he would destroy himself; he was a very passionate man.
Deceased was 48 years old. The Jury found that he hung himself, while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

BRATTON FLEMING - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at the 'Friendship Inn,' before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of JOHN FISHER, a labourer of Challacombe, aged 65, who on the previous Monday, while at work for Mr Smith, farmer, removing turnips, drove the "butt" in which he was riding against a wall, causing it to capsize, and deceased fell under the shaft, and was instantly killed. "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Dairyman Found Drowned. - The body of MR WILLIAM MOSES, dairyman and market gardener, of Cattedown Farm, was found on Thursday afternoon lying on the mud in Sutton Harbour, about sixteen yards of Chappel's quay, Vauxhall-street. It was first observed by Thomas Blee, a waterman, who brought it on shore, and with the assistance of P.C. Elson and others it was taken to the Guildhall, where an Inquest was held by Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." The deceased on the previous afternoon had been engaged in the purchase of some mangold wurtzels. In the evening he was at the 'Post-office Inn' drinking grog, and left there, as stated at the Inquest, at a quarter to eleven o'clock. At half-past eleven o'clock that night he was seen in the lane leading from Briton-side on to the North Quay drunk and sick. It is supposed that he must have wandered from there on to the quay near where his body was found, and there being no chain up, he walked over.

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Mine Accidents:- An Inquest was held at Mary Tavy, on Monday, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of THOMAS ROUNDSLEY, a miner, who was killed at Wheal Friendship Mine, on the previous Saturday. The deceased was at work in the shaft, and in consequence of his foot slipping from his standing place, he fell to the bottom, where he was found quite dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was found. The deceased leaves a wife and family to lament his untimely loss.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident. - A fatal and melancholy accident happened to a clay cutter, named JAMES BROOKS, of Chudleigh Knighton, on Friday evening. The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, was in the employ of Messrs. Watts, Bearne and Co. While at work in a clay pit at Kingsteignton, on Friday evening, he missed his footing and fell to a depth of 25 feet, breaking his neck. He died almost instantaneously,. Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Saturday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TOTNES - Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, by Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH ELMS, widow, aged 85 years. It appeared that the deceased, who was blind and failing in her mental powers, fancied that two little children were up the chimney. She went to the fire-place for the purpose of investigating the matter, and whilst there her clothes caught fire, and before assistance could be rendered she was so severely burnt that she expired in a few hours. The neighbours, and Mr Owen, surgeon, stated that everything possible was done for her but in vain. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Thursday 5 April 1866
HALBERTON - Fatal Occurrence. - An Inquest was held last Saturday afternoon, at Ascott's 'Swan Inn,' before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ISAAC HOLLOWAY, who was found dead on Friday evening, near the entrance to the village, by Halberton Court. Deceased was a nutseller. Last Friday he was at a sale at West Manley Farm. He was addicted to intemperance, and was the worse for liquor n that day. About half-past seven in the evening, he was discovered lying in a pool of mud and water, about six inches deep, on his face and hands, with a basket of nuts beside him. When he was taken up he was found to be dead. There were no marks of violence, nor any further evidence to show how he came by his end. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday 12 April 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. Sudden Death Of An Infant. - On Friday last an Inquest was held by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the 'Golden Anchor' inn, Holland-street, touching the death of MARIA JONES, the infant daughter of WM. JONES, mariner. the deceased was seven months old, and had been a fine healthy child up to the previous evening, when she was taken in a perambulator to the Vegetable Market for the benefit of the air. In a few minutes, however, she was observed to gasp two or three times and to change colour, and death ensued before sufficient time had elapsed to convey her home. - Verdict - "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Suicide at Exeter. - A servant girl named MARY ANN AGGETT, a native of Chagford, in the employ of Mr Couch, of Friar's Walk, Exeter, hung herself on Tuesday morning, in the back kitchen of her master's house. The deceased was engaged to a young man named Joseph Maude, of Chagford. At the Inquest held on the body by Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, at the 'Windmill Inn,' it was stated that the deceased was jealous of another young woman, who was also in love with Joseph Maude. A verdict that the deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity was returned by the Jury. Deceased went to the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Sunday evening, and then appeared in her usual health and spirits, as also she did when she retired to rest on Monday night.

APPLEDORE - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Ship Inn,' before J. H. Toller, Esq., to inquire into the death of MR W. EASTMAN, a resident of New-street, Appledore. From the evidence adduced it appears that MR EASTMAN was engaged on board the barque Polly, lying in the Richmond Docks, on the 30th March last, getting some timber on board; but in doing something to the winch he stepped back, slipped his foot and fell into the hold of the vessel, breaking his leg and ribs and doing considerable damage to his chest; he lingered until last Thursday ( a week), when he expired. Although many accidents have happened in and around the dock, we believe this to be the first death that has occurred up to the present time. Great sympathy is felt for the family that has been bereaved.

Thursday 19 April 1866
PAIGNTON - Shocking Accident. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, Paignton, by Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM TINCKHAM, a labourer, residing at Lovington, in the parish of Berry Pomeroy, who met his death the previous day by the wheels of a cart passing over head. It appeared from the evidence that on Monday deceased was driving a cart laden with straw, and stopped at Mr Evans', a saddler, in Paignton, for the purpose of leaving the bridle he was then using to be repaired, and incautiously took it off the head of the horse. The animal suddenly became frightened and ran away, deceased holding it by the halter, and endeavouring to stop it, as children were coming out of an adjacent school. After running some distance, just beyond the vicarage gate, deceased fell, and the wheel of the cart passed over his head, fracturing his skull, and killing him instantly. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned. the horse's taking fright is attributed entirely to the taking off the bridle while he was in harness.

Tuesday 1 May 1866
BUCKLAND BREWER - Melancholy Suicide at Buckland Brewer. - On Thursday forenoon, a painful report spread through this usually quiet village, which unhappily was found to be too correct, that the wife of MR EDWIN PROUSE, residing at Bilsford farm, had committed suicide by hanging herself in her bedroom. Deceased who is 70 years of age, has been suffering from ill health and low spirits for a long time, and from several rash acts which she had on previous occasions attempted, it is believed she was in an unsound state of mind; nothing however unusual was noticed in the manner of deceased on the morning in question. A man named Trathin was passing through the farm yard and saw the deceased suspended by the neck close by the bedroom window. He immediately gave an alarm, and on going to the unhappy woman it was found that she was quite dead. She had taken a bolster case, twisted it rope fashion, and suspending it from a crook, placed it round her neck. Her feet were only a few inches from the floor of the room. No immediate cause can be assigned for the deed beyond the above facts. An Inquest was held on the body at Bilsford before J. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County, and a respectable Jury on Saturday; when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 3 May 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Bear Inn,' Green-lane, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an infant named ELLEN ESSERY, aged four months, which expired suddenly on the previous day, at the house of a woman with whom it had been placed to keep. Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed that about two months since he saw the child which was very weak and emaciated, and he directed the mother as to how it should be treated. The child was not in a healthy condition when born, and it appeared to have been to some extent neglected. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but expressed their opinion that death was accelerated by neglect, proper care and nourishment not been supplied to it by the mother.

Thursday 10 May 1866
ASHBURTON - The Fatal Accident at Ashburton. - Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Ashburton, concerning the death of JOHN HINE. The deceased was 14 years of age, and was in the employ of Mr Abbot, of Bowdley Farm, Ashburton. On Saturday he was employed with a pair of horses and a stone roller rolling a field, when he suddenly stumbled and fell, and the roller passed over his body, killing him almost instantly. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - Another instance of the uncertainty of human life occurred at Southmolton, on Tuesday last. MR THOMAS BAKER, an old and respected builder, was suddenly taken ill whilst sitting in the timber yard of his son-in-law, Mr John Smith, and having been at once removed by the men to his house adjoining, he quickly expired. MR BAKER was 74 years old and an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, the same day, when it appeared that the immediate cause of death was disease of the heart. Verdict: "Died by the Visitation of God."

Tuesday 15 May 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death At Barnstaple - An Inquest was held on the 5th instant, at the 'Masons Arms,' before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS DYER, who died suddenly on the previous day. Deceased, who was 23 years of age, had worked for eight years for Messrs. Harris and Son. For some time past, he has complained of internal weakness, and at half-past eight on the night of his death he said he was suffering from a severe pain in his head. He fainted in the shop, and restoratives were applied; he had a fit, however, shortly afterwards, and became insensible. Mr Fernie, surgeon, was sent for, and promptly arrived, but the poor fellow never regained his consciousness. The deceased had only been married a fortnight. The medical testimony showed that apoplexy was the cause of death.

BARNSTAPLE - On Friday (last week) an Inquest was held at the 'Red Lion Inn,' Quay, before I. Bencraft, Esq., the Borough Coroner, upon the body of an aged woman, the wife of MR BERRY, sen., of Cross-street. It appears that MRS BERRY had been afflicted with blindness and other diseases for several years past, but during Thursday she did not appear to be worse. In the night, however, she dropped down, and before medical assistance could be of any avail she was dead. Verdict: "Died through the Visitation of God."

Thursday 17 May 1866
EGGESFORD - A Suspicious Case. - On Thursday last, the body of an infant was found buried in a garden belonging to a house occupied by SARAH BROOK, widow. P.C. Fursdon made the discovery; it was buried something less than two feet below the surface. the body was taken to the 'Fox and Hounds' to await an Inquest. The mother at first denied the birth of the child, but afterwards admitted the fact. The birth was premature, but the child was fully formed and was dead born. It had been buried without any covering whatever, and not even been washed. The mother has been a widow about two months, which makes the case somewhat peculiar. the child not being illegitimate, there was no motive arising from that cause for the concealment of the birth. What the mother's motive could have been does not appear. Though in this case no foul play is apparent, so many are the instances to infanticide, that humanity shudders at the very approach of the horrid crime. The beasts of the field treat their young with affection, how many human parents have sunk far below them.

Thursday 24 May 1866
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY, wife of MR JOHN LAKE, farmer. On the previous Saturday she went to Southmolton market in her husband's cart, and when returning in the evening, and within sight of her own house, the vehicle by some means upset and she was thrown out. Injury of the vertebra of the neck caused immediate death. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - Fatal Railway Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Dock Inn,' before R. R. Crosse, Esq., touching the death of WILLIAM CRISPIN EASTERBROOK, a labourer, aged 50, in the employ of E. T. Ward, Esq., of Langridge. The deceased was returning from work on Saturday evening, with a fellow labourer named Morrish, and took the route of the line. On coming to Gunstone Bridge the up train from Bideford neared them. The driver sounded the whistle, and they both got off the line, but deceased again crossed in front of the train, and the buffer struck him on the back part of the head, knocking him over the bridge into the water, from whence he was taken out quite dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

HORRABRIDGE - Mine Accident At Horrabridge. - Mr Alan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Furze-hill Wood Mine on the bodies of MICHAEL YEO and HENRY FOX, two of the men lately drowned in the Furze-hill Wood Mine owing to al rush of water from an adjoining mine into which the accidentally broke. The Jury having viewed the bodies, the Coroner said eight men were killed but only two had been found, but he was told that the other six were likely to be found in a week or ten days, so that there must be another Inquiry. Under those circumstances the most convenient plan would be to take sufficient evidence to warrant the burial of the bodies and the adjournment of the Inquest, until the other bodies were recovered.
William Doidge said he was captain of the Furze-hill Wood Mine, and had been so for two years. On Saturday, the 12th instant, about 11 a.m., he saw two lads, named Gregory and Elford, and they said something to him which induced him to go down the engine shaft 35 fathoms by the ladder. He could go no further owing to the presence of water. The water was rising then in the shaft about a foot in a minute. Seven men and one boy were drowned, including the two deceased men, whom he identified. There were three levels, twenty fathoms, forty, and fifty-four fathoms. The mine adjoins on the west a wood in which is an old abandoned mine. that mine had recently been taken by the company working Furze-hill Wood Mine. On the Thursday before the accident he went down two shafts of the old mine. One was 18 and the other 19 fathoms. Both shafts were dry. He did not go down to see if there was any water, but for the purpose of preparing to work the old mine. He was in the extreme east of the 40-fathom level on the morning of the 11th instant. He thought the work was then nine or ten fathoms beyond the boundary of the old mine. No calculations had been made to shew the part of the old mine which would be touched by extending eastward the 40-fathom level. About a week or two ago, he tested a shaft of the old mine through which the adit runs. The outflow of the adit was choked. There was about four feet of water in the shaft he so tested. He understood that the old mine had not been worked below the level of the adit, and thus that there was no substantial quantity of water in the old mine. He understood this from James Gerry, of Horrabridge, who had worked the old mine. This old adit was above the level of their 20-fathom level, on which they had a rise, but they had not intersected it. There was no indications of the old shafts being arched. He had been at the eastern end of the 60-fathom level every day of the week but Thursday. There was no water beyond the ordinary quantity. There was no drainage from the east that he could perceive. He could not account for the accident beyond saying that the persons who had formerly worked the mine had been down deeper than was expected, and that a large body of water escaped from the old mine. If all went well he thought the other bodies might be recovered by Thursday. In answer to the Coroner, the witness said no mining engineer had surveyed the mine since the accident. There was no records given of the old mine when it was transferred to the company working Furze-hill Wood Mine, and he believed that it had not been tested since the accident, and appeared to remain much in the same state. A Juryman asked the witness whether it was not his intention to have gone down the shaft on the morning of the accident, and Capt. Doidge replied in the affirmative, but said he remained on the surface awaiting the arrival of Mr Horswill. If he had gone he would probably have shared the fate of those who were drowned.
Uren Gregory, a lad, was called and proved that on Saturday week the deceased men were in the forenoon core; and as soon as the water rushed in from the old mine he managed to get to the ladder and escaped.
The Inquiry was then adjourned until Friday next, at three o'clock; and the Coroner remarked that if in the meantime any of the other bodies should be found, the Jury would be summoned together immediately, in order to prevent any delay in their burial.

Tuesday 29 May 1866
CREDITON - Dreadful And Fatal Gun Accident At Crediton. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at Ford Farm, Crediton, before Mr Coroner Crosse, on the body of WILLIAM OLDING, a young labourer of 17, accidentally shot on Monday. The following evidence was given:-
James Jervie, a lad of 13, who with the deceased was in the employ of Mr John Harding Francis, of Ford Farm, and lives in the house, said:- On Monday evening I went with the horses to field after leaving work. Deceased requested me to fetch from our bedroom a gun and pistol, in order to kill some birds. The gun belonged to my master, the pistol to deceased, who purchased it at Crediton, and also the powder and shot. He was in the habit of casting his own bullets, having a mould for that purpose. I carried the gun, deceased the pistol; we did not find any birds. We then began to fish the river for minnows, and on our way home caught half a cap full, which deceased carried. I carried the gun on my arm (the gun produced), with one hand near the trigger and the muzzle resting on my left arm. On coming to the back entrance to Ford Farm deceased turned round and said he would shoot me, and held the pistol towards me. I immediately turned towards him and said "O, will you?" when the gun exploded and deceased fell back. I then dropped the gun and ran to Winstout Farm, where my master resides, and told the occurrence to Elias Stone, the workman, saying, "I had shot WILL," and begged them to come down directly. I did not know whether OLDING was dead or not. I then ran across two fields to my father's house, and told him of the circumstances. The gun went off quite accidentally; I felt assured that when deceased pointed the pistol towards me he did not intend any bodily harm but said so in fun. We had not any angry words together; we were on the best of terms. In turning round the trigger might have hitched in my slop; master did not know we had the gun. Deceased and I have worked together ever since Lady-day; we never bore any malice towards one another.
Elias Stone stated that he knew deceased and Jervis; never knew them quarrel, and Jervis was a good tempered boy.
Mr John Francis stated that deceased and Jervis were in his employ. He did not know of the boys having the gun. He had placed it on the meal hutch, not thinking of the lads meddling with it. They were on the best of terms; did not entertain the least suspicion that the occurrence happened through malice, but was purely accidental. Jervis was a good tempered boy. Mr Holman, surgeon, said he was fetched by Mr Francis on Monday, about 9.30 p.m. He immediately drove to Ford, and on coming into the yard found deceased lying on his back on the door step, the head and chest inside, the lower extremities outside. On examining him, he found a gunshot wound on the right cheek, the charge smashing the lower jaw and cheek bone, and penetrating the base of the skull. The edge of the wound was black. Death must have been instantaneous. At the request of some of the Jurymen,
John Heal, a labourer on the farm, was called in, who bore testimony to the good feeling existing between deceased and Jervis. A verdict of "Casual Homicide" was returned and that it was purely an accident. It had been circulated that the lads had been fighting, and that malice had existed between them, which rumour was a misrepresentation by busy people who knew nothing of the affair whatever.

Tuesday 5 June 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden And Melancholy Death Of HENRY IVIE GRIBBLE, Esq., of Barnstaple. - It is our painful duty to have to record the sudden and unexpected death of one of Barnstaple's worthiest and most respected citizens. HENRY IVIE GRIBBLE, Esq., one of the firm of Messrs. Marshall, Gribble, and Co., bankers, of Barnstaple, was yesterday morning discovered lying on the floor of the Bank quite dead. The deceased gentleman left his home shortly after nine o'clock in more than his wonted health and spirits, and it is supposed that whilst engaged in writing he was seized with a fit of apoplexy which proved fatal. An Inquest was held yesterday, when a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned. We shall give fuller particulars in the Journal of Thursday. In the meantime we have been requested to state that the Bank will be carried on under the same title, the present partners being joined by Captain John Norris Marshall, a gentleman of great wealth and business ability.

Tuesday 12 June 1866
WEST ANSTEY - Shocking Death From Excessive Drinking At West Anstey. - On Thursday Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Yeo Mills, in the parish of West Anstey, on the body of EDWIN BUTLER, commonly known by the name of "Stafford," a labourer on the Devon and Somerset Railway, whose death has occasioned much sensation in the neighbourhood. It appeared, from the evidence of John Light, that deceased left Landkey in his company at 6.30 on Tuesday morning, for the purpose of walking to Yeo Mills, and that on their way they drank three or four quarts of cider between them. On arriving at Yeo Mills the ganger there gave them 6d., for which they had two more quarts of cider. Having drank this they asked Mr Partridge, a farmer of the neighbourhood who was present, if he would give them a quart. He consented to pay for a quart of beer for each if they would drink it in one draught. Light and deceased did so, and said they could drink another, which Mr Partridge ordered. Having finished this deceased asked for another quart. Mr Partridge refused at first, but after a short time consented to let him have it. Before deceased had quite finished it he placed his hand over his stomach and laid his head on the table, and immediately afterwards he was carried out by two men and placed on his side in the stable. After a short time Light was brought out and placed there by his side. This was about half-past eight, but he (Light) did not remember anything more till about two o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he awoke. On putting his hand on deceased he found he was dead, and gave the alarm. James Herford confirmed the last witness's evidence, adding that he went into the stable and put some sacks over them about half-past ten. Deceased was then lying on his hands and face, and snoring very loudly. Dr Constable said he examined deceased, and found his head, face and neck were very much congested and livid, which led him to suppose respiration was impeded. Having made a post mortem examination it was his opinion that death was caused by suffocation, while in a state of insensibility from drink, he having turned over on his face. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation from Excessive Drinking."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident On The Devon and Somerset Railway. - On Saturday last a sad accident, occasioned by a landslip, and resulting in the death of a fine young man named THOMAS JOY, aged 22, occurred on the Devon and Somerset line, now in course of construction. The facts will be gathered from the evidence given at the Inquest held on the body by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the evening of the day, at the North Devon Infirmary, whither the unfortunate man was conveyed shortly after the accident, and where he died in the course of an hour and half from the time of his arrival.
Mr A. J. Newman, sworn:- I am house surgeon at this Infirmary. The dece3ased was brought to this institution on a stretcher at 11 o'clock this morning. He was immediately put to bed. I found that he was in a state of extreme collapse. He had fractured both of his legs, and I could not make an examination. My efforts were directed to revive him by administering brandy and applying heat to the surface of the body. He rallied a little, but afterwards sunk and died at a quarter past twelve. I have since made an examination of the body. The right thigh is fractured and there is a comminuted fracture of the right leg extending into the knee joint. A severe and comminuted fracture of the left leg, and a large wound on the right forearm, which is superficial. I am of opinion that he died from the shock to the system arising from the severe nature of the accident.
JAMES JOY sworn:- I live at Alverdiscott, near Barnstaple, and am a labourer. The deceased was my son; he was about 22 years of age, and was also a labourer. He has resided at Alverdiscott all his lifetime, till Lady-day, when he went to work on the Devon and Somerset Railway. I last saw him about a month since, on a Sunday, at my house, where he spent the day. He was a strong, healthy young man and a very dutiful child.
James Gaydon, sworn:- I am a labourer, and live at Swymbridge Newland, in the parish of Landkey. I work on the Devon and Somerset line, in a cutting, opposite to Yolland, where the deceased was also at work at the time of the accident. We were filling a waggon with deads at about 10 ½ this morning, when suddenly there was a fall of earth which had been undermined. It fell on the deceased and covered him. We immediately set to work to extricate him, which occupied 17 or 18 minutes, as there was half a waggon load of heavy soil on him. His legs were across the metals. As soon as we cleared his head, he said "The Lord have mercy on my poor soul;" which he repeated constantly till we brought him to this place. We borrowed a door and carried him thereon to the engine, which brought him on a ballast waggon to the temporary station near Barnstaple. Deceased was in great pain and we could see that his legs were greatly injured. He did not bleed much. I came hither with him and did not leave him at all. The earth that fell had been hollowed out some 12 or 18 inches under. The depth of the cutting is about seven feet. The Coroner shortly addressed the Jury, remarking on the dangerous manner in which the excavations were carried on by undermining, without such precautions as prudence might have suggested. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 June 1866
WINKLEIGH - Sudden Death. - Coroner's Inquest. An Inquest was held at the 'Poltimore Inn,' St. Sidwell's, on Saturday evening on the body of JANE BIRD, aged 65, who resided in Gill's Court, Cheek-street, and who was found dead in her bed that morning. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a native of Winkleigh, and had been an out-patient at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Hunt, surgeon, stated his opinion that deceased died from "An effusion into the chest," and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BURRINGTON - Sudden Death. - On Monday an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Upacott Farm, Burrington, on the body of the illegitimate infant child of ELIZA SHORT, aged seven weeks, which died on Saturday morning, the 9th instant, under suspicious circumstances. Evidence was given to the effect that the child had a bad mouth, and, according to an absurd custom, he was carried to the water and a rush drawn through his mouth. Dr Ford, of Chulmleigh, made an external examination of the body, and found that the child died from thrush, associated with defective nutrition. - Verdict accordingly.

NORTHAM - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Northam, on Tuesday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM PRIEST, a labourer, 64 years of age. On the 29th ult., the deceased was working in a stone quarry at Northam, the property of William Yeo, Esq., of Appledore, and while in the act of blasting a rock in the usual way, the powder exploded before he could escape to a place of safety, and a quantity of the rock falling on him fractured his skull. From the injuries received, death ensued at the end of eight days. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 June 1866
BRAUNTON - Suicide By Hanging. - On Tuesday morning MR JOHN BLACKMORE, of Park Farm, committed suicide by hanging himself in a cow house. It appears that he rose at about six o'clock, and was found some time afterwards suspended by a rope to one of the joists of the building. No reason can be assigned for the rash act; a rumour was, however, current that temporary embarrassment and an unpreparedness to meet his landlord on his rent day might have troubled him, but this was proved to be altogether groundless, his wife offering to pay the rent immediately. An Inquest was held on the body last (Wednesday) evening, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, Mr G. P. Hartnoll foreman, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday 5 July 1866
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - On Monday evening a boat accident occurred in the estuary of the rivers Taw and Torridge, which terminated fatally to an old man named JOHN HEAL, well-known as a "hobbler," and who had been accustomed for fifty years to sea and river navigation. The deceased had gone down from Barnstaple with a party whom he had landed at Greysand; himself remaining on board in charge of the boat He appears to have fallen asleep, and before he was aware the tide which flowed at about 6 p.m. floated the boat and it was carried by the current in the direction of Appledore Pool. Shouts from the shore and missiles thrown at the boat at length aroused him, and deceased endeavoured to beat back to Greysand, which however he failed to accomplish - the strong current and adverse wind rendering all his efforts abortive. Under these circumstances, it was proposed by the crew of another boat, (Stribling's) to take on board the party left on Greysand and to convey them to their own boat; in this they had nearly succeeded when, from some unexplained cause, HEAL'S boat capsized, just off the Cockle-ridge. He was told by parties on board the second boat, now within hail, to let go the jib-sheet; which, had he attended to, his boat would probably have righted herself; but he gave no heed, indeed, he appeared to be paralysed with fear. He remained for about five minutes clinging to the side of the boat, which gradually filled and went down. Deceased then swam off and endeavoured to reach the other boat, and he had got very near when he became quite exhausted. Seeing his danger, a young sailor named George Vicary (son of the late Mr Richard Vicary) who was standing at the bow, divested himself of his coat and gallantly plunged in to his rescue, to accomplish which he made desperate exertions, and nearly sacrificed his own life in the attempt. He failed in his benevolent efforts, and poor HEAL finally went down. An oar was thrown to Mr Vicary, on which he was buoyed up, and at length he regained his boat in a state of great exhaustion, after having been in the water half-an-hour. It may be added that the accident was seen from the Look-out, at Appledore, and a pilot gig manned by six oars-men put off and pulled to the spot - about two miles distant - which they reached just in time to see Mr Vicary taken on board his boat. The body of the unfortunate deceased was recovered on the following (Tuesday) morning, about twenty yards from the spot where he went down. It was conveyed to his house at Barnstaple, to await a Coroner's Inquest, which was held in the course f the day, and resulted in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." - The Jury highly eulogized the intrepid conduct of Mr Vicary, and requested the Coroner (Mr I. Bencraft) to apply to the Royal Humane Society for a medal of merit; which he promised to do.

Thursday 12 July 1866
ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held, on Monday, at the 'Parade Inn,' on the body of a boatman named ELDRIDGE, who died suddenly on Saturday night. It appeared that the deceased retired to bed in his usual health, and shortly afterwards his wife was alarmed at finding him very ill. Mr Vye, surgeon, was soon in attendance but found life quite extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Thursday 26 July 1866
STONEHOUSE - Death From Eating Laburnum Seeds. - Mr Bone, Coroner, on Tuesday, held an Inquest at Stonehouse, on the body of JESSIE SAUNDERDOCK, aged three years and five months. On Thursday deceased complained of being sick, but her mother thought it was only a bilious attack. On Friday, however, she was no better, and told her mother that she had been eating "sweet peas," a name applied by children to laburnum seeds. On Saturday the deceased was taken to Mr Pearse, surgeon, but the poison had taken too great a hold for the remedies applied to be efficacious and the deceased died on Monday morning. Mr Pearse made a post mortem examination, and found in the stomach of the deceased a green fluid, such as would be produced by laburnum seeds. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

TRUSHAM - Death Through Wrestling. - An Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Trusham, on Friday, by F. Kellock, Esq., Deputy Coroner on the body of WM. DOWN. It appeared from the evidence that on Monday evening the deceased and another man, called Samuel Potter, were wrestling in a hayfield, both being under the influence of liquor. The deceased threw Potter on the first round but was afterwards himself thrown. Potter rolling over him. After another round deceased complained of a pain in his stomach, and then lay down. Potter placed him on a hay slide, and asked whether he should take him home, but deceased requested to lie there, remaining until early the next morning, when he walked home and went to bed, from which he never rose. Dr Carter, of Chudleigh, was called in, who prescribed the proper remedies, but before they could be administered deceased expired. A verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

EXETER - Terrible Death At Exeter. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday, at Exeter, respecting the death of JOHN MILFORD, a cooper, who worked at the City Brewery, and was landlord of the 'Anchor Inn,' Exe Island. The evidence shewed that the deceased was sober, but was addicted to sometimes falling off into a sound sleep. He was talking to one of the witnesses a few minutes before the accident which caused his death. After conversing with the witness the deceased went to the cooper's shop, and in a short time Mr Bastick, owner of the brewery, ran in, crying out, "There's a man under the wheel." On looking down a man's arm and leg was seen pointing upwards. When MILFORD was extricated he was found to be dead. The evidence shewed that the place was a dangerous one, and the Jury having visited it, appended to their verdict of Accidental Death, a recommendation that Mr Bastick should make the place safe for the future.

Thursday 2 August 1866
HARTLAND - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held at Hartland, on Saturday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of GRACE HARRIS, a servant girl, aged 18 years, who was drowned on the previous Tuesday. She went on to the rocks near Moorwinstow to gather shell fish and became surrounded by the tide. She called for help and a farm servant named Heard proceeded to the place, but was not able to render assistance, as he could not swim, and there was about four land yards of water to the depth of twelve feet between them. She asked what she should do, and on his telling her to endeavour to come to him, the unfortunate girl plunged into the water. Mr Howard, miller, then arrived and threw a rope to deceased, which did not reach her, and she very soon sank. The body was picked up the next day at Marshland beach, in the parish of Wellcombe. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

TOTNES - Sad Death At South Pool Slate Quarry. - RICHARD SMALE, a shoemaker, of Frogmore, twenty-one years of age, has been accidentally drowned by falling into a pool of water at South Pool Slate Quarry. The deceased was at the time shewing the quarry to a friend, a sailor, who had never seen one, when in passing through a dark tunnel they fell into a hole filled with water 12 feet deep. The men caught a chain suspended above them, but it was not fastened, and on being pulled ran out. The sailor extricated himself and ran for assistance, but it arrived too late. An Inquest was held on Thursday, at Totnes, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 9 August 1866
TORBAY - Fatal Effects Of A Broken Leg. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday afternoon, at the Torbay Infirmary, on the body of a labourer named HOOPER. Several weeks ago HOOPER broke his leg whilst digging out some deads in the Belgrave-road, the superincumbent mass having fallen in upon him. He was removed to the Infirmary, but refused to have his leg amputated until last week. Since the operation he has gradually sunk, and died on Monday. A verdict was returned in accordance with these facts.

SIDMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Sidmouth. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the 'Bedford Hotel,' Sidmouth, before Robert Brent, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH SCOTFORD, cook, in the service of -- Lowrie, Esq., Sidmouth. On Thursday, about mid-day, the deceased was found by a fellow-servant, named Elizabeth Patten, lying in the stable yard, partially covered with large pieces of timber which formerly composed the platform for the guns belonging to the volunteer artillery. Patten gave the alarm to her master and Captain Ayre, R.N., and after helping to remove the timbers, went for Dr Hodge and Dr Pullen. The medical gentlemen, however, could do no good for the body was quite cold. It is supposed that the deceased went into the stable yard to hang up clothes. The lines were connected with the platform, and in some way the heavy woodwork gave way and fell upon her.

HONITON - Death From Swinging On A Gate. - A very sad accident, which terminated fatally, has happened to a boy, about seven years of age, named RICHARD ROSS, son of a naval officer residing in London. The little fellow had been for some time on a visit to his uncle, MR JAMES ASH, draper, of Honiton, and on Saturday he went to Dunkeswell to spend a few days there at Mr Clement's, Cox Hill Farm. On Monday evening the deceased and a child of Mr Clement's of about the same age were playing together at a gate. Little ROSS was riding on the gate, and the other child was swinging him to and fro, when by some means the top hinge of the gate became unhitched and it fell over, throwing poor little ROSS violently on the ground. He received such a severe blow on the forehead that he died almost instantly. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, before Dr. Brent, Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Sudden Death Of A Farmer. - On Tuesday afternoon, as MR JOHN STEVENS, a farmer who has lived in the neighbourhood of Moretonhampstead for many years, was passing through a field by a lane close to the Lustleigh railway station, he was seen to fall forward on his face. Several bystanders, thinking MR STEVENS had been seized with a fit, raised him, and sprinkled his face with water; but he did not revive, and died within five minutes from the time he was seen to fall. MR STEVENS was upwards of 70 years of age, and for some time past has been in failing health. The body was removed to an adjacent cottage, where an Inquest was held.

BOVEY TRACEY - Concealment of Birth at Bovey Tracey. - An Inquest was held at Lustcombe Farm, Bovey Tracey, on Saturday, by Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, on the body of a male infant of E. A. FROST, a single woman, residing as domestic servant with Mrs Cleave, of Lustcombe Farm. It appeared from the evidence that on Wednesday night FROST was delivered of a male illegitimate child; and as doubts arose as to whether he was born alive or not, Dr N. J. Haydon was called to make a post mortem examination. After hearing his evidence the Coroner defined to the Jury what constituted a legal birth, and the Jury returned a verdict that the child was still-born. The Inquiry last some hours. It is understood that a warrant has been issued for the apprehension of the woman FROST for concealment of birth.

ILFRACOMBE - Suicide. - A determined act of suicide was committed yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon. A woman named HONORA RICHARDS, who resided in Broad-street, went to her brother's house in Portland-street, on a visit, and as she remained upstairs some time, the servant girl went into the bed-room and was horrified to find her hanging to the bedstead, with her knees on the floor. The deceased was promptly cut down and P. Stoneham, Esq., was quickly in attendance, but life was quite extinct. The deceased was of very eccentric habits. An Inquest will be held on the body today (Thursday).

Thursday 16 August 1866
CHULMLEIGH - Fatal Result of a Quarrel - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Chulmleigh, on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN SANDERS, son of a farmer of that parish. It appeared that the deceased was a visitor at the late Races held at Wembworthy and during the sport had a quarrel with some game-keepers, and from words came blows which resulted fatally. The particulars of the sad occurrence will be gathered from the following evidence:-
John Martin sworn:- I live at Wembworthy and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, JOHN SANDERS, very well. He lived in the parish of Chulmleigh, at the house of his half-brother, MR ROBERT BRAY ASH, farmer. I have this day seen a body, which I identified as the body of the deceased. On Thursday, 2nd of August, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I was proceeding to my work in the parish of Chulmleigh, and when I got near Chawleigh Week Mill railway bridge, I saw a man lying upon his back in the pathway, within three-quarters of a yard of the railway, on the Wembworthy side. I went upon the wall of the bridge and looked in upon him, and asked him why he lay there, but he made no answer. I then said "MR JOHN SANDERS, I see!" He looked up to me and asked me to help him up. I went down and helped him up, but he could not stand. I sat him down upon the ground and picked up his hat; inside of which there was blood. I produce the hat, which is in the same state it was when I picked it up. I asked him who had been beating him, but he made no answer. I held him up, and he asked me to give him a drop of water to drink, but having nothing to dip it up with I could not give it to him; but I told him I would go to Chawleigh Week Mill to Thomas Ware, and ask him to let me have some drink. Before I left him to get some assistance he asked me to get him against the wall, which I did, as he could not stand. As I was leaving the deceased I saw another hat between the railway and the marsh, about a land-yard from the spot where I found the deceased. I went to Thomas Ware, told him about the deceased, and left the other hat with him; and then went to Chawleigh Week Farm to give information to his brother, MR THOMAS SANDERS. I saw one of his workmen, Philip Trigger, and told him he must, as quick as possible, inform his master of it. I then went to my labour; and in the evening I called at Thomas Ware's for the strange hat, which I received, and I delivered it last night to James Balsdon, a policeman, who came for it. the hat now produced is the same hat, and is in the same state as when I found it. I don't know whose hat it is. When I found the strange that there was rain water in it.
THOMAS SANDERS sworn:- I live at Chawleigh Week Farm, in the parish of Chawleigh, and am a farmer. The deceased was my brother. Between six and seven o'clock in the morning of Thursday, the 2nd of August instant, I was informed by one of my workmen that the deceased was down under the cattle arch, and could not get up. I took my horse and went to the spot. When I got there he was lying upon his right side near the wall. I asked him why he lay there? and he said he could not get up. He desired me to get a cart; which I did. Thos. Ware came down whilst I was there, and I left Thomas Ware with the deceased. I fetched a cart, and the deceased was taken to the house of Robert Bray Cook. I have seen him several times since, and in reply to my questions what was the matter, he said John Cox took away his hat up in the field and would not let him have it; and that when he said he would make him, that John Cox knocked him down; and in reply to questions if any one came down with him from the field, he said "No." I was present when he died about half-past six o'clock yesterday morning. He stated to me during his illness that he heard the five o'clock train in the morning of Thursday, 2nd of August.
Mr J. Crook Davy, sworn:- I live at Chulmleigh and am a surgeon. On Friday, 3rd of August, I was called upon to attend on the deceased. I found him in a paralytic state, and he complained to me of great uneasiness in his neck, for which I gave him an application. From the symptoms about him, I was very doubtful about his case. I have seen him two or three times a day during his illness, and I had every reason to suppose that he had received severe injury in the upper part of the spinal cord. From the first, he never retained the contents of the bowels or the bladder, and, in connection with the inflated state of the bowels and stomach, with great difficulty in breathing, gave me every reason to suspect pressure on the upper part of the spinal cord. The symptoms never yielded from the commencement. I have this day made a post mortem examination, by the direction of the Coroner, and found a fracture with partial displacement, between the fourth and fifth of the cervicle vertebrae, with effusion of blood into the spinal canal, which is quite sufficient to cause death. I have had conversations with him during his illness, and he has been perfectly rational during the whole time. He has stated to me, in answer to my questions, that he felt something fly up into his head. Upon the buttocks there were wounds, which had the appearance of having been produced by kicks.
William Newcombe sworn:- I live at Winkleigh, and am a shoemaker. I was at Wembworthy Races on Wednesday, the first day of August instant. The deceased was also there. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night the deceased asked me to get a pint of beer for him. I did so. As the owner of the booth would not allow me to take away the beer without I paid him for it, I paid him the price - three pence. I then took the beer to the deceased and asked him for the money, but he refused to pay me. After some little time, as he still refused to pay me, I took off his hat and held it; and John Cox came along and I told him that I had bought a pint of beer for MR JOHN SANDERS, the deceased, and that he had refused to pay me for it. Cox then said, "Let me have the hat," and I gave it to him. He then went to MR SANDERS and asked him if he would pay me for the beer, but he refused to do so, and pushed John Cox away two or three times. Cox then pushed the deceased, who fell on the grass, and Cox helped him up. I then went to the deceased and asked him if he would pay me for the beer, which he did, and I went home.
John Holdway sworn:- I live at Wembworthy and am kennel-man to Lord Portsmouth. On Wednesday, the first day of August, I was at Wembworthy Races, and I saw a man there who, I was informed, was JOHN SANDERS, the deceased. A young man, named William Newcombe, of Winkleigh, had the deceased's hat in his hand, and refused to give it up unless three pence was given to him for some beer. John Cox was close by, and said to Newcombe, "Give me the hat: JOHN SANDERS will pay you the three pence." The deceased still wanted his hat, but Cox, not giving it up, he (deceased) struck him twice or three times; I cannot say which, as it was dark. Cox then struck SANDERS, and they had a bit of a scuffle, after which SANDERS paid Newcombe for the beer.
Hannah Dymond sworn:- I live at Chulmleigh, and am a washerwoman. I knew the deceased, JOHN SANDERS. I last saw him alive on Wednesday, the first day of August, at Wembworthy Races. He was under the booth, in the grand stand. John Cox, of Eggesford, under keeper to Lord Portsmouth, and another man whom I did not know, was with him. The two men were drinking, and the deceased was sitting some way off by himself. The deceased called for a pint of beer, which was brought and put down before him, and the other two men came forward, and John Cox took up the pint of beer and he and the other man drank it between them. The deceased said as they had drank it he should not pay for it. John Cox then struck the deceased with his fist behind the neck, and the deceased left the booth and went towards Chawleigh Week Railway Bridge and about five or six minutes after John Cox and the other man also left the booth and went the same direction. This, I should think, was between ten and eleven o'clock at night. I saw John Cox lift one of his legs as if to kick the deceased, but I don't know whether he did so.
The Coroner then adjourned the Inquiry to Tuesday, the 14th August.
Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest was resumed on Tuesday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. The Jury having been re-sworn, the following additional evidence was taken:-
William Mair sworn:- I live at Winkleigh, and am a thatcher. I was at Wembworthy Races; I saw the deceased, John Cox, Richard Ware, and John Holdway, and also William Newcombe there, about half-past ten o'clock at night. There was an altercation between the deceased and William Newcombe about a pint of beer. Newcombe took the deceased's hat and said he would not give it up until he paid for the beer, having before asked him for the money; Newcombe took the hat and carried it away. Cox then came forward and said, "MR SANDERS, if you will pay for the beer I will insure your having your hat." MR SANDERS said he would not pay for it, and then pushed Cox, and Cox passed the hat down over the face of the deceased. MR SANDERS again pushed Cox, and said he would have his hat. Cox then struck him in the breast, and he fell back over some boards; the deceased then went out the lower end and Cox the higher end of the booth. I went over the boards and saw Cox strike the deceased in the breast a second time outside the booth. SANDERS rose up and Cox struck him again in the mouth, and he fell right back on the grass. Deceased rose up, and said, "I think I am as good a man as you, Cox;" who said, "If you get in my hands again, MR SANDERS, I shall hit you a great deal harder than I have." MR SANDERS then went into the booth and had something in a pint. I am certain that Budd did not come out with a light when the deceased and Cox were outside; this was about eleven o'clock at night. I saw the deceased take out a two-shilling piece and give to Newcombe and Newcombe went into the booth and returned with 1s. 9d., which he gave to the deceased. I saw the deceased knocked down three times by Cox, and no one came forward to help him up. I did not see Cox lift his toe to kick the deceased.
Robert Budd sworn:- I am an innkeeper, and reside at Wembworthy. I had a booth at Wembworthy Races. After dark a long time, I heard blows outside my booth; I called to the policemen to stop the noise, but one of them said, I don't know which, "Serve him right, he asked for it." I then went out with a light and saw the deceased and Cox facing each other; I spoke to deceased, but he made no reply. I then spoke to Cox, and said, "Know better, John, than to strike a man like MR SANDERS, who has not got all his buttons." Box replied, "He has got buttons enough to strike me hard." Cox had got the deceased's straw hat in his hand, with which he two or three times struck the deceased across his face. Cox then put the deceased's hat on his head and left him. A short time after the deceased came to my booth and asked for some brandy, which I declined to let him have. He sat down upon a form and asked for some drink, and I gave him some ginger beer, which he drank, and he sat there some time; and whilst he was sitting there he asked several times for some tobacco, but I did not give him any. After a time he rose up and wished my brother-in-law, John Bailey, and myself good night. He did not complain of being hurt all the time he was in the booth.
Mr John Ford sworn: I live at Chawleigh, and am a farmer. I knew the deceased; I saw him at Wembworthy Races, about seven o'clock in the evening, and he was then very well. I saw him again on Sunday, the 5th day of August; he was in bed at his half-brother's, Mr Ash. I asked him what was the matter with him, and he said there had been a row at Wembworthy Races about a pint of beer; and I asked him with whom, and he said with Cox. He said Cox came by unawares and gave him a blow in the neck; he said no one struck him at any time except Cox, and I asked him if any one else had struck him except Cox, and he said, "No one that he knew of." I was there three days following, and he told me so every time.
Mary Ann Harris sworn:- I live in the parish of Chawleigh, and am a single woman. I was at Wembworthy Races on Wednesday, the 1st of August. I was at the grand stand after twelve o'clock at night, when there was quarrelling between three persons, whose names I was informed were John Cox and JOHN SANDERS; the other, William Newcombe, I knew. they were quarrelling about a pint of ale. Newcombe said he had paid for the ale, and wanted SANDERS to pay him again; but SANDERS, the deceased, said he would not pay for it as he had not drank it. Box then knocked the deceased down, and the deceased's head came against my left foot; as the deceased lay upon the ground Cox came forward and kicked him twice. I went to two policemen, who were close by, to interfere, but they would not interfere, and said, "It served the b---- right." Their names are George Creedy and Abraham Fursdon. I lifted up the deceased, and Cox again came forward and struck him in the chest and knocked him down, and I went away again to the policemen to interfere, but they would not. Cox was then beating him, and as the policemen would not interfere, I went to the deceased and lifted him up a second time, and Cox struck him immediately after on the back of the neck. Newcombe then came forward and attempted to strike him, but I prevented him. Creedy afterwards said, "You have had a d..... good hiding, and served you right to." Cox then again came forward and attempted to strike him, but he did not. SANDERS then took out a two-shilling piece to pay Newcombe for the beer, and Newcombe was paid. I then went away, leaving the deceased standing outside the booth, and I did not see him again until between five and six o'clock in the morning, when I saw him close to a railway bridge, lying upon his back with his head close to the wall of the bridge. Leaning over a gate, not far from the deceased, there was a labouring man with a hook in his hand. I said to the man, "That man (meaning the deceased) has had a good drashing:" and the man said, "Have'ee." I should know the man if I were to see him again. I thought the deceased was asleep, and I then went up over the bank and across the line and went home. I did not see the deceased strike Cox or speak to him. I asked the man if I could pass over the railway bridge, and he said the train had just passed down, and that there would not be another until about eight o'clock, and that I could pass the railway bridge. I saw blood about the deceased's lips, as if he had been spitting blood. The man I saw, I am informed, was Richard Cox, of Wembworthy. I did not see Budd come out with a light when the deceased and John Cox were outside the booth.
Courtney Davey sworn:- I am a Serjeant in the Devon and County Constabulary, stationed at Chulmleigh. On Tuesday night, the 7th day of August, I heard from the first time that the deceased had received injuries on the race course on the 1st of August. I first went to Mr Davy, of Chulmleigh, surgeon, and asked him if the reports were correct that the deceased was not likely to live out the night. I then went to the house of his half-brother, Mr Ash, and saw the deceased in his bed-room. I asked how the affray had happened. He said it was about a pint of beer, and that Cox had struck him. I asked him if any one had molested him on his way home, but he replied, "No. It was Cox up in the field." I asked him if he left the field by himself or whether he had any company. He said he did not see any one after he left the field until Martin came to him in the morning. This he repeated several times. I tried to impress upon him whether any one had molested him after he left the field, but he repeated that no one had molested him. He kept on saying that it was Cox who struck him up in the field. When he said all this I have no doubt he was labouring under the pains of death. He seemed to be perfectly collected at the time. When I went to Mr Davy he told me he did not think he would live out the night.
Mr Incledon Bencraft was in attendance at the Inquest to watch the proceedings on behalf of John Cox, whose name it will be seen was mentioned as being in the affray at the booth. The Inquest was again adjourned until Monday, the 20th August, at half-past ten in the morning.

GEORGEHAM - Two Deaths By Drowning. - A distressing accident occurred at Croyde, in this parish, on the afternoon of Saturday last. I young gentleman, son of W. S. COLES, Esq., a resident of Clifton, whilst on a visit here, went out for the purpose of bathing. The tide at the time was receding, and he got into a dangerous position. A man named THOMAS GLOVER, with whom he was lodging, seeing his danger, procured a rope and went to his assistance. Distressing to relate, this man got washed off his feet whilst attempting to rescue the lad, and both were drowned in the sight of several persons on the beach. The Deputy Coroner, John Henry Toller, Esq., held an Inquest on the bodies on Monday, when the following evidence was taken:-
Thomas Hill sworn I live at Clifton, in the county of Gloucester, with MR WILLIAM GALE COLES as butler. I have this day seen a body which I identified as that of JAMES ROBERT COLES, a son of the said WILLIAM GALE COLES, aged about twelve years.
WILLIAM GALE COLES sworn:- I reside at Clifton. The deceased was my son, and was about twelve years of age. On Saturday last, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was with him on the beach at Croyde. He was with me with the intention of bathing. His younger brothers were in the water before. He undressed and went in. I was close to him when he went in. He did not go in very far and I turned away for a few minutes. I then turned and saw that he was evidently battling with the waves, and was being carried out. I rushed into the water and called to him, but I never saw him after that, and I had great difficulty in getting out of the water.
John Smith sworn:- I reside at Croyde in Georgeham. On Saturday last I was at Croyde on a fishing excursion, and, whilst there, I was informed by MR WILLIAM GALE COLES that his son and another person were drowned. He was in the greatest distress, and asked me to endeavour to recover the bodies. In a short time after watching, I saw something turn up, and thinking it might be one of the bodies, I went to the spot and found it was the body of a little boy named JAMES ROBERT COLES (the deceased), the son of MR WILLIAM GALE COLES, as I was afterwards informed.
Verdict:- "Drowned whilst Bathing," with a recommendation from the Jury that a notice should be affixed in the most conspicuous place, warning persons against bathing near the rocks at low water.

Thursday 23 August 1866
CHULMLEIGH - The Fatal Affray at Wembworthy Races. Committal Of Lord Portsmouth's Gamekeeper For Manslaughter.
The inquest on JOHN SANDERS, who met with his death through violence on the 1st instant at Wembworthy Races was resumed on Monday at the White Hart Inn, Chulmleigh, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. No further evidence beyond that fully reported in our last was forthcoming, but the Jury viewed the spot where the deceased was found. On their return, The Coroner having read over to the Jury and explained the legal definitions of murder and manslaughter, the room was cleared.
On the public being re-admitted, after about half an hour's consultation, Mr Richard Mitchell, the foreman of the Jury, said they were all agreed in their verdict of Manslaughter against John Cox. Several of the Jurors also expressed strong disapproval of the conduct of George Creedy and Abraham Fursdon, the two policemen who were said to have been present at the scuffle in the race booth, and did not interfere after being requested to do so, though the fact was not embodied in the verdict, as Mr Superintendent Wood, who was present, stated that the matter would be fully inquired into.
John Cox was then called into the room and formally committed to take his trial for Manslaughter at the next Devon Assizes. On the application of Mr Bencraft bail was accepted, the prisoner himself in a £1009 bond, and Mr Rudall and Mr W. Partridge, of Eggesford, as his sureties in £50 each.

Thursday 6 September 1866
OTTERY ST. MARY - Dreadful Catastrophe At Ottery St. Mary. - Eight Persons Killed and Eleven Seriously Injured. - The truth of the old saying, "Misfortunes never come singly," has been exemplified in the case of recent occurrences at Ottery St. Mary. A short time ago we had to chronicle a devastating fire; now we have the sad task of recording that a shocking accident occurred on Sunday evening, by which several persons lost their lives, and a number of others were seriously injured. On that evening a female member of the Plymouth Brethren, Eliza Hawker, of Treble's paper mills, Exwick, addressed a crowd of from 120 to 150 persons, from the ruins of the shop formerly occupied by Abraham Harding, grocer, at the corner of Tiphill-foot, leading into the Square. Opposite were the ruins of the house occupied, previous to the fire, by Mr Windover, saddler, consisting of a portion of wall six feet in length and ten feet in height, and a chimney fifteen feet high behind it. At half-past 7 the congregation from the neighbouring chapel augmented the crowd. There was no indication of approaching danger, and the people were quietly listening to the preacher, who, by a remarkable coincidence, was discoursing of the Judgment Day, when the rocks and stones, she said, would fall on them. Presently a noise as of something giving way was heard, instantly the chimney tottered over and fell on the wall, and before the crowd had time to escape the mass of brickwork was upon them. The scene was of the most heartrending description. In place of the one voice which had been heard just before, the cries and shrieks of a hundred voices rent the air; the road was covered with the debris, among which lay the mangled bodies of those on whom it had fallen. The groans of the injured and dying mingled with the lamentations of their friends, whom the news of the disaster speedily brought to the spot. The unfortunate sufferers were soon extricated, and conveyed to public-houses and to their own homes, where those in whom life was not extinct were attended by Dr Whitby, Messrs. Edwards and Davy, surgeons, Ottery, and Drs. Jerrard and Mayne, Honiton. The town was in a state of the greatest consternation, and the excitement was speedily communicated to the neighbouring places. The names of the dead are:- JOHN GILLAM, a boy seven years of age, son of MR GILLAM, watchmaker; EMMA ROWE, single woman, 16, daughter of a thatcher; JANE LANG, 20, wife of JAMES LANG, carpenter and machinist; MARY ANN BISHOP, 52, widow of a miller (she buried her husband last week); ELIZABETH DAVIS, 17, laundress, residing with her grandfather, a mason; ELIZABETH KELLOW, 17, living with her mother, a widow, who keeps a small dairy. All these died within an hour of the accident; EMMA HAKE, 15, daughter of JOHN HAKE, of the 'Lamb and Flag Inn'; and JAMES LANG, the husband of the woman LANG, who was killed, died in the course of Monday afternoon.
The seriously injured persons are:- Elizabeth Rounsevill, 20, scalp wound, daughter of Samuel Rounsevill, labourer; Fanny Temple, 20, scalp wound and injury to the chest; Elizabeth Green, contusions in various parts of the body, daughter of James Green, shoemaker; Geo. Pyle, 8, dislocation of the ankle joint, son of Mr Pyle, of the 'Volunteer Inn'; --- Gillam, a young woman of 17, scalp wound and injury to the side, sister to the boy GILLAM who was killed; Biddy Jeffery, 18, daughter of Mr Jeffrey, of the 'Five Bells Inn'; -- Litley, a pensioner from the Marines, working as a labourer, and his wife, each aged about 50, and Robt. Channon, 24, mason, various contusion, W. Churchill, 23, labourer, had his toe smashed; -- Baker, 50, gardener to Sir John Coleridge, had his leg broken, and is now an inmate of the Devon and Exeter Hospital. These are now progressing favourably and it is thought most probable that they will all recover. Besides these at least a dozen persons were more or less severely bruised. Lovell, a labourer, had his clothes torn in pieces, but escaped with slight bruises; and many other persons who were struck escaped with comparatively slight injuries. A strong wind was blowing at the time of the accident, and it is believed that the foundation of the chimney had been sapped by water which had collected around it since the great fire. It seems pretty clear that such a towering ruin ought not to have been allowed to stand. Other ruins of a similar description were taken down yesterday. The feeling of many in the town was strong against the woman; they complain of her choosing such a place for preaching.
The Inquest on the eight bodies was held at the 'King's Arm's Inn' on Monday afternoon, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 13 September 1866
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Child Murder At Bishop's Tawton. - MARY MORRISH, a widow woman, about 40 years of age, was brought up in custody on a charge of having wilfully murdered her new-born child by administering a certain poison, on the 28th ult.; and Ann Geen, the midwife, was also charged with being accessory to the crime. A preliminary investigation only was made sufficient to justify a remand, applied for by Mr Supt. Cunningham, until the result of the Coroner's Inquiry is made known. It appeared from the evidence taken that MORRISH had been delivered of an illegitimate child, which died very suddenly shortly afterwards. A Coroner's Inquest was held, when Mr Fernie, surgeon, of Barnstaple, made a post mortem examination. At the Inquest, opened on Wednesday, he stated his belief that the child had been poisoned; and the Coroner thereupon, ordered the contents of the stomach to be sent to Professor Herapath for analysis. The result of the analysis showed that poison had been administered, and the prisoners were taken into custody. The Magistrates remanded the prisoner until Friday.

APPLEDORE - Sudden Death On Board A Vessel. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Appledore, touching the death of JOHN HAMLYN, which occurred very suddenly on the previous afternoon. The following evidence was taken:-
John Stoneman deposed:- I live at Appledore and am a mariner. I knew deceased (JOHN HAMLYN) who was a sail-maker, and about sixty years of age. On Thursday afternoon last I saw him alive. He was then on board a vessel called the Coronation, at Appledore Quay, walking the deck. I put him on board the vessel. His son and myself went away to weigh the anchor as she was going to East Beach. A boy on board the vessel sang out that the deceased had fallen. I went alongside as quick as I could and ran to him. He was quite stiff. His son came after me, and cried out to a shipwright to fetch a doctor, who went immediately. His son and myself lifted him up, when he groaned. I went and got some water and bathed his temples, when more men came and he was taken on shore and carried to the saw-pit. After being there about ten minutes the doctor came.
Thomas Hutchings deposed to being a sailor boy, and was on board the Coronation with the deceased, on Thursday afternoon. We both walked aft to cast off a rope and after saying the rope was stranded, he dropped down. I held his head and called on his son, who immediately came and sent for the doctor. He was then taken on shore.
Robert Stuart, M.D., deposed to being a medical man at present assisting Dr Pratt, of Appledore. Being sent for to go to the deceased, he went and found him in the saw-pits. Examined him and found him to be quite dead. Believed he died from natural causes - to the best of his belief from the rupture of a vessel in the heart. Verdict:- "Died Suddenly from Natural Causes."

TORRINGTON - Death From Starvation And Exposure - An Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., on Saturday last, at Great Torrington Union House, touching the death of SIMON PERRY, 62 years of age, under the following circumstances:-
Simon Perryman, of Great Torrington, labourer, deposed to being at the 'Exeter Inn,' on Sunday, the 2nd inst., when a man came in and called for a bottle of ginger beer which he drank, and asked the landlord if he could have a bed for the night. On being told that he could, he said he should go and get some money from his shop-mates to pay for his lodgings. Before he left I asked him where he came from, he said North Wales, and was a currier. He looked very hungry and thin, and could hardly drink his ginger beer. I saw nothing more of him until Thursday last, when meeting Mr Hobbs of 'Railway Hotel,' he asked me if I had seen Supt. Blake, as a man was at his house who he thought was dying. Thinking from his description he might be the same person as I saw on Sunday evening, I went down and found it so. He appeared in a dying state, in a state of starvation was my belief.
William Hobbs deposed to keeping the 'Railway Hotel.' On Wednesday evening, about a ¼ before 7, a man came to my house and asked for a pint of beer which was brought him, but on my wife coming in she took it from him, saying he was drunk. I afterwards saw him smoking his pipe in my settle, and in a quarter of an hour he left, and went out. I saw him again the next morning at the back of my premises, being told by a neighbour there was a man who slept in my stable the night and that he was drunk. On seeing him he was lying on the bare stones in my lower stable. I desired him to rise up when he was hardly able to stand. I then saw he was not drunk then nor on the night before. He then walked into my kitchen, and I followed him. His legs did not appear strong enough to keep up his frame. I desired my daughter to give him some tea, and bread and butter. He ate a part of it and put the remainder in his hat and drank two cups of tea. He then went out; shortly after on looking for him, I found him in the stable on a heap of chips lying on his left side. I helped him up and into the house, and left him in charge of my nephew, while I went to see Supt. Blake as I thought he was in a dying state. I saw the Superintendent and Mr Heale, relieving officer, and I was desired to fetch Mr Hole, which I did, and he came in a short time.
J. C. Hole, Esq., surgeon, stated that he went to 'Railway Hotel' and was shown a man in the kitchen. It was rather dark and he requested he might be moved into the light. He was assisted and rambled in his walk; he was partially insensible and had great difficulty in utterance. I found the state of exhaustion was from want of necessaries. There was no pulse in the wrist. I then requested Mr Heale, relieving officer, to get some arrow root which was done, and spirit was added to it, which he took with difficulty. He afterwards rallied a little and he requested Mr Heale to take him to the Union House, as there was no sleeping accommodation at the 'Railway,' which was done. I asked his name and age, when he said he was a journeyman currier, and was called SIMON PERRY, and was 62 years of age. In my opinion he died from apoplexy, caused by want of common necessaries of life and exposure to the weather.
Elizabeth Williams deposed to being nurse at the Union House. Between twelve and one o'clock on Thursday last, a man was brought in very weak and cold. He was put into bed and a clean shirt put on him, and a basin of strong elder tea was boiled and given him; hot water bottles were also applied to his feet. He also had gruel given to him. Mr Jones's son then came and ordered me to give him a couple of pills, but thinking they might be too strong, I gave him a slight infusion of senna with some drops of peppermint. All proper nourishment was given him but he died on Friday morning about five o'clock.
Verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

TORBAY - Fatal Accident On The Dartmouth Railway. - An Inquest was held on Friday, at the Torbay Infirmary, by Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN HOLDSWORTHY, a labourer, residing at Preston, in Paignton, who was killed the previous day while at work on Dartmouth and Torbay Railway. It appeared that deceased, with others, was at work on a siding near the Torquay Gas Works, getting down some earth, when suddenly a quantity of earth slipped, and deceased fell with it, a portion of the earth falling upon him. He was removed to the Infirmary, where he died in a few hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BISHOP'S TAWTON - Suspected Infanticide - Adjourned Inquest. - John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Ring of Bells' public house, Bishop's Tawton, on Wednesday last (yesterday) on the body of a deceased female infant child of MARY MORRISH, widow woman. The Inquest had been adjourned from 29th day of August, to permit an analysis to be taken of the stomach of the deceased by Professor Herapath, of Bristol. The Coroner read the evidence taken at the previous Inquest which was as follows:-
Ann Geen deposed:- I reside in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, and am the wife of William Geen, labourer. I am in the habit of attending women in their confinement. About 3 o'clock on Monday morning last, a man named Robert Abbott, of Bishop's Tawton, came to me and asked me if I would be pleased to come to MARY MORRISH, who was expected to be delivered. I accordingly went to MARY MORRISH'S house and found her very ill, and she continued so, until she was confined, on Tuesday evening. I was present when she was confined, and so was Mrs Kidwell, with whom she lodged. She was delivered of a female child. When it was born it was quite black and was gasping for life, and it breathed differently from other children except when they are dying. I washed and dressed the child, put the mother to rights and then went home. Before I went home, I carried the child up to its mother, and said "Do cover it up for it is quite cold." The child was lying on the right side of the mother. I had not been home long and got to bed, before Robert Abbott came to me again, and said I was to come again to MARY MORRISH, for he believed the child was dying. I must have been absent from the mother about an hour. When I got back to MARY MORRISH, the child was lying where I had left it, by the side of the mother. I saw the child was dying; it was in the state I left it, gasping for breath. I took the child up in my arms, and held it in my lap until it expired. It died about 11 o'clock on Tuesday night. Before I left the child the first time I gave it some sugar and water, but it came out at the nose. I never heard the child cry after it was born. I have no reason to suppose that the child received any improper treatment from the mother.
Jane Kidwell deposed:- I live at Bishop's Tawton, and am the wife of Samuel Kidwell, labourer. I know MARY MORRISH; she lodged with me. I knew she was in the family way. I was present when she was confined, between four and five o'clock, yesterday afternoon. The child looked very purple when it came into the world, and did not make the least noise. After it was washed and dressed, sugar and water was given to it; first it swallowed it very well. After it was washed and dressed I left it with the mother. I went up to see the mother at different times. I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock last evening, and just as I was got into bed, one of MARY MORRISH'S children came to me and said I must please to come in to mother, as she believed the child was dying. I accordingly went and saw the child was dying. I was present when the child died, which took place about 11 o'clock. When I was called from my bed, sugar and water was given to the child but it could not swallow it.
Andrew Fernie, Esq., deposed:- I live at Barnstaple and am a surgeon. I have this day seen a body which I was informed was born of the body of MARY MORRISH. It was the body of a healthy well-developed new born female child. there were no marks of any violence whatever to be seen. There was a good deal of discolouration of the child, which is usual for some hours after death. In the first place, I opened the chest and found the heart and lungs and other organs quite healthy. The lungs were those of a child which had breathed very well. I then examined the abdomen and first removed the stomach, having tied each end of it so that I might not lose anything which it contained. The intestines and other organs were in a healthy state. I then opened the heart and examined the brain which was healthy. I then examined the stomach by slitting open the upper end of it and pouring the contents into a clear glass. The lining part of the stomach was very red and inflamed and at one part of the inflamed surface there was a small gray patch where the lining membrane was destroyed and near this there was a very small dark red spot. I produce the stomach and its contents.
Additional evidence was now adduced:-
Ann Geen deposed:- I saw MARY MORRISH on the Thursday (30th August) on the day that my house was searched. I asked if she would have a coffin. She said I could do as I liked. I said it was not my child, and she said Mr Robins should make a coffin. I said "This is a pretty thing that my house should be searched, all through you; and if anything wrong has been done with the child, you have done it." To which she made no reply. The only thing I gave the child was sugar and water, which was given me by Mrs Kidwell. I gave it two teaspoonfuls after I had washed and dressed it and before I took it to its mother. This was about an hour after the birth of the child. I third teaspoonful came out of the nose as I put it into the mouth. When I carried the child to the mother, she did not seem to take the least notice of it. I then left and went home. In about an hour I was called again by Robert Abbott, who said he thought the child was dying and begged me to come. I did so, and saw the child lying in the same place in which I had left it by the right side of the mother. The child was quite cold. The mother did not show the least affection for the child.
Jane Kidwell sworn:- I mixed the sugar and water which was given to the deceased by Ann Geen. There was no other ingredient beside sugar and water. When I went to bed, I took up a cup containing more sugar and water to the mother. She objected to my giving it to the child, and said she would feed the child herself. I then went to bed. The child was then in bed with but lying away from the mother. I placed the sugar and water on the mother's bed. She said she thought the child was asleep and when it woke up she would give it to it herself. She shewed no affection for the child. At about half-past nine MARY MORRISH'S little girl called me. She said, "Jane, will you please to come in to mother; she thinks the child is dying." When I went in, I saw MARY MORRISH giving the child something. She had in her hand a cup and a teaspoon; she was giving it something, which she put into the mouth and it came out at the nose. I thought the cup contained the sugar and water I had taken up. She did not appear confused and took no steps to conceal it. MARY MORRISH lodges with me; she has a drawer in the kitchen, which she keeps locked. About a fortnight before her confinement I saw the drawer unlocked by MARY MORRISH'S little girl. I there saw a bottle of very dark liquid. (The bottle now produced by Superintendent Cunningham is the same bottle when I saw it in the drawer it was labelled "Poison.") The next time I saw the bottle it had been washed out and the label washed off: it was the day after she came downstairs - on the 30th August - on the day following the Inquest. The bottle was then upon the shelf. The mother was left alone with the child for half-an-hour or more, after Ann Geen had washed and dressed it.
Ann Geen recalled:- When I took the child up to the mother, after washing and dressing, it was about 7 o'clock.
Mr Fernie, surgeon, deposed:- When I took the contents of the stomach of the deceased, I put it into the bottle now produced, covered the bottle with paper and attached my own private seal, which I now identify., The bottle I delivered into the hands of Serjeant John Sherriff, of the D.C.C., on the 31st of August last, for the purpose of being delivered to Professor Herapath, for analysis.
Professor Herapath sworn:- I am a professor of chemistry and senior magistrate of Bristol. On the 31st August, Serjeant John Sherriff delivered to me two packages sealed with seals similar to those I produce. In one of these was enclosed the bottle which I now produce. It contained about half-an-ounce of whitish grumous matter, looking like a fluid; but upon attempting to pour it out I found it had a consistency something like the white of an egg. As I had nothing to guide me as to the nature of the contents I tried it for arsenic and other metallic poisons and afterwards for strychnia, but failed to discover either of them. I then tried for opium, and after many manipulations I separated from it the principal alkaloid of opium which is morphia, which I produce in the crystallized form. I then examined the stomach, which was in a separate wooden box covered with white paper and sealed down, which contained four packages - labelled 1. stomach, 2. hart, 3. kidney, 4. liver. I found the stomach red and inflamed and produce a portion dried on glass. This shows that an irritant had existed in the stomach. There was a dark surface on the dependant portion of the stomach, which I could not account for; it was adherent to the inner surface and could not be taken off. I then operated upon the liver and from that, after destroying the animal matter, I obtained morphia, which I also produce. From these circumstances I have no doubt that the child must have died from the effects of opium in some form or another introduced into its system; and from the surface of the stomach being inflamed I should say it was more than probable that it was given in a state of laudanum, the alcohol of which would tend to inflame the stomach. I believe this is the first time that morphia has been extracted from a liver - at least I never heard of it.
By Supt. Cunningham:- I should say that opium administered to a child would produce death in a very short time.
Jane Kidwell recalled:- I was present when the post mortem examination of the body of the deceased was made by Mr Fernie. When I saw the liquid from the body I said "That's the colour of the liquid that I saw in the bottle in the drawer."
Mr William Curtis deposed:- I am a chemist, living at Barnstaple. I think about the latter part of March or beginning of April of this year, MRS MARY MORRISH, of Bishop's Tawton, widow, applied to me, stating that she had not been as "she ought to be, after the manner of women generally, for two or three months at least." From her appearances and the manner in which she acted, I was led to believe that she was in the family-way. I asked her if such was the case, which she acknowledged, and I then strongly persuaded her not to take anything. It was on a market-day, and she remained in the shop for nearly two hours begging me at intervals to give her "something to do her good." Finding she was bent on having medicine of some kind, I gave her a six-ounce bottle containing an infusion of senna, well knowing that it could do no injury but would tend materially to benefit both mother and child. She had at intervals of a week three bottles of this kind of mixture, when (I suppose finding it had not the effect desired) she discontinued coming for more. She made no further application to me until the 10th of August, when she called and asked to see me privately. She then gave me a piece of paper on which was written "Prussic acid," and asked me to supply her with 6d. worth. I told her it was so poisonous that to none but medical men would I supply it. I returned her the piece of paper which she kept. I never supplied her with opium or any mixture containing opium.
Mr Cunningham said Mr Curtis had given him every information in his power and readily assisted in facilitating the ends of justice. He was sorry to say that other chemists had acted otherwise; they had promised to go to see the prisoner for the purpose of identification, but they had not done so. He considered this conduct disgraceful to them.
The Coroner:- It is certainly their duty to assist to the utmost of their power.
Mr Fernie recalled:- I have heard the evidence of Professor Herapath, and am of opinion that the death of the child was caused by opium, administered in some form or other.
The Coroner read over the depositions, and the Jury, after a short consultation, agreed to their verdict, which was handed in by the Foreman (Mr Thomas Western) as follows:- "That the deceased died from the effects of Opium; but by whom administered, to this Jury doth not appear."

Thursday 20 September 1866
TIVERTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Tiverton, on Saturday, on the body of MARY LAKE, a widow. Elizabeth Bowden, who was the first witness called, stated that she was a neighbour of the deceased, and saw her last on Thursday evening; she appeared then to be in usual health. It appears that on Friday morning the neighbours not seeing her about so early as they were accustomed, proceeded to the cottage of deceased, where she was discovered downstairs sitting in a chair with her arm resting on the mantel-piece. She was quite dead. The Jury were unanimous in their opinion, and a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased was 75 years of age.

Thursday 4 October 1866
EXETER - Fatal Quarrel Between Two Paupers. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Monday morning, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of WM. CHAMBERS, a labourer, 74 years of age. The deceased was an inmate of the St. Thomas Union Workhouse, and on the morning of the 18th September last, Mr Timewell sent another pauper named William Smith, an old man aged 60, into the oakum room to procure him some junk. The deceased went to the box where it was stored, and Smith, was standing by with a piece of junk in his hand. The deceased said "Put down that it isn't yours." But Smith refused to do so. CHAMBERS tried to take it away from him and a struggle took place, in which the deceased was thrown by his antagonist, the force of the fall breaking his leg. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital almost immediately. A consultation of the surgeons took place and it was decided to amputate the left leg, the deceased having sustained a compound fracture of the ankle joint. The case went on well for a few days, but sloughing of the stump set in, he grew rapidly worse, and died on Saturday morning. Mr J. U. Huxley, the house surgeon, at the hospital, said he considered death had resulted from gangrene of the stump consequent on the amputation. The deceased was of a very shattered constitution, his arteries being much diseased, but had it been otherwise, and he a young man, he would probably have recovered. Without amputation there was no chance of his recovery, and he would have died had not that been done. The Coroner said it was a very painful case, but the point for the consideration of the Jury would be of a very simple nature. There could be no doubt as regarded the law that where there were two men fighting, and - no matter who gave the first blow - in the course of that fight either of the persons sustained an injury which resulted in his death, the survivor would have to answer to the law for that death. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Manslaughter." Previous to the deceased's death his deposition was taken before R. S. Gard, Esq., in the presence of Smith, who was afterwards remanded until Friday, at the Castle. He is now in the county gaol.

Thursday 11 October 1866
TORRINGTON - Extraordinary Occurrence - Birth Of A Child In The Street. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the Board Room of the Torrington Union, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a newly-born male child under the following most extraordinary circumstances:-
Charles R. Jones, M.D., deposed:- On Tuesday evening last, about half-past nine o'clock, a man named JAMES ORCHARD (accompanied by his son, about eleven years of age) came to me at my house. He asked me to go out to a tent near the 'Ebberly Arms' to see his wife. I asked him what was the matter, and he said she had a violent pain in her bowels. I asked if she was in the family way, and he said she was. I then said, "Do you think she is in labour?" He said, "No, sir." I asked where he had come from that day, and he said from Ringsash. I asked if the pain was constant, and he said "No," but it comes on violently at times. I had something the matter with my eyes, and told the man I could not go out. After some conversation, I sent by him some medicine (an anti-spasmodic draught) to relieve the pain, and told him if she was not better in the morning, if he would tell me I would go out and see her. About five o'clock yesterday morning I was called out of my bed, and the same man was at my door with his wife on a donkey. I went down to them and his wife complained of pain in the bowels, but she could not tell me if she were in labour. I asked her distinctly, as I considered she was. I then directed the man down Well-street, to some lodging-houses, and told him where the inspector of police lived. I told the man ORCHARD that as soon as his wife was in bed I would come and visit her. The man and his wife then went away. About a quarter after six there was a very loud ring at my bell. I went to the window and saw ORCHARD, and he said, "My wife has got a child in the road, near the turnpike road." I immediately dressed, and left my house at 20 minutes past six by my clock. On my way to the wife I asked ORCHARD how it was that he had not got his wife into a lodging-house, and he said he had called at several, but they were all full. I then asked him if he had seen the policeman, and he said he had; and that he had asked the policeman to put his wife into some place, but he refused to do so. The officer is called Philip Blake. I then went on to Mr Walter Cock's, the overseer; who gave an order for the woman to be removed to the Union, and he sent a donkey and cart and some straw to take her there. I went down to the end of Well-street, and, in the road between Well-street and Calf-street, at a barn'[s door, which lies back in a sort of recess, I saw the poor woman resting on a donkey in great pain. I inquired where the baby was, and found it was wrapped in a cloth on the top of the donkey, on the seat where the woman had sat. I then saw Mr Lewis Penhorwood (whose father occupies the barn), and he having opened the barn door, the woman and child were taken into the barn on some straw. I then looked to see what state the child was in, and I placed it in warm water and used artificial respiration, without any avail. The child was cold and very pale, and, although the heart did beat, it soon died.
Lewis Penhorwood deposed:- I live at Great Torrington, and am the son of Henry Penhorwood, butcher. Yesterday morning, about twenty minutes after six, as I left my house to go out over our farm, my attention was called to a woman standing at my father's barn door looking at something on a donkey. I saw that something unusual had happened but did not like to interfere. In a few minutes Dr Jones and the man ORCHARD came round the corner of the street. Mr Jones then told me what had happened, and at his request I at once opened the barn door and placed some straw on the floor; the woman was then taken into the barn; further assistance came, but the child died.
At the close of the foregoing evidence the Coroner adjourned for an hour and half, to see if the man ORCHARD could be in attendance. On the Jury re-assembling, P.C. Langdon stated that he had been in search of ORCHARD but could not find him. The Inquest was the adjourned to this day (Thursday).

Thursday 18 October 1866
TORRINGTON - Adjourned Inquest. - On Thursday last, an adjourned Inquest (on the body of a new-born male child, which was born in the road between Well-street and Calf-street, on the 3rd instant) was held at the Board Room of the Torrington Union, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the following additional evidence was taken:-
Mary Hodge deposed:- I am a widow, and keep a lodging-house in Well-street. Yesterday morning between five and six o'clock, a man and woman came and knocked at my door; they had a donkey. The man asked if they could have lodgings, and I told them I had no lodgings, as my house was full. I then directed them across the street to Jane Jeffery's, who kept lodgings. The woman did not say that anything was the matter with her at the time. They then went away in the direction of Jane Jeffery's house, and I went back to my bed.
Jane Jeffery deposed:- Yesterday morning I heard some one at my door. I went to the window and saw a woman and a donkey. I said to her, "My good woman, what do you want." She said, "Have you any room?" I replied that I had not got any room, and direction her to Mrs Parnacott's at the 'Exeter Inn,' where I told her she would be likely to get room for herself and the donkey. She then left, leading the donkey and went in the direction of Mrs Parnacott's.
JAMES ORCHARD deposed:- I travel with brushes. On Tuesday, the 2nd October, about nine o'clock at night, I went to Dr Jones. I told him my wife was very ill, and wished him to come out and see her. She was then near the 'Ebberly Arms.' Dr Jones told me he could not go out that night, but if she was no better in the morning he would come out He sent by me a small bottle of medicine. About five o'clock on Wednesday morning, I again went to Dr Jones with my wife. He told me I was to take her to a lodging-house, and the police was to get one for her if I could not get any. I went down the street with my wife, and (after going to two lodging-houses) she sat down in the street, and I then went to the 'Exeter Inn,' but could not make anyo9ne hear. My wife then told me to go to the policeman. I went to Philip Blake (the policeman now present) and told him my wife was very ill in the street, and I could not get lodgings for her, and asked him if he would get lodgings for her. He said, "I shall not get lodgings for her; you have no business to go about." I told him I had been to Dr Jones, who said he was to get lodgings; and I said she would die in the street. He said, "Serves you right; you have no business to go about." I went back and told Dr Jones, and he said he could do nothing for her until she was in bed, and said I was to go for a pass to take her to the Union, but it was too early to get one. I went back to my wife and told her, and then found that she was confined in the street, near a barn door. After my wife was confined I went to Dr Jones and told him my wife was confined in the street, and asked him to come and see if the child was right. I heard the child moan.
Cross-examined:- When I first went to Dr Jones in the morning he told me that he considered my wife was in labour. the policeman did not say to me that I might die by the hedge. It was five o'clock when I passed the turnpike gate.
Philip Blake deposed:- I am police of Great Torrington. I recollect the morning of Wednesday, the 3rd of October. About twenty minutes to six in the morning, the man ORCHARD came to my door and knocked me up. I lifted the bed-room window; I saw the man ORCHARD, who told me that his wife was down in the street poorly. He asked me to get out and get her lodgings. I told him I could not compel people to take them in; that they ought to get lodgings for themselves; and that it was a great shame to lay about by the hedges. I directed the man to the relieving officer, and also to Mr Cock, the overseer, who could give an order for her to go into the Union. I swear that the man did not say his wife was very ill.
Cross-examined:- I did not say "Serves you right." I did not say, "I shall not get you lodgings."
Robert Mitchell deposed:- On Wednesday morning, the 3rd instant, before three o'clock, a man and a woman (on a donkey) passed through Calf-street Gate and paid me a penny. The man ORCHARD is the same man. He asked me to show him where there was a lodging-house; and I directed him to some in Well-street.
The Jury, having consulted for some time, came to the following verdict: "That the child, from the suddenness of its birth, died from it smother not being able to procure proper care and attendance in her confinement."
The Coroner:- Then you attach no blame to anyone?
A Juror:- No, sir; we have no wish to do so, but if the persons to whom the woman applied after leaving Dr Jones, had known the state she was in, as he did, we should have censured them to the very utmost.

SOUTHMOLTON - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening, before J. Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury (of which Mr P. Widgery was foreman), touching the death of EDWIN JOHN CHURCHWARD, a little boy five years of age, son of MR CHURCHWARD, wool and skin dealer, who, while at play that morning, fell into a cask of water and was drowned. The Jury having been sworn, the following evidence was taken:-
WM. CHURCHWARD, jun., deposed to seeing his brother that morning at play with other children on some bags of wool. He missed him for a short time and then discovered his feet and legs sticking out of a cask, in which there was 14 inches of water. The cask was very narrow; he made an alarm, and deceased was taken out.
MR WILLIAM CHURCHWARD deposed:- The deceased was my son. He was five years old. This morning about breakfast time I was engaged loading some bags of wool. Deceased had been playing on the bags; I lost sight of him for about twenty minutes. He was then found by the last witness in the cask, which is about the size of a flour barrel. I believe that he must have been in the cask full twenty minutes before he was taken out. He was quite dead. I immediately sent for a doctor. There was not the least chance of his turning in the cask, owing to its being so narrow. There is no doubt in my mind but that he slipped off from one of the bags and accidentally fell in. This was the whole of the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was a very fine, promising, and intelligent boy, and, of course, his premature death has plunged his parents in the deepest grief.

Thursday 25 October 1866
LANGTREE - Melancholy Death By Drowning. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of JOHN MADGE, of Langtree, who met with his death under the following circumstances:-
John Madge deposed:- I live in the parish of Langtree with Mr John Copp, who is a miller. I knew the deceased JOHN MADGE, who also lives with Mr J. Copp, and worked for him. The deceased and I slept in the same room. He was very subject to fits of epilepsy. I have known him have two or three of a night. Between two and three o'clock yesterday morning he had one which lasted about a quarter of an hour, when he went to sleep. He generally went to sleep after having had fits. About a quarter past six o'clock yesterday morning he got up and went to his work. I did not see him afterwards alive. When he got out of bed he dressed as usual. He did not speak when he left the room, but looked very dull and sluggish.
John T. Copp, deposed:- I live at Langtree and am a miller. I occupy the Higher Mills. The deceased lived with me. He was about 22 years of age. He has lived with me 12 weeks. He was very subject to fits. I have known him have two or three of a night; when he could do nothing. Yesterday morning about seven o'clock I went into my stable and the deceased was there with my horses. He appeared to be very well, but looked dull and stupid, as he always appeared to look. I ordered him to go up to the mill pond to turn on the water, as I wanted it for the mill. He went away directly. About twenty minutes after seven, finding the water did not come to the mill, I went up to see what was the reason, and when I got up about half-way I heard a little boy, called Augustus Judd, halloaing to the deceased, but finding he could not make the deceased hear he halloed to me and said "JOHN MADGE has fallen down, Mr Copp, and I am afraid he will fall quite into the water." I ran up as fast as I could run and caught him out of the water. He was lying upon his stomach with his face completely covered with water. The pond was full at the time. He was quite dead. When I took him up I held him a bit, and then went in for a horse and cart to take him to his home, which was done.
Augustus Judd deposed:- I live with Mr George Whitlock, of Collacott Farm, in Langtree. I knew the deceased JOHN MADGE. He was subject to fits. Yesterday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, as I was driving my master's sheep near the mill pond I saw the deceased close to it. I thought he had fallen down, and as I was going down to him I saw Mr Copp coming, and I called to him and said, "My Copp, JOHN MADGE has fallen down and I am afraid he will get into the water," and Mr Copp began to run, and we got to the spot about the same time. Mr Copp took him out of the water, but he was quite dead. He was lying with his face in the water, with his left arm curled up and his right arm stretched out. I stood by the side of the deceased whilst Mr Copp went to fetch a horse and cart, and he was taken home.
John Coplestone Hole, Esq., deposed:- I live at Great Torrington, and am a surgeon. I have known the deceased for several years. He was subject to epileptic fits, and I have attended him several years for epilepsy. About six months since I attended him for one. About two years-and-a-half or three years since his mind became deranged from epilepsy, and he was considered a fit subject for an asylum, and I wrote the usual certificate, and he was taken to the Lunatic Asylum at Exminster, where he remained about nine months. I have since attended him for epilepsy. I have this day seen the body. There was no marks of violence thereon, and from the examination of the body and the evidence I have heard, I have no doubt the deceased died from drowning whilst in a fit. Verdict:- "Accidentally Drowned whilst in an epileptic fit."

Thursday 15 November 1866
SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal and Distressing Gun Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, by Jas. Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN LEWORTHY, a labouring man, aged 35 years, who had accidentally shot himself and died from haemorrhage as will be seen from the following evidence:-
Mr John Elworthy deposed as follows:- I am a famer residing at Honiton Barton, in the parish of Southmolton. This morning (Monday), about half-past 7 o'clock, I went out to see my sheep. I had my dog with me which started a hare; it ran some distance and returned backwards. I then heard the report of a gun and I went towards the place from whence the sound proceeded, and I found the deceased, JOHN LEWROTHY in the highway; he could not speak but attempted to do so. I immediately went to my house and procured assistance and in about ten minutes I came to him again; he could then speak very distinctly. On my asking him how it occurred he said he was joining the barrel of the gun on to the stock and by knocking the stock hard on the ground it caused it to discharge. Deceased told me he saw the hare and was preparing to shoot at it. I asked him if he had anything in his pocket to tie up his wound which appeared to be in the higher part of the thigh and I tied it up with a necktie; the deceased was in great agony and expired soon afterwards.
William Brewer deposed that he was a workman of the last witness. On that morning he was called by a fellow servant to take home the deceased with a horse and cart. Witness proceeded to where LEWORTHY was lying in the road, and did not notice a very great effusion of blood. He placed him in the cart and took him to his house in South-street.
Thomas Elworthy corroborated the statement of the last witness, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.
The deceased was a powerful labourer, 35 years of age, and was proceeding to Warkleigh to his work, and unfortunately took the gun in his pocket which was the cause of his premature death. He has left a wife and children to bewail his loss. We are informed there is every probability that if medical assistance could have been immediately procured his wife would have been saved.

Thursday 22 November 1866
BARNSTAPLE - An Infant Suffocated In Bed. - On Monday evening Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the dwelling-house of JOHN CHAPPELL, mason, upon the body of his infant daughter, who was found dead in bed by her mother's side that morning. THOMASIN CHAPPELL, the mother, deposed that the child was about four months old. It had not been a very strong child since its birth, but had improved in health since she had dry-nursed it. That morning, shortly after four o'clock, witness awoke, and not hearing the child breathe, she asked her husband to light the candle, which he did. Witness then saw the deceased lying on its side. The child was quite dead. Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, deposed to having examined the body of the deceased, and was of opinion that the child had been suffocated. Verdict:- "Accidentally Suffocated."

BARNSTAPLE - The Sudden Death of a Lady at Newport. - On Friday an Inquest was held at Newport, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MISS MARIANNE CHURCHWARD, of 1, Orchard Terrace, who died very suddenly on the previous day. The following witnesses were examined:-
Catherine Hill deposed:- The deceased was my mistress. I have lived with her for 48 years. She was 58 years old. She has been in her usual good health up to Sunday last, when she complained on her return from church in the morning, of a pain across her chest. She, however, went to church again in the evening; on her return she complained again of her chest. On Wednesday last she appeared as well as usual, and a lady with her three children dined with her. She walked into Barnstaple that evening and returned shortly before ten o'clock. She then complained of a violent pain in her chest. She went to bed and remained there about half an hour, then she got out and was sick. She had been sick before, down stairs. I saw her fall from the chamber utensil and I caught her and held her in my arms until I obtained assistance. My sister, Joanna Irwin, was with me at the time. I observed she was dead. I sent immediately for a medical man. Mr Gamble arrived soon afterwards - within an hour. Her body was placed on her bed before Mr Gamble came. She had not taken any medicine to my knowledge lately.
Charles Hanlen Gamble, Esq., of Barnstaple, surgeon, deposed as follows:- I have been acquainted with the deceased for several years, but never attended her professionally. On Wednesday evening last I was called to her residence, and, on arriving there, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I found the deceased in her bed. She was quite dead and cold. I examined her body and found no external marks of any injury or violence. The pupils of her eyes were dilated. Her face was very pale and there was a dark appearance round the lips. I am of opinion that she died of apoplexy, caused by effusion on the brain.

Thursday 6 December 1866
CLOVELLY - A Child Burnt To Death. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Clovelly, on Monday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of LILLY HOCKRIDGE, a young child, daughter of a labourer, who died from injuries received from its clothes accidentally catching fire. The facts were disclosed in the following evidence:-
Sarah Parsons deposed:- I live in the parish of Clovelly and am the wife of JOSEPH PARSONS, mason. About three or four o'clock in the afternoon of Saturday last, I was in my garden, and on coming to the gate I saw the deceased child, LILLY HOCKRIDGE, make her way towards my door, in flames. Having an apron in my hands, I wrapped the child in it, but, finding it would not do, I wrapped my clothes right round her, and having quite extinguished the flames I took her into my house, and with some water I put the fire out. In a few minutes the mother of the child, MARY HOCKRIDGE, came. She was in great distress, and ran for more assistance. She very soon returned with a person named Mary Hamlyn. The child was undressed, and it was found to be very much burnt about the bowels, thighs, and arms. Barm was applied to the wounds and it was wrapped up in a sheet. The mother took the child in her arms. She was particularly fond of the child. Mr Dene, surgeon, of Hartland, was immediately sent for, and he attended to the child at the time of its death, which took place about eleven o'clock a.m., on Monday, Dec. 3rd. I believe the mother is very kind to her children. The deceased child was about three years old.
Wavell Arundell Dene, Esq., surgeon, deposed:- I live at Hartland, and am a surgeon. On Saturday afternoon last I was sent for to attend on the deceased child. I immediately went, and when I arrived the child was in its mother's arms wrapped up in a sheet. I had the child taken up to bed. It was very much burnt about both thighs, the abdomen, the whole of the bowels, both arms, and the face was scorched. I then dressed it by wrapping her in cotton wool all round the body, arms, and thighs. What had been done to the child before I came was perfectly correct. When I came again on Sunday morning the child was dying and died whilst I was in the village. The injuries which the child received were quite sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 December 1866
BERRYNARBOR - Melancholy Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq. (Deputy Coroner), touching the death of MR WILLIAM TOMS, yeoman, of Berrynarbor, when the following evidence was adduced:-
James Hussell deposed:- I live at Yetland, in the parish of Berrynarbor, as a labourer, in the employ of MR FRANCIS TOMS, of Yetland Farm. I knew the deceased, WM. TOMS. He was the father of MR FRANCIS TOMS, and resided with him. He was about sixty-seven years of age. I last saw him alive, between ten and eleven o'clock yesterday morning. I, at that time, went out to the shippen and drenched a bullock with him. I then left him and did not see him afterwards. He sometimes went away for the whole of the day and returned about dark. I was not alarmed when he did not return to dinner, but about seven or eight o'clock, I thought it strange he was not returned. My master, MR FRANCIS TOMS, returned from Barnstaple market about twenty minutes before six. He inquired for his father, and I told him I did not know, but I thought he was gone to Combmartin. Between seven and eight o'clock, as he was not returned, my master was under trouble, and he and I went to Combmartin to see if he had been at his niece's, but we did not find him there. We searched everywhere we could think of for him until near twelve o'clock, when we gave up searching for him until the morning. About seven o'clock my master, I, and a servant boy resumed the search, and in a wood called Yetland, about a quarter of a mile from Yetland Farm, I found the deceased hanging from a tree. There was a mote near and a person could stand upon it and put a rope round the branch from which he was hanging. The crown of his head was three or four feet from the branch and his feet were three or four inches from the ground. He was cut down directly, but was quite dead, being cold and still. He sometimes complained of a pain in his head.
J. Harper, Esq., deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Barnstaple. I have this day seen the body of MR WILLIAM TOMS, of Yetland farm, in the parish of Berrynarbor. There was a black mark round his neck such as would be occasioned by a rope. The tongue was swollen and jammed against the teeth. There were no marks of violence upon his body, and I have no doubt he died from asphyxia caused by the rope which encircled his neck.
FRANCIS TOMS deposed:- I live at Yelland Farm, in the parish of Berrynarbor, and am a farmer. The deceased was my father and was about sixty seven years of age. About four years since he had a fall, since which he has often complained of pains in the head, and was sometimes very forgetful and giddy. My mother died about twelve months since, and he grieved very much for her. Verdict:- "Hanged himself: but in what state of mind he was at the time there was not sufficient evidence to show."

Thursday 10 January 1867
TAWSTOCK - Accidentally Killed. - On the 4th instant, a fatal accident occurred to a girl, named SARAH ANN BOWEN, servant to Mr P. Andrew, sen., of Parkgate. Deceased was on her way to the chaff house for provender for her master's pony, when she turned aside to watch the revolutions of the water wheel of a thrashing machine, then in full working. By some mischance her dress became entangled in the universal joint and she was thrown under the crank which inflicted terrible injuries issuing in instant death. Mr Harper, surgeon, was soon in attendance, but his services were of no avail. An Inquest was held on Saturday, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict was returned in accordance with the facts.

Thursday 24 January 1867
BARNSTAPLE - A Child Scalded To Death. - An Inquest was held at 9 p.m. at the 'Horse and Groom,' on Friday, on the body of CHAS. GABRIEL, aged two years and three months, son of a boot and shoemaker, living in Queen-street. It appeared from the evidence that whilst the child was sitting in front of the fire, a saucepan, containing boiling water, accidentally upset, and he was scalded about the arms and face. His father at once took him to the infirmary where the wounds were dressed and the child taken home again, the house surgeon not considering the injuries sustained to be of a dangerous character, or such as to necessitate his remaining in the establishment. The child grew worse and died in 36 hours. No medical man saw the child after it was returned from the Infirmary. The father said he sent for one but he did not come. The messenger who was sent was not examined. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

LITTLE TORRINGTON - Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY GEARY, aged two years, son of JAMES GEARY, a labourer, of this parish. It appears that on Tuesday, the 15th instant, the deceased was left with an older child while the mother went out into her courtlage; the latter had been absent only a few minutes when she heard the deceased shriek and saw him coming towards her with his clothes on fire. She extinguished the flames, and called in the aid of Mr J. C. Hole, surgeon, who attended the child till his decease, which took place on Monday, the 21st instant. Verdict: "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 31 January 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Death In The Union Workhouse. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, the 25th instant, at the Barnstaple Union Workhouse, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM FROST, an infant, then and there lying dead. The following evidence was adduced:-
Mrs Mary Janes deposed:- I am nurse at this establishment. On Wednesday afternoon last, about four o'clock, I saw the child in the Sick Ward with Ellen Squires, the woman who takes care of it. It appeared very sleepy. I told her to put it into bed; she said if she did it would not sleep at night. Maria Parkin gave it some bread and milk, which it ate heartily. She then undressed and washed it. It was put into bed and appeared to be asleep; this was about five o'clock. I saw it again after six o'clock; it then seemed to be sleeping comfortably. I saw it again the next morning about half-past seven o'clock; it was then apparently asleep. It was in a child's bed by itself. I was called into the ward about ten o'clock and there found the child in the bed dead. It was not quite cold. I reported its death immediately to the master and matron. Its body was removed to the dead-house about three o'clock. I could not see anything about its body to account for its death. It was lying on the left side; the face was uncovered.
Mary Turner sworn:- I am a single-woman and an inmate of this Workhouse. I have been employed for nearly two years as an assistant in the Women's Sick Ward. the deceased child had been in the ward about three or four months; another inmate named Ellen Squires used to attend to it. Yesterday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, she spoke to me about the child. About ten o'clock I looked at the child and turned down the bedclothes. I then saw that it was dead. I felt its forehead; it was quite cold. I then went down stairs and called the last witness.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- I am the medical officer of the Barnstaple Union Workhouse. The deceased was about a year and five months old. It had been a very weakly child from its birth until the last few months. I had kept it in the Sick Ward and it had been having extra diet. It has been in much better health for the last two months, and appeared to be thriving. I was in the Sick Ward on Wednesday last, in the afternoon, but my attention was not called to the child. On visiting the Workhouse yesterday, I was informed the child was dead. I have this morning examined the body externally; I find no marks of any violence or injury on it. It appears to have been well nourished. I cannot without making a post mortem examination state correctly what has caused its death, but from its appearance I see no reason to think that it died from any other than natural causes.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 7 February 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death At Pilton. - An Inquest was held at the 'Chichester Arms,' Pilton, on Thursday, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of ANN FURSE, 58 years of age, under circumstances which will be gathered from the following evidence:-
Mary Routcliffe deposed:- The deceased was my mother. She was about 58 years of age. She resided with me, and earned her living by sorting wool for Messrs. Sanders and Co., of Pilton. She earned lately about 4s. a week. She was a weak person,, and suffered from asthma and diseased heart. She has not been under the treatment of any medical man for the last two years. She went to her work yesterday, as usual, about a quarter after nine. I worked in the same room with her. I did not go to my work until about two o'clock. I took the deceased her dinner, consisting of some broth, pork and turnips. She complained of being very ill, and took only the broth. Shortly afterwards she left her work and went down stairs. After she had been away about half-an-hour I went downstairs and saw her sitting in front of the kiln fire. She appeared to be very ill, and had great difficulty in breathing. I assisted her home to my house with Harriet Reed. We had great difficulty in getting her to my house. I put her into a chair and placed her before the fire. She said she was dying. She was then carried upstairs and put in a bed. I did not see her alive afterwards. As soon as she reached my house an order for the parish doctor to attend her was obtained from Mr Thomas, the overseer, and sent to Mr Fernie. Mr Fernie's assistant, Mr Bosson, arrived about two hours after the messenger was sent for the doctor. She was dead when he came.
Harriet Reed deposed:- I am a wool sorter, and work for Messrs. Sanders. I worked in the same room with the deceased. We have worked together for about nine months. She has been ill for several months past, suffering from shortness of breath. Yesterday afternoon, about half-past three o'clock, she complained of being ill; left her work and went downstairs by the kiln fire. I assisted her daughter ( the last witness) to take her (the deceased) home. I gave her a little brandy whilst taking her home, and she had a little gin given to her. She died in my arms about half-an-hour after we reached her home. She was then in a chair, and I supported her. She died off without any struggle. We were more than three-quarters of an hour taking her to her residence.
Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, deposed:- I was absent from Barnstaple, from noon yesterday until about twelve o'clock the same night. I left my assistant, Mr Bosson, at my house when I went away. I have today examined the body of the deceased, and from the appearance of it I am of opinion that she died of natural causes most probably of heart disease. There were no marks of violence on the body.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 14 February 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - On Tuesday afternoon last a fine little boy named JOHN YEO, son of parents residing in the vicinity of the Custom House, was accidentally drowned by falling over the Great Quay into the river Taw. Life was scarcely extinct when the body was recovered but all attempts to restore animation were in vain, in consequence of unnecessary delay and mismanagement on the part of the persons who took charge of the body. An Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., which resulted in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 21 February 1867
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a child, who had died suddenly at the village of Hele, near this place, on Thursday. Deceased was the daughter of JAMES STEPHENS, labourer, and on the day in question was seized with spasms, and shortly afterwards died. Mr Gardner, surgeon, who attended, considered that death was caused by spasms, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

ROBOROUGH - Sad Death Of An Aged Woman By A Fall. - An Inquest was held on Friday, at Roborough, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY PENBERTHY, a married woman, who met with her death under the following painful circumstances:-
Thomas Kelly deposed:- I live at Roborough, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, MARY PENBERTHY. She was the wife of ROBERT PENBERTHY, of Roborough, labourer. On Saturday night, the 26th of January last, as I was in my house I heard a noise as if some one had fallen outside my barn door. I opened the door and found it was very dark. I went back for a light, and found that it was a woman that had fallen out over the roof of my pig's house down to my back door. The woman was the deceased; she was insensible. Adjoining the pig's house there is a bye-road leading to other cottages by the side of which there is no fence which makes it very dangerous to pass at night, particularly on a dark night, and it was very dark on the night in question.
William Rockey deposed:- I live at Roborough and am a carpenter's son. On Saturday, the 26th of January last, I went to Torrington. On my return home in the evening, when about one mile from Torrington, I saw the deceased, whom I knew very well, coming towards me, walking. I was also walking. I waited until the deceased came up to me and we walked on together. She walked so fast that it was with difficulty I kept up with her. She was carrying a basket and a bag, but I carried the basket for her. She was very steady. When we came to a place called Ten Oaks we met the husband of the deceased. We all three walked on together for a short distance until she came to a bridge when the deceased stayed behind, and I and the husband went on together, he taking the basket from her. I saw nothing more of her.
ROBERT PENBERTHY deposed:- I live at Roborough, and am a labourer. The deceased was my wife. On Saturday, the 26th of January last, she went to Torrington market, and in the evening I went to meet her. When I came to Ten Oaks it began to rain and I stopped in a linhay for shelter. She, together with William Rockey, shortly came up. We all three went down the hill together and passed the road leading to the place where the deceased fell over. At the bridge she stopped and gave me a basket. I and William Rockey went on, thinking she was also coming on; but, in a little time, not finding her coming I called to her, but received no answer. I called again and received no answer. I then went back, thinking to meet her at every step, and kept calling. Thomas Kelly hearing me call came to me with a lantern and said "Do come home, your wife has fallen down." I went to his house and found her insensible. She remained at Thomas Kelly's house until the Tuesday following, when she was taken home. She remained ill until Wednesday, the 13th of February, when she died. She was about 79 years old.
Charles Richard Jones, Esq., deposed:- I live at Torrington, and am a doctor of medicine. On Sunday, the 28th day of January last, I saw the deceased. She was then in a semi-conscious state. She had a wound on the scalp of the parietal bone, which seemed to have bled a little. The side of the face was bruised and she was perfectly unable to move her right leg. She has been lost every since, and I am of opinion that she died from shock to the system, occasioned by the fall at her advanced age.
Verdict:- "Died from the effects of a fall, with a recommendation from the Jury that a fence of some sort be placed at the place where deceased fell, as a means of preventing the sacrifice of human life."

Thursday 28 February 1867
KENTISBURY - An Inquest was held at Kentisbury, by John Henry Toller, Esq., on Saturday last, on the body of MARY LARAMY, the daughter of MR PHILIP JOHN LARAMY, who met her death under the following circumstances:-
It appeared from the evidence that the child died from the effect of scalds occasioned by the accidental upsetting of a saucepan of milk over its back and legs, from which death ensued: - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 28 March 1867
APPLEDORE - Accident. - On Thursday, a fatal accident occurred at West Appledore, to a son of MR JAMES LOCK, ship carpenter. MRS LOCK left her house for a short time, shutting her little boy inside. On her return to the house a frightful spectacle presented itself. The little boy in her absence had been playing with the fire and ignited his clothes. It seems that the poor little fellow screamed with all his might and rushed to the door, but being so young (only three years of age) could not open it, and the neighbours, not considering that anything unusual was the matter, the child continued in a blaze until the mother returned, when she found him by the door with some parts of his body literally burnt to a cinder. Death happily put an end to his intense sufferings. An Inquest was held on Friday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 4 April 1867
TIVERTON - Suicide. - A man named JAMES ELLICOTT, residing at Cove, near Tiverton, committed suicide on Saturday morning last in a plantation near his house, by cutting his throat. The poor man, who was about 50 years of age, had been the sexton of Cove chapel for some years, and was a hard-working, industrious man. For the last twelve months he had been ill health, and within the last fortnight appears to have been subject to certain delusions. On Sunday last he dressed himself to go to perform his duties at the chapel, but afterwards refused to go, stating he was afraid that he should be killed. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at Cove, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. The deceased leaves a widow and eight children.

Thursday 25 April 1867
TORRINGTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the 'New Market Inn,' Torrington, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN PASSMORE, aged 15 years, a farm servant, in the employ of Mr Samuel Freeman, of Coombe-farm. The following evidence was adduced:-
Joseph Freeman sworn:- I reside at Coombe-farm, in the parish of Great Torrington, and am a farmer. I knew the deceased, JOHN PASSMORE; he was about 15 years of age, and also resided at Coombe, as a farm servant. My father, Samuel Freeman, resides at Coombe-farm. He had been with my father about seven days. On Monday, the 8th day of April instant, he was employed to drive four horses in a thrashing machine. He was never so employed before; and early in the morning I showed him the way, and he seemed to know perfectly how to drive them. His duty was to stand on the platform upon the top of the machine to drive the four horses, and not to sit down. I gave him all these precautions in the morning; had he remained standing he would have come to no harm. It was about half-past nine when I told him to stand on the platform. I was near the spot about my own work. About half-past ten, finding the horses did not keep up to their full speed, I looked out through the barn's door, when the deceased began to cry, and I held up my finger to a man called Edward Smale, who was feeding the machine, and he stopped instantly. I went out to the machine house and found the deceased's trousers on the right leg split up, and the leg was injured. I took him out over the arm of the machine and carried him in. His leg was bandaged, and he was taken to his mother's house, in Great Torrington, in a cart. We have had boys much younger driving the machine, and had he stood according to my directions no harm could have come to him.
GRACE PASSMORE deposed:- I reside at Great Torrington. The deceased was my son, and was rather more than fifteen years of age. He was employed at Coombe-farm as a farm servant. On Monday, the 8th day of April instant, as I was going to my house I saw a horse and cart standing at my door, and was told my son had met with an accident. I could not go near him for two hours after he was brought home. As soon as he came Mr Hole, of Great Torrington, was sent for. I have attended upon him since the accident happened, and Mr Hole has attended him also. I asked him how the accident happened, and he said he was standing on the board; the chain was there, but he had no hold of the chain, and he turned round and slipped his foot and fell, and caught his right leg in the machine. He died yesterday morning, about eleven o'clock.
Mr John Coppleston Hole sworn:- I live at Great Torrington, and am a surgeon. On Monday morning, the 8th day of April instant, I received a message to go to the deceased, who had met with an accident. I accordingly went, and on my examining him, I found a lacerated wound about an inch and a half long below the knee of the right leg. the outer side of the limb and both legs were a mass of contusions; and about Friday or Saturday after the accident the skin surrounding the lacerated wound was in a state of gangrene, which had crept down the leg and also up the thigh. The day before his death there was a partial separation of the gangrenous parts, and a portion came off in shreds. He died from gangrene from the effects of the contusions of the legs. I believe he had every care and attention. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 May 1867
OKEHAMPTON - Death By Drowning. - On Monday evening last, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, an Inquest was held in this town on the body of a boy 3 ½ years old, son of MR MOSES MEDLAND, of East-street, who was discovered dead in the East Ockment river, on Friday afternoon last. It appears the child strayed away, and was missing for several hours, when, after a search, his body was discovered, having been washed some distance down from the spot where it was supposed to have fallen in. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was accordingly returned.

EXETER - Suicide at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon, at Exeter, on the body of a mason's labourer, named DYER, who had committed suicide by hanging himself that morning. The deceased, who lived in George-street, rose at five o'clock, his wife supposing that he was going out. When she got up at seven o'clock, however, on going down stairs, to her great horror she saw him hanging in the doorway. An alarm was given and the body was cut down, when life was found to be extinct. The deceased was addicted to occasional fits of drinking, and was known by several of his fellow workmen at the church now in course of erection fat the Free Cottages to behave very strangely at such times.

CHUDLEIGH - Fatal Fall Over Chudleigh Rocks. - An Inquest was held on Friday, at Chudleigh, concerning the death of JAMES TANCOCK, a labourer, in the employment of Lord Clifford, at Ugbrook. The man was at work with others woodbuilding, and on heavy rain coming on they took shelter in a linhay at Gappah, belonging to John Cook, and remained there drinking the cider they had brought in their bottles until eight o'clock in the evening, when Cook re-filled the bottles, and the deceased left to go home to Chudleigh. He then, it was stated, was the worse for drink, but could walk tolerably steady. Next morning he was found by Samuel Snell, a labourer, at the bottom of the rocks, quite dead. His nearest way home would have been by a path not far from where he fell, and he was seen not far from the spot after leaving Gappah. The marks on the ground above the precipice indicated that deceased had wandered about and tumbled down once or twice before falling over. The Deputy Coroner, Mr Michelmore, having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was walking from Gappah to Chudleigh, and being intoxicated, he missed his way and fell over the rock and was killed.

Thursday 9 May 1867
COPPLESTONE - Inquest. - On Tuesday last, before Mr Coroner Crosse, at the 'Copplestone Inn,' an Inquest was held on the body of RICHARD HEMMACOTT, labourer, about 56 years of age. Deceased , who was of a quiet disposition and sober habits, had on the night of the previous Saturday a quarrel with his wife. He got up on the Sunday morning and left his home about nine o'clock, and not having been seen for some time a search was made, when his body was discovered at noon in the quarry pit near the railway station, which was filled with water. On being taken out it was discovered that life was extinct. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Moon, Ch[?] Farm, and it is stated that he possessed a considerable sum of money. Verdict "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 16 May 1867
ATHERINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, a Coroner's Inquisition was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of MARY ANN SLOMAN, an infant, aged nine weeks, the illegitimate child of JANE SLOMAN. The principal evidence adduced was by Mr Harper, surgeon, of Barnstaple, who, after making a post mortem examination, sated the cause of death to be inflammation of the lungs, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

HIGH BICKINGTON - A Farmer Accidentally Killed. - On Tuesday, an Inquest was held at Ash Farm, in this parish, before J. H. Toller, Esq., touching the death of MR JAMES PIKE, which occurred under circumstances which will be gathered from the following evidence:-
James Stanlake deposed:- I live in the parish of High Bickington with my grandfather, JAMES PIKE, who is a farmer. I knew the deceased JAMES PIKE, who was my uncle, and was about thirty-one years of age. About eight o'clock on Saturday evening, 20th April last, the deceased, who also resided with my grandfather, and was his son, went to Pulley's Mill, in the parish of High Bickington, for some grist. He did not return that night, but no one was alarmed, as it was thought he had remained at the village. Finding on the following morning that he had not returned I, about five o'clock, went to look for him, and when I got out into the road I saw the deceased lying upon his back. About a land-yard from him a bag of grist was lying in the road. I went to him and asked him what was the matter with him, and he said, "I'm shaked to pieces." I also asked him if he could stand, and he said "No." I then went into the house for assistance, and he was taken in and laid before the fire, but as he did not wish a medical man to be sent for at once no one was called. In the evening he seemed to get worse, and in the morning, about half-past four, Dr Jones, of Great Torrington, saw him and attended on him up to his death, which took place yesterday morning about five o'clock.
JOHN PIKE deposed:- I live in the parish of High Bickington with my father. The deceased was my brother. On Saturday evening, 17th April, he went to Pulley's Mill for some grist. He did not return the same evening, but I was not alarmed as I thought he had remained in the village. He also said he was going to the parsonage to see some ewes. About 11 o'clock the horse came back without any grist, and I thought the deceased had sent him back. About five o'clock in the morning, not finding he had returned, I searched about his bed for him, but not finding him I sent my nephew to look for him, who shortly returned and told me he was lying in the road. I went out and he was brought into the house. He has been attended by Dr Jones since, and died yesterday morning.
Chas. R. Jones, Esq., deposed:- I reside at Great Torrington, and am a doctor of medicine. I knew the deceased, JAMES PIKE. On Sunday evening, 21st April, I was sent for to see the deceased. I was too unwell to go that evening, but I sent something. On the following morning, about half-past four, I saw him. He was in bed, sensible; had great difficulty of breathing; retention of urine and paralysis of the lower extremities. I believe from what the deceased told me that the evidence of the preceding witnesses is perfectly correct. He described to me the accident occurred from the horse shying at its shadow in the pond, as it was a moonlight night; that he was sitting on the grist, and let the reins out of his hand for the horse to drink, to save trouble after he got into the yard to lead the horse to water. That he was insensible for some time, but he heard some one cutting hay in the mowstead. That he called to him, but his voice was so feeble he could not make him hear. That he also heard his horse being put into the stable and the dog bark. That he considered the reason he was not heard was from the enfeebled state of his voice, and the tempestuous weather. My first opinion of the case was that it would be a fatal one, and the cause of death arose from concussion of the spine, exposure to the weather and lying in the mud so many hours. I am also of opinion that there may be a fracture of some portion of the vertebral column, but as I cannot find any displacement I cannot decided say that such is the case. Verdict:- "Accidentally Killed."

BAMPTON - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at Oaten's 'White Horse Inn,' before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Snell was foreman, on the body of a little fellow, aged nine years, son of JAMES WENSLY, smith. Deceased, in company with other boys about his own age, went to bathe in the river Batham, on Monday last. Whilst endeavouring to reach a piece of bread which he had thrown into the water, he overbalanced himself and fell in, and the other boys being too young to render any assistance, he was drowned. Verdict "Accidentally Drowned."

SOUTHMOLTON - Child Drowned. - On Thursday evening last about 6 o'clock a remarkably fine boy named AARON JAMES SKINNER about three years old, met with his death by drowning. An Inquest was held on the day following before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner. Mr Philip Widgery was foreman of the Jury. From the evidence adduced it appeared that on the evening in question MR AARON SKINNER, the little boy's father, who is a miller residing at Tuckey Mills, about a quarter of a mile from the town, was endeavouring to kill a trout for his wife who was ill: he intended to shoot it: his boy was in the house when he returned with the gun; he then hastened to the mill adjoining, thinking from the sound that the corn was nearly run out. Shortly afterwards his girl about 13 years old was calling the child, and went to the mill thinking he had gone there with his father, but she soon found however that he was in the mill leat. He was soon taken out, and although life was not extinct he very soon died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was given.

Thursday 30 May 1867
ILFRACOMBE - Death From Excessive Drinking. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the 'Lamb Inn,' before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ANN HANCOCK, who was found dead in her bed on the morning in question. The following evidence was taken:-
ELIZA HANCOCK, sworn:- I am a single woman and reside at Ilfracombe. The deceased, ANN PARKER HANCOCK was my sister, and was in her forty-fourth year. She sometimes complained of a pain in her side, but nothing very alarming. She was in her usual health yesterday, and appeared in very good spirits. I have sometimes seen her the worse for liquor. She had some brandy and water yesterday; near about nine o'clock last evening went to bed. I can't say that she was sober at the time. About four o'clock this morning as I wanted a little more room, I touched her hand and it was warm, but as she was asleep I would not disturb her, and about half-past nine o'clock this morning I spoke to her but she did not answer, and I touched her hand which was still and cramped. I did not think she was dead, and I went to my sister-in-law, MARY JANE HANCOCK, and I told her she would not answer me, and begged her to come in, which she did, and when she had seen her she said she was dead.
MARY JANE HANCOCK sworn:- I am the wife of THOS. HANCOCK, of Ilfracombe, innkeeper. I knew the deceased; she is a sister of my husband, and has been given to drinking a great deal lately. I saw her take a little brandy and water last evening. This morning, about half-past nine o'clock, ELIZA HANCOCK came to me and asked me if I would come in and look at her sister, for that she could not rouse her, and that she had not spoken to her lately. I went up to her and touched her by the shoulders to see if I could move her as she was covered up by the clothes, but found her cold and stiff. I then went down stairs and told ELIZA HANCOCK that her sister was dead.
Frederick Gardner, sworn:- I live at Ilfracombe, and am a surgeon. About a quarter before ten o'clock this morning, I was sent for to go to the deceased, ANN PARKER HANCOCK. I accordingly went to her, and at the bottom of the stairs I was told she was dead. I went upstairs and found she was dead. I examined her, but found no marks of any violence. From the stiffness and rigidity of the limbs, I should fancy she had been dead some few hours. From the appearance of the body I have no doubt she died of apoplexy, induced by excessive drinking. A verdict was given in accordance with the medical testimony.

Thursday 20 June 1867
PARKHAM - The Late Fatal Accident At Lundy Island - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, at the house of Mr James Lee, innkeeper, on the body of JAMES BRAUND, whose melancholy death by accident we reported in our last. The following evidence was taken:-
JOHN BRAUND sworn:- I live at Buck's Mills, in the parish of Parkham, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, JAMES BRAUND, who also lived at Buck's Mills, and was a labourer. For the last six months I have been at work in the island of Lundy. The deceased was also at work there. On Monday last, in the evening, I was at the cliffs looking out for gulls' eggs. I heard some stones rattling, and some one calling out. I ran within sight of the person and saw him holding on, with his back towards the cliffs, by his hands and moving his feet - trying to get a standing place. He was about five hundred yards from me, but, from the situation of the place, I was unable to get to his assistance. After I had seen him about half a minute he fell to the bottom - a depth of two hundred feet. I ran to get all the assistance I could, but when I went down to the place where he lay he was quite dead.
Richard Moase sworn:- I reside at Buck's Mills. I knew the deceased JAMES BRAUND. He was about thirty years of age. On Monday last I was at Lundy, and was told that some one had fallen over the cliffs, but that it was not known who he was. I went to the cliff and saw some one lying on the rock on his face and hands. I went to another place, and went down with a rope to the body, and saw it was the deceased. There was a great quantity of blood on the rock, and some of his brains was scattered about, and his skull was dreadfully fractured. Assistance was procured and he was taken up by a rope, and on Tuesday last was brought to his home, at Buck's Mills, in a steam-boat. He was quite dead when I found him.
Dr Ackland sworn:- I live at Bideford, and am a Doctor of Medicine. I have this day seen the body of the deceased, JAMES BRAUND. On examination I found the whole of the skull extensively fractured, and the brain largely injured, more particularly at the back of the head. The injuries were the cause of his death, and were, no doubt, produced by the fall, as given in evidence. Verdict:- "Killed by falling from the cliffs on Lundy Island."

Thursday 27 June 1867
TORRINGTON - Found Drowned. - On the 24th May last, a man named RICHARD BEVANS, of Drewsteignton, was found to be missing from that village. On a search being made for him, his hat was found near an old lime quarry which was then filled with water. This led to the supposition that the missing man must have drowned himself, and every means that could be devised was adopted with a view to recover the body, but to no purpose. On Monday morning last, 24th June, after a month had elapsed, two persons, named John Ponsford and William Agget, were near the spot, and saw the body of the missing man floating on the water. The body was taken out and at once conveyed to the village, where an Inquest will be held on it by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner.

Thursday 4 July 1867
SOUTH MOLTON - The Late Alarming Fire, and Loss of Life. - We last week gave an account of a fire which occurred here on Thursday morning. Our report was sent by our correspondent at nine o'clock a.m., and at that time the conflagration appeared to be effectually subdued. However, as has been the case more than once in Southmolton, there was a second outbreak - the latter more fearful in its consequences than the first. About ten o'clock a.m., when nearly all parties had returned to their respective avocations, the fire bell again sounded an alarm; and it was soon discovered that the row of thatched cottages, in Mr Furse's court, were in flames. The sun was very hot; the weather was drier than it had been for the year, and the wind was blowing westerly. The alarm caused the greatest consternation, as may be imagined; many hundreds of the inhabitants were quickly hurried to the spot, and scores set to work to assist the tenants in clearing out furniture and effects from and around the burning dwellings; and immense quantities were lodged at a long distance in the road of East-street, whilst some was being dragged to the homes of relatives or friends for safe custody. The fire proceeding from the thatch (which was an accumulation of years) was intense, and sparks were carried by the wind (which was not high) to a considerable distances from the spot. The home engines were again put to work, but the fire raged with great violence and large quantities of water apparently had little, if any, effect upon the devouring element. It was recollected that a well, which had been covered in for years, was in the road opposite Mr Furse's, and men were put to work to dig, when they discovered and opened the same and a good supply of water was obtained. the fire continued with such fierceness that one and all became considerably alarmed, as no one could possibly say where it would end. The Mayor telegraphed to Barnstaple for a fire engine, and, on getting a reply that it was on the road, a couple of horses were despatched to assist in getting it as quickly as possible on the distressing scene. A special messenger was despatched to Chittlehampton for the West of England Fire engine there, which was as soon as possible driven in with a number of men forming its brigade and others, who immediately went to work in good earnest, and very satisfactorily did their duty, the engine being in excellent working order. Soon afterwards the fire engine from Barnstaple with its brigade, also arrived and likewise went to work fully determined, if possible, to extinguish the flames. Men were stationed on the walls and thatched houses which were in danger from the proximity of the fire. It was a sorrowful sight to witness the clearances of all the houses of their furniture in front in East-street from Miss Hobbs's to Mr Sanders's, of the 'Sheep Market Inn,' at the head of Bunker's new road. The fire was carried by the wind to Mr Cole's, butcher, to the 'Exeter Inn,' and to the premises belonging to Mr John Burgess, in South-street; this occasioned more alarm, but, through great energy and attention, the flames were in those places extinguished. In addition to what we stated last week, the damage was as follows:- Mr Bennett's, whitesmith's shop, was nearly destroyed, other injury was done to his cottages in the rear of his dwelling; and two of the tenants, Woollacott and another, were compelled to leave. Four dwelling-houses in Mr Furse's court, occupied by Messrs. Reynolds, Saunders, Norton and Nicholas, were totally destroyed. The stables and outhouses of Mr Furse were burnt down, his tannery (occupied by Mr Smyth) was soon a total wreck, viz.: the drying lofts, bark mill, barn, bark ricks (the stock of bark being very large), bark linhays, &c., &c. The dwelling-houses of Mr Dunn, farmer; Mr Chapple, wheelwright; Mr Mills, wool-dealer, and Mr Sanders, innkeeper, were destroyed, with the workshops and the stock-in-0trade, tools, &c., of the before-named Mr Chapple and his son. Also the cluster of thatched outbuildings of Mr Dunn, occupied by himself and Mr Mills. Behind their dwellings the fire reached to the Infant School and did considerable damage to the eastern roof, &c. The chimney of Mr Chapple, parish clerk, on the opposite side of the road, singularly caught fire but was extinguished without occasioning much damage. Injury was also done to Miss Gould's back premises; and a couple of outhouses belonging to Mr W. Cole, butcher, some distance therefrom, were burnt down. The furniture of persons living in the New-road was removed as the flames approached so near. The fire raged for at least six hours and the bark ricks continued burning for a day or two. An engine was kept in the street until Tuesday and men were employed to watch the premises to that time. the fire insurances offices which suffer are, we understand, the Liverpool and London and Globe, the West of England, the Norwich Union, and County.
Whilst Mr Furse's cottages were burning, soon after the second outbreak, the bystanders were horrified at hearing that a lad of 16 years, named ROBERT MANATON WHITEFIELD, an apprentice to Mr Poole, printer, was dreadfully burnt by the fire. On inquiry, we found that the lad was very actively engaged in raising water at a pump situated in the court, when a tremendous mass of flaming thatch suddenly slid from the roof and enveloped him in flames. The poor fellow ran southerly and managed to get over the railing of the tannery, when he was burning dreadfully and in awful agony. We are told that one of the men put out the fire by the aid of water from one of the pits. The lad was conveyed home and lingered until Saturday last when he died.
The Inquest:- Was held before James Flexman, Esq., the Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Widgery was foreman, on Monday last. The body was viewed and ordered to be interred, but no evidence was taken or verdict given until an investigation is made into the origin of the fire and the Inquest was accordingly adjourned to receive the result.

Thursday 11 July 1867
MARWOOD - An Inquest was opened by John Henry Toller, Esq., at Middle Marwood, on the evening of the 5th instant, upon the body of WILLIAM TUCKER, a farm labourer, 62 years of age, who had died the day before after a very short illness. Owing to rumours prevailing that poison had caused death, it was thought right that the matter should be thoroughly investigated. An examination of the body was made by Mr Fernie, surgeon, of Barnstaple, on the evening of the 5th instant, but as this could not be finished until a late hour, the Inquest was adjourned to the 8th instant. the result, however, of the examination showed that a perforation of that part of the intestine close to the stomach (the duodenum) had taken place in consequence of previous disease, and this had caused violent inflammation of the peritoneum and intestines, which produced a rapidly fatal result. The symptoms attending such rupture of the bowels are so sudden and violent, as to resemble very much those following the action of a dose of poison, and it has not seldom happened that in these cases a suspicion of poison has been aroused in the minds of those witnessing the death after a few hours of an apparently-healthy individual, more particularly as this rupture generally takes place shortly after a full meal. An instance is on record where the body of a person who had died in this manner was exhumed several months after burial for the purpose of examination.

Thursday 25 July 1867
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by J. Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Charles Griffiths was foreman, on the body of JOHN LANE, a Chelsea pensioner, who died suddenly on the previous evening, aged 82. The evidence tended to show that death was occasioned from natural causes, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 1 August 1867
MARWOOD - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JANE TUCKER, an infant, who died after a very brief illness, under circumstances which justified an investigation. The following was the evidence adduced:-
Ann Hancock sworn:- I live at Marwood, and am the wife of Thomas Hancock, of Marwood, labourer. I am in the habit of taking children to dry nurse them. On the first day of June last, I took in the deceased child, JANE TUCKER. She was the child of MARY ELIZABETH TUCKER, of Ilfracombe, a single-woman, and was about four months old. When brought it was very sickly. She was always in the habit of throwing up her meat, and had little gatherings about her, but she gained flesh and strength whilst she was with me. On Thursday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, she was taken sick but did not get worse, and in the morning I brought her down-stairs and dressed her but she was not well. About half-past eleven o'clock, I had occasion to go to Barnstaple, and left the child in charge of my daughter, Susannah Hancock, and told her that if the child was worse to call a neighbour. I then went to Barnstaple and returned about a quarter past six, when I found the child was dead. In addition to the child being sick, she also had loose bowels.
Susannah Hancock sworn:- I live with my father, Thomas Hancock. The child, JANE TUCKER, was placed under the charge of my mother. About half-past eleven o'clock, yesterday morning, my mother having occasion to go to Barnstaple, left the child under my charge. I was to give her wholesome milk and keep her dry. I did so and took care of the child in her absence. At ten minutes after six, I gave her some milk and went to the fire place, and on turning round I saw the child was not sucking. I touched one of the arms and thought it was rather still, and I also touched one of her eyes, and felt it was cold, and I was afraid she was dead. I called a neighbour, named Sarah Curtis, who came back with me and after seeing the child said she was dead. In about ten minutes my mother returned from Barnstaple. I kept the child in the cradle all day after my mother left, but turned her once.
Mr Andrew Fernie sworn:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Barnstaple. I have this day seen the body of a child named JANE TUCKER. It was a tolerably healthy child, and there were no marks about it. I have made a post mortem examination of the body and found a part of the bowels in a state of intususception which causes a complete stoppage and produces vomiting and purging, followed by death. I have examined the stomach which was partly filled with food and in a healthy condition. Verdict:- Died from a stoppage of the bowels.

Thursday 8 August 1867
NORTHMOLTON - Inquest By John Henry Toller, Esq. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by the Deputy County Coroner, at the 'Somerset Inn,' Northmolton, on the body of an infant child named FREDERICK GOVIER, there lying dead. The following evidence was taken:-
MARY ANN GOVIER deposed:- I am the wife of WM. GOVIER, of Northmolton, thatcher. The deceased, FRED. GOVIER, was my child, and about one year and nine months old. On Tuesday evening last, between five and six o'clock, I went out into the yard behind my house to let out my pig. I left the child in the kitchen with his brother, named GEORGE GOVIER, who is nearly four years of age. The deceased was standing by a chair when I went out, and when I returned, which was about five minutes after, the child was standing by the chimney's back burning. I put out the fire, and in doing so burnt my hand very much. I immediately sent for Dr Spicer, of Northmolton. I stayed by the child all the night, but he died on Wednesday morning, about five o'clock.
Robert Henry Scanes Spicer, Esq., deposed:- I live at Northmolton, and am a doctor of medicine. On Tuesday evening last, about six o'clock, as I was coming down the street, at Northmolton, I received a message to attend on the deceased. I did so, and found the child burnt about the lower part of the bowels, the buttocks, the left arm, and the left side of the face. The buttocks were quite charred, and the skin shrivelled up like paper. I dressed the burns immediately; but from their extensive nature there was no possibility of preserving life. I consider the child was taken proper care of. I have known the mother twelve years, and do not know of a more affectionate mother in her station of life. Verdict:- "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident at Newton Abbot. - On Friday last, a boy about two years of age, the son of a packer on the railway, named FORD, was killed through being knocked down by a cart laden with ballast, at Teignrace. The child had strayed a short distance from home, and was standing near a gateway, when a horse and cart belonging to Mr Dunsford, farmer, was being driven through, by a lad who was holding the horse by the head. The boy in charge of the cart shortly after passing the child looked back, and saw it lying in the road, apparently dead. He went back, and found that the child had been knocked down, and had sustained a severe blow in the head. The little fellow was carried home, and Dr Drake sent for. Before he arrived, however, the child died. Mr Bone, the Plymouth district Coroner, in the absence of Mr H. Michelmore, held an Inquest on the body at the 'Union Inn', Teignrace.

Thursday 12 September 1867
Fatal Accident To A Porter On The South Devon Railway. - The excursion traffic of Wednesday on the South Devon Railway, on the occasion of the Totnes races, was attended by an occurrence resulting in the death of one of the officials of the company. On the evening of that day a porter named NORTH employed at Newton, who had been assisting at the Totnes station, was returning by a train which was despatched at 8.55. Shortly after starting NORTH said to others in the carriage with him that he believed a carriage door was open, and he left the carriage while the train was in motion for the purpose of shutting it. When the train arrived at Newton, NORTH could not be found. A telegraphic message was at once despatched to Totnes, requesting that a search should be made on the line as far as Littlehempstone, and Mr Sampson, goods clerk, and a porter at once proceeded up the line, and in Hempstone Wood they found the dead body of NORTH, the back part of his head being fractured. Deceased was placed clear of the lines, and assistance having been procured the body was conveyed to the 'Manor Inn,' Littlehempstead, but the landlord of it, a man named Palk, refused to take it in, and it had consequently to be taken to another inn, a mile distant. Yesterday an Inquest was held on the body before Mr Henry Michelmore, Deputy-Coroner, when evidence having been adduced in accordance with the facts above stated, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - Deceased was a single man, and was 25 years of age.

Thursday 19 September 1867
BRAUNTON - Shocking And Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Braunton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, touching the decease of CHARLES RIDD, miller, who met with his death in the manner described by the following witnesses:-
MRS MARY ANN RIDD deposed:- I live at Braunton, and am a widow. I knew the deceased; he was my brother-in-law, and was twenty-four years of age. I carry on some mills in Braunton called Iron Mills, and the deceased was my journeyman. On Saturday last, he went to Barnstaple station for Mr George Pettle, of Braunton, and returned home about ten at night, quite sober. When he returned I was in the mills, and he said to me, "Why do you let the water run away to the waste?" I told him I had not stopped the mills since he left. He never said another word but went straight up over the stairs, and all at once I heard a sudden jerk of the mill-wheel. I said to a boy, "What is that?"and I went up over the stairs and called upon CHARLES, and hearing no speech I went straight to the window. I had a candle in my hand, which was blown out by the wind. I called out from the window, but there was no speech; and I came down over the stairs and went to the place where the water wheel was, and the first thing I caught hold of was one of the deceased's boots, which I pulled, but found I could do nothing. I sent a boy for assistance, and I was taken into the house.
Mr John Harris deposed: I am bandsman in the first battalion of the 20th Regiment, and am stationed at Plymouth, and am a native of Braunton. I knew the deceased. On Saturday evening last, about twenty minutes after ten, I was in the churchyard at Braunton and heard cries. I went to the spot, which was the Iron Mills. When I came there, I saw CHARLES RIDD betwixt the mill wheel and the trough. He was under water, and I tried to lift him, but could not succeed. When the water was let off, it was found he was jammed between the wheel and the trough, which was the reason I could not lift him; but some more persons having come he was lifted out, when he was found to be quite dead. He was then taken into his house.
Mr John Holland deposed:- I reside at Braunton, and am an innkeeper. Between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday night last, I was in my house, and was told that CHARLES RIDD was under the mill wheel. I ran to the spot, and when I came there I found such was the case. I rendered all the assistance I could, and with the help of others he was taken out quite dead. When I got there he was under water, and the water was pouring over him.
Mr Stephen Orson Lane deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Braunton. Between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday evening last, I was sent for to go to Iron Mills, having been informed that CHARLES RIDD had met with an accident. I accordingly went, and when I got there I found him quite dead. I examined the body and found a few marks and bruises in his face and also on both hands. There were no bones broken. I believe his death was occasioned by being suffocated in the water. The learned Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." We understand that the unfortunate man was to have been married on the Monday following the day on which he came to such an untimely and melancholy death.

PLYMOUTH - Terrible Blasting Accident At Plymouth. - Mr Edmonds, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at the 'Prospect Inn,' Plymouth, concerning the death of RICHARD GOURD, who had been instantaneously killed during a blasting operation that morning at the West Hoe Quarries. About eleven o'clock the deceased, who was foreman of the quarry, attended by a quarryman named Richard Proctor, were engaged in blasting a rock at the quarries near Millbay. In the first operation the rock was only shaken, and a second firing was performed with similar results. A third attempt was then made. It appears that in this work it is found best not to use an ordinary fuse, but a rod is inserted in the side of the hole during tamping, and afterwards withdrawn, the space it occupied being then filled with fine powder, and a short connecting train laid to a quantity of coarse powder, which burns slowly, and which in turn is set fire to by a piece of common touch paper. In the third operation, there not being enough coarse powder at hand, the deceased dispensed with it, and applied the touch paper direct to the top of the fine powder, relying on getting away before the touch paper had burnt so far. In this it appears he made a miscalculation, for when Proctor had, as usual, rung the danger bell, the deceased lit the touch-paper, but had only advanced a step or two from the rock when the charge exploded, hurling the unfortunate man into the air, and he fell on the bottom of the quarry, a distance of 18 feet. Proctor, who was considerably higher up, ran down to his comrade, but found that he was dead, his head having been crushed by a piece of rock. The deceased had been foreman of the quarry for twelve years, and always superintended the blasting. He was greatly esteemed by Mr Milson, the manager, and his fellow workmen. He was forty-eight years of age, and leaves a wife and several children. The Jury, of whom Mr Cornish Eliott was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Shocking Death. - A shocking accident is reported from Torquay. An old woman, 72 years of age, named ELIZABETH LEAMAN, was getting into bed when her clothes were set on fire by a lighted candle placed by the bedside. Her husband, an infirm old man, rendered his best assistance to extinguish the flames, but the poor woman was fearfully burnt. She unlocked the door and went to the top of the stairs, screaming "Fire!" The neighbours flocked in, but too late; the skin and flesh came away from the poor woman in large pieces, and after suffering much agony she died at the Torbay Infirmary, where an Inquest was held on Thursday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

ATHERINGTON - Sudden Death Of A Postman. - On Saturday evening a case of awfully sudden death occurred in this parish. JOHN PARSLEY, aged 64, the postal messenger employed in carrying letters from Atherington to Highbickington, had performed his usual journey and returned to his house fatigued and unwell. He requested his wife to prepare a cup of tea, and said he would go upstairs and recline on the bed till it was ready. Having made ready the frugal meal the poor woman went up to call her husband whom she found on the bed lifeless. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body which resulted in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 October 1867
TORRINGTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' in this town, on Friday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of JOHN WALKEY, who met his death on the previous day, under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Francis Lile, sworn:- I am an engine driver, in the employ of the Rolle Canal Company. I knew the deceased, JOHN WALKEY, he was a mill sawyer, and about 44 years of age. He has worked for the Company about three weeks. I was at work with him yesterday in a shed belonging to the Company. In the shed there was an engine and a saw table. It was about half-past nine o'clock. The deceased was planing. He was standing at the end of the saw table, and I was standing by the engine to put on the steam or take it off. All of a sudden I heard a sound, like the report of a gun, and instantly I saw the deceased drop. I immediately shut off the steam and went to within a few feet of him. I saw blood flowing from his head. I then left him in charge of Joshua Ayre and John Delbridge, whilst I went to call assistance. The engine was worked all the morning before half past nine, and I observed nothing at all irregular in the working of the machinery. The deceased had remarked a few minutes before the accident that the machine was doing its work very well. The wheel was broken into fragments - one piece weighing eight pounds and an ounce was carried thirteen landyards, and two other pieces were picked up by me three landyards off. The engine was not working up to its full power at the time, it being then only worked at 30 lbs. pressure of steam. The engine had been worked at 45 lbs. pressure of steam before breakfast, on the same morning, for the purpose of sawing, but after breakfast, I reduced it to 30 lbs. as the planing did not require so much pressure as the sawing.
James Delbridge sworn:- I live at Wear Gifford, and work as a sawyer for the Rolle Canal Company. I was at work with deceased yesterday morning feeding the planer I was about seven or eight feet behind deceased assisting him. About half-past nine I heard a report, and had just turned round when a piece of the broken wheel fell from the roof of the shed, struck me on the right side, and knocked me on my face and hands. On rising up, I saw the deceased lying on the ground apparently dead. Deceased said to me about three minutes before the accident, "I think we are getting on first-rate with the planing this morning," to which I assented. I had worked with the deceased at Mr Cox's shipbuilding-yard for about twelve months before we came to work for the Canal Company. He had the name of a skilful workman. There was no indication of anything being wrong, everything was going on as comfortable as could possible be.
C. R. Jones, Esq., M.D., deposed:- I was sent for yesterday morning, between nine and ten o'clock. I went immediately down to the shed, where I saw the deceased. He was lying on his back at the place where he fell after receiving the injury, There was a large wound in the forehead, through which the substance of the brain proceeded; there was a considerable haemorrhage from the wound, and a great deal of blood came from the mouth. He breathed, but the breathing was laboured; the pulse was slow, and had but little power. Deceased was removed to a room at the Company's Office. He continued in the same state until just before one o'clock when he died. I remained with him up to the time of his death. The cause of death was "Fracture of the Skull and Laceration of the Brain." The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a widow and two children to mourn his sad and painful death.

Thursday 17 October 1867
BURRINGTON - Shocking Accident. - On Wednesday, the 2nd, THOS. HOLLAND, who has a share in the contract for the parish roads at Burrington, was ripping stones in Elscott Quarry, at a depth of 8 feet, when, in undermining, the upper part fell, completely burying him. Philip Rice and his son were on the spot, but were unable to extricate him by themselves. Mr Robert Cole, Elscott Farm, arrived about twenty minutes after the accident, and with the assistance of Messrs. Robert and James Snell, farmer's sons at Elscott Farm, succeeded in getting him out. They found him lying on his back quite dead. An Inquest was held the following day by John H. Toller, Esq., when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 7 November 1867
NORTHAM - A Child Scalded to Death. - An Inquest was held at Northam on Tuesday (last week), before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM ASHTON CHAPPLE, aged 21 months, the son of JOHN ASHTON CHAPPLE, dairyman, of Northam. On the 7th inst., the deceased accidentally fell into a pan of hot milk, and was severely scalded about the body. He was attended by Dr Pratt, of Appledore, but never rallied, and expired on the previous day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 21 November 1867
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - The passage of holy writ, "In the midst of life we are in death," was strikingly illustrated in this town on Sunday last, in the case of a poor old woman, named GRACE WOTTON, who, not making her appearance, as usual, the neighbours sought the aid of the police, who, on breaking open the door, found the poor creature, in a state of semi-nudity, lying dead underneath a table in her kitchen. An Inquest was held on Monday before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Thomas Chapple was foreman, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned. Deceased was the widow of the late MR ABRAHAM WOTTON, for many years the landlord of the "Devonshire Ox Inn," and had, since her husband's death, about two years ago, lived alone in a small cottage in Thorne's Court. She is believed to be 78 years of age.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - A Fatal and Distressing Accident happened to a labouring man of this parish, named HENRY STAPLEDON. On Thursday last he was working in a quarry near the village, when the deads fell in, completely buying him. He was taken out alive, but within an hour death put an end to his sufferings. On examination it was found that his lower extremities were awfully crushed. He was an honest, sober, industrious, and religious man. He leaves a widow and four small children to mourn their loss. A subscription is about to be made, and donations cannot be better bestowed. An Inquest was held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned; the Jury very liberally gave their fees to the widow.

Thursday 28 November 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Deaths at Barnstaple. - A Tailor named JAMES HEAL, in the employ of Messrs. Avery and Wills, was seized with illness while at work on Saturday night, and expired almost immediately, before medical assistance could be procured. He has left a widow and several children wholly unprovided for. An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:-
Henry Jarvis deposed:- I was well acquainted with the deceased. He was a tailor, in the employ of Messrs. Avery and Wills. I worked in the same shop with him. He was at work with me, as usual, on Saturday last, the 23rd inst. About half-past eight o'clock that evening he left the workshop to receive his wages in the front shop, in Cross-street. He returned within half-an-hour; I was then in the store room, which is under the shop. My wife was with me. The deceased spoke to her as he came in, and asked her how she was. I then heard him going upstairs to the workshop, and immediately afterwards, heard groans. I ran up over the stairs and found him lying on his right side, about halfway up the stairs. His head was resting between the wall and the stairs. I caught him round the waist and held him up for about two minutes, and I then, with the assistance of the men who had opened the shop door and come to the top of the stairs, took him into the work room. We placed him in a sitting position, and I sent for Mr Fernie, the surgeon. I held him in that position until Mr Fernie arrived. Mr Fernie came in about five or six minutes. HEAL was then quite dead. He never spoke after I came to him; I think he groaned once after he was in the room. He was 39 years of age, and had been apparently in good health for some time past. He was crippled in his hips, and was a man of temperate habits.
Andrew Fernie, Esq., deposed:- On Saturday night last, about six o'clock, I was called to the workshop of Messrs. Avery and Wills, in Holland-street. I went immediately, and on arriving there I found the deceased lying partially on his back on the shop floor, near the top of the stairs. He was quite dead. He was pale but not cold. I examined his body, and found no external marks of any kind. He appears to have died without a struggle. There was no blood or froth issuing from his mouth. the pupils of his eyes were natural. From the appearance of his body, I am of opinion that he died from failure of the action of his heart. The Jury returned as their verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God." The Coroner, Surgeon, and Jury gave their fees to the bereaved widow and family of the deceased, who are in a state of great destitution; and a small subscription has just been entered into to meet their present and pressing necessities. The donations of the humane could not be better bestowed.

BARNSTAPLE - Another sudden death occurred in this town yesterday (Wednesday). MR E. M. CHAPPLE, plumber, living in Aze's-lane, was seized with illness while at work, and expired just as he reached his home. This (Thursday) morning an Inquest was held, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, when the following evidence was taken.
ELIZABETH CHAPPLE deposed:- I am a daughter-in-law of the deceased. I reside a few doors from him, and have seen him every day for several weeks past. I saw him on Tuesday last in the forenoon; he complained of a pain in his stomach, and I don't think he went to work that day. He was a plumber. Yesterday, about one o'clock I saw him in his own kitchen sitting before the fire. He appeared to be very ill, and went upstairs to go to bed. I then went home and returned to his house about two o'clock. I then saw him in bed; I asked him if he was better, and he said no. He asked me to go for Mr Cooke, saying he was very ill. I went to Mr Cooke's house and found he was from home. Soon afterwards Mr Cooke came and saw him. After Mr Cooke left I went upstairs with a cup of tea for him; he drank part of it. I went downstairs and immediately heard him making a groaning noise. I ran upstairs to him; I spoke to him, but he did not answer. I called Maria Purchase, who came up, and he died in her arms within three minutes afterwards.
Michael Cooke, Esq., deposed:- I was acquainted with the deceased, and had been attending his wife for the last few days. I saw the deceased on Monday last, and he appeared to be in his usual health. Yesterday afternoon, about four o'clock, I was called into his house as I was passing. I found him in bed; he complained of a pain in his chest. He said he had been taken very ill and faint as he was going to his work that morning, and he had returned home. He described his symptoms, and I then went home to prepare him some medicine. In a few minutes the last witness came and told me he was dead. He was in the same bed I had seen him in about ten minutes before. I cannot state the exact cause of death, but I believe he died suddenly from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 5 December 1867
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - Another instance of the uncertainty of life occurred in this town on Thursday evening last, the particulars of which were given before the Borough Coroner (James Flexman, Esq.) and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Warren was foreman, on Friday evening last, at the Town Hall.
Ann Bridgman deposed that she was the wife of Chas. Bridgman, of this town, wool dealer. The deceased (MR JOHN KINGDON, skin and wool dealer), lived near her house, and occasionally visited it when wool was drying. On Thursday night he was there; those who were present had half a gallon of beer together, but deceased said he could not drink any of it, but sent for half a noggin of gin, and mixed it with about half a pint of water; he did not drink much of it, but gave it to witness's father. He left their house about five or ten minutes to seven, and she lighted him out as it was dark.
William James Webb, on being sworn, said he was at deceased's house, on Thursday evening last, when he came in; it was about seven o'clock. He asked his son, John, how long he had been home. Witness then asked him how he was. He replied, "He was not so well as he could wish." He then lighted a candle and went out at the back door. In about ten minutes after this his son, ABRAHAM KINGDON, went out the same way. He returned, and told his mother a candle was burning in the closet, but he could not see his father. MRS KINGDON and her son, JOHN, immediately ran out, and he very soon afterwards heard JOHN exclaim, "Oh, he's dead!" MRS KINGDON screamed and witness at once fetched the doctor.
ABRAHAM KINGDON, deceased's son, corroborated the last witness's statement.
Mary Cotty, of this town, widow, said she was called at the time in question, and ran to the back premises of deceased's house, where she saw MRS KINGDON crying. She went into the closet. Deceased was in a kneeling posture, his head being against the seat; he was quite dead. Richard Hoskins and two other men carried him upstairs on a chair. There was a scar on his nose, which was occasioned by his falling.
A verdict was given, "That the deceased died by the Visitation of God." MR KINGDON was 44 years of age. [The holding of an Inquest in this case has occasioned considerable talk and condemnation among the inhabitants, many of whom are decidedly of opinion that it ought not to have been held, as MR KINGDON has for a long time been under the treatment of Messrs. Furse, surgeons, and was known to be labouring under a severe case of heart disease. The surgeons some time ago gave it as their opinion that deceased would certainly die very suddenly. Furthermore, no medical man gave evidence at the Inquest.]

Thursday 12 December 1867
EXETER - Horrible Death of a Lunatic. - We have the duty to record a most distressing occurrence which took place at St. Thomas Lunatic Asylum, Exeter, on Thursday, - the death, by suffocation, of MRS JANE CLARKE, an Exeter lady of independent means, who had been an inmate of that institution for a very brief period. The Inquest on the body of the lamented deceased took place on Thursday afternoon, at the Asylum, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Smith was foreman. The following facts were elicited at the Inquiry. It seems that MRS CLARKE, who residing at Mount Radford, was admitted into the Asylum on the 27th ultimo. Under the directions of Dr Eales, the acting-superintendent, she was placed in one of the ordinary wards, as, though very violent at times, she had never made the least attempt to commit suicide. She became unusually excited immediately after her entrance into the room, damaging the walls and chi8mney-piece, and indeed pulling to pieces everything on which she could lay her hand. With a small hairbrush she smashed the windows and doors, made holes in the walls, and such was the extent of the damage, that it was considered expedient to provide a special room for her confinement. A room with boarded walls was accordingly prepared, and she was removed there. The new room was about 12 feet square, and as a protection from fire, there was a large iron guard fixed in front of the grate, from which it extended about two feet. She was placed in the room about six o'clock on Tuesday night, when, in consequence of the severe weather, a little fire was lighted. She received continuous attention from Jane Johns, the head attendant, and up to the time of her being left for the night - half-past ten - she was contented and calm, though a little mischievous. Shortly before retiring to rest she had a glass of ale, but did not partake of any supper. She had been visited at least ten times during the day, and when bid good night at half-past ten she was in apparent good health and perfect security. She lay on a straw mattress, the bed having been removed for safety. The patients and their attendants went to bed as on ordinary occasions, and nothing unusual occurred until half-past five the next (Wednesday) morning, when the occupant of the sleeping apartment immediately above that of MRS CLARKE, discovered that it was full of smoke, and at once raised an alarm of fire. Dr Eales and several attendants were soon on the spot. On examination of the room, smoke was perceived issuing through the crevices of the floor from MRS CLARKE'S apartment. Under the directions of Dr Eales a hatchet was at once procured, and the floor having been broken open water was poured into the room below. Whilst this was going on Dr Eales went downstairs in order to gain access to MRS CLARKE'S room by the door and if possible save the life of the unfortunate woman. On opening the door a shocking sight was presented. MRS CLARKE lay near the door, apparently motionless, the floor and walls were on fire, and the room was filled with a dense volume of smoke. The utmost attention was at once concentrated on MRS CLARKE, who was removed to an adjoining room. She was observed by Dr Eales to breathe, and that was probably her last breath, for, though watched carefully afterwards, there was not the least indication of life. On examination of the body, it was found that her face, arms, backs, and legs had been severely burnt; the burning of the body, however had not been sufficient to cause death - that had evidently resulted from suffocation. A most remarkable circumstance was that she was dressed as on the preceding night, and yet not one single article of her linen was burnt. This seemed to show that the poor sufferer had received the injuries to her body whilst naked. It is difficult to say how she ignited her bedding, but it is supposed that she ripped open the mattress, piled up the straw in the centre of the room, and then managed to get a light from the fire-place. The room on being examined proved to be greatly damaged. In the centre of the floor a hole about three feet in diameter had been burnt by the flames from the bedding - the walls and the door were also burnt. Dr Drake, who was called as one of the witnesses, stated that he had attended MRS CLARKE at her private house; she was at times mischievous and very fond of lighting fires in the house. The evidence showed death had resulted from suffocation, and the Jury, after a full enquiry, brought in a verdict to the effect that deceased (who was 55 years of age) intentionally set fire to a room, thereby causing suffocation.

BEAFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ROBERT WARD, a mason, who lodged with Richard Bird, cordwainer. The deceased partook of supper on the previous Saturday night, when he appeared to be in his usual health. Shortly afterwards he complained of shortness of breath and great pain in his chest, and soon became speechless. He died within an hour of the attack. Dr Risdon, of Dolton, examined the body and was of opinion death was occasioned by disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 19 December 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Death of an Infant Under Mysterious Circumstances. - On Thursday evening an Inquest was opened at the 'Unicorn Inn,' Pilton, Barnstaple, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, upon the body of a female infant, daughter of SARAH DUNNING, of Pilton, single woman, who died suddenly on the previous night. The mother deposed that the child was born on the 21st of November. It took the breast well, but did not appear very healthy, and had a bad eye, which grew much worse on Tuesday, and discharged a great deal of matter. In the afternoon she obtained an order for the parish surgeon; but afterwards, having bathed the eye, and believing it to be better, did not send the order. The child ate but little on Tuesday, and was sick several times. She went to bed about eleven, and when she awoke about half-past seven the next morning, found the child dead in her arms. Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, of Barnstaple, deposed that death, in his opinion, was caused by suffocation, and that the child might have been overlaid. There are no marks of violence on the body. A post mortem examination was deemed necessary, and an adjournment, therefore, took place.

Thursday 26 December 1867
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - A workman named JOHN GREENAWAY, employed at brickfield on Polsloe Road, near Exeter, was crushed to death on Saturday morning by the falling of several tons of bricks. Mr Grinfield-Coxwell, surgeon, Heavitree, was immediately called in, and hopes were entertained that life was not extinct. Mr Grinfield-Coxwell did all that was possible to surgical skill to restore animation, assisted by Mr Follett Laidman, who came in afterwards, but both the medical gentlemen agreed that death had ensued almost immediately upon the accident. The unfortunate man leaves a widow and nine children unprovided for.

PLYMOUTH - A Woman Burnt to Death at Plymouth. - On Saturday morning,, at 2 a.m., an alarm of fire was raised at 4, Hick-a-lane, Looe-street, Plymouth. A woman named SUSAN FOWLER, 81 years of age, who resided in a small room in the house, caught her clothes on fire and thus set fire to the room. Assistance was promptly rendered and the fire extinguished, but not until the old woman was very severely burnt. She was immediately taken by the police to the South Devon Hospital, where every attention was paid to her, but she sank under the shock, and died during the day. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

YARNSCOMBE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held, on Saturday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JANE DAVY, a single woman, aged 67, who expired suddenly on the previous Tuesday. Dr. C. R. Jones, of Great Torrington, was of opinion that death was occasioned by apoplexy or natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 2 January 1868
BIDEFORD - Fatal Gun Accident. - The boy, GEORGE PADDON, thirteen years of age, an accident to whom has already been reported, died on Friday. He was out with some other little boys shooting birds on Thursday, and while pushing a stick down the barrel of the gun, a charge of powder being in it and a cap on the nipple, it went off, the stick passing into his groin and coming out at his shoulder. An Inquest was held on Saturday night, before Mr T. L. Pridham, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. Several of the Jury and also the Coroner, observed that little boys such as the deceased ought not to be allowed to carry guns, which is a common practice in Bideford.

Thursday 16 January 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening last, by I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the house of Mr G. H. Pugsley, at Newport, touching the death of MRS MARY JONES, wife of MR WILLIAM JONES, ship-carpenter, there lying dead. The following was the evidence adduced:-
George Heanes Pugsley deposed:- The deceased has been in attendance as a nurse on my wife, who has lately been confined, about ten weeks. She was a strong, active person, about sixty years of age, and has apparently been in good and perfect health during the time she has been at my house. This morning, about half-past eight o'clock, she came into my bed-room, where I was in bed with my wife, and asked if I would like to have a cup of tea. I said "Yes;" and she went downstairs. She returned in a few minutes with two cups of tea on a tray, which she gave to my wife and myself. After some conversation, she took the baby from my wife, and was walking round the bed; when she reached the foot of the bed I saw her stagger and gradually fall down on the floor. I jumped out of bed, took the child from her, and attempted to give her some brandy. I think she swallowed a little. I called up the maid-servant, and went for Mr Gamble, the surgeon. Mr Gamble came at once, and saw the deceased; he told me she was dead.
Charles H. Gamble, Esq., surgeon, of Barnstaple, deposed:- This morning, shortly after nine o'clock, I was called by the last witness to his house, at Rumsam. I found the deceased lying on a bed upstairs, partly undressed. I examined her body. Found no marks of any external injury or violence. The countenance was composed, but rather pallid. The pupils of the eyes were slight dilated. She appeared to have been dead about half an hour. I think her death was caused by syncope, produced, probably, by a rupture of a vessel at the base of the brain. Verdict:- "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

Thursday 30 January 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'London Inn,' Litchdon-street, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of MRS MARY JANE STEVENS, there lying dead. The evidence taken was as follows:-
Mary Jones deposed:- I reside next door to the deceased. I used to see her every day, and go errands for her. She had been apparently in good health until Wednesday last, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, when she said something had taken her in her side and all over her head. She sent me for Mr Cooke, surgeon. He came to her directly, and I afterwards had some medicine of him for her. She took the physic, according to his directions. I remained with her until her husband came home, and then I left. I saw her again the next morning, about seven o'clock, when she was in bed. She said she was very ill. I gave her two cups of team, and remained with her until the afternoon. Mr Cooke saw her about four o'clock. About seven o'clock she got out of bed and undressed herself. She had gone to bed the night before with her clothes on. Her husband came upstairs whilst she was doing so. She sat down on the night-box, and immediately gave a loud scream. She fell forward on her face and hands. MR STEVENS sent me to the neighbours for assistance. When I returned her husband was holding her up. She was quite dead. Her body was then placed on the bed. I went directly for Mr Cooke, but he was not at home. I then went to Mr Johnston's (surgeon), and he returned with me and saw the deceased.
Michael Cooke, Esq., surgeon deposed:- I have known the deceased for several years. I attended her professionally last summer; she was suffering from indigestion and palpation of the heart. I attended her for a few weeks, and she got better. On Wednesday afternoon last I was sent for, and found her in a room downstairs; she said she had been suddenly seized with a very severe pain in the back of her neck., She seemed to have had a great deal of pain in her neck and shoulders. I gave her some medicine, and told her to go to bed. I saw her again the following afternoon; she was then in bed, but not undressed. She still complained of pain in her head and neck. I again examined her, but found no appearance there of disease. I told her to undress herself. I also told the last witness (Mary Jones) to come down for more medicine in the evening. I did not see deceased alive afterwards. From the evidence I have now heard of her sudden death, and from the symptoms she complained of to me, I think she had disease of the vertebrae of the neck, and that there was a rupture of a ligament, causing pressure on the spinal bone, and so producing immediate death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 6 February 1868
CHULMLEIGH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Bendley Cottage, Chulmleigh, before John Henry Toller, Esq., (Coroner), and a respectable Jury, of which Mr J. Nott was foreman, on the body of WILLIAM CARTER, aged 63 years, blacksmith. JAMES CARTER, son of the deceased, stated that on Friday, the 24th ultimo, deceased was at work in his shop. The gun now produced was there to be repaired; it was loaded at the time, of which his father was not aware, deceased having accidentally thrown it down, when it exploded, and the contents were lodged in the fleshy part of his right arm. He died on the 30th ultimo. Dr Ford, of Chulmleigh, stated that on the 24th of January he visited deceased when he found a gun wound in the right arm. Every means were used in order to restore deceased, but without success; and he died on the 30th ult., as before stated. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

BRAUNTON - Accident By Fire. - Yesterday intelligence was brought to the Relieving Officer, resident here, that a child aged 8 years, the daughter of a poor labouring man called GEORGE WINSOR living in a cottage in the midst of a wood called North Wood in the parish of Morthoe had been burnt to death. It appears by the statement of the father that his wife had gone to the mill and the grandmother, who lives with them had gone to Braunton leaving the deceased in charge of two younger children, with the usual caution to be careful of the fire which caution seems to have been disregarded; for on the Grandmother returning home through the wood she met the two youngest children crying and told her that MARY was home burning. This sad news proved too true for she was found burnt almost to a scroll quite dead. As no person was living near, there could be no assistance rendered and the wonder is the other two had not shared the same fate. An Inquest will be held today.

Thursday 13 February 1868
GEORGEHAM - Shocking Death. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH WINSOR. MARY WINSOR said she lived at Georgeham, and was a widow. The deceased was her grandchild, and about eight years of age. On the previous morning, about nine o'clock, she left home to go to Braunton for some food, and returned about one o'clock. When she went away she left in the house her son's three children, named ELIZABETH, HANNAH, and THIRZA, aged respectively eight, five and two-and-a-half years. On her returning home HANNAH and THIRZA were outside the house, and they told her that ELIZABETH was burnt. She went into the house and saw the deceased under the table, she was then burning, and witness took up some water and threw on the blaze, but she was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 26 March 1868
MORTHOE - The Wreck of the "Sea Bird," of Truro, Off Ilfracombe. - Inquests were held at Morthoe, on Monday, on the bodies of WILLIAM TOM, the captain of the schooner Sea Bird, which was wrecked off Ilfracombe, on the 4th instant, and of a sailor, name unknown. The bodies were picked up on the previous Saturday by John Yeo, a labourer of Morthoe. Mr J. P. Brown, the owner of the vessel, had identified the body of the captain. The other body, which was not identified, was dressed in a white slop, Guernsey shirt, two dark flannel shirts inside, and a pair of cloth trousers. On his right arm were the letters "E. A. H.", and in his pockets were a comb and a knife. On the handle of the latter was written "J, Corce." The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Thursday 2 April 1868
HARTLAND - Shocking And Fatal Accident. - On Saturday an accident of a sad and painful nature happened to a little boy named GEORGE JEWEL, son of SAMUEL JEWEL, of Hartland Quay. It appeared that the little fellow, who was between two and three years of age, was out at play and got to the edge of the cliffs and fell over to the depth of 27 feet, and fractured his skull. The mother of the child, hearing the screams of the other children, ran out to ascertain the cause of it, and to her horror saw her child lying at the bottom of the cliffs. Without a moment's consideration, she commenced descending the dangerous and treacherous rocks until her course was obstructed by their precipitous nature, and she was unable to go forward to the help of her child or to retrace her steps, and she had to remain in that dangerous predicament until help came. With difficulty the mother and child were taken up; the latter, however, singular to say, was not quite dead, notwithstanding the great height from which it fell, but died about three hours after. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the 'Hartland Quay Inn,' when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

CHULMLEIGH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM JOSLIN, a labourer, 62 years of age, who committed suicide on the previous Saturday by hanging himself in a linhay. From the evidence of the wife, it appeared the deceased had been unhappy for some years, always fancying that he was haunted by some evil-disposed person. The verdict of the Jury was that the deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 9 April 1868
BUCKLAND BREWER - Supposed Infanticide. - Some considerable excitement, was caused in the village of Buckland Brewer on Saturday, by a rumour, that a child had been murder by its mother, but how far the facts will justify, the rumour is a matter now of Inquiry. On Thursday, JANE SQUIRE, a servant girl in the employ of Miss Heal, Buda Farm, was delivered of a female illegitimate child, and on Saturday, the child died without any sign of illness. On Monday, Dr. J. Thompson, of Bideford, made a post-mortem examination of the body and found the child did not die of natural disease, but in all probability of suffocation. He could not say if the suffocation had been accidental or intentional. Mrs Judd, at whose house the woman had been confined, stated at the Inquest held on Tuesday, at Bilsford, before J. Toller, Esq., that on Saturday evening, she left the mother and child apparently well, and went to Buckland Village, and stayed about an hour and a-half, when she returned, the mother told her the child was dead, at which Mrs Judd became frightened, and cried. The mother said, What is the use of crying about the child, as it is dead? After this, she added that she went to bed with the child, and supposed it went under the clothes, and got suffocated when she was asleep. The Jury considered the case and recommended an adjournment for further evidence until Monday, at Buckland village, at noon. The Coroner made an order to bury the body.

Thursday 16 April 1868
BUCKLAND BREWER - The Supposed Child Murder. - An adjourned Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Coach and Horses Inn,' Buckland Brewer, before Mr J. Toller, to inquire into the cause of the death of the illegitimate female child of JANE SQUIRE, domestic servant in the employ of Miss Heal, Buda Farm, who met with its death under suspicious circumstances. There was no material additional evidence adduced beyond the facts already published. The medical evidence being to the effect that there was no natural disease, but death was probably the result of suffocation; and the testimony of Mrs Judd that during her absence of an hour and a half, the child being well when she left home, it died during that time, and the suspicious statement of the mother that "it was no good to cry now, the child was dead, and she supposed it got under the bedclothes, and got stifled." - The Jury returned an open verdict that the child died of Suffocation, but there was no evidence how such took place.

Thursday 30 April 1868
APPLEDORE - Sudden Death Of An Ilfracombe Pilot. - An Inquest was held at Appledore, on Saturday, before the Deputy Coroner, touching the death of THOMAS WILLIAMS, aged 55, a well-known pilot of the port of Ilfracombe. It appeared that about seven o'clock on the previous morning the trawl Wave, left Ilfracombe for Barnstaple Bay, the deceased and a man named Irwin being on board. On arriving at the Bay and being about six miles off the land, the deceased complained of illness, and lay down on the deck for three quarters of an hour, when he returned to his duty at the helm. While Irwin was attending the sails the deceased fell into the cockpit. The trawl was immediately brought up to Appledore, and medical assistance obtained, but the deceased was found to have been dead some time. The Jury, after hearing the medical evidence, returned a verdict that death was occasioned by Disease of the Heart.

Thursday 7 May 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning At Barnstaple. - SAMUEL BAKER, a lad 14 years of age, living at Hardaway Head, and apprenticed to Messrs. Rottenberry and Son, tailors, &c., was drowned on Sunday, about four o'clock p.m., whilst bathing with other boys under Anchor-wood. The river was dragged and the body recovered about an hour afterwards by Mr John Stribling, junior, and conveyed to the 'White Lion Inn,' where an Inquest was held, on Monday. The following evidence was adduced:-
Samuel Coates, of Barnstaple, apprentice to Mr Rd. Lancey, plumber, deposed:- Yesterday afternoon I went with a boy, called William Westacott, down to the railway by Anchor Wood. We went as far as the first cattle arch below the bank. I there saw the deceased and his brother with two other boys, named Reed and Fisher. Five of us undressed and went into the water, viz., Reed, deceased, his brother, Perkins, and myself: the tide was up close to the railway. I saw the deceased walk into the water, and I said to him, "Don't go out too far or you'll be out of your depth." I had no sooner said this than I saw the deceased washed down by the tide. I went to him and caught him by the hair of his head, and endeavoured to pull him in. We struggled together, and he caught me round the neck when we both went under. I freed myself from him and caught him by the hair again, when he laid hold of my legs and we both went under the second time. After some time I let him go, and he sank, for I was unable to hold him any longer, being out of breath. I remained by the river for an hour afterwards, and saw several boats come down, and the men in them searched for the body of the deceased, but had not found it when I left. John Stribling, of Barnstaple, sailor, deposed:- Yesterday afternoon, between four and five o'clock, I was in the North Walk and heard that a boy was drowned by the railway. I procured a pair of grapnels and went in a boat with my brother and cousin to the railway. After searching for about an hour I saw deceased at the bottom of the river, in the deep channel near the railway. I got the body up into our boat, and brought it to this house. Verdict:- "Accidentally Drowned whilst bathing." The Jury commended the courage and nerve shewn by the witness, Samuel Coates, in endeavouring to save the deceased.

Thursday 14 May 1868
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held, on Saturday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of RICHARD WEBBER, a thatcher, aged 76. A few days since the deceased was proceeding to Mr Darch's, a farmer, and on getting over a gate he slipped his foot and fell on his head, thereby sustaining a fracture of the spine, which caused death some days afterwards. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 4 June 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Burning - Inquest At The North Devon Infirmary. - An Inquest was held before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on Tuesday, at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, touching the death of ANN DANIEL, a child about two years and a half old, the daughter of CHARLES DANIEL, labourer, of Ashford. The following evidence was taken:-
THIRZA DANIEL deposed:- I live at Ashford and am the wife of CHARLES DANIEL, labourer. The deceased is my daughter; she is two years and eight months old. This day three weeks (May 12), she left my house with her elder sister, MARY, who is four years and five months old, and went up on the hill above my house to play with other children. It was about two o'clock when the children left me. About four o'clock, George Corney, who lives near my house, brought the child to me. It was very severely burnt; its right leg and arm, and forehead had very extensive burns on them. I sent immediately for Dr. Lane, of Braunton, who arrived within three quarters of an hour afterwards, and attended to the child; he continued to do so until Friday last, the 28th of May, when it was taken to the North Devon Infirmary. The burns did not heal and appeared to get gradually worse. I am not aware that the children had any lucifer matches on the day the deceased was burnt; they had none when they left my house.
George Corney deposed:- I am a carpenter, and live at Ashford. On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 12th of May last, about four o'clock, I was working in my shop in the village of Ashford, when I heard the screams of a woman in the direction of John Clement's house which is about ten yards from mine. I went towards the sounds and I saw smoke coming from the door of Clement's pigs' house, and a quantity of straw on fire. The deceased was lying on the straw in the midst of the flames; she was not moving and appeared to be suffocated. I took her out in my arms and she was given to her mother soon afterwards. The pigs' house is about 20 yards from the house of the child's parents. The child was very severely burnt in various parts of the body.
Mr James W. Cooke, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased child was brought to this institution on the afternoon of Friday, the 29th of May last. I examined the child; it appeared to be dying from exhaustion caused by some very extensive burns on different parts of its body, which appeared to have been caused about a fortnight previously. I attended to the child until its death, which took place on Sunday afternoon. It never rallied after it came here. Its death was caused by the injuries it had sustained from the burns. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

HIGH BICKINGTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held in the 'Golden Lion Inn', on Monday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ROBERT NEWMAN, a labourer, 78 years of age. The deceased had been poorly for several days, and complained of pain in his chest, but would not allow a medical man to be called in. On Friday night he became worse, and, while a messenger was on his way to fetch the doctor, the deceased expired. Dr Charles R. Jones, of Torrington, was of opinion, death was caused by disease f the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

WESTLEIGH - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of CHARLES DYER, five years of age, the son of WM. DYER, shoemaker. Mr Fred. Lee, blacksmith, stated that on the previous day a little boy named Saunders came to him and said there was some one in the well. He immediately ran down to the well which was full of water, and found the deceased in it with his head upwards. He pulled him out but there was not the slightest symptoms of life. The well is an open one, and the water generally on a level with the ground and overflowing, therefore, liable to accidents, although within the memory of the oldest inhabitant of the parish, no accident has ever occurred there before. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

HARTLAND - Sudden Death Of A Clergyman. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of the REV., THOMAS BROOKS, about sixty-three years of age. Mr Lewis Lane, a farmer, of Hartland, stated that the deceased, who came from Hackney, near London, had lodged with him. He brought by a Mr Thomas Barrett, of Hackney, who told witness that he wanted to get him away from his friends into a quiet place, and that he was subject to epileptic fits. On Monday night deceased went to bed apparently in good health, but not getting up at his usual hour in the morning, and making no answer to knocks at his bedroom door, which was locked, an entrance was obtained, and deceased was found lying upon his right side, and quite dead. Mr W. Vine, surgeon, said there were no marks of violence on the body, and he believed death resulted from natural causes. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 11 June 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning At Barnstaple. - On Thursday a boy named WREY, about three years of age, the son of a labourer, working at Mr Thomas Brannam's pottery, in the absence of his parents at the Races, was drowned in Chanter's Green. The child was rescued in almost a lifeless condition, and carried to the North Devon Infirmary, where he died about ten minutes afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday morning, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, when the following evidence was taken:-
James Comer, of Barnstaple, deposed as follows:- Yesterday, about twelve o'clock, I went to Chanter's Green, in this borough, with four little children, the deceased being one of them; its parents having left him with another child of theirs aged four years, in my charge, they having gone to the races. I sat down on the grass near the entrance on the Barnstaple side; the children, all four of them, were playing round me for about an hour. I then missed the deceased; it had been away from me about a quarter of an hour. I went to look for it in the direction of the ornamental water. When I reached the water, I saw a young man take the body of deceased out of the water and give it to James Benham, who went as fast as he could with it towards the Infirmary. When we were just outside the Infirmary I took it from him and carried it into the hospital, where the nurses took charge it. I thought I felt it move once whilst I was carrying it;, it was insensible, and I believe it was dead before I reached the Hospital. There were a great many children in the Green at the time.
James Benham, of Barnstaple, deposed: Yesterday afternoon, between one and two o'clock, I was sitting on one of the seats in Chanter's Green. A young woman ran up to me and said a child was drowning. I went immediately to the ornamental water, and I there saw the body of a child in the water; it was not struggling, it was close to the wall near the timber yard. A young man passed me and took the child out and handed it to me. The witness, James Comer, just then came up to me, and we took the child as fast as we could to the Infirmary. I think the child struggled once whilst I was carrying it. There was about two feet of water where the child was.
Charles H. Gamble, Esq., surgeon, deposed: About a quarter past two o'clock yesterday afternoon, I was called to the Infirmary. I saw the body of the deceased in the lower Ward. I examined it; it was quite dead, and appeared to have been dead at least half-an-hour. My assistant, Mr Shapland, was with the body when I arrived. He informed me that he had used the usual means for producing respiration. The child's death was caused, in my opinion, by suffocation from drowning. Verdict "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 18 June 1868
EXETER - A Fatal Fall occurred on Friday at Whipton, Between six and seven o'clock in the evening JAMES HOARE, labourer, was loading hay in a field in the occupancy of Mr Morgan, dairyman. He was upon a load of the hay, when he accidentally fell off, and a bundle of the hay fell upon him. Mr Morgan, who witnessed the accident, directed HOARE to be removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. During the loading of the hay the horse was perfectly still. At the Hospital, Dr Huxley, the house surgeon, found the patient insensible and the suffering acutely - he was past recovery, having fractured the spine; he died at four o'clock on the following morning. Deceased has left a wife and three children. An Inquest on the body took place at the 'Valiant Soldier,' on Saturday afternoon, before Mr Coroner Hooper; Mr Lawes was foreman of the Jury, who brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was aged 32; it was added that at the time of the accident he was perfectly sober - he was subject to fits.

ASHBURTON - Melancholy Death at Ashburton. - For several years past a MRS WOOD has carried on the general grocery business at East-street, Ashburton, and from the fact that the shop she occupied was her own property, it was generally considered that her circumstances were favourable. In spite, however, of this, she seems to have been in a desponding state for some time past. On Sunday afternoon, soon after three o'clock, she entered the apartments of a neighbour named Westaway, saying she was too late for church and should, therefore, go for a walk; and left the key of her house with her, and departed. She did not return. The following morning the police were communicated with and diligent search was at once instituted. The fact of her being missed quickly spread abroad, and it soon became known that a Miss Abbot, who has relatives living at Dean Prior, saw her pass through that village about six o'clock on Sunday evening. On Tuesday morning, news was received at Ashburton that her lifeless remains had been found the previous day in a small rivulet near Ford Cottages, about two miles from Plympton. She was lying in the water face downwards, and so shallow was it (only about two feet deep) that some parts of her under clothing were not wet. For some time past the poor woman has been on very familiar terms with a Miss Bennett, of Ashburton, and on Friday evening last report says that she entrusted her with a confidential statement, adding that if anything happened to her shortly she would not forget it. The deceased, who is over 60 years of age, has a son living in America, and a husband in some part of England, who has not lived with her for years. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Found Dead" returned.

TORRINGTON - Death of a Prisoner. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning at the County Gaol, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a prisoner named JOSEPH QUICKE, 71 years of age. The deceased was received at the prison on the 8th of April, having been sentenced to two months' imprisonment for absconding from the Torrington Union workhouse and carrying with him the union clothes. His term expired on June 6th, but he was too ill to leave. He lingered till the 12th, when he expired. The medical evidence was to the effect that the deceased died from senile decay. He was taken on his admission to the infirmary, put on extra diet, and every attention paid him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

MORTHOE - Melancholy Suicide. - On Sunday last, MR RICHARD HARDING, of Shaftesborough, in the parish of Morthoe, committed suicide by shooting himself. His wife attended Divine service in the morning, and dined with her husband on her return home. Shortly afterwards he left the house, and the report of a gun was heard, and in an adjoining barn the deceased was found dead, with a gun by his side. The deceased, who leaves a widow and four children, was highly respected. He had been for some time in a low and desponding state of mind. The Inquest on the body was held at Chaceborough, on Tuesday, before the Deputy Coroner, Mr Toller, when the following evidence was taken:-
CHARLOTTE HARDING said:- I reside in the parish of Morthoe, and am widow of the late RICHARD HARDING, of Morthoe, farmer. He was about 38 years of age, and subject to epileptic fits. About two months since he had one, since which he has not been well in his mind - sometimes low in his spirits, and sometimes the other way. On Saturday morning last, fearing he might have another fit, I sent my servant into the fields to look after him. He sometimes would say, "I am as mazed as an old sheep." On Sunday morning I went to church. Between one and two o'clock he had his dinner, and afterwards sat in the window seat with a book in his hand, and I sat in a chair, being tired, dozing. About three o'clock I heard the report of a gun, and I sprang up and looked up at two crooks where the gun was kept, and found it was gone. I rushed out to the barn. The door was shut. I opened it and found deceased lying upon the floor upon his back, with the gun by his side. I put my hand to his head, and found he was quite dead. A quantity of blood was coming from his head. I rushed to farmer Snow's and told him of it. I had not liked deceased's looks for some time past.
William Snow:- I reside at Morthoe, and am a farmer. I knew the deceased. On Sunday afternoon last, about three o'clock, MRS HARDING rushed up to my house and said her husband had shot himself in the barn. I went right down, and found him lying upon his back in the barn quite dead. The gun was by his side. There was a great quantity of blood upon the floor. I went off to Ilfracombe for a doctor, who immediately came, and the deceased was removed from the barn to his dwelling house. I met him out upon the hill last Sunday week, and I thought his manner and conversation strange, so much so that I mentioned it to my wife on my return home.
Richard Angel:- I am a first-class constable in the Devon County Constabulary. On Sunday afternoon last I received notice from Mr W. Snow of the death of MR RICHARD HARDING, of Morthoe. I went there, accompanied by Mr Snow and Mr F. Gardner, of Ilfracombe, surgeon. When we got there, we were shown a barn, and found the deceased lying upon the floor upon his back with a gun lying by his left side. His hat was upon the floor, and I picked it up and found a hole driven from the back part of it. I now produce the hat.
Frederick Gardner, surgeon, Ilfracombe:- On Sunday afternoon last, about four o'clock, I received notice of the death of MR RICHARD HARDING, of Morthoe I immediately went to the house, accompanied by Mr Wm. Snow and the policeman. When we got there we were shown to the barn. I found the deceased lying upon his back with a gun lying upon his left side, and a quantity of blood upon the floor, which had evidently flowed from a wound on the back part of his head. I found another wound at the back of the mouth through which the charge had entered, passing through the brain and communicating with the wound already mentioned. The muzzle of the gun had evidently been placed in the mouth and the discharge occasioned the death of the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - As MR JOHN COCKRAM, of Woodland Farm, West Anstey, was returning home from this town, on Saturday last, he was accidentally killed through the upsetting of the vehicle in which he was seated. An Inquest was held on Monday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:-
GEORGE COCKRAM, on being sworn said:- I live at West Anstey and am a son of JOHN COCKRAM, late of West Anstey, yeoman, deceased. On Saturday last, my father and myself went to Southmolton market in a spring trap with two wheels. We remained at Southmolton until about nine o'clock, when we left to return. He was a little tipsy but not very much. When we came to Yeo Mills, he had two glasses of beer, after which we proceeded onwards, my father driving. My father trotted down over the hill to Town Farm Corner, and on going round the corner, the right wheel of the trap went up over the hedge, and my father and myself were thrown to the ground. I was insensible. I found myself at Mr Maunder's, at Town Farm, but how I got there I do not know. My father was about 48 years of age.
John Maunder, farmer, said;- The deceased was a neighbour of mine. At two o'clock yesterday morning, whilst I was in bed, I heard someone calling outside. I went to the window and asked what was the matter when the last witness told me his father's trap was turned up in the road. I dressed as quick as possible and went to the spot, and found MR COCKRAM lying on his face across the road. The trap was just by his feet turned upon one wheel. I took him by the right arm and lifted him a little bit and called to him, but he did not answer. I put down my ear to hear whether he breathed, but found he was quite dead. My man came, and I left him in the charge. I went to deceased's residence and gave an alarm, and I returned to the spot with Wm. Lovering and lifted the deceased up and found a blow on his left eye. He was looking rather dark. Some blood was coming from his nose.
John Crocombe said:- I am a gamekeeper. At ten o'clock yesterday morning, hearing of the accident, I went to Town Farm where it had happened, and found a small stone and piece of stick, which I now produce, covered with blood. There was a mark of blood on the grass in which the stone and stick were lying.
Ann Purchase said:- I am the wife of John Purchase of West Anstey, shoemaker. I knew the deceased. I was present yesterday morning when Mr Collyns, surgeon, of Dulverton, saw him. He examined him and said the injuries he had received were sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 25 June 1868
ILFRACOMBE - Death From Excessive Drinking. - An Inquest was held, on Friday, at the 'George and Dragon,' before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of EDWARD LEWIS, a cooper, 54 years of age. The deceased had been lodging at the inn and was found dead in a room there, on Wednesday, on his knees, his head resting on a chair. He complained of illness on the previous day, but refused to have medical assistance. - The innkeeper's wife stated that the deceased was not intoxicated on that or the previous day. Mr E. Vye, surgeon, considered the cause of death was apoplexy. P.C. Kemble said the deceased was of intemperate habits, and he had frequently seen him tipsy, and rambling about the streets of Ilfracombe. The Jury's verdict was "Death from Apoplexy, induced by excessive drinking."

Thursday 2 July 1868
BISHOP'S TAWTON- Fatal Accident At Bishop's Tawton. - ELLEN DARCH, two years of age, daughter of MR RICHARD DARCH, miller, of Whitemoor Mills, fell into the water at the mill a few days since and was drowned. At the Inquest held on the body before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident on the River Taw. - On Thursday evening last, the public sensibility was greatly excited by a rumour that a boat full of men and boys had been accidentally thrown into the river and that tow of the number - railway porters, named respectively GEORGE CANN and JOHN OATWAY - had been drowned in the gurgling tide. The rumour, unfortunately, proved too true; the two men above-named were, by the sad event, suddenly deprived of life, their wives rendered widows and their children orphans The facts were disclosed in the following evidence taken before a Coroner's Inquest held on Friday evening, at the 'Exeter Inn,' Litchdon-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, composed as follows:- Mr John Inch Knill, foreman, Messrs. Richard Farleigh, Wm. Rowe, Jas. Baker, Joseph C. Nosworthy, Richard Lancey, William Curtis, William Trawin, Thos. Raker, William Chanter, George Davolls, and T. Gayton.
Mr Finch, solicitor, appeared on the part of the bereaved families, and Mr W. H. Toller represented Capt. Tamplyn. The Jury having been sworn the Coroner briefly addressed them, pointing out their duty to inquire into all the circumstances connected with the melancholy event - to see if it was the result of malfeasance or negligence. The river was the Queen's highway, and should be kept free from all obstruction, and they should inquire whether that was the case when this accident occurred; also, whether, any persons could have rendered assistance to the unfortunate men and neglected to do so.
Coroner and Jury then proceeded to view the bodies, which were lying at the late residences of the deceased, in Litchdon-street and Lower Maudlyn-street. On their return the following witnesses were examined.
James Mills sworn:- I am a porter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway, and reside at Derby. I left work last evening at half-past eight, and came into town, with seven other porters. Stopped at the end of the bridge, and agreed to go up the river in a boat: myself, JOHN OATWAY, , John White, George Boucher and GEORGE CANN - give in all. We got a boat at Castle Quay and, with two lads, we got in and put off. The tide was flowing strongly and we went toward the Bridge. We had two oars, myself and OATWAY were pulling and a lad belonging to the boat was steering. We kept on the town side of the river. Heard some one call out to us to mind the rope - a warp from a vessel, near the Baths. Immediately the rope caught the boat on the top gun-whale. The rope was moored out in the river from Mr Bartlett's coal yard. We tried to free the boat, it capsized, and we were all thrown out in the river. I caught hold of the boat as she was righting and got in again, with one of the lads. I saw Boucher in the water near to the boat and put out a oar to him, of which he took hold and saved himself. I saw OATWAY holding on to the warp from the vessel; the water was up to his middle. I did not see either of the other men. A boat came alongside and we got in and were landed at the slip in the New Road. When we got the other side of the Bridge and before we landed we took in another - a man named Scamp. Mr Samuel Channon divested himself of his jacket and waistcoat and jumped overboard and seized him round the waist; he kept him up till we could get him into the boat. I then went home. The sole cause of the capsize was the warp from the vessel.
By Mr Ffinch:- Before I went to the railway I had been to sea two years. I was, therefore, acquainted with the management of a boat. When we came into contact with the warp, the deceased OATWAY was on the Fremington side f the river. I saw no one on board of the vessel and got no assistance from any one on board. The warp was fastened to something in the river - it was fixed. We all caught hold of the rope to try to pass it over our heads. The whole occurrence was within a minute. If the rope had not been there, the accident could not have happened. The rope was the sole cause of the accident.
By Mr W. H. Toller:- the boat drifted after she left Castle Quay. We had not proper control of the boat. I did not see the rope till we got close upon it.
George Boucher sworn:- I am a porter on the railway and went with the last witness and five others on board a boat at Castle Quay. I was never in a boat before. A rope from a vessel lying off Mr Bartlett's yard caught the boat on the top the water rushed under it and capsized the boat. I was thrown into the river on my head. I was rescued by Mills, after sinking twice. Another boat was near, and Mr Lemon jumped therefrom into the water and rescued White, who was hanging on to the rope. OATWAY and Mills managed our boat.
James Hain sworn:- I am in the 14th year of my age, and live in Barnstaple. The porters came down and OATWAY asked me if I could steer. I said I could, and went on board. There was a rope across the river and Scamp said, "Now we are into it." We immediately came into contact. I was not thrown out but all the rest were. Mills and Boucher were got in; and afterward Mr Channon rescued Scamp. We did not get the boat straight till we were upset.
By Mr Ffinch:- The boat was Stribling's. I work at the lace factory, but understand the way to steer the boat. If the men had been steady and had kept inside, near the vessel, they might have gone clear. The rope was fixed from the vessel to something in the river I saw no one on board the vessel, and got no assistance from it.
By Mr Toller:- I could see that the rope was fastened on board the vessel. I have had much experience as coxswain of a boat. If the rope had not been there the accident could not have occurred. The boat capsized toward the rope.
Mr T. Blanchard, Superintendent of Police, sworn:- I was on the Quay last night, after the accident. I saw one man hanging to the rope, and saw him saved. The rope was a warp from a vessel off the Cockpit and extended three-quarters across the river, at high tide. The vessel was Capt. Tamplyn's and was under repair.
By Mr Ffinch:- A Bye-law of the borough requires two men to be on board a vessel lying in the river, at the ebbing and flowing of the tide. I did not see the harbour master there. I believe he is ill. He has no clerk or deputy whatever. There are no drags or life belts belonging to the town to be used in case of accident. That used last night was the property of Mr Stribling.
Mr Ffinch read the 41st Bye Law, as follows:- "Every master or owner of any ship or vessel, lying or being within the said Borough, shall have two men on board such ship or vessel, at and during the flowing of tide, and for one hour after it begins to ebb, and in default thereof shall forfeit and pay any penalty no exceeding forty shillings. And it shall be lawful for the Water Bailiff or Harbour Master for the time being of the said Borough, in every case of such default, to provide what assistance he may consider requisite for the management of such ship or vessel during the time before mentioned, and to charge the expense thereof, over and above the penalty above imposed, to the master or owner of such ship or vessel; and if the master or owner of such ship or vessel shall refuse or neglect to pay such expense on demand, the same, with all costs attending such neglect or refusal, shall be levied in the same manner as the penalties for the breach of any Bye Law are by the said recited Act directed to be levied and recovered."
Richard Nott sworn:- I am a smith, and reside in Silver-street. This morning I entered a boat off the slip in the road, to go fishing. Saw two men with grapnels. In going through the third arch I saw something white in the water; found it was the body of a man. I caught hold of it and pulled it up, with assistance. It was OATWAY.
Joseph Stribling sworn:- I am a pilot and son of a pilot. I was searching for the bodies of the deceased, on Friday morning, and was present at the recovery of the body of JOHN OATWAY. P.C. Gliddon was present. I assisted to carry the body home to the house of deceased. There are no public drags provided for saving bodies in case of accident.
This was all the evidence.
The Coroner briefly summed up, directing the attention of the Jury to the following points in the evidence: - 1. That the deceased were unskilful in the management of the boat. 2. That the boat was capsized by a rope thrown out from a vessel, to the obstruction of the free passage of the river. 3. That the Bye-law of the borough, which required two men to be on board and in charge of a vessel moored in the river at the flowing and ebbing of the tide was not complied with. 4. That there are no drags, &c., provided by the town authorities for saving persons from drowning. 5. He laid it down as the law that it was highly improper to place a rope across the river to the interruption of a free thoroughfare.
The Jury returned as their verdict that the deceased were accidentally drowned by the upsetting of a boat; and appended to their verdict the following rider:-
"The Jury wish to represent that in their opinion the warp from the Fanny was improperly and illegally thrown out across the river - that the master or owner of the said vessel is highly culpable for his neglect of the duty prescribed by the Bye-laws - that the obstruction caused by the said rope was the sole occasion of this most lamentable accident. That the fact of the absence of the Water Bailiff from duty be represented to the Town Council; as, also, the necessity of proper drags and apparatus being provided for rescuing persons from drowning."
Honourable mention was made of the gallant, and praiseworthy conduct of Mr Samuel Channon, in plunging into the boiling tide to rescue one of the submerged men; as well as of the indefatigable exertions of Mr John Lemon. The Jury gave their fees for the benefit of the bereaved widows, MRS CANN and MRS OATWAY, on whose behalf benevolent persons are promoting a subscription.

BIDEFORD - Drowned While Bathing. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Lamb Inn,' Homestone-lane, before Charles W. Hole, Esq., Deputy Borough Coroner, touching the death of JOHN EDWARD BRAUND LUGG, a lad about ten years of age, residing at Milton-place, Bideford, who was drowned while bathing off Ford Rock, on Saturday last. The Jury, of whom Mr Robert Holman was foreman, having viewed the body, the following evidence was given:-
Henry Ley, a lad about 13, deposed:- I knew the deceased. He called upon me about half-past one o'clock on Saturday, and asked me to go with him to bathe; but I did not go. About three o'clock, however, I went down near the rock, and saw the deceased in the water, holding up his hand, and calling out "Save me." I could only see his hair, and he could not swim. I undressed as quickly as possible, and went into the water, and swam up to him, the tide at that time running down. I caught hold of him by the hair, and pulled him towards the shore; but he grasped me by the mouth, and his legs being entangled in mine, we both went further out, and he sunk. I think if he had not grasped me by the mouth I should have saved him.
Simon Westacott, brightsmith, deposed:- On Saturday, about four o'clock, I was in Meddon-street, and heard that a boy had been drowned off Ford Rock. I went there, and found people searching with boat-hooks. I stripped, went into the water, found the body, and brought it on shore. It had been in the water about half-an-hour. The Deputy Coroner, in remarking upon the to rescue the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

EXETER - Death From Smelling Decomposed Mackerel. - An Inquest was held at Exeter, on Thursday, before Mr Hooper, City Coroner, on the body of a married woman named MARY HEXTER, aged 58, who lived at 4 Turner's Buildings. The deceased complained to her husband on Wednesday of not feeling well, and said that when she went out in the morning on an errand she passed some putrid mackerel that had been thrown into the gutter on Stepcote Hill. This affected her stomach so much that she kept continually vomiting, and died the same night. Mr Roper, surgeon, who was called in to see the deceased, said he believed she was not a strong person, that she had her stomach upset by the smell of the fish, that the vomiting caused exhaustion, and that eventually she died of syncope. the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. The Coroner said he should bring before the notice of the Local Board the desirability of keeping the back streets better flushed, especially Preston-street, Rack-street and Stepcote Hill.

Thursday 16 July 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Accidental Death. An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon at the North Devon Infirmary, by Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM RICHARDS, of Loxhore, who succumbed to the injuries received from being thrown from a cart on the Loxhore road, on Friday week, as reported in our last. The following was the evidence:-
Mr F. R. Fairbank, surgeon, Lynton, sworn:- On Friday, July the 3rd instant, I was riding from Lynton to Barnstaple, and just as I had passed the road leading to Goodleigh, at the top of the hill after the second mile-stone from Barnstaple, I met a horse and cart coming quickly round the corner (which is a sharp turn) without any driver. The cart was heavily laden, apparently with artificial manure. After the cart had passed me, I saw the deceased lying on his back in the road. I dismounted and moved him to the side of the road and placed his head against the bank. He was quite unconscious. There was a cold sweat over his face. I examined his head carefully. I did not find any external wounds. Blood was flowing freely from his left ear. I stopped a cart which was passing, and assisted to put the deceased carefully into it. I accompanied the cart to the Infirmary. I did not allow the horse to go beyond a walk. I gave the deceased into the hands of Mr Cooke, the House Surgeon. The deceased did not recover his consciousness whilst I was with him. From his symptoms, my opinion is that he was suffering from fracture of the base of his skull. The horse and cart, when I met them, were about one hundred yards from where I saw the deceased lying in the road.
Mr John Hearn, toll-gate keeper, Barnstaple, sworn:- On Friday week last, the 3rd of July instant, the deceased passed through my gate, at Crookman's Corner, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. He was walking on the foot-path; his horse and cart, laden with manure, was in the road. He gave me a manure ticket on coming up to the gate, and I returned him sixpence, which he had paid me in the morning. The deceased was a farm servant in the service of Mr Hunt, of Chelfham. After I paid him the sixpence he got into his cart at the tail end and took hold of his reins. He was lying on his belly on the manure, and went a steady pace on the road to Goodleigh. About twenty minutes afterwards the deceased was brought back in Mr Martin's cart. He was then unconscious. The last witness was with him. He was sober when he passed my gate and paid me the sixpence. I was well acquainted with him.
Mr James Wood Cooke, House Surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, sworn:- The deceased was brought to this Infirmary on Friday, the 3rd of July instant, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. The witness, Mr Fairbank, was with him. The deceased was perfectly insensible. There was slight haemorrhage from the left ear. I examined him after he had been undressed and put into bed, but found no mark of any external injury on his body. He remained totally unconscious for two days, and then, on being spoken to in a loud voice, he would reply to questions that I put to him, but he never regained his consciousness entirely. He died on Monday night last, here, about twelve o'clock. I have this morning made a post mortem examination of the deceased's head. On removing the scalp, I found considerable echymosis on the back part of the skull, shewing there had been a blow received there. Underneath the dura mater I found considerable effusion of blood, and on removing the brain I found a considerable fracture of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. From the above appearance, my opinion is that his death was caused by a fracture of the base of his skull. Verdict - "That the death of the deceased was caused by a Fracture of his Skull, but how the injury was inflicted there is no evidence to shew."

Thursday 23 July 1868
SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident in Bristol To A Native of Southmolton. - A few days since, Mr H. S. Wansbrough, deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Wagon and Horses,' Redcliff Hill, Bristol, on the body of HARRIET WARREN, 36 years of age. John Gardiner, living at No. 1, Prince-street, stated that on Saturday week last, about six o'clock in the morning, he was going along Redcliff-street, and the deceased was also in the street. As she was passing by the shop of Mr Gibbs, draper, a piece of cement, large enough to cover six people, fell upon her. She was taken to the General Hospital, where she died on Friday. Mr Joseph Gibbs, living at 102, Redcliff-street, stated that the cement which fell was the ornamental facing over the window. There were five pieces forming an arch, four of which fell. The arch in question was considered quite safe, and it was supposed that the "pitching" of the stones in the street, in front of the house, had shaken the cement from the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A strange coincidence in connection with this case is that the principal witness was not able to attend, having met with a fatal accident a few days ago, and upon whom an Inquest was held. A cousin also of the deceased, named Warren, met with a fatal accident on the Bristol and Exeter Railway a week or two ago. The deceased has left a husband and five children to bewail her loss.

Thursday 30 July 1868
BURRINGTON - Death By Drowning. - On Monday evening THOMAS ISAACS, a lad aged about 17, was fishing in the river Taw, near the Southmolton Road Station, in company with his younger brother, when he saw a trout in the distance and sprang after it. He was, however, drawn into a pit which has been the scene of numerous fatalities, for which it has been designated the "Death Pit." He was unable to extricate himself, and when assistance arrived it was too late - his body was recovered, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Fatal Accident. - A sad and fatal accident occurred near Kingsbridge, on Friday night, under the following circumstances. MRS IRELAND, wife of MR IRELAND, corn dealer, Exeter, and daughter of MR COSWAY, St. Sidwell's, had for some time been on a visit at Torquay, and on Thursday her husband came from Exeter with a horse and waggon to fetch his wife and some furniture. They left Torquay on Friday evening. When about two miles from Chudleigh the horse started without any apparent cause,. The husband was on the off side at the time, and the deceased was sitting on the top of the waggon. The husband jumped to the near side and attempted to stop the animal, but in the struggle his foot slipped, and the wheels of the waggon passed over his body. On recovering himself he saw his wife lying on the road about 20 yards ahead, and on going to her found her motionless. Some cottages being near he managed to procure assistance, when it was found life was extinct. The horse was stopped at Bella Marsh, and Mr Watson, miller, of that place, conveyed deceased and her husband to Kingsteignton. The husband has received serious injuries. An Inquest was held on MRS IRELAND on Saturday, before Mr H. Michelmore, when these facts came out in evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 August 1868
TOTNES - Death By Drowning At Totnes. - On Saturday morning WILLIAM SHILLABEAR, 17 years old, an apprentice to Mr Farley, tailor, was drowned while bathing in the Dart. He came home to dinner as usual and finding it not quite ready he went with a younger brother to bathe. The water being very low he walked across the river, but on returning he got into a deep pit, with which the river abounds, and being unable to swim he was drowned. He was seen by Mr S. Cuming, jun., and sailor on board the Newcomin, and they immediately put off to his assistance, but it was some time before the body was recovered; life was then quite extinct. An Inquest was held in the evening at the 'Dartmouth Inn,' before Mr Henry Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

APPLEDORE - Death By Burning. - On Sunday morning last, ELIZABETH MEADE, a young woman, 16 years of age, went into a neighbour's house with a toy to present to one of the children. While holding the child's hand she stopped down with her back towards the grate; her dress instantly caught fire and she ran out of the house. A pan of water was thrown over her and a surgeon sent for. He found his patient severely burnt in various parts of the body, and applied the proper remedies, but she survived the shock to her system but a few hours. An Inquest was held on Monday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the following evidence was taken:-
Alice Pugsley deposed: - I live at Appledore, and am a single person. I knew ELIZABETH MEADE. She resided at Appledore, and was about sixteen years of age, and was a single person. I lived close to her house. Yesterday morning, about ten o'clock, she came into our house with a little ball, being a child's toy. She put the ball into my sister's child's hand. She held the child's hand, and in stooping down with her back towards the fire, I saw her dress on fire. I said, "BESSY, your dress is on fire;" and she ran out of the house. I went out after her, and my mother came out with a pan of water and threw over her. Several persons came to render assistance, and the fire was put out.
Eliza Pennington deposed:- I live at Appledore, and am the wife of John Pennington, labourer. I knew the deceased, ELIZABETH MEADE. About ten o'clock yesterday morning, being in my house, I heard Alice Pugsley say to the deceased, "BESSY, your dress is on fire." I took some water I was using and ran out after her and threw it over her, but it did not put out the fire, but other persons gave assistance, and the fire was at last put out. She was then carried to her house and put to bed, and a medical man sent for.
Mr H. H. Lower, surgeon, deposed:- I reside at Appledore and am a surgeon. Yesterday morning, about twenty minutes after ten o'clock, I was sent for to go to the deceased. I accordingly went and examined her, and found her burnt all over the body with the exception of just the feet. Proper remedies were applied, but nothing could be done further, and I was of opinion that she could not live many hours. I called again at five o'clock, but found she had been dead about three quarters of an hour. I believe everything was done for her that could be. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt."

PETER'S MARLAND - An Aged Man Burnt To Death. - On Thursday last, a poor old man named WILLIAM SHORT, for some years sexton of Peter's Marland, met with his death while at labour, under very painful circumstances. He was engaged in rooting furze, and had set fire to some so as to hasten his work. The fire either burned too rapidly, or else was spreading where the poor old fellow did not wish the furze to be burnt, so that with a shovel he endeavoured to extinguish it. While thus engaged, the smoke overpowered him, he became senseless, and the flames soon reached him, burning all his clothing completely off, with the exception of leggings and boots. Not coming home at his usual time in the evening, search was made, but his body was not discovered before twelve o'clock, the accident occurring probably exactly twelve hours before, as his watch stopped at that time.
An Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr John Henry Toller, Deputy Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:-
William Luxton, sworn:- I live at Peter's Marland, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM SHORT. He was a labourer, and was about seventy-three years of age. He was crippled in his left leg He had a job down in Stone Moor, namely, rooting furze stubbs. He had had the job about two months, and went there when he liked, working for Mr Passmore, of Peter's Marland. He was sometimes in the habit of burning the furze to make it easier to root up. I saw him going to his work at Stone Moor on Thursday morning about seven o'clock. He passed by my house. On Thursday evening, about ten o'clock, John Taunton and Jesse Mills came to me and asked me if I had seen WILLIAM SHORT for the day. I told them I had not seen him since the morning. They said he was not at home, and we went down to Stone Moor in search of him. We found him dead upon the ground. His clothes were all burnt, and he was lying upon his face and hands, and the furze was all burnt round him in ashes. We took up the body, which was very much burnt, and was naked with the exception of his boots which were on his feet. There was a buckle round his waist, which was burnt. We took his watch and found it had stopped about a quarter after twelve o'clock. I have this morning viewed the spot, and found a pathway cut through the furze to stop the fire at a certain point. His feet lay across the path.
John Tanton, sworn:- I live at Peter's Marland, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM SHORT. He was missing on Thursday evening, and I and William Luxton and Jesse Mills went down to Stone Moor in search of him, and I corroborate the evidence of William Luxton. About half-past eleven o'clock on Thursday morning I saw smoke rising from Stone moor. Verdict:- "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 13 August 1868
LYNTON - Death By Drowning. - Mon Monday last an Inquest was held at Lynmouth, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM VAUX EADE, a young gentleman who had recently arrived with his father as a visitor, but with the intention to become a permanent resident. The father, after a short stay, had gone back to Exeter to make arrangements for the transference of his furniture, &c., to Lynton, but was taken suddenly ill and died; the melancholy end of the son we now chronicle. The facts are as follows:-
Joseph Bain deposed:- I live at Sweethope, in Lanarkshire, but I am at present lodging at Lynmouth. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM VAUX EADE; he resided at Sherborne, in Dorsetshire, and was in the 6th form of the King's School at that place. On Saturday morning last, about 7 o'clock, his elder brother, CYRIL EADE, came to me and knocked me up to go bathing. We went bathing about eight o'clock. The party consisted of the deceased, his two brothers, myself, and my two sons. We went to a point called Blackland Sand, which is the usual place of bathing. We all went into the water and could all swim. After a little time I lost sight of the deceased by his getting round Blackland Point. In a few minutes CYRIL EADE one of the deceased's brothers, and one of our party came to several of us standing together, and who had just started to get round the Point, and said "he was afraid WILLY was gone." The tide was rising and the waves were running very high; therefore, we could not look for him. The body was picked up about ten minutes after eleven o'clock on the same morning. There were some marks about his forehead. Four of the other boys were also placed in great danger, and before CYRIL EADE came round the Point I was engaged in attempting to render assistance to one of them but in so doing I was knocked over upon the rocks. I consider it a dangerous place for bathing at certain stages of the tide.
George Charles Rotherham deposed:- I reside at Bishop's Hull, near Taunton, but am at present in lodgings at Lynmouth. I bathed on Saturday morning, at Blackland Sand, and was present when CYRIL EADE came round the Point and said "he was afraid his brother was gone." I rescued one of Mr Bain's boys who was in danger.
John Hodge deposed:- I reside at Lynmouth, and am a superannuated coast guard officer. On Saturday morning, hearing that the deceased had been drowned, I, accompanied with others, went in search of the body. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, about 100 yards east-ward of Blackland Point, we found the body of the deceased. There were marks about the face and forehead. The deceased was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned While Bathing," with a recommendation that "a notice be at once affixed in the most eligible place on Blackland Sand, cautioning persons from bathing there during rough seas."

BARNSTAPLE - Death Of A Resident of Barnstaple At Devonport. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of THOS. ISAAC, a mason's labourer, aged fifty years, who died on Tuesday morning, at the hospital, from the effects of a fall and injuries he had received in a trench surrounding the fortifications at Devonport, on the 19th July. The deceased, a resident of Barnstaple, was employed at Plympton, and came to Devonport in company with another labourer named Tossell, to see his son, a private of the Royal Marines. Whilst at Devonport the deceased and Tossell went into two different beer shops, where they had several quarts of ale, leaving about half-past eleven. The deceased asked the landlord of the last beer-house they were in whether he could supply them with a bed for the night, but on being answered in the negative they left. Shortly after the deceased said to the man Tossell that he knew where he could get a bed, and they walked up on the Brick-field, where they got inside the rails of the trench near the drawbridge for the purpose of lying down for a few hours. After the deceased got inside the railings, Tossell could not make out where the deceased was, but on hearing a groan he began to feel about, and it being dark, and he a stranger to the place, he fell into the trench, a height of twenty feet, fortunately pitching on his feet. When Tossell recovered from the shock he again heard some one groaning, and on crawling over to the place whence the sound came he perceived that it was the deceased who had fallen in as well as himself, but was quite insensible. Deceased and Tossell were conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where Tossell recovered from his severe shaking, but his companion died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 August 1868
ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held here by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, touching the death of JOHN LARAMY, labourer, aged 65, who was accidentally killed on the night of the 12th instant, on the road between Barnstaple and Ilfracombe, and near to this town. The following was the evidence taken:-
John Bush deposed:- I collect the tolls of Two Potts turnpike gate. I knew the deceased, JOHN LARAMY; he lived at Ilfracombe, was a driver, and about 65 years of age. Last evening, a little before 9 o'clock, he passed through Two Potts turnpike-gate, with a four-wheeled wagon drawn by one horse which was very heavily laden. He was standing upon the platform in front of the wagon, leaning against the goods. He has passed through the gate about twice a week during the last five or six weeks. We had some conversation last evening when he appeared perfectly sober, and after wished me good night passed down the hill with his wagon.
Humphry Lerwill deposed:- I live at Arlington and am a miller. Last evening I was at Ilfracombe, and on my return home, about half-past nine o'clock, when half-a-mile from the town, I saw something lying in the hedge trough on the right hand side of the road. It was dark at the time. A wagon with one horse had just before passed me. I had a cart with me in which was my wife with others, and I was walking up the hill behind the cart. I went to the hedge trough and saw it was a man lying upon his face and hands with his head a little above the trough. I called to him thinking he had had a little to drink, and pulled him up upon his knees when I heard him breath once. I also felt his heart beat a little, and saw his head move; it was then I thought he was dead. I called for my wife in the cart to come back and we took the body to Ilfracombe.
Henry Richard Foquett deposed:- I am a surgeon and reside at Ilfracombe. Between half-past nine and ten o'clock last evening, I was sent for to see the deceased. I went to him and found him dead. I put my hand to his chest and found most of his ribs broken on both sides, which was quite sufficient to cause death. Verdict:- "Accidentally killed whilst driving a horse and wagon."

CREDITON - An Inquest was held at the 'King's Arms Inn,' on Thursday, by R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner on the body of the infant child of MARY ANN STEER, found dead in bed on Tuesday morning last. The mother of the child stated that between four and five on Tuesday morning she suckled it. It was then well and quickly fell asleep. On her awaking about seven o'clock she found the child dead. Her husband was from home, and it was her custom to have her three children to sleep in the same bed with her. Dr Whidbourne, who was called in at the time, gave it as his opinion that the child died from suffocation, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 27 August 1868
FILLEIGH - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, a labourer, named JOHN COMER, of Farthing Lake, in the parish of Filleigh, met with his death whilst working in a quarry (said to be only eight feet deep) on South Bray Farm, in Chittlehampton. The poor man was working with two other men in the quarry, when the head fell in and buried him. He was ultimately extricated, but very soon afterwards expired. Deceased has left a widow and a very large family. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday last, when a verdict was given in accordance with the above facts.

Inquest at the County Gaol. - On Saturday a Coroner's Inquest was held, in the Devon County Gaol, before Mr Coroner Crosse, on the body of JOHN JAGO, aged 42, of Liskeard, who had been imprisoned for the theft of a sheet in North Devon. His period was a month, but the idea of imprisonment excited him a good deal. He refused to put on the prison suit or his own clothes, and walked about his cell clad only in his shirt. In the excitement he burst a blood vessel in his head, and died, according to the evidence of the surgeon, Mr Caird, of effusion of blood upon the brain. Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'Barnstaple Inn,' before I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of MRS MARY BROOKES, who died suddenly on the previous night, from natural causes, at the age of 94. The following evidence was adduced:-
Susan Curtice deposed:- The deceased has resided with me about eight months; she lived previously in one of the Salem almshouses, but left there on account of being incapable of taking care of herself. She was 94 years of age. Her daughter, Mrs Serjeant, of Torrington, who is the wife of a retired painter, placed the deceased with me, and arranged to pay 8s. a week for her board and lodgings. She had been in her usual state of health lately, and appeared to be stronger than when she first came to me. The deceased was of a cheerful disposition, and hearty at her meals. She did not take any intoxicating liquor of any kind. She went to bed last night about half-past six o'clock, and had her tea before she went to bed. I took her up a cup of cocoa and some bread and butter for her supper about ten o'clock, which she partook of. When I left her, she appeared as usual. This morning, about half-past seven, as I went down stairs, I looked into her room, as I usually did, and seeing her feet were uncovered, I went over to her bed, and spoke to her three times. Finding she did not answer, I called my husband into the room, and he said she was dead. My husband immediately went for Mr Cooke, surgeon, who arrived at our house within half-an-hour. Mr Cooke examined the deceased in my presence, and said she was dead.
Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- This morning, soon after eight o'clock, I was called to the house of Mr Curtice by him, and went immediately. I found the deceased lying in the same bed she is now in. She was quite dead, and apparently had been so for several hours. I examined her body, and am of opinion that her death resulted from natural causes. I cannot say what the exact cause of her death was, whether apoplexy or disease of the heart. Verdict:- "Died suddenly by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 17 September 1868
INSTOW - Fatal Gun Accident. - An Inquest was held at Instow on Saturday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE EDWARD FISHLEY, eleven years of age, son of the well known ferryman. On the previous Thursday, SAMUEL FISHLEY, brother of the deceased, took out two gentlemen named Woodcock, each of whom had a gun, in one of his father's boats. Returning in the evening they were met at the landing-place by the deceased and while Mr B. Woodcock was in the act of taking up one of the guns that was lying upon the seat, previous to landing, it went off and the contents entered the poor boy's neck, causing instantaneous death. The gun was half-cocked. Superintendent Cunningham said that he had examined the gun, and, in consequence of the imperfect state of the lock it could be discharged at half-cock. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death," with a recommendation that the gun be destroyed.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident While Bathing at Northam Burrows. - An Inquest was held a few days since before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of ROBERT MILLS, a young man, aged 20, son of MR GEO. MILLS, farmer, of Northam, who was drowned while bathing at Westward Ho! It appeared that the deceased, his brother, and some friends from Bristol, who were on a visit at his father's, went out bathing. Whilst they were in the water the deceased, who could not swim, observed that the tide nearly reached their clothes, and on going towards the shore to place them out of the reach of the tide he walked into a pit which had been formed by portions of a wreck lying on the sands One of his companions went to his assistance, and he also walked into the pit, and would have been drowned had not deceased's brother, who, being some distance off when the accident occurred, and was not aware deceased was in the pit, came to his rescue. The body was found between the wreck at the ebbing of the tide. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and recommended the wrecks on Northam Burrow Sands to be removed as soon as possible.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of ROSETTA LEMPRIERE, wife of Mr F. P. LEMPRIERE, of Silver-street, Bideford. It appeared that on Thursday last she was in great grief about the loss of her child, which happened a few days previous, and about 9 o'clock in the evening she sent one of her children to a neighbour, named Grace Squire, to inform her that she had been taken very ill. On entering the house this neighbour found her sitting on a chair with her head resting on her husband's shoulder. She died almost immediately. Mr Pridham was sent for but life was quite extinct. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned by the Jury. Deceased leaves a husband and three children in very adverse circumstances, the family having long striven against trouble, affliction, and poverty. MR LEMPRIERE'S father was formerly Incumbent of Newton St. Petrock, the living being now held in sequestration; he has an uncle a clergyman of the Church of England, and his grandfather was author of the celebrated dictionary bearing his name.

BUCKLAND BREWER - Accidental Death. - On Friday evening a retired farmer, named MR WILLIAM GEORGE, of Parkham, had been to Buckland Brewer on horseback, and on returning home he appears to have got off at a gateway, because as he was attempting to get on horseback again, his niece saw him fall back, and pitch upon his head. She ran to the village and obtained assistance, but before the unfortunate man could be conveyed home he died. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict was returned in accordance with the facts above-stated.

Thursday 24 September 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Awfully Sudden Death. A case of this kind occurred on Wednesday evening. SERGEANT WALSH, of the Devon Artillery Militia, Plymouth, was on a visit to Barnstaple, for recruiting purposes, it being the fair week and while conversing with several others in the square, he suddenly complained of illness, emitted a quantity of blood and fell backwards. He was removed to Mr Curtis's close by, but life was found to be extinct. The body was afterwards taken to the Infirmary to await the Inquest. It is supposed that death was caused by the rupture of a blood-vessel. At the Inquest held before Mr I. Bencraft, on Thursday, the 17th September, the following evidence was adduced:-
John Leitham, Company's Serjeant on the Permanent Staff of the Devon Militia Artillery, residing in Barnstaple, deposed as follows:- The deceased was a Company's Serjeant on the Permanent Staff in the said Regiment of Artillery. I have known him for the last fourteen years; he arrived yesterday by the 12.10 a.m. train at the Barnstaple Station from Devonport; he came with a recruiting party. I met him at the railway station. He went with me to my residence, and died; he remained at my house until five o'clock, when he had his tea with me, and appeared to enjoy both his meals. He left my house about a quarter to six o'clock with myself and Sergeant Whitley, of the same regiment. We walked about the town for some time, and about twenty minutes after seven o'clock we were all three standing in the Square between the West of England Bank and the railings of the Square. Whilst standing there he turned to me and said "Jack, I feel unwell." I took him by one arm and Whitley the other. His legs gave way, and his head fell forward, when a quantity of blood gushed from his mouth and nose. I left him to fetch a doctor and returned in about five minutes. I then found his body on a chair, Dr Johnston was with him. I saw that he was dead. He did not complain of being ill to me before the time above mentioned; he appeared in his usual health. He did nothing whilst he was with me except walk about; he was in my company from the time he arrived at the station until he was seized in the manner before described. He only drank two glasses of beer during the time he was in Barnstaple and was perfectly sober when he arrived.
Mr Charles Johnston, surgeon deposed:- Last night, about half-past seven o'clock, I was called to the deceased by a policeman. I found him on a chair between the Bank and the Square. There was a large quantity of arterial blood on the ground before him. I examined his pulse and eye and found he was dead; there was no pulse, and the pupils of his eyes were dilated. I am of opinion that his death was caused by a rupture of the aorta. I saw no evidence of any disease about him. Verdict:- "Died suddenly from Natural causes."

Thursday 1 October 1868
ST. GILES IN THE WOOD. - Coroner's Inquest. - Suicide Of A Respectable Farmer. Great consternation was felt here on Thursday afternoon, on the arrival of the sad intelligence that MR THOMAS NORMAN, a respectable farmer occupying Winscott Barton, at St. Giles in the Wood, had committed suicide by cutting his throat. He was but 33 years of age and unmarried. It was known to his friends that he had, when quite a young man, been thrown from a horse and sustained injury to his head, from the effects of which he had, it was considered, suffered from time to time, but nothing so dreadful as this was apprehended. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday, at the Farm House, before J. H. Toller, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr James Baldson was the foreman, when the following evidence of the touching, painful, and distressing case was given:-
H. A. Vallack, Esq., of Great Torrington, said deceased was a farmer and was 33 years old about last Christmas. I have known the deceased from a boy; about 16 years since he was thrown off a horse and received violent concussion and compression of the brain, and since then he has had aberration of the mind, which has come to my knowledge on several occasions.
Ann Squire, who had been housekeeper at the Barton for more than twelve months, said at times deceased had been strange and excitable. He had his dinner on Thursday, about one o'clock. I noticed that he scarcely ate anything and said but very little, although at times very talkative. He was in the house at a quarter after five last evening, and sat at the bottom of the table. I was getting the tea at the time, and while doing so had occasion to go into the dairy, and whilst there I thought I heard MR NORMAN go upstairs. When I returned he was not in the room; I thought he was gone up to lie down on the bed, as he had been out late the night before. After waiting some time I went to the bottom of the stairs and called him, but he did not answer. Thinking he might be poorly I went upstairs and went through another room into his bedroom. I saw deceased lying on the floor on his back with his throat cut: there was a great quantity of blood; I saw the razor in his left hand; I believe he was dead at the time. It was about a quarter to six o'clock when I found him. I called in assistance and sent off for a doctor immediately. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon (Thursday) I saw him come down stairs with some letters which he put into the fire and burnt.
Charles Richard Jones, M.D., practising at Torrington, said:- I have known the deceased for more than fifteen years; I remember the accident referred to by Mr Vallack; he has since that suffered from periodical attacks in the head, and was at times very excitable. On passing here yesterday, about two o'clock, I saw deceased in the yard when he said he was rather out of sorts, and feared he should lose a cow. He appeared dejected and was not in his usual spirits. About a quarter after six I was alarmed by receiving a message to come to Winscott, as MR NORMAN had cut his throat. I came here immediately, and on going to his bedroom found deceased lying on his back by the side of his bed, quite dead. He had a razor in his left hand, which he firmly grasped. The fingers were quite rigid, and I had great difficulty in removing the instrument from his grasp. The face was turned toward the left shoulder, the countenance perfectly placid and pallid. There was a wound extending completely from under the mastine process to the temporal bone on the right side to beyond that projection on the opposite side. The cause of death was loss of blood, and from all I saw the wound was a self-inflicted one. At the close of the evidence the Coroner briefly summed up, and the Jury at once returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 15 October 1868
TAUNTON - A Frightful Discovery, was made on Saturday on the lonely Blackdown hills, about seven miles from Taunton. In a ditch a mile from the Holman Clavell Inn, in the parish of Pitminster, was found the decomposing remains of a man's body with the throat cut. Near were a razor and a knife, both covered with dry blood. The police have been communicated with, and an Inquest will be held. It has been ascertained that deceased's name was HENRY MITCHELL, of Crediton, and that he formerly belonged to the 16th Rifles. It is conjectured that the body must have been lying in the ditch nearly a week.

Thursday 29 October 1868
SOUTHMOLTON - A Tradesman Accidentally Drowned In His Cess Pit. - A melancholy event occurred in this town on Thursday evening last. MR WILLIAM COLE, an old and respectable butcher, accidentally fell into a cess pit on his premises and was drowned. An Inquest was held on Friday last at the Guildhall, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner. the following formed the Jury; Messrs. J. T. Widgery (foreman), W. H. Tall, Wm. Paige, C. Blackmore, J. Venner, W. H. Pearce, Thomas Redler, R. Courtenay, F. Moore, J. Mills, G. J. Thomas, and R. Stone. The Jury inspected the body and the following evidence was taken.
James Parsons deposed as follows:- I live in the house with deceased as his servant, and have been with him for seven months. Last evening about half-past seven, deceased came into the kitchen where I was sitting and asked me for a lantern and candle, that he might go over and see the cow and calf. I went with him, after going and seeing cow and calf, where he remained for a quarter of an hour. He ordered me to go up to the loft for a couple of handfuls of hay, for the cow. He was glad to see the cow feeding well, he then left, and walked toward the dung pit. I told him that he was going the wrong way and he was going towards the dung. Deceased said "nonsense" he then went to the dung pit, and I heard him fall into the dung pit. Deceased said "Wait a minute," thinking he would get up, I said I would go and fetch Mary, this was about a minute, I went and fetched Mary who returned with me. She did not attempt to get deceased out, I then went into the street, and the first man I saw was Mr Fry who went with me to the pit where deceased was, and Mr Delve came down also after deceased was taken out.
John Fry, sworn:- I was in East-street last evening, about half-past seven o'clock, when the last witness spoke to me he said "quick, Fry, quick, come in and speak to mistress." I went with him, and he took me down to the bottom of the court and in going down he said "master has fallen into the pit." I went down and found the deceased in the pit, and MRS COLE and the servant girl standing by. I caught hold of deceased by one leg and his boot came off in my hand, I then got hold of the trousers, and pulled him back, and got him out on land. I then assisted in taking him in the house. He was to all appearances dead when taken out of the pit. It was full quarter of an hour from the time I saw deceased, before we got him into the house.
Mary Ann Moore, sworn:- I lived a servant with deceased, I remember last evening, my master about half-past six came into the kitchen and asked the boy if the cows had had their mash, I replied that I had given it to them. He then asked the boy to give him the lantern that he might give the cows some hay. My master and the boy James Parsons left together, about a quarter of an hour after, the boy came in and asked me to go down the court as master had fallen into the dung pit. I went down then and saw him. I spoke to him and got no answer, and saw no motion of the body and concluded he was dead. I was much frightened and could not touch him. He had killed some sheep during the evening and appeared just as usual. The Coroner said, as a medical man, he was called in to see the deceased. His appearance was quite compatible with the facts deposed to by the witnesses. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was 65 years of age.

Thursday 19 November 1868
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Fatal Accident. - Inquest On The Body. An Inquest was held here, on Thursday last, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, to Inquire into the cause of death of MR WILLIAM WALDRON, of Court Farm, in this village. The Jury (Mr Charles Bryant, foreman) having been sworn, the following evidence was taken:-
Mr John Shaddick, of Newport, carpenter, deposed:- Last night, about quarter to eight, I was going down through Newport and saw a pony galloping up without any rider. A little further on I saw a man lying on his back with his head towards Newport Terrace. Colonel Brine, who came up at the same time, and myself then lifted him up, and asked him if he was hut, but he made no answer. I then suggested we should sit him up against the wall of Captain Whitlock's house, which we did. We again asked him if he was hurt, and he then said "Its no matter of yours." I felt his head and body but could distinguish no wounds - only a small lump on the right side of his forehead. Having an appointment in town I left him in the care of Mr Webber, who came up at the time. I knew the deceased; but it being so dark I could not distinguish who it was at the time.
Mr James Webber, of Newport, tailor, deposed:- About quarter to eight last evening I was coming from Barnstaple and just as I came to Captain Whitlock's Mr Shaddick called out to me and said there was a man lying in the road. I then went over and found a man lying with his legs over the pathway. I said to him "What's the matter? You'll catch a cold." He asked me to let him lie a minute or two, and just at that moment Mr Cox came up with a pony, and asked who had lost it. Then Mr John Waldon, of Fisherton, came up, and spoke to him. We then got him up, and Mr Waldon on one side and I one the other assisted him to walk as far as Mr Featherstone's. He complained of a blow in his head, and I examined his head and found a lump, but no blood. We then got him on the pony, and offered to accompany him, but he declined, and he then rode on. We followed him as far as the turnpike and found he was going on all right, and we returned. From a remark he made whilst at Mr Featherstone's we inferred he had fallen from the pony, and pitched on his head, and on looking at the saddle we found the stirrup leather broken. This morning I heard MR WALDRON was dead. I pointed out to P.C. Molland where the deceased lay, and he pointed out some blood on the pavement.
Mr William Featherstone, of Newport, saddler, deposed:- Last evening, about eight, I was standing at the head of Newport and saw some men riding towards me. I found it was Mr Waldon, of Fisherton, and Mr Keal, of Landkey, and directly behind them a pony with no rider. Mr Keal took hold of the bridle and gave the pony to Mr Cox, who led it down the road. Mr Waldon, having noticed the dog as belonging to the deceased, then turned back, and I went after him. Just afterwards I was called out of my father's house by the deceased, who said "Come on Bill, and mend this leather." I then repaired the leather and saw him safely on the pony. He then wished us good night.
Miss Mary Rawle, postmistress, of Bishop's Tawton, deposed:- Hearing of the death I went down to MRS WALDRON'S to comfort her in her trouble I there saw Mr Gamble, surgeon, and I asked his opinion of the cause of death. He said the cause of death was the rupture of a small blood vessel on the brain, occasioned by the blow, caused by his falling from the pony. He also said, "Had I been called last night I should have said the blow was of no danger, but now having examined him, I nor twenty medical gentlemen could have been of no use."
The Coroner having summed up, said there was not a doubt but that the deceased's death was accidental, caused by his falling from the pony through the breaking of the stirrup leather. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death." A singular circumstance connected with the melancholy death was that the deceased had only bought the pony that day.

Thursday 26 November 1868
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. Coroner's Inquest. An Inquest was held on Saturday, November 21st, at the 'Rolle Arms' Inn, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES HARRIS, an old man, a thatcher, in the employ of Mr Tucker, of Maidenford, yeoman. On Friday morning the deceased proceeded to his work, at a short distance from Barnstaple, and not coming home during the day, his wife went to look for him on the following morning, and found him lying dead in a linhay. The following evidence was adduced:-
Mr John Tucker, of Maidenford, yeoman, deposed:- I have known the deceased for several years. He was a thatcher, and resided at Landkey Newland. He has been in the habit of working for me lately. Yesterday morning he came to work for me; he left my house about ten o'clock to thatch a linhay a few fields from my house, the distance being about a quarter of a mile. He was then apparently in good health and spirits, and took some cider with him. This was the last time I saw him alive. I have seen his body this afternoon at this inn.
MARTHA HARRIS, of Landkey, deposed:- The deceased was my husband, and was about fifty years of age. He has left seven children. He went from home yesterday morning, about seven o'clock, apparently in good health, to go to his work, at Mr Tucker's, Maidenford. He did not return home last night, and this morning I went to Mr Tucker's to inquire for him. On arriving there, I went with Mr Tucker's grandson to a linhay, about a quarter of a mile from Maidenford House, and on entering the linhay, I saw my husband lying with his face and hands on the ground. I called to him, but he did not answer, and on touching him I found he was quite cold and dead. He has never been subject to fits, or ever to my knowledge required medical advice. His hat was off when I found him, under the ladder, which was against the roof of the linhay.
Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- This afternoon, about three o'clock, I examined the body of the deceased, at the place where the Jury have just seen it. I cannot find any external appearances of injury or violence having been sustained or inflicted on the body. I cannot state the exact cause of death without making an internal examination of the body. I cannot say whether he died from apoplexy or disease of the heart, but I have no reason to believe that his death was caused otherwise than by natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased was found dead in a linhay, and that his death resulted from Natural Causes."

Thursday 3 December 1868
EXETER - Suicide of a Gentleman. - On Friday an Inquest was held on the body of MR JOHN CLAUDE MARTIN, who committed suicide by jumping out of his bed-room window, at 23, East Southernhay, Exeter. Deceased was 37 years of age. About eight months ago his wife died at Newton, and it appeared to prey very much on his mind, so much so that he had to go to Scotland for a change. He was born in India, and lived there for some years. Eight years ago he had a sunstroke there, and since that his health has been very delicate. The Jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Thursday 10 December 1868
BERRYNARBOR - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Wednesday, the 2nd of December, at the 'Globe Inn,' Berrynarbor, on the body of the late unfortunate CAPTAIN MATTHEW HAWKINS, of the smack Hero, of Barnstaple, who met with an untimely death by the foundering of his vessel, in mid-Channel, about a month since. The following was the evidence:-
John Brooks deposed:- I live at Combmartin, and am an apprentice to a carpenter. On Monday evening last, at about half-past three o'clock, I happened to be in a field, on a cliff, in the parish of Berrynarbor, and saw a body floating in the sea. I descended to a place called Golden Cove, and saw the body was about two yards from the shore. I obtained assistance, and the body was landed. It had on a pair of fustian trousers, a pair of serge drawers, a pair of sea boots, a flannel shirt, a check shirt, a knit-shirt, a comfortable round the neck, a yellow south-wester tied round the chin, and a pair of red made braces. The body I have this day seen is the same, and was brought to the place where it now is.
MISS FRANCES ELIZABETH HAWKINS deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple, and am the daughter of the late MATTHEW HAWKINS, master mariner. About two months since my father left Barnstaple in his vessel named the Hero. My brother (JOHN) was mate of the vessel, and was on board when she sailed as well as a boy named John Lee. They sailed for Cardiff, and from thence went to Penharth, where they were wind-bound. About three weeks since we heard the vessel was missing, and we gave her up as being lost. Yesterday two red web braces, made by a saddler, part of a worsted scarf, which was violet and black, but is now faded, part of a knit shirt, which I now produce, and a brass button, about the size of a half-penny, with a stag upon it, were delivered to me. I recollect when I last saw the trousers remarking to my mother the oddity of my father in having only this one button of the kind upon his trousers. Towards the back part of my father's head there was a mark of a cut, which he received many years since, when in the Bristol trade. I identified all the articles which were delivered to me as my father's. When I left Barnstaple it was with the understanding that it was my brother's body that had washed in.
Mr Robert Moore, mariner, deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple. yesterday I saw the body, which I was not able to identify. Towards the back part of the head there was the mark of a cut. I took from the body all the articles enumerated in the daughter's evidence, and delivered them to her, who immediately identified them as belonging to her father. She gave a description of the articles before they were removed from the body, and also mentioned that her father had a cut towards the back part of his head.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The remains were interred in Berrynarbor church-yard. The family of the deceased request us to convey to the Rev. Walter Fursdon, rector of the parish, their grateful acknowledgment of the kindness which they received from the reverend gentleman, whose sympathy for them was shewn in a manner worthy of a kind-hearted Christian minister.

BRAUNTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, the 3rd of December, by John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of JOSEPH GILLARD, a French boy, who was accidentally drowned while assisting to take a vessel out over Barnstaple Bar. When the body was first picked up, it was supposed to be that of John Lee, who was lost in the Hero, as two men of Barnstaple said they could "recognise" the body, but on further inquiry it was found to be that of the French boy, who had resided for some time at Appledore, as the following evidence will show:-
Mary Smith deposed:- I live at Braunton, and am the wife of Charles Smith, labourer. About ten o'clock yesterday morning, I was on Saunton Sands picking up some firewood, when I saw the head of a human being at the high water mark, and about a land-yard below was the body. Upon it there was a Guernsey frock, a pair of duck trousers, blue stockings, a pair of boots, a striped cotton shirt, and a cloth waistcoat. Assistance was obtained, and the body was taken to the dead-house at Braunton.
William Horwood deposed:- I live at Braunton, and am an apprentice to a shoemaker. I lately resided at Appledore, and knew the deceased perfectly well. I last saw him alive at Appledore, on the 4th of November last, when he came into Mr Samuel Fursey's shop, shoemaker, at Appledore, where I was then working, to have his foot measured for a pair of boots, when Mr Fursey took the measurement. A short time before that his boots were brought to be mended, and I was close by when they were mended. I have this day seen his body, which is the body of JOSEPH GILLARD. I knew it to be the body from the clothes it had on, and particularly from the boots, which were mended in Mr Fursey's shop, at Appledore. I am perfectly satisfied it was the body of the deceased, JOSEPH GILLARD. Verdict:- "Found Drowned."

Thursday 17 December 1868
BUCKLAND FILLEIGH - Suicide. - On Friday last an Inquest was held at Buckland House, in this parish, before Mr H. A. Vallack, Coroner, touching the death of ELIZA JACKSON, house-keeper to Mr T. Fisher, who committed suicide on the previous day by strangling herself. It appeared from the evidence that on Thursday morning last, about seven o'clock, one of the servants, named Elizabeth Braund, went to the bedroom of the deceased when she found her lying in her bed apparently dead. She called another servant in her alarm, and then discovered that deceased had a silk handkerchief tied tightly round her neck, her face being swollen and discoloured; Mr Fisher was informed of the circumstance and Dr Owen, of Black Torrington, was at once sent for. On his arrival he examined the deceased, and found that death had been caused by strangulation, and that she had been dead three or four hours. On the previous night, about 10 o'clock, one of the female servants saw deceased walking to and fro in her bedroom and observed that there was something strange in her manner; heard her walking in her room for more than an hour. At three o'clock in the morning one of the servants got up to go to Exeter, and a cup of tea was taken to deceased in her bedroom; she drank part of the tea and appeared to be more comfortable than on the previous evening. The Jury, having heard the evidence, were of opinion that deceased destroyed herself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind, and gave their verdict accordingly.

Thursday 14 January 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple, on Monday, 11th instant, before the Borough Coroner, (Mr R. I. Bencraft), on the body of the infant child of JOHN BRACHER, a tailor, living in Prince's-street. The child was found dead in bed on the previous morning, by the side of its mother. Mr Cooke, surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The evidence adduced was to the following effect:-
MRS ISABELLA BRACHER deposed:- The deceased was my child, and had been apparently in good health since her birth. She was eleven weeks old. I put her to bed, about eleven o'clock on Saturday night last, where my husband was sleeping, and there was nothing amiss with the child then. I went to bed myself about three o'clock the next morning. The child was asleep when I went upstairs. After getting into bed, I suckled the child, and laid it outside me with my right arm round it. About half-past eight o'clock the same morning, when I awoke, I found the child a little way from me. On taking it up, I felt it was cold, and on looking I found it was quite dead. The child was lying on its side partly uncovered. I then gave the child to my husband, and called Mrs Passmore, who immediately went for Mr Cooke, the surgeon.
Mrs Jane Passmore, widow, deposed:- I occupy an upstair room in JOHN BRACHER'S house. I saw the deceased child on Saturday night last, about ten o'clock; it was then in a cradle, in the kitchen, apparently in its usual health. I went to bed about the same time the last witness did; we went upstairs together. Just as it became light I heard the child crying in the next room; it continued crying for a few minutes, not more than five. I heard no more of it until about half-past eight o'clock, when the last witness ran into my bed-room and said her child was dead. I went directly into her bedroom, and saw the child in its father's arms. I took it from him and found it was dead and partially cold. Its eyes were shut, and the mouth was partly open.
Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- Yesterday morning, about nine o'clock, I was called by the last witness, and went directly to the house of JOHN BRACHER, tailor, in Prince's street, in this borough. I saw the deceased child, had it undressed, and examined it. there was no appearance of violence or injury having been inflicted on the body. In my opinion it died from convulsions, and had apparently only been dead a short time, as it was quite warm. The child appeared to have been well nourished and properly cared for.

Thursday 28 January 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Ship Inn,' Quay, Barnstaple, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of MR WALTER PALMER, the landlord, who died on the evening of the previous day from the effects of a wound self-inflicted while labouring under mental aberration. The following evidence discloses the facts of the melancholy case:-
JANE PALMER deposed:- The deceased was my husband; he was about forty-six years of age. For the last three months he has been very unwell and in very low spirits, caused by his having sustained heavy losses connected with a vessel that belonged to him. He has not been drinking much lately, and has not, to the best of my knowledge, been intoxicated during the last three months. He got up on Wednesday morning last about half-past six o'clock, and went down stairs and lit the fire. He brought me up an article of dress, and then went down stairs again. When I went down stairs I could not find him in the house; I called him but received no answer. I then ran across to Mr A. Bater, who came over directly and went up into a loft at the back of our house. Before I called Mr Bater, I observed a ladder had been placed against the door leading to this loft. I then ran upstairs and found his razor, which he kept in the window in his bedroom, was gone. Mr Bater brought the deceased into the house soon afterwards, and assisted him upstairs and into his bed. Mr Cooke came directly and saw him, and attended him until his death, which happened last evening about six o'clock. I was present when he died; I did not leave him from the time Mr Bater brought him into the house until he died. During the whole of this time his mind was wandering; he said he saw people in his room, and talked incoherently.
Alfred Bater deposed:- On Wednesday morning last, about a quarter to eight o'clock, I was called by the last witness and went directly to this house, which is opposite mine. I went directly up into a loft at the back of the house, and found the deceased. He was lying on his face and hands between a bundle of straw and the wall. I called him and he answered me. I felt his neck, it was wet, and on going to the light I saw blood on my hands. I then tied a cloth round his throat and assisted him down the ladder. I asked him how he came to do it, and he said he would not go to the asylum. I helped him upstairs and into his bed. I then went for Mr Cooke. After Mr Cooke had attended to him I took a light and searched in the loft; I found a razor on the top of the wall near the place where I found deceased. There was a candlestick and an unlighted candle and a box of matches in the candlestick on the wall close by the razor. The deceased had been in a very low state of spirits lately, and something appeared to be affecting his mind.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- On Wednesday morning, about eight o'clock, I was called by the last witness to the deceased. I went directly and found deceased in bed, undressed. I removed a cloth which was round his neck and found he had a large jagged wound across the front part of his throat, about four inches long. On examination I found it had opened the upper part of the windpipe. There was not much haemorrhage, the principal vessels in the neck not having been interfered with. I dressed the wound. The deceased said he was very sorry he had done it, but it was through trouble owing to his losses on his vessel. I saw him several times during the day; he was in a very agitated state of mind and delirious. I saw him the following morning; he was then in a delirious state and breathing with difficulty. I did not think he would recover. I was sent for about six o'clock last night and found he was dead. I have not the least doubt that the deceased was of unsound mind when he inflicted the injury on his throat, which caused his death.
The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased cut his throat whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

MORTHOE - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident befell the wife of MR GEORGE CHUGG, yeoman, Ossaborough, in the parish of Morthoe, on Sunday last. She attended Divine worship at Morthoe in the morning, and on returning home after service in a vehicle, in company with a servant man who was driving, a rat suddenly ran across the road, and she desired the servant man to jump out of the gig and kill it. He got down to do so, when the reins unfortunately became entangled with the breeching, or harness. The horse thereupon became restive, commenced kicking, and then bolted. MRS CHUGG was thrown out violently, and sustained fatal injury. She was immediately conveyed to Ossaborough, which was but a short distance from the spot, and Messrs Gardner and Stoneham, surgeons, Ilfracombe, were sent for, but on their arrival life was pronounced to be extinct.
The Inquest. - Was held on Monday, the 25th of January, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County of Devon, when the following evidence was adduced:-
John Lovering deposed:- I live at the house of MR GEORGE CHUGG, at Morthoe, as a farm servant. I knew the deceased, MRS CHUGG: she was the wife of MR GEO. CHUGG, and was about fifty-three years of age. Yesterday (Sunday) I drove MRS CHUGG to the Wesleyan Chapel, at Morthoe, in a dog-cart. Arthur Gammon, who is a fellow-servant, was also in the dog-cart. As far as I know, the horse which I drove was quiet. I have before driven him. On our return home, about one o'clock, I saw a rat by the side of the road, and I said to MRS CHUGG, "Look at that," and she said, "Jump off, Jack, and kill it." I got off and gave her the reins, which she took, and I took up a stone to throw at the rat, but before I could throw it, the horse was gone off. The cart got out of my sight by a turn in the road. I followed quickly, and when I came within sight of it, I saw it was upset. I went to the spot and picked up MRS CHUGG. She was lying on her right side. She neither moved nor spoke. I got assistance and she was taken to her home, which was near.
Arthur Gammon deposed:<- I am a farm servant and live at MR GEORGE CHUGG'S, Morthoe. I knew the deceased MRS MARY CHUGG - she was the wife of MR GEO. CHUGG. Yesterday morning, I went to the Wesleyan Chapel, at Morthoe, with MRS CHUGG. John Lovering was with us. We were in a dog-cart driven by one horse. On our return home we saw a rat in the road, and MRS CHUGG desired Lovering to jump out and kill it. He gave the reins to MRS CHUGG and jumped out, and the horse immediately ran off at a brisk trot, and then into a gallop. Both MRS CHUGG and myself tried to pull him in, but we could not succeed, and the trap was upset, and I was thrown into the hedge. When I got up I saw MRS CHUGG lying in the road by the side of the hedge. I called to Lovering and he came as quick as he could. I spoke to her but she did not answer. With assistance we conveyed her to her home.
Jane Davis deposed:- I live as a servant at MR GEO. CHUGG'S. My mistress, MRS CHUGG, went yesterday to the Wesleyan Chapel, at Morthoe, drawn in a dog-cart by one horse. In the afternoon, between one and two o'clock, she was brought home senseless. She neither moved nor spoke. She was laid upon a sofa. There was a gurgling noise in the throat, and to the best of my knowledge she died in about a quarter of an hour after she was brought home.
Mr Philip Stoneham deposed:- I reside at Ilfracombe, and am a medical man. Between half-past one and two o'clock yesterday afternoon, I received notice to go to Morthoe forthwith, to see MRS CHUGG, who had been thrown from a trap. I at once went to Morthoe, and when I arrived I found her laying on the sofa. I examined and found a good deal of effusion of blood about the neck under the skin, and on further examination found she had fractured her neck. The top of her bonnet was covered with the dirt of the road. She was a very heavy woman, and the injuries she received were such as may be caused by being thrown from a vehicle. The Jury returned as their verdict, "Accidentally killed by being thrown from a dog-cart."
Very deep sympathy is felt for MR CHUGG. A few weeks since his eldest son succumbed to a painful disease which cut him off in the morning of his days; and now he is called to sustain a most distressing bereavement in the sudden and accidental death of one of the best of wives. The deceased was a gifted and pious woman, and her bereaved husband and children sorrow not as those without hope.

Thursday 4 February 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest - Shocking Case. - On Thursday evening last an Inquest was held before Mr James Flexman, Borough Coroner, on the body of MARY LANE, aged 18 years, at the Union Workhouse, who had died from the effects of a burn. There was a respectable Jury, of which Mr Philip Widgery was the foreman. The following evidence will show the nature of the case, and which was taken after the Jury and Coroner had viewed the body, which lay in a shell in the dead house and presented a dreadful appearance:-
ANN LANE, on being sworn, said:- I reside at Highbray, in the parish of Southmolton, and am the widow of WILLIAM LANE, brother of the deceased. On Saturday last I went to fetch some water from a well, and I heard screams proceeding from the house of WILLIAM LANE, the deceased's father. I immediately went and opened his door, when I found the room full of smoke. I went in a little further, and saw the deceased in a flame. I took up some old things (rags) that lay in the house, and endeavoured to extinguish the fire, and I succeeded in putting it out. She had on a linen apron. I think it was about eleven o'clock in the morning. I helped the deceased up over the stairs; she walked up. Sarah Parker also assisted in helping her up. I gave her some tea to drink. I saw her several times during the day before she was taken to the Union Workhouse. The deceased's house was about two minutes walk from mine, and I had to pass her house to go to the well. I have known the deceased for nine years. She was a perfect idiot, and incapable of doing anything for herself. I found a chair by the fire, and the bellows near. The deceased was sitting in the chair with her arms uplifted. Her mother was ill in bed.
SARAH LANE deposed as follows:- I am the sister of the deceased, and live with my parents. Mother has been ill and confined to her bed for the past eight months. My sister was incapable of taking care of herself. She was subject to falling down, sometimes three or four times a day. She was scarcely ever left alone long. On Saturday last I went for water. My sister was on a chair in the corner near the fire. The pump is about 40 yards from my house. The last witness called me and told me to be quick, as she thought mother was worse. I left the pitchers by the pump and went home immediately. My sister was sitting on the chair, and when she saw me she came towards me. I took off her clothes downstairs, put a sheet round her, took her to bed, and put linseed oil about her. I went for my father and he came home afterwards. Immediately after the accident we sent for Mr Furse, the doctor. He came between three and four and ordered a cup of tea for her and she drank it. Mr Furse said as mother was so ill my sister ought not to remain in the room. Mrs Oaks, Earl Fortescue's housekeeper, consulted with Mr Furse, and it was thought desirable to take her to the Union Workhouse. Earl Fortescue sent her in, in one of his carriages. She left our house between seven and eight o'clock. Mrs Oaks, my aunt, and I accompanied her to the Union. Every care was taken of her; Mrs Oaks gave her brandy and water several times on the road. My sister (the deceased) never spoke to be understood. I was with her to the time of her death, and assisted the nurse in doing all that was required. She had every nourishment and died this morning about half-past six. She partook freely of everything that was brought to her. She had everything much better than she could have had at home.
WM LANE, the deceased's father, said:- My daughter was 18 in June last. She had never been well from her birth. My wife is in a dying state. I am quite satisfied with what has been done for my daughter.
the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner remarked that it was the worst case he had ever witnessed. He was surprised that the deceased, being so horribly burnt all over the body, had lived so long. She could not have possessed any nervous system capable of receiving the shock. He (the Coroner) believed that 99 people out of a hundred would have died from the shock, and she appeared to be quite unconscious. The Jurors expressed themselves strongly on the kind sympathy which Earl Fortescue had evinced in favour of the deceased, his lordship having taken considerable interest in the case and sent her in one of his carriages, with his housekeeper, to the Union Workhouse and arranged that the deceased's sister should remain in the establishment to attend upon and comfort her.

Thursday 11 February 1869
APPLEDORE - Accident. - At Appledore on Friday morning, two workmen engaged in scraping the ship Louisa fell into the river, the ropes holding the stage on which they stood having given way. One of the men, Staddon, swam to the mooring chain, and was saved; the other, WOODLOCK, sank, and when recovered fifteen minutes afterwards was dead. He leaves a widow and two children unprovided for. The ropes had been burnt by a fire which the men were using at their work. An Inquest was held on Saturday before J. H. Toller, Esq., when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death by Drowning." We are glad to hear that a subscription is being made for the bereaved family.

Thursday 25 February 1869
EXETER - Sudden Death at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Friday at the 'Three Tuns,' Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of ROBERT PITTS, who died suddenly about one o'clock that morning at the above inn. The deceased was about 48 years of age, and was formerly in the employ of Mr Davy, of Countess Weir, as farm bailiff. About a month ago the deceased left his place, and since then has lodged at intervals at the 'Three Tuns.' The deceased went to the house on Thursday last, and on the following morning got up and went out and did not return until between five and six in the evening. He was very restless and appeared to have been drinking all the evening, and between eight and nine o'clock asked for a candle, saying that he wanted to go to bed. About half-past twelve o'clock the servant girl came down stairs and told Mr William Routley that the deceased was out of bed and in the passage. Mr Routley went up stairs, and, with the assistance of his father, Mr Robert Routley, got the deceased into bed, and then noticing that he seemed very ill, went for a doctor. Mr Woodman was in attendance in a few minutes, but the deceased was dead. Mr Woodman now said that he was of opinion that death was caused by a fit of apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - Awfully Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'Exeter Inn,' Litchdon-street, before Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, touching the death of MR EPHRAIM HANCOCK, an employee at the Barnstaple Iron Foundry, who died suddenly on the night preceding from the rupture of a blood-vessel. The facts will be gleaned from the following evidence:-
Mr Richard Ashton, Secretary of the Old Gas Company, deposed:- Last evening, about half-past nine o'clock, I called at the house of deceased, and he asked me to come in. I had some conversation with him, and he promised to deliver some handbills for me. A person called Thomas Chapple was with him. We went into the 'Exeter Inn,' which is next door to the deceased's residence. I asked him to have some beer. He said he had been poorly in his stomach, and would rather have three pennyworth of brandy, which I ordered for him. He drank it, and I remained with him about ten minutes, when I left him in the kitchen of the 'Exeter Inn.' This was about ten o'clock. He appeared in his usual health and spirits, was perfectly sober, and not the least excited.
Mr Robert Atkins, innkeeper, deposed:- I was well acquainted with the deceased, for he lived next door to me, and I have seen him nearly every day for several years past. He has lately been apparently in his usual good health. Last night he came into this house with the last witness, and the deceased remained until about eleven o'clock. During the time he was here he drank three three-pennyworth's of brandy, being three quarters of a noggin. When he left he appeared to be very well and wished me good night, as usual. He went out at the back door, and crossed the yard to his house. I was called up from my bed by a knocking at the door about half past twelve o'clock. I went immediately to the deceased's house by the back way, and on going upstairs I found him in bed. There was a large quantity of blood by his right side. I saw at once that he was dead, and remained in the room until Mr Cooke, surgeon, arrived, which was about ten minutes afterwards.
MRS LEONORA HANCOCK deposed:- The deceased was my husband. He went to bed last night, about twelve o'clock. He appeared to be as usual, but he had been suffering from a cold on his chest lately, and had a cough. Mr Cooke had been attending him. After he had been in bed about a quarter of an hour he raised himself up on his knees. I heard a gurgling sound, and I spoke to him, but he did not answer. I got out of bed and procured a light. I then saw a quantity of blood issuing from his mouth He was quite dead, and on his face. My daughters went for assistance, and the last witness came up within ten minutes. He had his supper - some roast pork - about half-past eleven o'clock. He was forty-six years of age.
Mr Michael Cook, surgeon, deposed:- Last night, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I was called to the house of the deceased. I found him in bed, lying on his right side. On examining him I saw he was quite dead. There was a large quantity of blood around him. The bed was quite saturated; it appeared to have come from his mouth. There was sufficient haemorrhage to cause his immediate death. He applied to me last Monday or Tuesday, and I found he was suffering from an affection of the lungs. He had a bad cough and great difficulty in breathing. I gave him some medicine. I saw him again on Wednesday; he appeared to be much relieved. I saw him at the iron foundry yesterday, where he worked, but did not speak to him. The cause of his death was the rupture of a large blood vessel in his chest. A verdict of "Died suddenly from Natural Causes" was returned.

Thursday 11 March 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening last, at the residence of Mr Thomas Lyddon, in East-street, on the body of a widow named ELIZABETH KINGDON, formerly of Northmolton, who was discovered dead in her bed that morning. The following evidence was taken before Mr James Flexman, the Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr J. A. Kingdon was foreman:-
Mary Burnett deposed:- I reside in this borough. I saw the deceased last Thursday, and she asked me to come and live with her, which I did on the evening of that day I have been out at work by day and have attended to her night and morning. I got her breakfast before I went out mornings. I gave her some of her meals on Saturday, and saw her walking in the street on that day with her sister. I gave her, I believe, tea and bread and butter, on Saturday night last, for her supper. She got up on Sunday, and walked in the court and garden two or three times, in the afternoon. She complained of being poorly, saying that she felt "shivery," and that her legs were swollen. She went to bed about four o'clock, and I gave her some tea twice, after which she said she was better. When I awoke, about eight o'clock this morning, I called the deceased, but go no answer, so I touched her, and found that she was cold. I called Mr Lyddon before I dressed, and we found she was dead. The deceased had been in the Infirmary for nine weeks. She has not wanted for necessaries, always having had a plenty of food. Fanny Venn also gave evidence similar to the last witness.
The Coroner asked whether the Jurors were satisfied that deceased had died by the visitation of God. He thought, after hearing the evidence, that no other decision could be arrived at; in which the Jury concurred, and a verdict was returned accordingly. Deceased was 62 years of age.

Thursday 25 March 1869
DEVONPORT - A Child Killed By The Fall Of A Chimney At Devonport. - About eight o'clock on Friday night the chimney of a house at 106, Pembroke-street, Devonport, suddenly gave way, completely smashing in the roof of a tenement at the back, which was used as a workshop by a shoemaker named JAMES POTTER, who was unfortunately there at work, his daughter, an infant, named RACHEL EMILY POTTER, being on a bed in the room. Both were completely buried in the debris. POTTER was badly injured about the head, face and hands, but with some little exertions succeeded in extricating himself from the ruin and proceeded to another room, where he procured a light and went to look for his child. With the assistance of some of the neighbours he discovered the child under the rubbish, still lying on the bed, the legs of which had sunk several inches below the flooring. The Messrs. Wilson were immediately in attendance, but pronounced life extinct. At the Inquest held, on Saturday afternoon, Mr Edward Thos. Nancollis, builder, of Devonport, stated that the chimney was from five to six feet high. He did not see anything about the tenement itself to lead him to believe that it was unsafe or unfit for habitation. The bricks appeared to be very good, but he was unable to give an opinion as to whether the chimney was safe or not just previous to its fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 April 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Suffocation At Barnstaple. Inquest on the Body. - Between two and three o'clock on Good Friday morning, JOHN DENNIS, a labourer, much addicted to drinking, was found by a policeman lying in an insensible state by the edge of the limekiln at Pottington. He was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, where he died shortly after his admittance, death being caused by inhaling the poisonous vapour which escaped from the kiln, viz., carbonic acid gas. An Inquest was held on the body on the following morning, before Mr Incledon Bencraft (Borough Coroner), when the following evidence was taken:-
P.C. Jones deposed:- I am a policeman of this borough. Last Thursday afternoon I saw the deceased, about five o'clock, at the 'Braunton Inn.' He was very drunk, and I turned him out of that Inn; he had broken a pane of glass there. I visited the limekiln at Pottington in company with Serjeant Songhurst, yesterday morning, about half-past two o'clock. The gate was locked, and I climbed over the wall. On going to the kiln, I found two men lying on the kiln. One man called Blake was lying on the middle of the kiln, and the other man, the deceased, was lying about a foot from the edge of the kiln. There was a stage close to his head, and his hand was near the stage; he was breathing very quickly and hard. I took him away from the side of the kiln; he was quite insensible. I then called Serjeant Songhurst, and, with the assistance of the other man, Blake, we took the deceased out over the kiln wall and conveyed him to the station-house in a cart. Serjeant Songhurst went for Mr Fernie, who came directly and saw the deceased. By Mr Fernie's advice the deceased was taken on the stretcher to the North Devon Infirmary, and he was given into the charge of the House Surgeon. The deceased was breathing when I left him at the Infirmary; he never recovered his consciousness. The deceased was a labourer, and was much addicted to drinking. He used to work at discharging vessels.
Mr James Wood Cooke deposed:- I am House Surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary. The deceased was brought to this Institution yesterday morning, about half-past four o'clock, by the last witness and others. He was perfectly insensible and very cold, and was immediately put into a bed. He had a severe burn on the right hand, and he was burnt on the upper lid of each eye. He recovered a little after we had got a little warmth into him, but he never recovered consciousness. He was unable to swallow. He died last night about half-past seven o'clock. His death was caused by inhaling the poisonous vapour which escapes from a lime-kiln, namely, carbonic acid gas. Verdict:- "Accidentally suffocated at Pottington Limekiln."

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death of Another Woman. - An Inquest was held at the dwelling house of Robert Galliford, in Mr Smyth's Court, on Wednesday evening last, before Mr James Flexman, Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury of which Mr Goman was foreman, on the body of ANN LAKE, aged 78, there lying dead. ROBT. GALLIFORD, her brother-in-law, deposed:- The deceased had complained for some time past of being ill; she had been suffering for some time past from asthma, but went to bed as usual on the previous evening. He heard her as she slept in an adjoining room, several times during the night, and once particularly as the day was breaking. He called her in the morning but she did not reply, and he went and found she was dead. Mrs Lock proved seeing the deceased soon afterwards. She had examined her and there were no marks of violence about her. The Jury unanimous in their verdict "That the deceased died from the Visitation of God." - This is the second woman who has recently died in the town in a precisely similar manner.

Thursday 8 April 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Friday, an Inquest was held before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, touching the death of ANN CANN, 68 years of age. On the previous afternoon, the deceased, an inmate of the Union Workhouse, while partaking of tea in the nursery, where she used to assist in the care of the children suddenly threw up her hands and fell to the floor. She never spoke or struggled, and when lifted up was found to be dead. The medical evidence went to show that death was caused by disease of the heart. The verdict of the Jury was "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 15 April 1869
EXETER - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Topsham Inn,' Exeter, before Mr W. Hooper, City Coroner, on the body of HANNAH NORRISH, thirty-six years of age, wife of JAMES NORRISH, a farm labourer, of Yeoford, Crediton. The deceased was standing, according to her own statement, made to her husband, watching the North Devon train, and, thinking she was safe, attempted to go across the line, when an engine came up and knocked her down. Her left arm was severed. George Lock, railway porter, said he observed the deceased at first standing near a heap of coals at the station. A train was in the station, on its way to Barnstaple. An engine was also on the Okehampton branch, and was despatched a short distance for a horse-box. Witness was on the engine at the time, and heard a scream. The driver pulled up immediately, and it was then ascertained that the deceased's left arm was across the rail, having been severed from the body. The evidence of James Clements, the engine driver, was taken, after the Coroner had, in the usual way, cautioned him. In his evidence he said he blew the whistle previous to moving out on the main line. He could not otherwise account for the deceased putting herself in danger, but that she was watching the train just left,, and did not observe his engine approaching her. Mr Ley, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was received into the Hospital in a very weak state, suffering from the effects of the accident and loss of blood. She went on satisfactorily, when haemorrhage set in, from which she recovered, but on Saturday it returned and she died. Death resulted from the shock of the accident and great loss of blood. He remarked that the deceased had several times told him that she did not lay blame to any person. A Juryman thought that the porter should be called in and told so, and this was accordingly done. The Coroner then said that the deceased had exculpated from blame any person, so that the driver and porter were both free from blame. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EASTDOWN - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquisition was held on Thursday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, at the residence of Mr Alfred John Houghton, at Eastdown House, touching the death of a visitor - a young gentleman, named ALFRED ALBERT DICKENSON, who was found dead in his bedroom on the previous Tuesday morning, by his kind host. The following was the evidence taken at the Inquest:-
Alfred John Houghton deposed:- I reside at Eastdown House, in the parish of Eastdown. I knew the deceased, ALFRED ALBERT DICKENSON. He was a clergyman, and was, I should think, about 28 years of age. He was a visitor at my house. He was in tolerable health, with the exception of a cold, but on Monday he was sick, and brought up a lot of bile. In the evening he had his tea and a lamb chop, and afterwards sat by the fire in an easy chair for about a quarter of an hour. About ten o'clock he went to bed, and appeared to be cheerful. I went up with him when he went to bed. He complained that his head was aching, and it was suggested that a mustard plaster applied to his neck would relieve the pain, and it was applied. I left him at half-past 10 o'clock, but about 11 o'clock I went to him again to know if he wanted anything, and he was awake, and his last words were "Good night, old fellow; I hope to have a comfortable night." I saw nothing more of him that night, nor heard anything. At half-past nine o'clock the next morning there were two letters and a paper for him, and I went to his room as I had always done. He had been staying with me since last Monday week. I opened his bedroom door and found him lying with his face upon the floor inclining to the left side. His nostrils and mouth were covered with mucous. I immediately called for assistance, and he was turned on his back, and his mouth and nostrils were sponged with warm water, when he draw his last breath. I immediately sent in for Dr Budd, of Barnstaple. On Monday morning, when I went to him, he was suffering from cold, and complained of bile, and expressed a wish for some chicken broth, which I took to him, when I immediately perceived that there was something peculiar with his left arm, he not having the free use of it, and he was obliged to shift his body in order to eat his broth. As long as I had known him he had a peculiar twitch with his head, which was drawn to the left by a series of jerks, and the left eye appeared smaller than the right He was, as far as I know, a very temperate man. His friends reside in the county of Westmoreland.
Maria Wescott deposed:- I live at Eastdown House, as cook. The deceased was on a visit to my master's house. He had had a cold for some days. My bedroom was next to his. During the night of Monday last I heard him making a noise, and I thought he was snoring. If I had heard anything unusual I should have immediately called my master. On Tuesday morning, whilst we were at breakfast in the kitchen, my master came down stairs and requested us to go up to the deceased's room instantly. My fellow servants and myself went up and found him lying upon his face upon the floor. I called my mistress, and he was turned on his back, and his hands were put into warm water, and he immediately expired. He had on one of his slippers.
Dr Rd. Budd deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple, and am a doctor of medicine. I had seen the deceased a few times, and observed a peculiar twitching of his head. On Tuesday afternoon last I was summoned to him. I found him in bed on his back, and observed a bruise on the left temple and a bruise on each knee. From the evidence I have heard I have no doubt in my mind that the deceased died of suffocation, while in an epileptic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Suffocation during an Epileptic Fit."

Thursday 3 June 1869
COUNTISBURY - Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at Countisbury, last week, touching the death of MARIA RAWLE, whose body was found in the river Lynn on the previous Friday. The deceased was a domestic servant, 25 years of age, and had lived in the service of Mr John Litson, of South Willsham Farm, about a month. On Thursday, the 20th instant, about mid-day, she left the house, her mistress thinking she was going on an errand, and did not return. Search was made for her in the night and also on the following morning, when she was found in the water lying upon her stomach, quite dead. The body appeared to have been washed down by the stream and stopped by a rock. Mrs Symons, wife of Mr G. Symons, a retired farmer, living at Parracombe, stated that just before Lady-day last Mr Richards, relieving officer, told her the deceased was in the Union Workhouse, and asked witness to take her on trial for a month as a servant. Witness did so, and she remained five or six weeks. At the end of that time witness paid a visit to her daughter, at Willsham, and deceased accompanied her, being very eager to do so. The deceased's temper was very curious, and she would sometimes sulk for hours. When deceased entered her service she said she had been in the workhouse nearly five years, and was very glad to come out, as she had not half food enough and did not like picking rope. Mrs Litson said the deceased at times appeared to be quite wild, and she did not intend to keep her, being afraid of her. A fellow servant proved having repeatedly heard the deceased say she would rather drown herself than go back to the union. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 10 June 1869
ATHERINGTON - A Farm Labourer Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the 'Carpenters Arms', Atherington, on Saturday last, by John H. Toller, Esq., County Coroner, touching the death of JOHN MARLOW, a farm labourer, who was found drowned in the river Taw on the day preceding. The following was the evidence adduced:-
Grace Hunt deposed:- I reside at Atherington, and am a labouring woman. The deceased was my son-in-law; he was a labourer, resided at Atherington, and was about forty-five years of age. I last saw him alive yesterday morning, between seven and eight o'clock. He was at that time having his breakfast, and shortly after left home to go to his work. He was at work at Mr Blackmore's, digging potato trenches. He left home in good temper. Between twelve and one o'clock, I took him his dinner, but he was not at work, but his mattock was on the spot. It cut me to the heart when I did not find him at work, as he had often said he would have a watery grave. He has often said so for the last four months. I was, therefore, very much alarmed, and I remained there some time. I did not know what to do.
John Hooper deposed:- I am gamekeeper to the Hon. Mark Rolle, and reside at Chittlehampton. About a quarter after eight o'clock this morning, I was down by the river Taw, and heard some men calling. I went to the spot, and they told me they were searching for MARLOW. I waited on the bank and instructed them how to search and lent them crooks. They searched Post Pool and got him up, and after they had got him up I went over in the boat in which the men were and helped them from the bank of the river to the road, and from thence the deceased was taken home. He was quite dead. I knew him perfectly well.
George Norman deposed:- I live at Highbickington, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased JOHN MARLOW. This morning, as I was going to my work I heard a man calling out on the opposite side of the water. I asked him what was the matter, and he said he thought MARLOW was drowned and that my brother was gone up for the boat. I went up against him and met him, and went into the boat with him, and we commenced searching for the deceased, and after searching with others for about half-an-hour, at length found him in the river. He was taken out of the water, but he was quite dead. He was then taken home. The Jury returned as their verdict, "Found Drowned, but how deceased got into the water there is no evidence to show."

Thursday 17 June 1869
NEWTON BUSHEL - A lad named LAKE, whose parents reside in Mill-lane, Newton Bushel, was accidentally drowned on Friday in the mill-leat, by falling into the water, just above the Newton Mills. An Inquest was held in the evening at the Town-hall, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

HARTLAND - Fatal Accident - On Monday night, a shocking and fatal accident happened at Hartland Quay. MOSES BAKER, in the employ of Mr Brimicombe, a maltster, was working in the rigging of the schooner Susanna, when he fell off and was killed on the spot. Deceased was well known to visitors at Hartland quay and much respected, and leaves a wife and young family to mourn his untimely death. An Inquest was held today (Thursday), when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 1 July 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death at Barnstaple - Inquest On The Body, Yesterday. - An Inquest was held at the 'Ilfracombe Inn,' High-street, Barnstaple, yesterday (Wednesday), before Mr I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM CARTER, who died somewhat suddenly the same morning. The following evidence was taken:-
John Heard, lath maker, deposed:- I have worked with deceased at Mr Rawle's, Rolle's Quay, for about three months. He came to his work, making laths, this morning as usual, at seven o'clock. He went home to breakfast, at half-past eight and returned a little after nine. He then appeared to be in his usual state of health, but about a quarter to eleven he complained of a pain in his left side, and left off working. He appeared to get better, but after a little while he said the pain had returned. He then went upstairs, and on his return said he had had some gin; about five minutes afterwards he began to vomit, and I persuaded him to go home. I assisted him to put on his jacket, and helped him as far as Mr Gould's yard gate, where he was again sick. I managed to get him to his lodgings, at Mrs Dennis', 61, High-street, where I left him in the passage, and went at his request for Mr Harper, surgeon. I left word at the surgery for Mr Harper to visit the deceased directly.
Maria Rawle said she had known the deceased for several years; he had worked for her brother as lath-maker. He came upstairs from the workshop and asked her for two-penny worth of gin, which he drank whilst she went to get change for a shilling he had given her. She noticed that he looked very pale, particularly about the mouth, and asked him what was the matter, when he replied he had a violent pain in his chest.
Elizabeth Ennis said:- The deceased lodged with me for seven years and was about 60 years of age. He had lately complained of pain in his head and chest. He returned from his work about eleven o'clock, accompanied by John Heard. He sat down on his bed and was very sick. I gave him a cup of tea. I called in a neighbour (Mr Prideaux) and deceased expired in our presence without a struggle.
Mr J. Harper, surgeon, deposed:- I have attended the deceased occasionally for the last four years. About a fortnight ago he complained of rheumatism in the head, for which I gave him some medicine. In the winter he was suffering from dropsy, and I then attended him. This morning, about twelve o'clock, I went to his lodgings, in High-street, where I found him lying across the bed, partially undressed. I found he was quite dead. I think he had been dead a few minutes. I believe his death was caused from a rupture of some internal vessel and was the result of natural causes. Verdict - "Died Suddenly from Natural Causes."

Thursday 8 July 1869
TIVERTON - Frightful Suicide of a Lady at Tiverton Junction. - A dreadful suicide by a lady of advanced age occurred yesterday, on the branch line running from Tiverton junction to the town of Tiverton. About a mile and a quarter from the junction, close to Wescott's Mill, the driver of the train which leaves Tiverton at 11.25 in the morning, to catch the twelve o'clock train at the junction, observed a woman come out from a plantation and walk along the permanent way for a short distance. When the engine was about 120 yards distant, the engine man to his horror saw her deliberately lay herself across the rail, placing her head in such a position that the advancing train must inevitably crush it. He blew his danger whistle, but the woman took no notice of the warning; then he put on his break, and signalled to the guard to do the same. All was to no purpose, and almost in an instant the wheels passed over the outstretched body. The poor victim had laid herself on the rail on her side with her face to the locomotive, and the engine man saw her gazing fixedly at it as it approached her. The train was descending an incline at the time, and was going at the rate of nearly forty miles an hour, so that it was impossible to stop it in such a short distance. The body was mangled in a frightful manner, the head being completely split in two and pieces of the body scattered to the distance of between forty and fifty feet. The train was put back to Tiverton, and information given to the Police. The remains were gathered by a police constable, who had been communicated with, and conveyed to the deceased's residence to await an Inquest. The poor creature proved to be a married lady named ELIZABETH HONEYWELL, the wife of MR WM. VINNICOMBE HONEYWELL, of Rose Cottage, Halberton. It is stated that she was in receipt of an annuity of a hundred guineas a year, which terminates with her existence, and that she had been married only a short time. She was fifty-nine years of age, and for some time past she had been noticed to be rather strange in her manner, but it excited no apprehension, and it was not considered necessary to put her under restraint. The engine man states that he saw her sitting on a fence close to the spot where the rash deed was committed, when the train passed earlier in the morning.

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Gun Accident. - On Friday afternoon a painful sensation was created in this town by the intelligence that MR JOHN BATES, of Umberleigh House, Atherington, had met with a sudden and violent death at his shooting box, at Whitefield Barton, in the parish of Marwood. MR BATES was well known, and from the general esteem in which he was held the greatest anxiety was felt among all classes to be put into possession of the facts, the more so as various sinister rumours were afloat as to the melancholy case. The arrival of a messenger from the scene of the catastrophe to invoke medical aid, followed by official information conveyed to the Coroner, left no doubt as to the death having taken place; the circumstances connected therewith will be found detailed in the evidence taken at the Inquest held on the body.
The name of the deceased was familiar to commercial men throughout the country, from his long and intimate connextion with the West of England and South Wales District Bank, of which, till recently, he was the principal and trusted manager. He was a man of high character and the strictest integrity, of great business capacity and sound judgment, especially on matters of finance; and among the "merchant princes" of Bristol, with whom he had intimate daily intercourse during his public career, he was held in high esteem. Under his fostering care, the bank, of which he was the mainspring and manager, extended its ramifications and multiplied the number of its branches, thus laying a broad basis which ensures its stability and is an earnest of future prosperity. A few years since deceased held the office of Mayor of Bristol, and well sustained the civic dignity. He subsequently retired from all official connexion with the city, and also relinquished the office he had held with so much credit at the West of England Bank, the directors awarding him a well-merited pension, and the duties and responsibilities of manager devolved on Mr J. Pomeroy Gilbert, late of Barnstaple. MR BATES then took up his residence in this neighbourhood, where he had for several years previously practised experimental farming on an extensive scale, and, having purchased a valuable estate in the parish of Marwood (Whitefield, the old family seat of the Leys), his intention was to have built himself a suitable mansion on the site of the farm-house, and to have enjoyed his otium cum dignitate for the remainder of his days. He was accustomed to visit Whitefield frequently - to remain there for several days of the week, in order to superintend farming operations and to carry out his plans for the future. On such occasions he was wont to derive pleasure from shooting on the estate. He was so occupied on Friday, when the fatal accident occurred which it is our duty to chronicle.
The Inquest. - At eight o'clock on Friday evening an Inquest was held at Whitefield Carton, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, and the following Jury:- Mr John Crang, foreman, Messrs. Thomas Carder, William Geen, Thomas Westren, Robert Harding, William Bater, Matthew Bament, Thomas Kelly, John Fairchild, John Rudd, William Lynch, Walter Fry, and James Beer. The Jury having been duly impanelled proceeded to view the body, which was lying in the sitting room on the ground floor. On their return the following evidence was adduced:-
Mr Bythesea Mortimer sworn:- I reside at the Elms, Bath, and am a midshipman in Her Majesty's service. I knew the deceased very well. He was my uncle by marriage. He was 69 years of age. I came out to Whitefield Barton on Monday last. The deceased resided at Umberleigh House, Atherington, whither I intended to have returned this day. I breakfasted with MR BATES this morning. He was then in good health and spirits and said he was going out rabbit shooting. After breakfast I went out to the spring from whence water is conveyed to this house, and did not return until half-past twelve o'clock. I then went into the dining room. On my way I met Mrs Courtenay and spoke to her as she was going into the scullery. On opening the door I saw my uncle lying on the floor, and went and told Mrs Courtenay. He was lying on his face, and his gun was by his right side. The ramrod was by his left leg. I did not touch him, but gave an alarm. Mr Courtenay heard me and he went into the room. I then took up the gun and saw that both caps had exploded. I then sent for a medical man. I thought deceased had fallen down in a fit, as there was no blood about. He was said by his friends to be careless in the use of his gun. My uncle was a man of good spirits and had been in good spirits all the week. I heard no gun go off this morning.
Mrs Mary Courtenay sworn:- I am the wife of Thos. Courtenay, and live at Whitefield Barton, which was the property of the late MR JOHN BATES. The deceased came here last Monday, with Mr Mortimer, to remain for a few days. Since then I have seen him frequently; he appeared to be in good health and spirits, except that he had pain from a boil at the back of his neck. I waited on him. This morning I carried him his breakfast at eight o'clock. He was then in his usual spirits. After breakfast he went on the farm, but returned at about twelve o'clock, came through the kitchen and asked for a glass of water, which I took to him. He generally keeps his gun in the sitting room, but at night takes it to his bedroom. He was sitting in the great chair when I took him the water. He only drank part of it; the remainder is now in the glass. I returned to the kitchen and resumed my work. I thought I heard the report of a gun, but took no notice of it, as Mr Mortimer and MR BATES were in the habit of using a gun; the latter scarcely ever went out unless he took the gun with him. When I heard the report of the gun it did not strike me that it was in the sitting room. About ten minutes after Mr Mortimer came in and asked me if I had heard the gun. I said "Yes." He replied "Uncle has dropped down, and is lying on his face." I did not go into the sitting room till my husband came. I then saw the deceased lying on the floor. No one touched the body before the surgeon arrived.
Thomas Courtenay sworn:- I reside at Whitefield Barton, and was in the employ of the late MR BATES. On Monday last he came here, accompanied by Mr Mortimer. He appeared in good health and spirits. I last saw him at ten o'clock this morning, when he came to me at the top of the Pond Meadow with the gun in his right hand. I said "Good morning sir," He said "Good morning, Courtenay." He remarked "It is very warm this morning. I shall take a walk into the wood, and walk in the shade. If I see a rabbit I'll have a shot at it." I said "Please, sir, I want to make up accounts with you this morning, as you are going to leave this afternoon." We then came into the house and made up the account in the book I produce. I saw no more of him till Mr Mortimer told me master was lying on the carpet. I went with Mr Mortimer into the room, and saw deceased lying on his face and hands, the gun by his side and the ramrod by his left leg. Mr Mortimer said, "What do you think is the matter with uncle?" I said "I don't know." I went over to his side, and then said "He's dead." I did not touch him. I then sent for a medical man. When I entered the sitting room there was a smell of gunpowder. The keeper has since drawn the charge from one of the barrels; it consisted of powder only.
John Gammon sworn:- I was in the employ of the late MR BATES, and looked after his cattle. I reside at Milltown. This morning I was in a field on the farm, cutting vetches, when I heard a gun go off in Whitefield Wood. I only heard one shot, which I considered was discharged by deceased. I afterwards saw him in the court at twelve o'clock. He appeared to be very well. He was in the habit of going out nearly every day, shooting rabbits or anything else. Deceased was a man of cheerful spirits, and I saw no difference in him today.
Mr Mortimer added to his evidence that he had frequently seen deceased go out with his gun, but never saw him take out his powder or shot flask.
Mr Michael Cooke deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Barnstaple. This afternoon, at about half-past one, I was requested to visit MR BATES, at Whitefield Barton, as he had fallen down in a fit. I came immediately and arrived shortly after two o'clock. I found the deceased lying on the floor in the sitting room, where the Jury have just viewed the body. He was lying on his stomach, with his face on the hearth rug. A double-barrelled gun was lying on his right side and a ramrod near his left foot. I turned him over on his back, and found he was quite dead, and had been so apparently for an hour or two. There was blood flowing from his nose, which was fractured. The injury to the nose was caused by the fall. I observed that his waistcoat was burnt, there was a hole on the left side, and on removing his clothes I found a gunshot wound on the left side immediately under the ribs. The wound extended upwards into the chest, had lacerated the heart, and fractured the ribs, and the injury was of such a character as to cause his immediate death. From the position of the wound and the direction that the shot had taken I am of opinion that deceased must have been leaning on the muzzle of the gun when it exploded; and, one barrel being loaded, and he in the act of loading the other, the gun might have accidentally gone off and caused the fatal injury. The shot bags were on the table. He might have been turning round to get the shot. The deceased's feet were not drawn up one above the other. He must have fallen instantly dead on being shot.
Mr John Inch Knill sworn:- I am the Editor of the North Devon Journal. Since this Inquest commenced I have seen the charge drawn from the double-barrelled gun of the deceased. It consisted of powder only.
Mr Richard Hutchings sworn:- I reside at Muddiford, in the parish of Marwood, and knew the deceased very well. I have been with him frequently when he has been out shooting. I have no hesitation in saying that he was most careless and incautious in handling firearms. He would talk while loading his gun and appeared to be treating it in a very careless way. His general temperament was cheerful and hopeful as any man I knew.
The Coroner addressed the Jury, remarking that, though there was no positive evidence as to the manner in which the injury was inflicted, yet from the fact that the deceased was of a happy and cheerful disposition, and from all the facts adduced in evidence there could be no doubt that the death of MR BATES was purely the result of accident.
The Jury deliberated a short time, and returned as their verdict "That the deceased died from a gunshot wound, the result of accident, which was caused by one barrel of the gun exploding while he was loading the other."

DARTMOUTH - The body of a woman named WALK, aged 78, the wife of JOHN WALK, labourer, was picked up in Dartmouth harbour on Saturday. At a Coroner's Inquest held the same evening the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

GOODLEIGH - Fatal Accident - Inquest. - In our 6th page will be found a brief mention of a fatal accident which occurred to a farm labourer named HENRY HEALE, of this parish. The following evidence was taken at the Inquest, before Mr J. H. Toller:-
Richard Norman deposed:- I live at Swymbridge, and am a farm labourer. I knew the deceased, HENRY HEALE. He lived at Goodleigh, and was a farm labourer, and was about forty six years of age. On Thursday last, I was at work in a field, part of Dean Head Farm, situated in the parish of Swymbridge, in the occupation of Mr John Huxtable, carrying hay. The deceased was also at work there. He was on the top of a cart treading the hay. I and a young man named William white were pitching the hay up to him, when the deceased over-balanced himself and fell off. I went round and picked him up. He was lying on his left side, and he could not at first stand but in about twenty minutes he got upon another cart of hay to tread it, but after a little time he said he could not do any more, and after a time he left to go home.
Elizabeth Norman deposed:- I live at Goodleigh, and am the wife of Nicholas Norman, of Goodleigh, labourer. I knew the deceased, HENRY HEALE. I saw him yesterday, about one o'clock. He was very bad. He said he had fallen off the load of hay, and had a pain in his back and inside. Mr Cooke, of Barnstaple, surgeon, saw him after he was dead, and stated to me that he considered he died from the effects of the fall. He was asthmatical and dropsical.

Thursday 22 July 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - Another Sudden Death. - On Wednesday, the 21s inst., about five o'clock, p.m. a woman named CLATWORTHY who resided in West-street, dropped down and expired almost instantly. Her husband is a labourer, and she has left a number f children to bewail her loss. an Inquest will be held on the body in due course before Mr James Flexman, the Borough Coroner.

TAWSTOCK - Death By Drowning. - THOMAS DUNN, 16 years of age, the son of a blacksmith, living at Lake, a hamlet in the parish of Tawstock, near Barnstaple, was drowned on Sunday, whilst bathing in the river Taw. It appears that the deceased and a lad, named William Harvey, about the same age, went into the water, just opposite Pill House, at midday. The deceased was learning to swim, and wore some pieces of cork around him, which were fastened by two strings behind. When in deep water, he cried out that the strings had broken, and sank. Harvey, who was able to swim, immediately went to his assistance, and by means of the cork, which was still attached to the deceased and floated over him, succeeded in dragging him a short distance, when the cork slipped off and the deceased again sank. The body was recovered about two hours afterwards by Samuel Jones, and conveyed to Lake, where an Inquest was held by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner. The following evidence was adduced:-
William Harvey deposed:- I reside at Lake, in the parish of Tawstock, and am a joiner's apprentice. I knew the deceased, THOMAS DUNN. He was in his seventeenth year, and was the son of JAMES DUNN, of Lake, blacksmith. Yesterday morning we went to church together, and on our return the deceased proposed our bathing. We then went down to the river Taw and there found several boys who had just bathed. We then took off our clothes, and the deceased first went into the water; returned, and borrowed some corks from one of the boys named Willmetts, and put them on. We then both went into the water, and were bathing for about twenty minutes, when the deceased, who was in the middle of the river, called out that the strings of his corks had broken. I went to him as fast as I could, but when I got to him he was under water, and I could see nothing but the corks. I caught hold of the corks and brought the deceased up, when he caught hold of me and pulled me under water two or three times. I got free of him and caught hold of the corks, and dragged the deceased along some way, when the strap of the corks, which was round the deceased's neck, got loose from his head, and I lost sight of him. I then took the corks, swam to land, and gave an alarm, and stayed by the bank to see if I could get a sight of him; and, after remaining there about half-an-hour, Samuel Jones of Lake, came to my assistance, and in about a quarter of an hour afterwards the deceased was taken out of the water dead. The tide was quite up. It must have been more than half past one when he was drowned. He must have been more than an hour and a-quarter in the water.
Samuel Jones deposed:- I live at Lake, and am a joiner. Yesterday afternoon, between two and three o'clock, as I was going over Barnstaple Bridge to attend a funeral, SAMUEL DUNN, the brother f the deceased, called to me. I waited until he came up, when he told me his brother was drowned. We then went to inquire for the grappling irons, but as some time would elapse before getting them, I went off in the direction of the spot where the deceased was drowned, and found several persons there who had been out in the water trying to find him. I then got into a boat, and with a stick tried to find the body; and eventually took off my clothes and discovered it, and it was taken out of the water, but the deceased was quite dead. When found the tide was going back. Verdict:- "Death by Drowning."

Thursday 29 July 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Carpenters' Arms,' Vicarage-street, Barnstaple, touching the death of CHARLES IRELAND, aged 25 years, who died suddenly on the previous evening at the house of his father, PHILIP IRELAND, in Gaydon-street. The following was the evidence adduced:-
PHILIP IRELAND sworn:- The deceased was my son; he was 25 years of age. He has resided with me in Gaydon-street, for the last three months. He has worked lately for me, with my horse and cart. He has been apparently in good health since he has lived with me. He has been in the habit of drinking intemperately, but not during the last fortnight. Yesterday he went with me to some ground I occupy on the Sherwill road; we returned about ten in the morning. He dined with me, about one o'clock, on some mutton. He was subject to epileptic fits, and complained of pain in his head He went to bed last night, about half-past nine o'clock, having made a hearty supper, and smoked several pipes of tobacco. After he had been in bed about half-an-hour he was seized with a fit, which lasted a few minutes; he had a second about half-an-hour afterwards, and then had a succession of fits until about half-past twelve o'clock, when I went to fetch a neighbour. On my return in a few minutes I found he was dead. My grandson, Henry Pomeroy, was with him when he died. The convulsions were not very strong, but his breath was very much affected.
Henry Pomeroy corroborated the evidence of the last witness, his grandfather.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, sworn:- About five or six weeks ago, the deceased was confined in the Borough Gaol, for fourteen days, for non-payment of rates. I then treated him for diarrhoea, but otherwise he appeared to be in general good health. This morning I was called to the deceased, about one o'clock. I found him in the bed he is now lying in. He was lying on his left side, his head elevated on a pillow. On examination I found he was quite dead. His features were composed, and not discoloured. The pupils of his eyes were dilated, his body was bathed in perspiration, but quite warm, and he appeared to have been dead a very short time. From his father's evidence, I am of opinion that his death was caused by epilepsy, as his body shews no appearance of death having resulted from any other cause. I cannot with certainty state the cause of death without making a post mortem examination. The Jury returned as their verdict, "Died Suddenly, from Natural Causes."

Thursday 19 August 1869
BARNSTAPLE - A Man Drowned in the Taw. - Inquest on the Body. - The body of a young man, named WILLIAM DAVIS, a farmer, who lived with his father, at Whiddon, in the parish of Landkey, was discovered on Friday afternoon, in Cooney Creek, adjoining Chanter's Green, when the tide was out, by a boy named William Pow. It appears the deceased purchased a hat, at Barnstaple, on the previous day, and spent a portion of the evening at the 'Commercial Inn,' which he left just before ten o'clock. There is no reason to suspect foul play, his watch (which had stopped at half-past ten) and money being found on him, but it is supposed that he accidentally walked or fell into the water, the tide being up at the time and the night very dark. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, at the 'Exeter Inn,' before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Robert Atkins was foreman. The following evidence was adduced:- Thomas Pedler, of Derby, deposed: Yesterday afternoon, about four o'clock, I was at the limekiln, near Cooney Creek, when I saw a man lying on the mud bank, about two feet from the stream, on the Chanter's Green side. The tide was out. He had all his clothes on. I took him by the hand and found he was dead. I then went and gave information to the Coroner. There were no footprints in the mud, and no indication of a struggle having taken place. George Pow, a labourer, living near the Newport limekilns, went to the creek in consequence of what his son told him. It was about four o'clock. I there saw the body of the deceased lying in the position described by the last witness. He was lying on his right side near the stream. I lifted him by the collar and found he was dead. I then went for the police. Two men, named Henry Bale and Joseph Ward came to my assistance, and we lifted the body on the bank adjoining Chanter's Green. His hat was on his head. Serjeant Songhurst shortly afterwards arrived, and the body was conveyed to the 'Exeter Inn' by his direction. I have known the deceased for several years, but did not recognise him until I saw the body at the 'Exeter Inn.' Miss Elizabeth German: I keep the 'Commercial Inn', in Boutport-street. I have known the deceased for eight or nine years. On Thursday evening he came to my house, between eight and nine o'clock, and remained there about an hour or an hour and a half. Mr William Vagg, who lives next door to me, was also there, and left with him. He wished me "Good night" at the door before he left. Whilst he was at my house he had three or four glasses of beer, and when he left he was perfectly sober. He had on a new hat, and was carrying his old one under his arm. He told me he intended to go straight home. He was in his usual health, and walked away quite steadily. George Songhurst: I am a Sergeant of the Borough Police. About a quarter4 after four yesterday, I received information from Mr Thomas Baker that a dead body had been found at Cooney Creek, and I went there. The body was lying on the bank, and there were several persons round it. The body was lifted on to the bank adjoining Chanter'[s Green. I took the deceased's hat off, and found a quantity of water in it. I ordered the body to be removed to the 'Exeter Inn' and I there searched him. In his pocket I found a watch, which was stopped at half-past ten. In another pocket I found half a-sovereign, and 1s. 5d. in silver and copper. In his jacket I found a handkerchief, a purse, and some other articles. I saw no marks of violence on the body. John Bell:- I am a porter to Mr William Symons, chemist, of Joy-street. I have known the deceased and his family for many years. On Thursday night, at about quarter to ten, I saw the deceased near the Albert Tower. He shook hands with me, and we had a few minutes' conversation. He then left me saying "I must make haste home, as I am very late." He was as "sober as a judge" - (laughter) - and walked steadily away. ELIZA MARTIN The deceased was my brother, and he was 33 years of age. He resided at Whiddon Farm with his parents, and managed the farm for his father. I last saw him at half-past six, on Thursday night. He had been at work all day, and was perfectly sober when he left home. He was of a cheerful disposition, and was in his usual health and spirits. Nothing had taken place to lead us to the supposition that he destroyed himself. - Mr Thomas Sheppard Law: I am a surgeon, residing at Barnstaple. At about half-past four Mr Baker asked me to come over and see a body which had been found in Cooney Creek. The body was on the bank adjoining Chanter's Green. I very cursorily examined the body, as there were a great many people there, but followed it to the 'Exeter Inn.' I saw it searched, and have since had it stripped and have carefully examined it. I can find no signs of any injury or violence whatever about the body excepting the removal of some skin, which had probably been bitten off by crabs. The pupils of the eyes were dilated, and a good deal of white froth was coming from the mouth. The nails were not at all torn, and from their appearance there was no sign of the deceased having struggled or grasped at anything. The body was and is now very rigid, and in appearance quite consistent with drowning. My belief is the deceased was drowned, and from the evidence I have heard I should think accidentally. - The Coroner then summed up the evidence to the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A recommendation was appended to the verdict that a more substantial bridge should be substituted for the present one, which is in a most dangerous condition, and that the pond adjoining should be filled up. The Coroner promised to convey the recommendation to the proper quarter.

SOUTHMOLTON - Manslaughter - We are sorry to report a case of Manslaughter which has occurred in this borough. The facts are as follow: On Sunday night last a young man named WESTACOTT, aged 22 years, came into the town from the neighbouring parish of Chittlehampton. He had with him a comrade called Philip Kingdon, and James Gillard also accompanied them. About nine or ten o'clock they visited the 'White Hart,' where they drank two or three pints of beer. A man named Handford, of Northmolton (known as "Champion") was there when they came in, and he repeatedly expressed his wish to fight with WESTACOTT. They did not, however, fight there, but left the inn at about half-past ten o'clock, Kingdon, Gillard and Handford being together. WESTACOTT had a quarrel with Handford outside the inn, but it is uncertain who struck the first blow; however, Handford struck WESTACOTT with his fist and knocked him down. WESTACOTT either rose or was lifted up, but felt that he was seriously hurt and could not walk. Kingdon and Gillard carried him into the covered skittle alley of the "White Hart," as the landlord and his family had gone to bed at the inn. Kingdon stayed with him all night in the skittle alley, where he sat until the morning about five or six o'clock, when Kingdon and Mr Vicary (the landlord) took him into the inn. It appears that the spine of WESTACOTT'S back was broken on his being knocked down by Handford. He was attended by Messrs. Furse, surgeons, but died on Wednesday (yesterday) morning, at about two o'clock. The dying declaration of the deceased was taken before Mr R. Ley (Mayor) on Monday, which was to the effect before particularized. A justice's warrant has since been issued for Handford's apprehension on the charge of manslaughter, and an Inquest is to be held this day (Thursday) before Mr James Flexman, Borough Coroner.

Thursday 26 August 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - The Late Case of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Wednesday and Thursday last, before Mr James Flexman, Borough Coroner, (assisted by Mr J. T. Shapland, Deputy Coroner,) on the body of the unfortunate young man JOHN WESTACOTT, who lost his life through injuries sustained by him on the previous Sunday night, under circumstances detailed in our last week's Journal. There was a respectable Jury, of which Mr W. H. Pearce was foreman. A number of witnesses were examined, and the Inquiry resulted in a verdict of Manslaughter being returned against George Handford.

Thursday 2 September 1869
DEVONPORT - At the Devonport Police Court, on Thursday, DINAH BENNETT was brought up on remand, charged with the wilful murder of her male child. The same evidence was given as that detailed at the Coroner's Inquest on Tuesday, and the Bench committed prisoner for trial at the next assizes on a charge of concealment of birth, the evidence being insufficient for a committal on the capital charge.

BARNSTAPLE - Death From Burning. - Mr I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday last, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of an aged man named WILLIAM DYER, of Fremington, who died on the previous Thursday, from the effects of injuries received from his having accidentally fallen on the fire in the house in which he resided. The following was the evidence:- Elizabeth Wellington sworn:- I live at Bickington, in Fremington. The deceased lived two doors from me. He lived in a house by himself. He used to sell sweetmeats in the Barnstaple market. This day fortnight, namely, on the 14th instant, I was engaged in my own house, ironing, about seven o'clock in the evening, when I heard a groan and on going into the next house occupied by James Sanders, I found the deceased lying in the fire place. His face and head were in over the fire on one side - the left side - and his teeth were on the bar that keeps in the fire. I lifted him from the fire. After a little while he spoke to me, but he gave me no account of how he fell into the fire. His eye was very much burnt. Mr Fernie, surgeon, came and saw him about two hours afterwards. I asked the deceased how he had fallen into the fire. He said he did not know. He did not appear to have been drinking. I had seen him twice before on the same day, when he appeared to be in a fit. He was stretched out on the floor in Mrs Dobbs's house. He was put to bed in James Sanders's house after Mr Fernie saw him. He was removed to the Infirmary last Wednesday week. I saw him before he was taken away. He had lived near me for about three years. He had been a gentleman's servant, and was, I believe, of temperate habits. - Agnes Sanders sworn:- The deceased lived next door to me. Since last May he has slept in my house, as he was subject to fits. He was about 75 years of age, and was very feeble. This day fortnight, about eight o'clock, I saw him in my house, and he had a glass of porter and a slice of a penny roll. I then went to the village for some flour, and left the deceased sitting at the head of my table. I was not absent more than a few minutes, and when I returned I found he had fallen into the fire. He was then on the floor, and the last witness was holding him. - Mr James Wood Cooke, House Surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased was brought here on the 18th instant. He was suffering from a very severe and deep burn on the head and face, on the left side. His lips and mouth were much burnt. He was very weak and exhausted, and suffering a great deal of pain. He continued to get weaker until Thursday last, when symptoms of lock-jaw appeared. He died yesterday from exhaustion. His death was caused by the injuries he had sustained by the burns above mentioned. Verdict: - "Accidentally Burnt to Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Death From Sunstroke. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by Mr I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, at the 'Unicorn Inn,' Pilton, on the body of WM. TOSSELL, a labourer, who died from the effects of sunstroke in the course of the day. The following evidence was given:- John Gordon deposed:- The deceased was a workman of mine; he had worked for me about three weeks as a farm labourer. He breakfasted at my house this morning about eight o'clock; he appeared in his usual health, and ate his breakfast heartily. He then went to the harvest field on my farm at Waytown, and was engaged in pitching barley from the carts to the rick. About half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the deceased on the top of the cart; he appeared to be pitching the corn unsteadily. He got off the cart, and I saw him reel and run about like a drunken man; he was then led back to the rick and placed on some straw in the shade. Seeing he was very ill, I rode for Mr Harper, the surgeon. After I had seen Mr Harper, I had the deceased put into a cart and conveyed to his house at the Priory, in Pilton. On his way we met Mr Harper at Vicarage-street, and he examined him. When I left him in the field he was conscious, but was insensible when I returned and had him put into the cart. He was a very temperate man. His breakfast consisted of cocoa, fried potatoes, and bacon, and he had some cider afterwards. - Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, deposed:- Today, soon after twelve o'clock, the last witness called at my surgery, and at his request I went in the direction of his residence, and met the deceased in a cart in Vicarage-street, in this borough. He was lying on his back quite insensible, and breathing stertorously. Both his eyes were fixed, and were glazed. His face was very pale, and his skin intensely hot. I accompanied him to his house in the Priory at Pilton, and remained with him until he died, which was about an hour after he arrived home. In my opinion his death was caused by sun stroke, produced by the excessive heat. - Verdict:- "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

PARACOMBE - Fatal Gun Accident. - A fatal and melancholy gun accident occurred on Monday last to MR JAMES NOTT PYKE, of Paracombe (son of the late REV. JOHN PYKE). An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:- John Blackmore deposed: I reside at Paracombe, and was servant to MR JAMES NOTT PYKE. About twenty minutes past twelve o'clock yesterday the deceased went out rabbit shooting, accompanied by the Rev. Richard Martin, of Challacombe, and three young gentlemen. I went with them. They had all guns except myself. We commenced in a field called Bay Close, which is near MR PYKE'S house. We tried up the hedge where a low bank branches off. I was in the road side. I heard one of the young gentlemen say "There is a rabbit in this bush." I then got up on the hedge, and just as I got on the top of it I heard the report of a gun in the field. MR PYKE was standing behind a furze brake, and I was standing on the hedge behind MR PYKE. Instantly I heard the report of the gun I saw MR PYKE fall down. I then jumped down from the hedge and helped MR PYKE up and got him upon his legs and asked him if he was much hurt, but I do not know whether he answered. I then saw a considerable lot of shot holes in his trousers immediately under his waistcoat, on the right side. Mr Martin was there on the spot, and told me to send one of the men after the doctor, when I said I would go myself, but MR PYKE said "You had better see if Kingdon is in the neighbourhood." I then left the deceased in the care of Mr Martin. - Rev. Richard Martin deposed: I am the Rector of Challacombe. I knew the deceased, JAMES NOTT PYKE. About eight or ten days since the deceased called at Challacombe, and asked me to come to Paracombe and bring my boys with me to go rabbit shooting. The boys who came with me were Frederick Williams, Arthur Chandler, and William Cresswell Arthur. We arrived at Parracombe just before twelve o'clock yesterday , and started rabbit shooting just after twelve. We might have been in MR PYKE'S house about half-an-hour. We began at the gate of Bay Field. I sent the two elder boys, named Williams and Chandler, with John Blackmore, in the road side of the fence, and Arthur being the youngest, I thought had better come my side of the fence with me in the field. MR PYKE also came our side. As we came through the gate I called to them and said, "We are shooting on the top of the hedge." We tried all up the hedge until we came to the bank pointed out by Blackmore, where a rabbit had gone forward, and MR PYKE had got on the bank which leaves the fence. MR PYKE had evidently seen the rabbit, as he beckoned to young Arthur, who was in the field, to come to him. The rabbit must have moved as MR PYKE jumped in after it, before young Arthur got quite up to the fence. Then as MR PYKE was inside I rushed forward to the gap in the fence, and I heard MR PYKE say some such words as "Look out, here it is," and almost immediately Arthur's gun went off and a cry came from MR PYKE. Blackmore immediately jumped down from the top of the hedge and asked if he was hurt. I scrambled over the fence as well as I could, and helped to support him. MR PYKE was perfectly sensible and cool, and requested that the doctor might immediately be sent for, and he was taken into the house, and Mr Kingdon, surgeon, of Combmartin, who happened to be close at hand, came in about five minutes after. I helped to wash the wound. Mr Law, surgeon, of Barnstaple, was also sent for, who came about five o'clock. Young Arthur will be fifteen years of age next February. The three young gentlemen have all been used to shooting and brought their guns with them, with the consent of their parents. After MR PYKE was in bed he twice sent me down to tell Arthur not to fret, as he was not in much pain. Arthur has been with me about eight months, during which time he has been accustomed to shoot. - William Cresswell Arthur deposed:- I am a pupil of the Rev. Richard Martin, of Challacombe. Yesterday, in company with MR PYKE, of Parracombe, Mr Martin, two fellow pupils, and MR PYKE'S gamekeeper, I went into a field near MR PYKE'S house, and tried for some rabbits. MR PYKE went one way, and I stood in the field with a single-barrelled gun which was my own, and my attention was called to a rabbit by MR PYKE. I saw it, and fired at it, and MR PYKE, who was behind a furze brake, called out. I could not by any possibility see MR PYKE behind the furze brake. I have been accustomed to shoot.
Mr Thomas Shepherd Law deposed: I am a surgeon, and reside at Barnstaple. I knew the deceased, JAMES NOTT PYKE. He was about twenty-four years of age. I was his medical attendant. Yesterday afternoon I received a message to attend at Paracombe to see MR JAMES PYKE, who had met with a gun accident. I came quickly, and arrived about five o'clock. I found him in a considerable state of collapse, and that he had several small shot wounds on the right thigh, especially in the right groin, and many on the lower part of the right side of the abdomen, and three or four on the left thigh. There was no bleeding of consequence from them, and most of the wounds seemed superficial, the shot being lodged in the holes. He rallied somewhat shortly after I arrived, but in about three quarters of an hour he became weaker and the collapse greater, with much restlessness and but little pain. Soon after this a considerable quantity of blood passed from his body. I have no doubt the intestines were wounded as well as blood-vessels of importance. I can have no hesitation in giving the opinion that he died from internal haemorrhage. Mr Kingdon was here when I arrived and remained, as well as myself, the entire time until his decease, which took place at half-past twelve o'clock this morning. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased "Died from the Effects of a Gunshot Wound accidentally and casually administered."

LYNTON - A Melancholy Case of Sudden Death occurred in this parish very early on Wednesday morning last. The unfortunate deceased was a labouring man named WM. HOOPER, a pauper, who had occasionally been an inmate of the Barnstaple Union, having no place of abode, and whose conduct of late has been bordering on insanity (which is inherent in the family). It appears that on Tuesday night he was at the 'Cottage Inn,' Lynbridge, and as he complained of pain in his throat a little brandy was given him, and the landlord allowed him to sleep in his barn, the door of which he locked. At about 2 o'clock in the morning, however, he managed to open the door and got out, and was heard by Mr Latham, landlord of the public house, just below, making a noise as though endeavouring to open the front door. Latham looked out of his bedroom window and saw the deceased walk very fast past his door and turn the corner near. Mr Squire, a farmer, of Countisbury, who had called at the inn, immediately afterwards went out, and, in searching for his horse which he had left tied up close by, saw the deceased lying on the ground; he did not go to him but, finding his horse had gone off, he walked away to go home. At about five o'clock in the morning deceased's son's wife got up to go to work, looked out of her bedroom window, and seeing deceased lying on the ground, told her husband, who immediately went down and found him lying dead. An Inquest was afterwards held on the body by the Deputy County Coroner (Mr J. H. Toller), and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts.

Thursday 9 September 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Starvation. An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Curriers Arms', Vicarage-street, by Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, touching the death of ANN BRAYLEY, widow, who was found dead in her bed on the day preceding, at her place of residence in Higher Maudlyn-street. The following evidence was given:-
THOMAS BRAYLEY deposed:- The deceased was my mother. She was ninety-one years old last September. I have lived with her in Higher Maudlyn-street for about twenty years. The house belonged to my brother, HENRY BRAYLEY, who allowed us to live in it rent free. He is in the coastguard service. My mother received 10d. a week from the parish; she had received this for several years. I earn my living by carrying water to poor people's houses, and earn sometimes about 1s. a week. Miss Gibbs, who lives in the Square, was my mother's niece. The deceased had been ill for about a week, and not able to eat anything or take anything except tea and coffee. I have never applied for an increase of pay to the guardians for my mother. Some years ago I applied for myself, and was ordered to go into the House. I staid up with my mother all night on Saturday last. She was very ill, and could keep nothing inside her. I did not go for a doctor; she did not like to have the trouble of one. Last Sunday, about one o'clock, I went to Miss Gibbs's, as usual, for our dinner. My mother was very ill, and could not speak. I remained away about a quarter of an hour, and found she was dead. I returned to Miss Gibbs's soon afterwards and told her what had happened. Miss Gibbs and myself then went to Mr Cooke's, the surgeon, who came to my house soon afterwards and examined my mother's body. I have no money in my possession, and no provisions in my house. The last thing I bought to make use of was a twopenny loaf. Mr Henry Gibbs left my mother 2s. a week by his will. I used to receive it on Wednesdays of Miss Elizabeth Gibbs.
Ann Found deposed:- I reside next door to the deceased, who has lived there for the last sixteen years, whilst I have been next door. I knew the deceased very well. She was crippled in one leg. She never left her house to my knowledge, but used to sit by her door some times. About three weeks ago I went into her house. She was then sitting on a chair washing. I know she and her son were in great want. I used to lend them some pence sometimes, and they always repaid me. Yesterday, about three o'clock, I saw the last witness leave his house. I then went and tried the door, and found it locked. When he returned, a short time after, I spoke to him and asked how his mother was, and he said she was dead. I then went into the house with him, and went upstairs. I found his mother dead, lying in her bed. She was quite cold and stiff. I think she had been dead several hours. The bedding was very filthy.
Mr Michael Cooke deposed:- Yesterday afternoon, about half-past three o'clock, I had information from Miss Gibbs of the death of the deceased. I went immediately to her house in Higher Maudlin-street. I found the deceased lying in a bed. She was quite dead, and stiff and cold. In my opinion she had been dead several hours. Her body was very dirty. She had nothing on but a small bed-gown reaching to her waist. The bed was saturated with discharges from her body. The stench in the room was the most horrible and sickening I have ever experienced. From the appearance of her body I think she died from natural causes. Her body was not more emaciated than I should expect to find in a person of her great age. Her death was most likely been accelerated by the want of proper care and attention. The windows of the house appeared to have been shut for several years.
Verdict: - "That the deceased died from Natural Causes, and that her death was accelerated by want of proper sustenance and attention."

Thursday 23 September 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Another Fatal Accident Through Intoxication. - An Inquest was held on Thursday morning, at the North Devon Infirmary, before the Borough Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft), on the body of WILLIAM CANN, who was fifty-three years of age, and met with his death accidentally, while in a state of intoxication. The following evidence was adduced:- John Hammett, labourer, said he had known the deceased for several years. He was a groom. On Monday last, about seven o'clock in the morning, he was standing outside Mr Willshire's iron foundry, at Newport, where he worked, and he saw the deceased riding a bay horse down the road from the Hollow Tree. As the deceased arrived just opposite him he saw him touch the horse with the spur. the animal jumped away, and deceased appeared unable to bring it up. He pulled the horse in over the footpath between the 'Newport Inn' and a wagon that was standing in the road outside. Just as the horse got inside the wagon he saw the deceased fall off very heavily on his back, and pitch just under the horse's belly. He noticed one of the horse's hind legs on the stomach of deceased. The horse remained perfectly still. Mr Edward Martin then led away the horse, and he assisted in taking the deceased to the 'Newport Inn'. Deceased could not speak nor stand, and seemed very much injured, but after a short time he helped to take him in his master's cart to the Infirmary. The deceased was intoxicated, and the horse was walking quietly down the road until he spurred it.
Mr James Wood Cooke, house surgeon of the Infirmary, said the deceased was brought into that hospital on Monday morning last, between eleven and twelve o'clock. He was quite insensible, but warm, and appeared to be intoxicated. He examined his body, and found a small cut on the left side of the back of his head, but no other appearance of injury. He was placed in bed, and in about two hours he became partially conscious and able to sit up. He gave him an emetic, which acted freely. He complained of pain over his bowels, but continued to progress favourably until Wednesday morning, when he began to bring up blood in large quantities. He subsequently sank gradually, and died at three o'clock in the afternoon. He believed his death was caused by the rupture of some large vessel in the abdomen. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased was Accidentally Killed by injuries received from falling off a horse he was riding on Monday, the 13th September, he being then intoxicated."

Thursday 7 October 1869
PARACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - JOHN LETHABY, farmer, of this parish, fell off his horse on Saturday, fracturing his skull and dislocating his neck. Death was instantaneous. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday, before the Deputy Coroner (J. H. Toller, Esq.), when the following evidence was given:- Henry Berry, landlord of the 'Hunter's Inn,' Martinhoe, stated that the deceased came to his house at about eleven o'clock on Saturday morning, and remained there until two o'clock, during which time he was supplied with three pints of beer (some of which he gave away) and three glasses of grog. He did not appear to be the worse for the liquor he had taken when he left, and was able to mount his horse without assistance. Two witnesses, however, named Whiddon, who saw the deceased shortly after he left the inn, deposed that he was then riding very unsteadily, so much so that one of them watched him, and saw the accident. On going to him they found that he was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday) morning, at the dwelling house of Mr John Hill, at Hele, in this parish, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN STADDON, 69 years of age, who met with his death under circumstances disclosed in the subjoined evidence:- GRACE STADDON, of Hele, deposed: The deceased was my husband; he was a labourer, and about 69 years of age. On Monday he was quite well and cheerful. I saw him in the back kitchen (the last time alive) on that evening, about 7 o'clock, sitting upon a stool in front of the furnace fire. The door of the furnace was then partly open. On this occasion I came from the garden, passed through the back kitchen where deceased was sitting, and went to a neighbour's house in the village. There was no other person in the house at that time. My son had not returned from his work. The deceased was in the habit of smoking his pipe in the back kitchen, and he did so on the occasion referred to. I went with his consent to the village, and he said "that he would keep the fire" in the meantime. I was absent about half-an-hour. On my return I called to him several times, but received no answer. I then went into the back kitchen, and as I entered called to him again; but, on proceeding to the place where he was, I discovered he was dead. He was then sitting on the stool, with his head resting near the door of the furnace; his right hand was touching the floor, and his left hand near the floor; his face was black and red, but he was not burnt, and his clothes were uninjured. He generally walked to Ilfracombe every Wednesday. I then called to my neighbours for assistance, and when they came they pronounced my late husband to be dead. The body was then conveyed to deceased's bed room. John Hill, miller, residing at Hele, deposed that he had known the deceased for the past 30 years and upwards. On Monday evening last, about eight o'clock, Mrs Taylor, a neighbour, called on him and said that she thought JOHN STADDON was dead. He was writing at the time; but he immediately proceeded to the house of the deceased, and found him in the arms of John Tucker, a neighbour. He turned back the head of the deceased to look into his face, and found it of a dark red colour. He felt his pulse, which had ceased to beat. He said he was dead, and should say he had been dead half an hour. He had a great tendency to sleeping in the daytime. Had been to a place of worship with him on several occasions, when he observed he frequently slept. The Jury returned as their verdict "that the deceased came to his death accidentally, from suffocation, whilst sitting over a furnace fire."

TOTNES - Melancholy Suicide. - On Thursday morning a respectable woman, the wife of MR SAMUEL LANE, one of the relieving officers of the Totness Union committed suicide by hanging herself in a back kitchen of the dwelling house. The deceased rose a short time before her husband to prepare his breakfast, as he was going on one of his rounds. When MR LANE came down, shortly after eight o'clock on going into the back kitchen he was horrified to find his wife hanging by a halter from a nail. He immediately cut her down and gave her some stimulants and Mr Owen, surgeon, was promptly in attendance, but the vital spark had fled. The deceased was about 60 years old. No motive has been assigned for the rash act. Much sympathy is felt in the town for MR LANE in his heavy affliction. An Inquest was held last night.

Thursday 14 October 1869
SHERWILL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the residence of Mr Lewis Richards, farmer, of Sherwill, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of JOHN COCKINGS, the unfortunate man whose melancholy death by accident we briefly reported in our last. The following evidence was given:-
Nicholas Passmore, sworn:- I reside at Barnstaple, and work for Mr Westacott, shipbuilder. I knew the deceased, JOHN COCKINGS. He resided at Bradiford, in the parish of Pilton, and worked for Mr Westacott, and was about thirty-four years old. The deceased and myself were at work together yesterday for Mr Westacott bringing home from the parish of Ilfracombe two wagon loads of timber, drawn by two horses each. It was dark when we left. The deceased took charge of the first wagon, and I took charge of the second. A man named John May was also with us. We went on very steadily until we came to Fry's Hotel, where we stopped. We then had a pint of beer each, and ate what we had with us. A farmer then gave us a quart of beer, which we drank. After the horses had been fed we left the hotel and proceeded to Muddiford, where we had two pints of beer between us and stood in the door-way to drink it. We had been working all the day and had nothing but what we had with us until we came to Fry's Hotel. We were fagged out wonderfully. We did not stay at Muddiford more than five minutes and proceeded on the road to Barnstaple. When we got the other side of Plaistow Mills the deceased got up on one of the shafts of his wagon to ride, and I walked on talking to him for some distance. I then went back to my wagon to get up on the shaft, but I did not; I walked on as before. I had not left the deceased above ten minutes, when on coming on I saw him crawling into the hedge-trough. I caught him up in my arms, and John May stopped the horses of my wagon. The horses of the other wagon were going on. I asked the deceased what was the matter with him and he said the wagon had been over him. We then put him upon my wagon and John May held him, while I ran and caught the horses of the other wagon, and went to Mr Richards of Blatchford Mills, who came out, when we found the deceased was quite dead. Where we picked up the deceased crawling into the hedge-trough was about two hundred yards from Mr Richards's house. The deceased was not the worse for drink. When I was walking by his side he kept on dozing. It was quite dark, therefore it was impossible for me to see him fall off. We were going on down hill about the rate of three miles an hour.
John May deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple, and am a labourer. I was with the deceased and Nicholas Robins yesterday, and travelled with them from the parish of Ilfracombe to Blatchford Mills. I can corroborate what Nicholas Passmore has stated.
Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, deposed:- I am a surgeon residing at Barnstaple. This morning, between twelve and one o'clock, I was sent for to go to Blatchford Mills to see the deceased. I accordingly went, but found him quite dead. He was in a chair dressed. I examined him. There was a wound two inches and a half long in the right groin, which laid bare the right testicle and the lower part of the abdomen. A considerable amount of blood had flowed from the wound. He was quite dead, and the injuries received were quite sufficient to account for his death.
Mr William Westacott, shipbuilder, said:- I knew the deceased. He worked for me several years, and I always found him a particularly sober man. I never found him once in twelve months the worse for liquor.
The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Falling off one of the Shafts of a Timber Wagon."

BRAUNTON - The Sea Yielding Her Dead. - A dead body in an advanced state of decomposition was discovered at Broadsands, Braunton, on Friday, by Henry Whynn, of Appledore. Mr Toller, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, which was identified by ELIZABETH ROWE, of Clovelly, (by the initials upon some of his clothes), as being that of her son, CHARLES HENRY ROWE, 31 years of age, a seaman on board the Reliance, which was wrecked in Bideford Bay, on the 12th of September last. The following was the evidence adduced:- Henry Wynn deposed: I reside at Appledore, in the parish of Northam, and am a seaman. Yesterday, about midday, as I was coming from Instow to Braunton in a boat, on reaching Broadsand I saw on the land something which I at first thought was a log of wood, but on going nearer to it I saw it was the body of a man. A woman, named Eliza Richards, was with me. We turned the body over, but I did not know what body it was. Mr Tucker, of Braunton, was at work there with his cart. We got his cart, and the body was taken in it to the dead house at Braunton in charge of Serjeant Quick, of the Devon County Constabulary. I searched the pockets, but found nothing but the knife now produced. - John Quick, of the Devon County Constabulary, stationed at Braunton, deposed: Yesterday, about two o'clock, I received from Henry Wynn the body of a man, and conveyed it to the dead house at Braunton. I examined the clothes. He had on a light oilskin overcoat, oilskin overhauls, a dark cloth jacket and trousers, a white inside flannel shirt, a blue outside flannel shirt, striped flannel drawers, and short Wellington boots. His blue shirt is marked in front with the letters C.H.R. He had a ring in one of his ears. - ELIZABETH ROWE deposed: I live at Clovelly, and am a widow. I have this day seen a body which I identified as that of my son, CHARLES HENRY ROWE. I knew him by his clothes, and by his initials upon some of them, and I positively swear that it is the body of my son, the deceased, CHARLES HENRY ROWE. He was thirty-one years of age, and was a seaman on board the Reliance, Captain Richards, of Appledore, sailing from Swansea to Fremington, laden with coal, which was wrecked on the North Tail on the 12th of last September. - Verdict "Found Drowned."

NORTHAM - Fatal Accident. - A very distressing and fatal accident occurred in this parish on Saturday last, to a boy, named MATTHEW HENRY CARTER, about eleven years of age, who was a servant in the employ of Mrs Bowen, of this place. The accident happened to the boy in his attempt to ride a pony belonging to his mistress, which he had been cautioned against doing. An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Unicorn Inn,' before the Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., when the following evidence was given:-
Mary Ann Perry deposed: I live at Northam, and am the wife of Thomas Perry, of Northam, sawyer,. I knew the deceased, MATTHEW HENRY CARTER. He was a servant boy to Mrs Bowen, of Northam, and was about eleven years of age. On Saturday last, about 2 o'clock, as I was returning from Appledore to Northam by the underway to the latter of which place I had been with my husband's dinner, I saw a boy leading a pony from Mr Penhorwood's yard, carrying a bucket with his left hand, and leading the pony with his right. He walked on as far as a step leading up into a field where he stopped the pony, and tried to get u p on it, when on putting his hand across the pony's back the bucket must have touched the pony, as I heard the bucket rattling, and he tried to throw the bucket over the neck of the pony in order to get a firm seat, when the pony started before he had time to do so, and I lost sight of him. I hurried on towards him, but I heard him and the bucket fall very heavy. I walked up to him and asked him what he was called, when I knew his face and I saw it was the deceased. I asked him if he was hurt very much, and he told me he was. He tried to lift himself from the ground, but could not succeed. I called for assistance, and Elizabeth Avery came, and he was taken into his mistress's house, Mrs Bowen, in the parish of Northam, when I went to my home.
Elizabeth Avery deposed: I reside at Northam with Mrs Bowen. I knew the deceased, MATHEW HENRY CARTER. He was a servant boy to Mrs Bowen. On Saturday last I saw him go towards the yard leading to the stable to take out Mrs Bowen's pony to take it to the blacksmith's to be shod. In a few minutes there was a knock at the front door. I went to the door and saw it was Mary Ann Perry, who told me that the pony had thrown the deceased, and begged me to come out, which I did and I took the deceased into Mrs Bowen's house. I examined him, and found there was a wound at the back of the head, but not very plain. There was blood coming from the wound, but not a great deal. I bathed it in water and vinegar, and asked him how the accident happened, when he told me he fell. I asked him how he came to ride the pony as he was cautioned not to do so, but he would not acknowledge that he did so. He was a very good boy, and I never knew him do differently from what he was ordered. The pony was a very quiet one. I at once caught the pony, and he did not attempt to move. After the deceased was a little revived I took him to his mother's house at Appledore.
Nynian Holman Lower deposed: I reside at Appledore and am a surgeon. On Saturday last, about half-past three o'clock, I was sent for to see the deceased. I immediately went, and found on examination that he had received a serious blow on the back of his head. I ordered him to be kept quiet and cold water to be applied to the contused wound. He was sufficiently sensible when I saw him to put out his tongue. I again ordered him to be kept quiet and said I would call again in the evening. I called at half-past seven o'clock and found him quite insensible and at times delirious, and just as I was going to call at half-past ten o'clock I met a man outside the house, who told me the poor boy was dead. I had not a very bad opinion of him when I first saw him, but on seeing him at half-past ten o'clock I considered him in great danger.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned the following verdict, "Accidental Death from a fall in attempting to get upon the back of a pony."

Thursday 28 October 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - Melancholy Accident To A Child. - An Inquest was held on Saturday night last, at the residence of MR WILLIAM BOWDEN, dairyman, in Alexandra Terrace, before Mr James Flexman (Borough Coroner), on the body of EMILY BOWDEN, a child of about two years and four months old, daughter of the before-named WM. BOWDEN. Mr Amos Tepper was foreman of the Jury, and the depositions of the witnesses were taken, whereby it appeared that the deceased was left in charge of her brother, a lad of about 13 years, who had also to scald milk and attend to his four brothers and sisters. He placed the milk when scalded in the passage to cook, and deceased whilst playing about, accidentally fell into it, and received very severe injury. She was taken out of the milk by her brother directly, and a neighbour on hearing her screams went immediately to her assistance and applied temporary remedies. Mr R. Ley (in the absence of Mr Flexman) was called in and attended to the unfortunate infant who lingered on till Friday, when she died from congestion of the brain. A verdict of Accidental Death was accordingly given by the Jury.

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - A lamentable accident occurred, on Wednesday evening, in the river Mole, about two miles above its junction with the Taw, and close to the seventh mile stone from this town to Southmolton Road Station, resulting in the death of SAMUEL MARLES, a young man who had during the previous fortnight, accompanied Mr Henry Pulsford Hobson, and his brother, on their fishing excursions in the neighbourhood, during which time the above named gentlemen have been the guests of the Rev. J. P. L. Sambourne, at Ashreigney. On the day named the party were fishing in the Mole, and SAMUEL MARLES, in endeavouring to free a line from an alder bush, lost his balance and fell into the water, when so strong was the current the unfortunate youth was immediately lost sight of. The party instantly ran down the stream, and got into the middle of the river, with a view of catching him as he floated down, yet he was not again seen alive; indeed, so swollen was the river with the late rains that it was doubted at one time whether the body would be recovered. Mr Hobson set a party of men to drag the river on Thursday, without success, and on Friday morning fresh grappling irons and other apparatus were procured from Barnstaple, and a larger number of hands, but the searchers appeared quite nonplussed. They, however, resumed their work on Saturday morning and about noon they found the body of poor SAM about a quarter of a mile from where he fell in, and on the same side of the river (the Kingsnympton side). The body, by the instructions of Superintendent Wood, who had been with the searchers the whole of the time, was conveyed to a barn in the occupation of Mr Tremlett, to await the Inquest, which was held on Monday, before the County Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., when a full investigation of the facts took place. It is but justice to Mr H. P. Hobson to record the very noble and feeling manner in which he acted towards the remains of the deceased, and also to the surviving members of his family; no member of which feels the sad bereavement more than does Mr Hobson, who was very much attached to the deceased, and intended to have taken him away to be his permanent servant, to which end he had during the past fortnight paid for two new suits of clothes, one of which the poor fellow was drowned in. On its becoming quite certain that MARLES was dead, Mr Hobson ordered a deep brick-walled grave to be made, and volunteered to pay all expenses attendant on searching for and interring the remains of his attached and faithful servant. That gentleman also ordered suits of mourning of the best material that could be procured for the members of the poor lad's family - eight adults - father, mother, three brothers and three sisters; and during the search for the body the same benevolent gentleman instructed Mr Harris of the 'Fortescue Arms' Southmolton-road station, to convey the members to and from their homes in carriages. The event has cast a great gloom over the neighbourhood, especially among the piscatorial fraternity, and the only redeeming feature - the silver lining to the black cloud - is the generous manner in which Mr Hobson has acted throughout this melancholy affair, the whole country-side being loud in proclaiming that gentleman's praise. The following was the evidence adduced at the Inquest:-
Mr Pulsford Hobson deposed:- I am at present residing at Ashreigney Rectory. The deceased, SAMUEL MARLES, was my servant. On Wednesday last he accompanied me and some friends down to the river Mole, salmon fishing. After fishing some time we came to the fish pass, which is near Mr Tanner's weir. My line there got entangled in the fish pass, and I laid down my rod and line on the bank. The keeper, Richard Hooper, and the deceased were standing over the fish pass, and, after telling them my line was entangled, I proceeded to talk to my friend, Mr Percy Robertson, who was with me. I walked away with him, and when I got below an alder bush, which was beyond the fish pass, I heard the keeper call out that the deceased was in the water. I ran down about three yards to see if I could see him, when he swept across the river, and I saw him turn over and go under water, but I did not see him again. Every effort was made to save him on my part as well as my friends. He did not come up again after first sinking.
Richard Hooper deposed:- I reside in the parish of Chittlehampton, and am keeper to the Taw and Mole Fishing Association. On Wednesday last, I was down at the river Mole on duty. Mr Hobson and his friends were fishing there. Mr Hobson was fishing with a minnow, and he told me he had hooked his minnow in the fish pass. About two yards below I saw the deceased come up with a gaff and give it to Mr Hobson and the deceased took the rod, when Mr Hobson went down the steps and tried to free the line, but not being able to succeed he came up the steps and gave the gaff to the deceased, who also went to try to free the line, but without success. Whilst trying to free the line he was stooping, but not being able to free it he stood up. I was going to leave the spot when Mr Percy Robertson came up and said "SAM! SAM! is in the water!" I had not, before Mr Robertson came up, seen the deceased in the water, but on then looking I saw the deceased float out nearly two landyards, when he went under water. About a yard and a half below the place where he went under water he came to the top. He was then lying on his back with his face towards me. I saw him throw abroad his arms twice, but he did not speak. I then said to one of the gentlemen, "Get a minnow attached to a rod and line and try to hook the deceased," but he said he had not got one. The deceased then made a sudden turn over when he sank. After he sank I went down about two landyards thinking he would come up, but he did not. After I had waited there a minute in the expectation of his coming up, I saw him four landyards below, but under water, and when I came there he was nearly two yards below me again, but under water. I then had to get over a fence, and on going down five or six landyards below I saw him nearly in the middle of the river on my side, but under water. I kept my eyes upon him and went to different places in the river to try to rescue the deceased, and made every effort to do so, but without success, and the gentlemen did all they could as far as I could see. There was a great deal of water in the river at the time, and the current was running very strong, the water being in such a state as to render it impossible to have saved the deceased.
John Isaac, labourer, deposed: - I reside at Burrington, and knew the deceased, SAMUEL MARLES. He was about nineteen years of age. On Wednesday last I heard the deceased was drowned, and on Saturday morning I proceeded with my son to try to find him. We saw several searching, and as they appeared to be in one place I said to my son we had better search further down. We proceeded down about a quarter of a mile, when, after looking about a little, I saw something in the water, which appeared to be rather light, and my son said to me "Father, I see something, what does it mean?" and after persevering we found the deceased, and took him out of the water with the aid of a pole and walking stick. A verdict was returned of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 4 November 1869
BARNSTAPLE - A Domestic Tragedy Near Barnstaple. - Much painful excitement was caused in Barnstaple on Saturday morning, by an announcement by the public crier that two children, aged respectively four and nine years, had disappeared on the previous day, and had not since been heard of. It appeared that the two children are the sons of a mason, named HEARN, and on Friday afternoon they were sent to school, as usual, but instead of going they strayed away, and were seen no more until the following day, Saturday. The elder boy, WILLIAM HEARN, was then discovered sitting by the side of a mill leat, near Landkey, and his younger brother, THOMAS, lying by his side. The elder boy was asked what he was doing there, and he replied that he "could not get his brother home." On examination, it was found that the child was quite dead, and the brother stated that he had fallen into the water, but was not drowned, because he spoke to him after he pulled him out. The children had been exposed to the inclemency of the weather all night, and the younger had evidently died from cold and exhaustion. WILLIAM HEARN was at once taken care of and conveyed to his home, where he lies in a very weak state; and the body of the other child was taken to the nearest house at Landkey, to await the Inquest which was held before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on Saturday night last, when the following evidence was adduced:-
Mr Henry Martyn Bryant deposed:- I live at Swymbridge and am a shopkeeper. This morning I left home at five minutes before ten, to go to Harford, to take down a hedge for my brother, and as I was crossing a stream which lay in my way to Harford, I picked up a child's cap behind one of the posts of a stile. I then went back by the side of the stream to see if I could see any child the cap belonged to. I looked across the stream over the hedge, where I saw two boys, and asked one if the cap I had belonged to him, and he said it did. I threw across the cap to him, and seeing the other boy on the ground I asked the first boy what was the matter with his little brother, and he said he was dead. I asked him what he was called, and he said WILLIAM HEARN. I asked him where he lived, and the boy replied that they lived at Davie's-lane, in Barnstaple. I asked him where his father was, and he said he was at work, and I also asked him whether his parents knew where they were, and he said "No." He also said his brother had fallen into the water, and he had taken him out again. I then left and gave information to Policeman Rich, and from him I went to Mr Verney, a neighbour, and several of us went to the spot where I had left the body, and brought the other boy and deceased, THOMAS HEARN, to the 'Castle Inn,' at Landkey.
Mr John Hawkes Jackman deposed:- I live at Swymbridge, and am a surgeon. This morning I was informed that it was supposed a child was drowned at Landkey. I immediately rode over, examined the deceased, and found him dead. My opinion is that he died from exhaustion and congestion of the lungs, consequent upon exposure to the weather, and the deceased having fallen into the water felt the exposure more. I think if any one had been present who could have given assistance when deceased fell into the water, his life might have been saved. His clothes were wet when I examined him.
MR JOHN HEARN deposed:- I live at Barnstaple, and am a mason. The deceased was my child. His name was THOMAS HEARN, and he was five years of age. I last saw him alive at my house yesterday afternoon, about five minutes before two o'clock. His mother told him and his brother WILLIAM to go to school, and they went out of the house together. In the morning they stayed home to look after the baby, whilst their mother went to market, as was their custom. There was nothing said or done to them to induce them to go away, and I had not the slightest idea that they were going away. They went out of the house together about five minutes before two, after having had their dinner. They had enough to eat, for if they had not they would have asked for it. Their mother said "Go to school, WILLY, your father will soon be after you." THOMAS was the deceased brother. WILLY has often absented himself from school and taken his brother, the deceased, with him, but he has not for several weeks until yesterday kept away from school. They went to school at Hardaway Head, in Barnstaple. When I returned from work, at half-past five o'clock, the children were not at home. After my wife had given me my supper, I desired her to go out and look for them. She did so, and came back and said she could not find them, and I then went out with my wife in search of them, and I did not return from searching until between ten and eleven o'clock. About ten o'clock I gave information to the police-station of the children being missed. We met with no one who had seen them. My wife and myself did not go to bed for the night. About half-past seven o'clock this morning I again started to look for them, and shortly after ten o'clock this morning, whilst I was at the Newport turnpike gate, I was informed they were found at Landkey. A person named James Verney informed me they were found, and I went out with him to Landkey, where I found THOMAS HEARN dead, and his brother very much exhausted. They were never ill used. WILLY has always been afflicted.
John Hammett deposed:- I live at Swymbridge, and am the son of Stephen Hammet, shoemaker of Swymbridge. Last evening, about half-past five o'clock, I was at Harford Water, which is in the parish of Landkey, where I saw two boys walking along the road. The younger who is the deceased was crying, and the elder was leading him. I asked them where they were going, and the elder said they knew where they were going. I was going one way and they were going towards Gunn, in the parish of Swymbridge. I lost sight of them on their turning a corner.
Verdict:- "Died from Exhaustion and congestion of the lungs, consequent upon exposure to the weather."

Thursday 11 November 1869
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - An aged labouring man named GEO. ANSTEY, while driving a hand-cart through our Square, on Tuesday last, about noon, was suddenly seized with great difficulty of breathing, fell forward and soon expired. - A Coroner's Jury found a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 9 December 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Singular Death of an Infant Through Suffocation, at Barnstaple - Inquest on the Body. An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon, before Mr I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of the infant child of DR. FORESTER, 15 weeks old, which met with its death under somewhat singular circumstances. A respectable Jury was impanelled consisting of: Mr C. Crassweller (foreman), Messrs. T. Blackwell, W. Hills, E. Petter, J. Harris, J. Hames, G. T. Gaydon, James Rowe, E. Martin, J. Baker, J Milroy, and J. P. Kiell.
The Coroner briefly stated the circumstances under which the Inquiry had been held, and, the Jury having viewed the body, the followed evidence was taken:-
Louisa Bevan sworn:- I am single woman and for the last three months I have been wet-nurse in the family of DR. FORESTER. Yesterday the deceased was in usual health. I put it to bed about six o'clock. I slept with it. I went to bed at about eleven o'clock, and suckled it about half-past twelve and again at about a quarter to two. It was then quite well. At about three o'clock I awoke again, but as the child was very quiet I did not disturb it. Shortly after six o'clock I woke again, and found that the child was still quiet. I tried to wake him, but could not do so, and, feeling rather alarmed, I went and called MRS FORESTER. She came immediately, and she kissed it, and said "Why the child is dead!" She then called DR. FORESTER, and he came immediately. He said that the child was dead. The child had on a night dress, and was wrapped up in a shawl and a blanket. The ends of the shawl was brought over the chest and pinned behind. A portion of the flannel had gathered up under the chin of the child, and when the Doctor took it off I noticed a red mark under the right ear. I am not conscious of having touched the child with my hand at all during the night. His face was uncovered and he was lying on the bolster.
DR. FORESTER said - The deceased, JOHN DENMAN FORESTER, was my son. He was three months and a fortnight old. He was in a perfectly good state of health when I saw him at ten o'clock yesterday morning. He had been in a delicate state of health for some weeks after he was born, but he has lately been in perfect health. Mr Perkins, of Exeter, who attended MRS FORESTER, recommended that as the child was suffering from bronchitis it should be wrapped up very warm. Through this treatment it not only recovered from the bronchitis, but ever since has thriven very much. This morning my wife woke me up at a quarter past seven. I could see by her manner that something dreadful had happened. She said, "JOHNNIE is dead," and I said, "It is impossible." She said, "He is." I said, "Then Louisa must have overlaid him." I immediately rushed down to the room. When I got there the child was in the nurse's arms. I saw directly that the child was dead, but the body was warm. I tried to insufflate the lungs, and sent off for the nearest medical man, which happened to be Mr Harper. The flannel was in four folds under the chin. It was pinned too tightly, considering it was a washed flannel. If it had been an elastic flannel it would not have happened. When I reproached the girl she assured me that she had only made two folds, and that the child must have rolled the flannel up by slipping down in the bed. I then saw a discolouration on the right side of the neck corresponding with the roll of the flannel. There was no discolouration on the other side, - only on the side on which the child was lying. Mr Harper came in about twelve minutes. The nurse was very kind to the child; indeed she was so fond of it that MRS FORESTER intended to keep her permanently to look after the child.
Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, deposed:- This morning, at about twenty minutes to eight o'clock, I was sent for to go to DR. FORESTER'S. The child was lying in the bed, and I examined it. The body was warm; the lips were a little livid, and the tongue protruded slightly between the lips. There was a red mark on the right side of the neck, about two inches long, extending from the front of the windpipe, towards the right ear. The child was quite dead, and I thought had been dead about an hour. In my opinion the death of the child was caused by pressure upon the windp9ipe, producing suffocation. In a child of that age the windpipe and cartilages of the body are very elastic, and the pressure of a hard ridge of flannel would be sufficient to cause asphyxia. The Coroner said that it was a most melancholy case, but it was clear that the child came to its death by misadventure. The Jury at once acquiesced this view, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," coupled with an expression of sympathy with DR. and MRS FORESTER in their bereavement, in which the Coroner joined. The Jury presented their fees to the Soup Kitchen.

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Thursday at Exeter concerning the death of WILLIAM WARREN, 15 years old, who died from the effects of a kick in the stomach received on Saturday last from his horse, which he was putting in the stable. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

CLOVELLY - Distressing and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of ALICE SAUNDERS, aged 39, the wife of a mariner. The deceased, who was near her confinement, fell down stairs on the previous Monday. She was a very heavy woman, and one of the witnesses stated that it required five men to take her upstairs again. Mr R. Cooke, surgeon, was called in and found that the base of the skull had been fractured. She was delivered of a still-born child and expired shortly afterwards from the effects of the fall. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 16 December 1869
DARTMOUTH - Melancholy Death By Drowning in the Dart. - A retired master mariner named WILLIAM ANGEL left Dartmouth in a small open boat, on Thursday morning last, at about eight o'clock, for Dittisham (a village situated on the banks of the Dart, about 2 ½ miles from Dartmouth), on some business; the deceased arrived at Dittisham all right, and left there about five or six o'clock in the evening for Dartmouth. Nothing further was seen of deceased until the following morning, when his body was discovered above Dittisham, close to the shore, on a part of the river known as Ham Beach. It was first seen by Mr Collier, who was rowing in a boat on his way to Dartmouth, who immediately pulled into Dittisham and gave information, and a police officer and others proceeded to the spot and brought the body ashore and lodged it at the 'Ferry Bridge Inn,' where it awaits the Coroner's Inquest. The boat belonging to deceased was found much further up the river, near Gora point. CAPTAIN ANGEL was about 60 years of age, and very generally respected.

TORRINGTON - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Great Torrington, by Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH CHAPPLE, aged 83 years, who was found dead in the Rolle Canal, on the previous Monday night. In the temporary absence of her daughter (Mrs Philip Blake), deceased had gone to the canal and drowned herself whilst labouring under a fit of mental aberration. This fact was clearly established by evidence and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

YARNSCOMBE - Death From Burns. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday, on the body of THOS. ROWCLIFFE FOLLAND, between two and three years of age, the son of a labourer. The deceased was left with a younger child in the dwelling-house, while his mother went an errand. On her return she found him burnt about the stomach, and he died from the effects of the injuries next day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but considered the mother blameable for leaving the children by themselves.

Thursday 6 January 1870
CHULMLEIGH - Fatal Accident On The Railway. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at Chawleigh Week Mill, by Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner, and a very respectable Jury of whom Mr William Snell was foreman, touching the death of JAMES DAVEY, farmer, who was accidentally killed near the Eggesford station on the morning of 30th Dec. The Jury having been sworn, viewed the spot where the accident occurred and on their return the following evidence was adduced:- Thomas Piper sworn:- I have worked for deceased about thirty years; he was 75 years of age, and rather hard of hearing. I last saw him alive on Thursday morning, about 8 o'clock, when he left me for the purpose of feeding his sheep. In order to get to them he had to cross the railway; there is no other way, his house being on one side of the line and the field in which the sheep were on the other. It was his practice to cross the line in going from one part of his farm to the other, and I believe he was returning home on the line when the accident occurred, and that the wind being rough he did not hear the train coming. George Ford sworn:- I am a packer on the North Devon line. On Thursday morning, soon after the 8.28 train had passed up, I found deceased, quite dead, lying on the line. His arms and left leg were nearly cut off and his skull was much fractured. The train must have gone over him after dragging him about five land-yards. - The Coroner:- Had he any right on the line? - Witness: - I am told that he had leave to cross the line, but my duty would have been to order him off. - The Coroner said there was no doubt that deceased had no right on the line, but his practice in crossing it had been winked at. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed by the train." - The Coroner said he was surprised that the Railway Company was not represented at the Inquest by one of their officials. It would have been a compliment, the man having been killed on the line. He (Mr C.) had held Inquests in similar cases on other railways when an inspector was always present.

Thursday 13 January 1870
BIDEFORD - Accidentally Suffocated. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, before Mr T. L. Pridham, on the body of JOHN HARDING, who was accidentally suffocated on the previous evening. The evidence showed that the deceased was a constant visitor at Mr Colwill's kiln; he had been there nearly all the day, but went away about four o'clock, and must have returned again after the men had left work. He was found just before seven in the kiln, and taken out quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased had accidentally fallen into the kiln and was suffocated."

BISHOP'S TAWTON - Death From Scalds. - The Inquest. An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Mr W. H. Toller, (Deputy County Coroner), on the body of MR P. HARTNOLL, a gentleman well-known in this parish. The Jury (of which Mr John Waldon was foreman) viewed the body, and heard the following evidence:-
Ann Nott deposed:- I am the wife of John Nott, farmer, and the daughter of deceased. We reside in the house of deceased, who was 76 years of age, and he has been blind for many years. He was very infirm. On Wednesday, the 29th December of last year, he was sitting in his arm chair, close to the fire. I put the kettle on the middle of the fire, resting upon a stick. Whilst I was turned round to put some tea into the teapot, I heard the water rushing out of the kettle. I instantly caught the kettle in one hand, and pushed back the arm-chair with the other. In the fright, I did not know if he made any exclamation, but I don't think he did. I called my husband, and with his assistance pulled off the deceased's shoes and stockings. There was some water in his boot, and I said, "Does it hurt you, dear father;" and he said, "Never mind; accidents will happen - it will be all right again by and bye." I saw there was a scald, but did not think it was a severe one. I had a little turpentine in the house, a few drops of which I put on, and a few minutes after I applied some sweet oil. The deceased's both feet were burnt, but the right one slightly. I did not send for a doctor that day, but seeing the next day that he slept more than usual I went to Mr Harper, surgeon, of Barnstaple, who has always attended him. I told him of the scald, and he gave me some ointment, which I put on. He did not seem to be better, and I sent for Mr Harper on the following day. From that time he gradually got worse, rallying a little on Sunday and Wednesday. On Friday morning, about half-past nine, he died.
Mary Morrish said she was called on Friday morning, about half-past seven, and was present at his death, which occurred at half-past nine. - John Nott corroborated the statements of his wife and the last witness.
Mr Harper, surgeon, deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple, and have attended the deceased for the last eight years. He has lately been getting very infirm, and has been blind for many years. On Friday, December 30th, Mrs Nott called at the surgery, and stated that her father had met with an accident She said he was burnt, and I gave her some ointment to dress it with. The next day she sent to me, and in the evening I went out and found his left foot scalded over the dorson (instep) and over the inner ankle. I saw him again on Sunday, when he was weaker and almost comatose. He allied somewhat afterwards, and when I saw him on Wednesday he was eating his dinner, but he was very drowsy and almost insensible. On Friday I was sent for again, and when I came out I found he had died about an hour-and-a-half before I arrived. I consider his death was caused by congestion of the brain, consequent upon the injuries received by the boiling water. He had every attention paid him by his friends. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Doctor's opinion of his death.

Thursday 20 January 1870
ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Fall Over A Cliff. - Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Barnstaple Inn,' Ilfracombe, on Thursday, 13th January, touching the death of ABSALOM BALMOND, aged 18 years, who was accidentally killed by falling over the cliffs, on the previous Monday. The following evidence was taken:-
Elizabeth Bryant deposed:- I live at Ilfracombe, and am a single woman. I knew the deceased. He was my nephew, and was about eighteen years of age. On Monday last, I was in my sister's house, at Ilfracombe, about three o'clock in the afternoon. Her name is MARY ANN BALMOND, and she was the mother of deceased. Whilst I was there deceased came in and asked for his dinner, of which he partook. He said he had come from Brandy Cove, which is in the parish of Ilfracombe, where some tallow had washed in. He brought home some with him. After he had his dinner, he said, "Mother, I am going again." I had before said to him, "ABBY, be careful, don't fall; they tell me it is a dangerous place," and he said "Aunt, I shall be all right." He left his mother's house about half-past three o'clock. About a quarter before six, when I was home, I was informed that he had fallen off the cliffs, and was taken up dead. I went to the quay, with my sister, and whilst there he was brought in, in a boat, quite dead, and taken to his mother's house, where I saw him.
John Gibbs stated:- I live at Ilfracombe, and am a blacksmith. I knew the deceased. On Monday last, I was looking out for tallow, which had been washed ashore, on the Ilfracombe coast. Whilst on the outer Torrs, which is above Brandy Cove, I saw the deceased running down over the cliffs to get to the place where the tallow was, and as I was returning home I saw him lying upon the beach on his side. Not seeing him move I thought he was dead. I could not get down to him, so I went to Ilfracombe and reported what I had seen to the police, and I accompanied some men in a boat to the spot. When we arrived he was lying in the same position, quite dead. There was blood about his face, and he must have fallen from the cliffs. He was put into the boat and taken to the pier.
Charles Bampford deposed:- I live at Ilfracombe, and am a sawyer. On Monday last, about five o'clock, I was on the quay, at Ilfracombe, and whilst there I was informed that a man had fallen over the Torrs cliffs. I went away to the cliffs, where there were five or six men standing. I found that they knew the man had fallen over the cliffs. It was dark, and I asked if any one of them would go down to the place with me, but they said they would not go down for £20. It was a dangerous place, and it was very dark. I then said I will go down by myself, and I accordingly went down to the beach. I slipped once going down. When I got down it was so dark, that I did not immediately see the deceased, but after looking about a few minutes I saw him. He was lying on his left side quite dead. I remained about the place until a boat came, when the body was put into it and taken to the pier. A verdict of "Accidental Death from Falling over a Cliff" was returned.

BURRINGTON - Fall of a House near Burrington. Three of the Inmates Killed. - A melancholy catastrophe occurred at Penniford, near Burrington, about one o'clock on Saturday morning, through the fall of a chimney on a house which was in a dilapidated state, resulting in the whole building being demolished, and three of the inmates buried in the ruins, viz., WILLIAM GOULD, an old man, aged 91, and two girls, aged respectively 11 and 9 years, the daughters of a carter, named BIRD, who was absent at Barnstaple at the time. The mother and two children, who slept in the same room (the only bed room in the house) fortunately escaped with but slight injury. On removing the debris a sad and heart-rending spectacle presented itself. One of the old man's legs was almost severed from his body, his shoulder was broken and his head much bruised; the eldest child appeared to have been suffocated, there being no marks of injury on the body; the other was much cut and bruised, and had lost a large quantity of blood. They were all quite dead. It was an old cob house, situated in a valley, and completely sheltered from the wind; the chimney was of stone. It is a wonder the adjoining cottage did not share the same fate. The occupants were afraid to remain in it after the accident, and have removed to a more secure place of abode. The sad affair has naturally caused a great sensation in the neighbourhood, and much uneasiness exists, which will, no doubt, lead to an investigation as to the stability of houses of a similar class. The lessee of the house is Mr W. Buckingham, of Exeter; the owner of the property is Earl Portsmouth.
An Inquest on the bodies was held on Monday, by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner. The foreman of a very respectable Jury was Mr Robert Baker. After viewing the bodies the following evidence was taken:-
MARY BIRD said - I am the wife of a labourer living at Burrington. I lived in a cottage owned by Mr Buckingham. WILLIAM GOULD was a relation of mine; he married my husband's mother, and he has lived with my husband, myself, and my four children, for some time past. On Friday evening last my husband was not at home - he was working at Barnstaple. I, my four children, and WILLIAM GOULD, went to bed about nine o'clock on that evening. I did not have much rest, owing to one of the little ones being very poorly. Between twelve and one o'clock the old man said to me "I think there is something the matter with that child or else it wouldn't be crying so." I replied I thought there was, and we then heard something "littering" down, and WILLIAM GOULD said, "What's that?" I said, "Oh, it isn't the wall falling, WILL, it's only the plastering." I then thought about my dear children near the wall, and I turned over on my side to get a light. Whilst I was feeling for one, the house came tumbling down all around us. The rubbish tumbled all down about me, and though my head was free, I shouldn't have been able to get out of it, hadn't it been for Thomas Hill, who lives in the adjoining cottage, and who came to my assistance. My little girl, ELIZA, was the one who called for Thomas Hill, and little WILLY tried to get out, but couldn't. ELIZA got him out. They are both bruised a little, but they don't complain much. I never heard a voice or a sound from the two dear children who are dead, and I only had that conversation with WILLIAM GOULD. - The Coroner - Did you ever complain of the cottage being in a bad state of repair?: - A. Oh, yes, sir. Q. Why did you live there then? - A. Well, I didn't care about living there; I was wearing of living in the house, and wanted to get away from there. The Coroner: Well, as there was danger there I wonder at your living there. - Witness: I didn't think of the chimney falling; but it has been in a miserable state every since I have been there. Q. I suppose it was difficult to keep the damp out? It was in a very bad state, I assure you, sir. Q. You paid rent for it, I suppose? - Yes; I paid all that was due up to last Michaelmas. Q. When did you last make application for it to be repaired? A. When I paid the rent last, shortly after Michaelmas. Q. Have you said anything about repair before? - A. I don't know that I have; but my husband has, and also my brother-in-law, Thomas Hill.
By the Foreman:- Did your little girl say on Friday night that she was afraid to go to bed for fear the house might fall down? - A. Yes, she did. She said, "I am afraid to lie here; look at these cracks." I didn't say anything, because I thought it was only the cracks in the plaster. Q. You said just now you heard a "littering." What was that? - A. It was part of the back wall falling. - The Foreman: The back wall, sir, is completely rotten, and must have given away. I am here on my oath, and I do say that the place was not fit to be inhabited by human beings. I was in the next cottage the other day, but I wouldn't have stopped in there five minutes if I had known the state it was in. - Witness: I have been wary of living there, and that's a fact. The Coroner: As to the repairs, you applied to have something done before last Michaelmas. - Witness: Others have. Last rent-day, I told Mr Buckingham myself, and he asked me particularly about it, and I told him it was the back wall. Q. You say you don't know how it was that the other house didn't come down; I suppose they were both in the same state? - I don't think the other was quite so bad; there was a little parting between the two, and I suppose that was the reason it didn't come down. Q. Well, why did you live in this house? - A. I hoped it might be repaired, and was looking out for another place. Houses are very scarce here. - By Mr Buckingham, through the Coroner: When did WILLIAM GOULD go there? - Witness: About six weeks ago; his wife died, and he was left alone with no one to take care of him, and we thought we would take care of him. He was 91 years old, and the children that are dead were eleven and five years of age. - Mr Buckingham: I only asked this question because I didn't know GOULD was living there. There were too many in one cottage I think, and in one room, and I wish to say they were not there with my knowledge. Of course I can't blame her, because it was only natural.
Thomas Hill, the brother-in-law, said - I live in a cottage adjoining the one that has fallen. About one o'clock on Friday morning I heard a rustling, and directly afterwards there was a crash. I got out of bed, took my wife and children out of the house, and then found the adjoining cottage in ruins. I got out MARY BIRD and the two children that are now living, and with assistance we got out the three deceased. Just as we were digging out the old man I heard one groan. The chimney of the fallen house was made of stone, and it was built on a cob wall. The back wall had been in a bad state for a long time, taking wet, and I can't help saying it was in a bad state. I didn't think there was any danger of the cottage falling on Friday night. Mr Buckingham has been a kind landlord to me. I went into the house last Lady-day. I have spoken to Mr Buckingham about having the place repaired. My cottage is in a bad state. The Coroner - It seems to me that there are a great many cottages in a bad state of repair.
The Foreman - Yes there are, sir, and its to be hoped this will be a warning and lead to their being properly repaired.
The Coroner - There are several belonging to Lord Portsmouth are there not?
The Foreman - Lord Portsmouth hasn't got any in bad state of repair. He had some but they are all repaired. There are many in the village, however, in a bad state.
The Coroner - It's time for you to mend your ways here then.
P.C. Blackmore said - I was called about half-past one on Saturday morning, and told that BIRD'S house at Penniford had fall in and some people were buried there. On going there I found the roof had fallen in and the chimney was on top of it. The front wall was out in the pathway. I sent at work to search for the bodies with others who were there, and the first I got to was WILLIAM GOULD; he was lying on his back on the bed, and his head was on his breast. He appeared to be quite dead. Part of the chimney was on him and we had to remove this before we could get them out. We next came to ELIZABETH BIRD; she was lying on her face and hands, quite dead. We then found MARY JANE BIRD; she was also dead, and her head was jammed between two pieces of timber. It was with some difficulty that we could get her out. The bodies were all removed to the village.
John Ford, a mason, said - On Saturday morning shortly after one o'clock, I was called to assist in taking out the bodies from the fallen cottage. I was at the cottage on Friday to examine the roof, and also the roof of the back house. I went with Mr Willoway, Mr Buckingham's hind. He wanted to know if the cottage roof could be thatched before the back house roof; I said it could not. I was going to Narracott to tell Mr Buckingham this, on Saturday, if the roof had not fallen in. I didn't see any danger there. I had not heard any complaint, and I did not look particularly for anything which might appear dangerous. The chimney was all buried round with thatch, and you couldn't see the foundation. I should think the chimney stack weighed several tons; it was built of stone, and was very heavy indeed. It rested on a cob wall, and if wet got in it would have rotted the wall away. I have lived in Burrington 36 years. I don't recollect when this house was built; it must have been built a great many years.
Mr W. Buckingham, solicitor, of Exeter and of Narracott House near Portsmouth's Arms Station, said: - On my rent-day, in November last EDWARD BIRD complained to me that his cottage was out of repair. I gave orders the same day to have it put in proper a state of repair. At the same time he mentioned that the 'slee' (i.e. back house) was out of repair. I had had that repaired so often that I asked him if it would not be better to slate it? The back part of the house I should say is against a high bank, and being out of the way of the sun is apt to decay quickly. He said he thought it might be better to slate the roof of the slee, and at the time I gave orders for the thatching, I directed my bailiff to inspect it, and to send a mason there also to examine it. I was under the impression that the thatch had been repaired. I had no other complaints about the cottage, or I certainly should have sent to have it done. I cannot personally attend to these matters myself, but directly I hear of anything I give instructions to my bailiff, and he to the thatcher, mason, or carpenter, as the case may be.
The Foreman - Do you mean that you thought from your books that the work was done?
Witness - From my books? What do you mean?
The Foreman - You pay your servants every week, I believe, and you could tell if the work was done by your books.
Witness - I pay my labourers weekly, but not the thatcher, mason and tradesmen.
The Foreman - Do you mean to say, then, Mr Buckingham, that you believed the place had been repaired?
Witness - It was my impression that it had been done.
The Foreman - Then you mean to say you thought the thatching had been done.
Mr Buckingham - I have already told you so.
The Foreman - But do you really mean to say so?
Mr Buckingham - I have already told you so on my oath. I don't know what you mean, to question my word in this way. I think you are a very unfit man to be in the place you are. The way in which you have put questions is most improper. You are taking a very one-sided view of the matter.
The Foreman - It's a very bad case of it, Mr Buckingham.
Witness - I hope you don't mean to question my word; if you doubt my word, you had better say so.
The Coroner then read over the evidence, pointing out to the Jury that if they thought the deceased persons came to their death in a purely accidental manner, they would return a verdict accordingly, and if they thought there was any one to blame, they would append what remark they thought fit to their verdict.
Mr Buckingham said, to satisfy the foreman, he would say that he paid his thatchers on his rent-day, and that would not be until next Lady-day. He, therefore, could not have known it before then, unless specially reported to him.
The Jury, after some little consideration, returned the following verdict - "We believe the deaths of these persons to be Accidental, through the fall of a house, which however, at the time, was out of repair." The Jury gave up their fees for the benefit of the BIRD family.

BERRYNARBOR - Suicide By A Farmer. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at East Hagginton, in this parish, by Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, on the body of MR JAMES RICHARDS, farmer, aged 50, who destroyed himself whilst in a fit of mental aberration. The following evidence was adduced:-
PRUDENCE RICHARDS deposed:- I live at East Hagginton, in the parish of Berrynarbor, and am a single woman. The deceased was my brother, and farmed at East Hagginton. He was a single man, and fifty years of age. He was at times not sound in his mind, and talked very incoherently, not being able for some months past to attend to his business as a farmer. I attended to him. For several months past he has slept in the same room I did, and last night he slept in the same room. My mother and my niece, Elizabeth Ann Harding, also slept in the same room last night. This morning, about six o'clock, Henry Sanders, who lives at our farm, came to our bed-room door, and said, "PRUDENCE, your brother!" I thought something had happened, but he would not at first tell me. I at last found out from him that he was dead. I then went down stairs with Henry Sanders, and when I came to the bottom I saw deceased suspended by a rope from a nail in the ceiling. He was cut down as soon as possible, but he was quite dead.
Henry Sanders deposed:- I reside at East Hagginton Farm, and have lived nearly two years with MR JAMES RICHARDS, the deceased. This morning, about six o'clock, on going down stairs, I saw deceased hanging from the ceiling. I immediately went upstairs to tell my old and young mistresses of it, and PRUDENCE RICHARDS, my young mistress, came down with me and saw the deceased hanging from the ceiling. I called assistance, and deceased was cut down, but he was quite dead, being cold and stiff. He has not been well for some time.
Mr P. Stoneham deposed:- I live at Ilfracombe and am a surgeon. I had known the deceased for several years, and he was a patient of mine. I have attended him off and on for several months for diseased stomach, and about a month or six week since I sent him to Dr Budd, of Barnstaple, but he did not get better. Last Tuesday week he sent for me to see if he had a complaint, which the world said he had, but he had it not. He was at times low and melancholy. This morning I was sent for and was told he had hung himself. I said it was of no use for me to go if he was dead, but as his mother wished it I did, and when I arrived I found him dead, with the mark of a rope round his neck, which caused his death. Verdict:- "Hanged himself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."

BARNSTAPLE - Death Of A Child From Fracture Of The Skull. An Unnatural Mother. - Censure Of The Coroner's Jury.
An important Inquiry was held last week, and concluded on Thursday night, at the 'Chichester Arms,' Pilton, before Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of a child, aged nine weeks, which met with its death under very suspicious circumstances. The following evidence was adduced:-
WILLIAM THORNE deposed:- The deceased child was my daughter. She was ten weeks old last Sunday. Mr Harper attended my wife at her confinement. The child was full grown, but rather delicate. It did not take the breast properly for some days. About a fortnight since, the child was suffering from sore throat and relaxed bowels, and I obtained, on the advice of Mr Norrington, some castor oil and gave to it, but the looseness did not stop. We afterwards gave her some raw milk and brandy, which Mr Fernie ordered, I having called him to see the child this day week. The child then seemed to be better. The Sunday before that my wife was sitting in front of our kitchen fire. The child was in her arms. A piece of burning wood fell out of the grate, and my wife in her hurry to avoid the burning wood tripped over the chair and fell on the limeash floor. In falling, the baby fell out of her arms on the floor. I picked up the child and gave it to my wife. It did not cry at first, and appeared to be stunned. My wife gave it the breast, but it would not suck for some time. The child was apparently convulsed, and twitching all the night afterwards. It did not get better the next day, and I called Mr Fernie the following morning, namely, Tuesday. On the Monday evening I was leaving to attend the Foresters' quarterly meeting. My wife did not wish me to go. We had had some disagreement, and she was rather excited. I left my house and went over to Mr Bushen's (at this inn), with a jacket I had to leave for him. My wife followed me to the door. I went into the kitchen and gave Mrs Bushen the jacket. I went out again directly. As I came out of the door my wife was standing outside with the child wrapped up in her arms. I ran down the street. As soon as I was outside, I heard her call after me, in an angry tone, but I did not hear what she said. I returned home in about an hour. My wife then had the child in her arms; she appeared to be calmed down. I had my supper, and we both went to bed about an hour and-a-half afterwards. The child continued to get worse and died last Sunday, about seven o'clock in the evening. Mr Fernie saw it the day before, about the middle of the day. Mr Fernie saw the child several times during the week. On the night my wife fell with the child, as before described, I observed a swelling on the top part of its head. The child was fearfully convulsed the day it died. I never mentioned to Mr Fernie about the fall the child had received until today.
Mary Jane Cann deposed:- I am fourteen years of age. On Monday evening, the 3rd of January, I was standing in Pilton-street, near the post-office. I heard a baby crying. I ran up the street towards the sound, and saw a child lying on the pavement, about a foot from the road. It was screaming very much. I took it up. Mrs Barnhouse came down to me. I said, "I've got a baby here." She took it from me, and went into the 'Chichester Arms' with it. When I took the child up I saw no one in the street. It was lying just opposite Mr Thomas's office window. It was very dark that night; it was between eight and nine o'clock. I saw Mr Barnhouse come out of Mrs Blake's - the door above this house.
Ann Barnhouse stated:- On Monday week last, about half-past eight in the evening, as I was coming out of the 'Fraser's Arms,' I heard a baby crying rather loud, and I went down the street towards the sound, when I met the last witness outside Mr Thomas's door. She had a child in her arms. She said, "My god, Mrs Barnhouse, I have picked up a baby!" I took the child from her, and carried it into this house. Mrs Bushen said it was MRS THORNE'S baby, and I carried it immediately to MRS THORNE'S house. MRS THORNE lives the door above the 'Union Inn.' I met her at her door. I asked her if that was her baby. She said it was. I gave it to her, and asked her how she came to put it down in the street. She replied she didn't know. She would not say what she did it for. The child was crying, but stopped when its mother gave it the bosom. MRS THORNE said she saw some one take it up and then she lost sight of it. I did not see any one in the street until I came up to the witness, Cann. The child was wrapped up in a double flannel and a woman's water-proof cloak. It was a dark night and raining a little. The mother appeared glad to see the child again.
Jane Bushen deposed:- On Monday evening, January 3d, WILLIAM THORNE came into my house and gave me a jacket. It was about half-past eight. He didn't stop a minute in the house; I saw him go out. I went into the room opposite and stayed a minute, and on coming out I saw MRS THORNE pass my door going up the street. I went into my cellar, and was drawing a glass of beer, when Mrs Barnhouse brought in a baby and came towards me, saying they had picked up a baby. She unwrapped it, and I recognised it as MR THORNE'S baby. I had seen the child several times before. Mrs Barnhouse then took it away. Five minutes did not elapse from the time I saw MRS THORNE pass till the child was brought in. I have often seen MRS THORNE with her baby lately. She appeared to be very fond of it.
Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, deposed:- This day week, about nine o'clock, I was called to attend the deceased child. I found it on its mother's lap looking pale, with a very weak pulse, and apparently exhausted. It had twitching of its limbs. The parents told me it had been suffering from loose bowels. The father also told me the child had been taken out to Mrs Bushen's the night before. It was, he said, wrapped up in a flannel, and he hoped no harm had come to it. It had no diarrhoea. I prescribed for it some warm milk and brandy. I was called to Exeter on a trial, on Wednesday and Thursday. On Friday, about dinner time, I saw the child and found it very much altered in appearance. The twitchings were stronger, the eyes were rolling. I told the parents to continue to give it milk. I saw the child the next day; it was in the same state. I called on Sunday evening and was told the child had died a few minutes before. I have, by direction of the Coroner, made a post mortem examination of the child. I found a swelling on the back part of the head. I made a cross cut across the swelling and throwing back the flaps of the skin, I found a good deal of coagulated blood. On clearing it away, I found beneath two fractures of the skull, one five inches long and the other three inches long. I then removed the skull cap; I found much blood on the surface of the brain, and the brain itself lacerated. Death was, in my opinion, produced by the injuries the skull and brain had sustained. Those injuries could not have been produced except by great force. The fracture was produced before death. I did not examine its head before it died.
Elizabeth Hedden, widow, deposed:- I was in the habit of going to the house of the father of the deceased child. From a few days after last Christmas, up to the time of its death, I used to wash for the mother. It had a very bad cold and was loose in its bowels. I know that after Mr Fernie was called in its bowels became settled. On Tuesday, January 4th, I stayed up all night with it, it was much convulsed during that night. I was with it again on the following day and night; it was then much convulsed. I left it on the Saturday, and on the Sunday evening I saw it in her mother's lap, when it was dead. I never heard that the child had met with a fall until Tuesday last. On Friday last I noticed a little knob on the back of its head; it felt hard and appeared as if its head had had a blow. When Mr Fernie was visiting the child on Tuesday night, I saw its mother remove the candle and place it further from the child, which was on my lap. I afterwards, as soon as Mr Fernie left, asked her why she removed the candle. She replied, "For nothing particular." MRS THORNE appeared very fond of the child.
Mary Allen, wife of John Allen, dairyman, deposed:- The father of the deceased child is my nephew. I remember when the child was born; I saw it a day or two after its birth, and I saw it occasionally afterwards up to the time of its death, which took place last Sunday. It looked a healthy child when first born. Last Monday I examined the head of the child (it was then dead) and found a swelling on the top of the head. I afterwards questioned the father and mother separately, as to how the mark was caused, and they both told me at different times and places that they did not know how it came, unless it was by a fall the child had from its mother's arms on the Sunday week before when a piece of wood fell out of the fire. I had not heard of this accident from anyone until I asked about the swelling on the child's head. I scolded the mother for having put her child down in the street, and she said she did it to tease her husband, and that she put it down carefully. This was just after she did it. I saw the child that night; it was frisking and crying. I did not point out the swelling to Mr Fernie when he examined the child after its death. The mother always appeared to be very fond of the child.
Mary Ann Barnhouse stated;- On Monday week last, MR WILLIAM THORNE came to me and asked me to go and stop with his wife, as the baby was very poorly. He said the child had fallen down out of its mother's arms the day before, when some wood fell from the fire. I went up and saw the mother directly. I told her what her husband had said to me, and she said it was correct about the child falling the day before. I stayed with the child about half-an-hour. I did not observe that it was convulsed. I saw the child again on Tuesday; it was then much worse, and had convulsions whilst I was with it.
The Jury retired to consider their verdict, and after half-an-hour's consultation, returned the following verdict:- "That the said child died at Pilton, on Sunday, 9th of January inst., and that its death was the result of an extensive fracture of the child's skull, produced by a blow, but how or by what means such fracture was caused there is no evidence to shew." The Jury requested the Coroner to call in the mother of the child, and express to her the opinion of the Jury that her conduct in leaving her infant in the street was most unnatural and unfeeling, which the Coroner did in appropriate terms, also adding his own censure on her conduct.

CREDITON - Fatal Accident At A Railway Crossing. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Uton, before A. W. Leigh, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BURROWS, of Uton, 67 years of age, who was found dead on Wednesday evening, about a mile and a-half from Crediton Station, on the North Devon Line. Mr Tyler, superintendent, Queen-street, and Mr Higgs, appeared to watch the case on the part of the Railway Company. WILLIAM BURROWS, son of the deceased, said he remembered his father leaving to go to Crediton, on Wednesday evening, about quarter to seven o'clock. He would have to cross the line at Salmon-hutch, a quarter of a mile from his cottage. He did not know any more till John Labbett called for him and he went to the crossing. He saw his father on one side of the rails, on the north side; he was bleeding a little, he was cut on the right eye, and the left hand was lacerated, the right arm was broken. He was not sensible and died immediately. Mary Salter, keeper of the gates, deposed that after the 6.15 train from Exeter had passed down, her attention was attracted to what she thought to be a newspaper, on the opposite side of the rails. She went part of the way to see what it was. She saw it was something lying there. She was frightened and could not tell what it was, and fetched John Labbett, who lived close by. They then ascertained that it was WM. BURROWS. He was lying on his face, his body was quite straight. He appeared to have been struck forward; he never moved or breathed; he was quite dead. Henry Pope, the driver of the train in question, said he passed the crossing at the rate of 25 miles an hour. It was a moonlight, but cloudy night; there was a rough wind blowing against them. They had the usual lights. He knew nothing of the accident ill next morning. There were no marks on the engine. He whistled when about 300 yards from the crossing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on the body of a poor young fellow named RICHARD TAPSCOTT who, for some years past, has been wandering about the town and neighbourhood, without any fixed place of abode, sleeping in linhays or outhouses whenever he had the chance, existing frequently on turnips and other roots and, in fact possessing many traits of a savage, met with his death under most painful circumstances. The Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, on Saturday evening last, before Mr James Flexman, Borough Coroner. Mr John Mills was the foreman of the Jury. - James Short deposed as follows:- I am a labourer and work at South Aller Quarry. I saw the deceased there yesterday morning, about seven o'clock, and spoke to him. He told me they had torn his coat abroad in the Union. I found him one morning in the hayloft. He frequently slept on the top of the lime kiln. I saw him in the kiln once, I think it was at Christmas last. This morning (Saturday) I went to the kiln's eye about day break, about a quarter to seven o'clock. The door underneath was partly open. On going to the top of the kiln I saw a bucket turned upside down with dire burning in it - deceased was lying on his back in the kiln and the fire was burning round him. There was a strong smell of burning flesh. I at once went to my master's and procured assistance, and on getting him out I found his feet had been burnt off and his right thigh was completely roasted. I afterward went into Southmolton and informed the Coroner what had occurred. TAPSCOTT had been twice sent to prison for lying about the kiln and once for stealing a jacket from the premises. - James Harris deposed to having assisted in taking deceased out of the burning kiln. He had frequently heard him ordered off the kiln. He came there to warm himself and for the purpose of getting what he could. - Superintendent Fisher proved going with a shell and horse and cart to South Aller kiln and taking the body to the Union. He had known deceased from childhood; considered him about 27 years of age. - John Huxtable, the porter at the Union, said the deceased was often an inmate. He entered it on the 5th inst.; he then wore a coat, waistcoat, trousers, scarf, hat, an old shirt, stocking without feet, and boots without uppers tied up with cord. He was put in a bath and his clothes were put in the store-room until the 12th inst., and they were in exactly the same state when handed to him. He left on his own notice; at times he would behave very well. The Jury did not consider it necessary to call in medical testimony and the Coroner expressed his belief that the poor fellow became suffocated in the kiln and afterwards burnt. A verdict was accordingly given.

Thursday 27 January 1870
BICKINGTON - Death Of An Infant From Burns. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held by Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, at the house of RICHARD EDWARDS, labourer, of this village, touching the death of his infant child, WM. EDWARDS, then and there lying dead. The following was the evidence taken:- MARY JANE EDWARDS sworn: I am the child of RICHARD EDWARDS, labourer, of Bickington, and am about ten years of age. The deceased child was my brother, and about two and a quarter years of age. On Monday, the 3rd of January, my mother went to Barnstaple to work, and left me with the baby; but before going desired me to mind it, and to clean the upstair rooms. My mother left about half-past nine o'clock, and about half-past three I went upstairs to clean the rooms, leaving the child on one side of the fire-place in a small heavy chair. After I had been upstairs a few minutes, I heard the child cry, when I immediately came down stairs, and saw its clothes burning. I wrapped my clothes round the baby, which put out the flames, and Mrs Lewis, a neighbour, came in. - Jane Lewis deposed: - I live at Bickington, and am the wife of Thomas Lewis, labourer. About half-past three o'clock, on Monday, 3rd January, I was in my house, which is close by the child's parents' , when I heard it crying, and was attracted by smoke coming from the house, and when I came there I found the deceased child standing on the floor with its face towards the door in a burning state, with MARY JANE EDWARDS by its side. A great quantity of the clothes was burnt, and I desired MARY JANE to strip off the burning part of the clothes, which was done. Flour and linseed oil were applied to the burns, and Mr Cooke, of Barnstaple, surgeon, was sent for, and attended the child to the day before its death, which took place yesterday morning. - Mr M. Cooke stated: I live at Barnstaple, and am a surgeon. On Monday, the 3rd instant, I was sent for to see the deceased child, WILLIAM EDWARDS. I accordingly went and found the child extensively burnt about the upper part of the thigh, the lower portion of the body, the under surface of the arms and the chin. I found that linseed oil and flour had been applied to the burnt parts. From the extensive character of the burns I thought the child would very shortly die from the effects. However, I saw it at different times afterwards, and found it improving and the burnt parts healing. On the day before its death I last saw it, when the child was in a very weak state, its appetite having failed. It died on the following morning from exhaustion. My opinion is that death resulted from the shock to the system caused by the extensive burns. I believe every care and attention was paid to the child. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Fire."

Thursday 3 February 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at the 'Curriers Arms', on the body of the infant child of MR GEORGE VICKERY, stonemason, who was found dead in bed the same morning, by his mother's side. The medical evidence went to show that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BRISTOL - Suicide of a North Devon Man at Bristol. - On Tuesday morning, MR WILLIAM FACEY, master mariner, a native of Berrynarbor, near Ilfracombe (whose wife and family have been recently staying at Llanelly, South Wales), was found in bed at Allen's 'Temperance Hotel,' Temple-street, Bristol, with his throat cut. It was fatally done, and a razor lying on the bed covered with blood told too plainly by whose hand. He took lodgings at the house on the previous Saturday, and on Sunday conversed cheerfully with those about, and read the Bible, not at all betraying that any such deed was in contemplation.
From the evidence adduced at the Inquest which terminated on Thursday in the now uncommon verdict of Felo-de-Se, it was shown that pecuniary difficulties led to the dreadful deed. Deceased was up to a comparatively recent period master of a vessel of his own, and resided at Appledore. His vessel was, however, wrecked; he lost his all, and he has since been in the employ of Mr Morris, shipowner of Bristol, and had made two voyages to North America in one of his vessels. On his return from the first voyage he did not give up his accounts, and neglected to do so when requested after his return from the second voyage. As a consequence, he was discharged. The language used in his letters, given below, shews his distress to have been extreme.
John Pugsley, of Berrynarbor, said that he had known the deceased for the past 22 years; he was born in Berrynarbor. Had not seen him since June, 1868. Some little time before that date deceased had lost his vessel, and there was a lawsuit between him and the insurance office, and the deceased became a bankrupt. His passing was opposed, but he got his certificate in July, 1868. His difficulties oppressed him very much, and he was reduced to poverty. He complained that his losses would "drive him wild," and he seemed vacant and absorbed in grief. Witness, however, had seen no symptoms of actual madness in him. In August last he wrote to witness and said he should never recover his position. Witness had not seen him since. The Coroner produced some correspondence which had passed between deceased and his employer, and also letters to his wife and friends showing the agonised state of his mind.
In one to a relation he said: "My senses are almost exhausted; my fingers tremble whilst I am writing this. But I cannot help it. O, my dear wife and dear child, pity and forgive me! But I cannot help it, my poor heart is in a flame. If I could see you once more - but I am afraid before the close of another day I shall be no more in this world. Adue, dear friend, mind you do as I have said - your affectionate cousin."
A letter to his wife and daughter, dated Jan. 14th, and subsequently re-dated Jan. 17, was amongst those found in possession of deceased. The following are specimens of the excited and fragmentary writing; "I now commence to tell you my melloncoly story. I am in an awful state of mind. I find everything is gone against me, my mind in all business matters is at an end. My dear tender wife it was a very great stougle the day I left my heart was breaking - if you remember I came and kissed your dear Face the second time, for the last in this world. ..... He has threatened to have me before the Marine Board; so I cannot beare the idea of being brought up by them. My dear, when I come to look round I cannot see anything like a friend who would give me a single meal's victules - I have no friend on earth but you and my dear little maid. I am got hold, and I am not able to work now as I used to, so I am entirely gone out of my mind, and by the time you get this I am afraid I shall be in another world. I hope and trust that God will help you in your great trouble. My two dear friends, forget me as soon as possible, and never think that you had any knowledge of me, and of all my troubles. O, when I think of it, it drives me mad. Adue, my beloved wife, may God give you strength to overcome this terrible trouble."
"I do love you but I cannot overcome this trouble. I am bound to leaved you, my own dear and tender child when will you and your dear aunt be able to read this most horrible declaration. I am well aware it will be a dreadful shock, but my dear child I am compelled now to do what I could wish I could in any way avoid but I can't.......... O my two very dear creatures I can see you in your agonies about me but I can't help it. But tell Edmund (and let him see this) that if he does not comply with what I have said I will trouble him if it is in my power, after death. He had better take you both way from them where you will be by yourselves. Oh, my God! what am I writing of! but I am deranged and I am not in my right mind."
"Friday, 3 p.m., the last I shall ever write. My watch will be here at Jenkins and my clothes and carpet bag. I have wandered about Bristol in a sad way, but now I am afraid this day will be my last. I wish I had taken my dear child up with me, then things would have taken another turn, but now I am alone and trouble has over-taken me....... My dear wife it will be a dreadful blow to you and my dear child. If I had the means I would go anywhere to get some work. I would be glad to work my fingers to the bone, but I cannot get away. I would go to Liverpool, but I have not the means. So I have fixed my mind on what I shall do tonight. I am afraid I shall be compelled to leave you."
In another part of the letter he says:-
"I hope the blessed Lord will help me this afternoon to overcome this dreadful temptation. Oh, if I could but see you once more! but how could I come - I have no ship, no money. * * * The Lord have mercy on me! For them to have threatened to have me brought up before the Marine Board, that is what has driven me to distraction."
"Monday morning. My dear, - Another dreadful night is over. I have your letter, which filled me with agony most dreadful. My two dear beloved ones. I am distracted now that I am come to the conclusion that I shall never see you again. I shall post this myself this evening before I commit the awful deed. They threatened to have me before the Board. I have not been in my right mind since, and now I am in an awful state. Oh, could I see you. Adue, my two dear friends. Adue to my two dear ones. It will be a dreadful thing when my death is announced. I have had some hopes for some days that something would turn up, but it is not likely. I hope it may before night. I shall be very glad…"
This letter was enclosed in an envelope addressed to his wife, and stamped ready for posting. In other letters and scraps of memoranda the deceased said he had not had two pennyworth of food for two days. The letters also contained the expressions: "I am in a terrible state of mind, but it is too late - I don't see how I can escape." "If you have not sent the money don't send it, as I shall not want money any more." One letter contained the sentence - "Don't you come to Bristol, when the sad news is verified - no matter what they do with me - but mind you have the pocket-book and its contents."
Upon an envelope was the following:- "My dear wife, I have no letter today - now I am done for - I am driven mad! God have mercy on you both." In one paper written, with the intention of being sent to his wife, the deceased said he had received her telegram at four o'clock that day, and "had been mad ever since." He declared in this document that the Marine Board should never have him, "unless they took him in bed in the morning." In the confused and incoherent passages of the letters he first accused one person and then another of "being his ruin," of "tearing him from his family," and "murdering him." He admitted in one letter addressed to his wife that he "had not his accounts made up, and that it was because he did not like to tell her of it, or to ask other people to do it for him, that he had been brought into this awful trouble." In the last letter read by the Coroner deceased complained of sympathy not having been shown him, and added if he had been shown sympathy he should have been "saved from this act;" but "I must be gone before the morning."
The Coroner, in his summing up, exonerated deceased's employer, Mr Morris, from blame, as acting an agent for the ship, he was compelled to press for the production of the accounts. After recapitulating the evidence, the Jury, as the result of thirty minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of Felo de Se!
The following is a copy of the letter from Mr Morris to CAPTAIN FACEY, referred to above:- "January 18th, 1870. - Sir, - Unless your accounts are sent in by Friday next, I shall then cause proceedings to be taken against you before the Board of Trade, as you have forfeited all claims to any longer indulgence." - On the Friday morning CAPTAIN FACEY wrote Mr Morris this letter; - "Dear Sir, I will be at your office tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock." - On the back of the communication of the 18th January, was this memorandum - "This threat has drove me to this rash act. I wish I had never seen you. How can you act so? I suffered myself.... in the old ship. I trust the Lord will crush (or punish) you." - [It appeared that the deceased did not go to the office, as stated in the letter.]

BARNSTAPLE - The Late Fatal Accident With A Thrashing Machine - Coroner's Inquest. - The man named PHILIP GRATTON, of Tawstock, who tore his leg in a thrashing machine at Tutshill Farm, in the parish of Pilton, a short time since, thereby necessitating the amputation of the limb, expired at the Infirmary on Monday, at mid-day. Hopes were entertained of his recovery, but he had a relapse, and medical skill was unable to save him. He leaves a widow and four children to mourn his untimely end. At the Inquest held on Tuesday evening the following evidence was adduced:
James Ford, of Pilton, deposed: On Friday, the 14th January last, I was at work at Tutshill Farm, in Pilton, assisting the deceased to feed a thrashing machine with wheat, in the sheaf. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the deceased get up on the feed board of the machine. I heard him scream out and I looked up and saw his left leg in the machine. He begged me to hold him up, but the machine stopped almost immediately by the belt flying off with a jerk. Mr John Brayley and the persons who were working the machine at once assisted me, and the deceased was freed from it within a quarter of an hour. He was taken at once in a cart to the North Devon Infirmary. I saw that his left leg was torn to pieces up to the knee.
Mr John Brayley said: The deceased was feeding a thrashing machine at my farm (Tutshill). I was almost directly under him. I saw him with the cover of a fan of the machine in his hand, and he appeared to be about to replace it. I had moved a little way from the machine when I heard a jerk, and some one said there was a man in the machine. I at once ran to it and slackened the breast about six inches. The breast of the machine was then unscrewed as quickly as possible, and deceased taken out. I then observed that his left leg was mangled and torn up to the knee. He was sent immediately to the North Devon Infirmary.
Mr James W. Cooke, surgeon, stated: The deceased was brought to this Institution shortly before five o'clock in the afternoon of the 14th of January. He was undressed and placed in bed. I found his left leg was torn to pieces as high as the knee joint. Amputation above the knee joint was performed by Mr Michael Cooke, one of the surgeons of the Infirmary, soon after the deceased arrived. He was suffering from diarrhoea when he came. He complained occasionally of pains about his stomach. The wound n his leg healed very well, and without any bad symptoms, and he appeared to be progressing until Thursday last when he complained of pains in his back. On Friday evening he vomited a quantity of decomposed blood, and he continued vomiting at short intervals until yesterday morning. He died at about one o'clock yesterday of exhaustion, produced by the vomiting. I believe, from his symptoms,, that his intestines were diseased, and the accident he had sustained may have accelerated his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," kindly giving their fees to the widow, and the Coroner added 2s. 6d. to them.

NEWTON ABBOT - Shocking Fatal Accident near Newton Abbot. - An accident of the most melancholy nature, terminating fatally, occurred to a lad named WILLIAM STEVENS, about eleven years of age, near Bradley, Newton Abbot, on Saturday morning. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Vicary, tanner, and early on the morning in question he was sent to the stables, situated near the Bone Mills, at Bradley, for the purpose of fetching a horse. A short time afterwards a labouring man observed the horse galloping towards Newton Bushel, dragging the lad by the halter. He followed the horse, but he had not proceeded far before he found the poor boy lying along the road lifeless, minus of one arm and an ear, and his head and face frightfully mutilated. the lad's arm was afterwards found in the Kingsteignton road. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, at the Commercial Inn, Newton Bushel. From the evidence adduced, it would seem that the boy, after placing the halter on the horse for the purpose of taking it to where the trap was, wound the end of it around his wrist, and when the horse started off he was unable to free himself. Mr Drew (Mr Vicary's manager) gave the boy an excellent character. the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 February 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests Held By the Borough Coroner.
Awfully Sudden Deaths. - An Inquest was held on Saturday morning, at the 'Lamb Inn,' Boutport-street, Barnstaple, before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES DOCKETT, a butcher, who suddenly dropped down and died, in Boutport-street, on the preceding evening. The following evidence was adduced:-
Samuel Pavey, of Barnstaple, deposed:- I was well acquainted with the deceased, having known him for the last thirty years. He was a butcher. Yesterday, about five o'clock in the afternoon, when I was in Boutport-street, just outside Parkman's Court, I saw the deceased coming round Mr Seldon's corner, from Joy-st. It was raining, and he had an umbrella up. Just as he came round the corner I saw him fall on his back. I ran over to him an caught him by the arm and endeavoured to help him up. I said "JEM, what's the matter?" He made no answer. His eyes appeared to be fixed. George Jones, the policeman, came, and we got him upon his legs. We then put him in a handcart, and he was taken across to the 'Lamb Inn,' and put into the room where his body now lies. Before3 he was taken across the street Mr Fernie arrived and saw him. Deceased never spoke a word, and he drew his last breath about five minutes after we put him into the 'Lamb Inn.'
Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, stated:- Yesterday afternoon, between four and five o'clock, I was called by P.C. Geo. Jones to see the deceased. I found him lying on his back, in a hand-cart outside Mr Joint's, in Boutport-street. He appeared almost gone. I had him taken into the 'Lamb Inn.' He gave a few gasps after he was brought in, and expired within five minutes. He did not speak or make any noise. The pupils of his eyes were natural. I observed a mark on the back of his head; I have examined it and find it is a superficial scalp wound, and of recent occurrences. I believe he died of apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held on Saturday evening, at the 'Horse and Groom Inn,' Boutport-street, before Mr Bencraft, on the body of MRS SUSAN PARKIN, wife of MR GEORGE PARKIN, butcher, who died at her residence, in Trinity-street, under very similar circumstances. The witnesses deposed as follows:-
Sydney Harper, butcher, deposed:- The deceased was my aunt, and the wife of MR GEORGE PARKIN, butcher. I am his apprentice, and live with him. My aunt was about forty-three years of age, and has been in her usual good state of health until this morning. She breakfasted with her husband and myself about nine o'clock and ate her breakfast heartily; it consisted of fried potatoes and bacon and tea. I went from the shop in the Butcher's Row to my uncle's house, in Queen-street, about ten o'clock this morning, when the deceased was sitting in the kitchen, in an arm chair, by the fire. She had her handkerchief to her eyes and her smelling bottle in her hand. I asked her what was the matter. She said a pain had taken her in her head. I went to the stable and returned in a few minutes. She was then upstairs. I called up to her to know if she was better. She did not reply. I then went upstairs and found her lying on the bed. I called her by her name, but she gave no answer, but seemed to try to speak. I then went to the market and told my uncle she was ill. He sent me direct to Mr Gamble's, the surgeon. His assistant (Mr Shapland) came within half-an-hour and saw the deceased.
Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, stated:- This morning, about eleven o'clock, I was called to the house of the deceased, in Queen-street. I went immediately and found the deceased lying on her back in bed. She was breathing very stertorously; her face was flushed and froth was coming from her mouth. The pupil of her left eye was dilated, the other was the usual size. She was perfectly insensible. I placed her on her side and loosened her clothes. Her pulse became gradually weaker, her nails and lips became chill, and she died in about ten minutes. I have no doubt she died of apoplexy. I have examined her head, but there is no mark or bruise on it. Her respiration ceased before her heart stopped beating. Verdict:- "Died suddenly from Natural Causes, by the Visitation of God."

CREDITON - An Inquest was held at the Crediton Union Workhouse, on Monday, before Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner, touching the death of the illegitimate male child of JANE GIBBINGS, which was found dead in bed, on Friday, the 4th inst., at the Workhouse. the child had been born two days previously. The Jury, after a very patient enquiry, returned a verdict of "Found dead in bed, but how, or by what means it came by its death, there is no evidence to prove."

EXETER - Suspicious Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Barnstaple Inn', North-street, Exeter, on Saturday, before Mr Hooper, City Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN MILLER, a currier, 43 years of age, who died under somewhat suspicious circumstances on the previous Tuesday. It was shown by the evidence that the deceased had been ill for nearly six months, but had only occasionally been prevented from attending to his work. He complained of violent pains in the stomach, which were always worse after meals. At times he suffered so much that he was unable to stand. Recently he became a patient at the Dispensary, and was treated by Mr Phelps for ulcer in the stomach. He was under the surgeon's care when he died. MILLER had been twice married, and his widow has had three husbands. They lived very unhappily together, and quarrels were frequent. Deceased had told two or three parties that when he drank anything at home there was something which seemed to grate between his teeth. On one occasion his son heard him complain to his wife about the milk being of a dark colour, but she replied that it was fetched in a clean can. About Christmas he was on a visit to his mother for some days, and during that time he was entirely free from pain. When he returned home he had a return of the pain. He told his mother that he could eat what she gave him, but what he had at home always seemed to grate between his teeth. Deceased's father asked the widow to have the body opened, but she refused to allow it. Mr Phelps had given a certificate that death had resulted from an ulcer in the stomach, but having heard the evidence given at this Inquest he thought it was singular that he should have been free from pain when he was at his mother's. The Coroner thought the case a suspicious one, and adjourned the Inquiry until Monday evening, in order that a post mortem examination might be made. The adjourned Inquest was held on Monday. - Mr Bankart, F.R.C.S., &c., said that in pursuance of instructions from the Coroner, and in conjunction with Mr Phelps, he had made a post mortem examination of the body of JOHN MILLER. They removed the stomach and other portions of the viscera which they put into stone jars. The whole viscera was very much congested, and was of a very dark colour all through. The blood was venous. There was no ulceration or artificial perforation of the stomach. He did not think that the appearances satisfactorily accounted for death, and he thought it desirable that an analysis of the contents of the stomach and viscera should take place. Without that he could not give a positive opinion as to the cause of death. There was not sufficient, in his opinion, either to account for death, or the symptoms during life. Mr Phelps said he had heard Mr Bankart's evidence and agreed perfectly in all that he had said. The Coroner said there could be no doubt that it was a case of very grave suspicion, and they would not be doing their duty if they did not see that the analysis which was recommended was made. The case was finally adjourned until Tuesday, the 22nd inst.

WESTWARD HO! - Death of SIR WILLIAM GORDON, K.C.B. - Inquest On The Body. - We regret to announce that SIR J. W. GORDON, K.C.B., who cut his throat at Col. Hutchinson's, at Westward Ho! on Tuesday, 1st inst., has succumbed to the effects of the dreadful injuries inflicted upon himself. The unfortunate gentleman died on Tuesday afternoon. The deep wound in his throat had gone on favourably up to Monday night, and hopes were entertained that he might recover; but a change was then observable, and he spent a very restless night. Dr Ackland and Dr Thompson have been most assiduous in their attendance, but the unfortunate gentleman sunk from exhaustion. SIR WILLIAM is 57 years of age, and his untimely death will be universally regretted. After commanding the Royal Engineers, at Portsmouth, he succeeded Sir John Burgoyne as Inspector-General of Fortifications, and up to this time has retained the post. At Portsmouth, says the Hampshire Telegraph, he was most popular, and upon his removal the Town Council unanimously adopted a resolution thanking him for his invariable kindness and as a mark of respect his name was given to the road crossing Southsea Common. The Broad Arrow says that SIR WILLIAM "was actively employed in the trenches before Sebastopol, was afterwards senior engineer officer at Portsmouth during the formation of the new defences of that fortress, and recently held a high command at Aldershot, where, in consequence of his high conscientious sense of duty, he was thrown into much excitement by what he had to endure in connection with the new control organization." An Inquest was held on the body yesterday (Wednesday) by the Deputy County Coroner (Mr J. H. Toller), when the following gentlemen comprised the Jury:- Mr H. Williams (foreman), Messrs. Wm. Davies, H. Pengelly, R. A. Sanders, John Penhorwood, William Adams, Wm. Ellis, Paul Gardner, John Stacey, Robert Prior, John Mills, William Ward, J. Henderson. The following was the evidence adduced:-
Col Hutchinson, who was much affected in giving a portion of his evidence, said:- SIR WILLIAM GORDON is my brother-in-law. He arrived at my house, at Westward Ho! on Monday night, Jan. 31st., at about 8 p.m. He previously telegraphed in the morning to say that he was coming to pay me a visit. He said he had not felt well for a day or two. SIR WILLIAM is a Major-Gen. in the Royal Engineers. His age is about 57. He has been 30 years in the service. He was in the Crimean war, and had charge of the Right Attack, and was wounded there through the arm. He has felt the effects of the wound ever since. I did not see SIR WILLIAM on the night of his arrival, as I was away from home. I arrived home at 11 o'clock, and by that time SIR WILLIAM had gone to bed. About quarter past eight on Tuesday morning I was passing my dressing-room when I heard a heavy fall in SIR WILLIAM'S bed-room, followed by deep groans. I went to his bedroom door and tried to open it, but found it to be locked. I then called to him and begged him to open the door, which he did, and then rushed back to his bed. When I entered the room I found him sitting up in his bed. I saw a deep gash in his throat, and the bed was deluged with blood. He just managed to say, "O! that this should have been done in your house." I could do nothing; but sent for Dr Ackland and Dr Thompson, who soon arrived. SIR WILLIAM has since been under my charge, and died on Tuesday afternoon, at one p.m. I was present when he died, with my wife, Colonel Gordon, and Dr Ackland. I saw deceased in the summer, and there did not appear to be anything mentally the matter with him then. I can say nothing as to his mental condition at the time he arrived at my house.
Colonel Charles Gordon examined:- SIR WILLIAM GORDON has been lodging in London, at 23 Suffolk-street. I reside at Gravesend. I am a Lieut.-Col. in Her Majesty's service. I have known SIR WM. GORDON for 15 years. I am no relative of his. SIR WILLIAM had chambers in London. I came down with him on Monday, Jan. 31st, to Westward Ho! He had been staying at my house since the previous Saturday, and was my particular friend. On Monday we came together to Col. Hutchinson's. I left him there, and I came to the Royal Hotel. We were to dine together at Col. Hutchinson's at 8 p.m. I had noticed for some time that SIR WILLIAM had been suffering from great depression of spirits. At times his thoughts and speech were most strange, but at others he was quite clear and lucid. I considered he might be guilty of some rash act if not removed from London, to some place where he might have his mind cheered by other thoughts then those that oppressed him. He was most sensitive upon matters that may not affect many others. For the last three days previous to the 3rd of January he at times talked wildly of having given offence of having injured me and other officers. I considered this was through over pressure of business, which a change of air would remove. He desired to bring me to Bideford. I would mention that on Sunday the 30th January owing to this strange talk I sent for a medical man unknown to SIR WILLIAM, who saw him at my house, and he sent a soothing draught. SIR WM. scarcely spoke to him. I was so alarmed that I thought at night to take his razor case from his room after the doctor had left my house, on the Sunday. This I kept until I came to Westward Ho! SIR WILLIAM was aware that I had them. On our way down, when he was perfectly sensible, he said, "You must let me have those razors back again now, because I cannot go unshaven at my sister's" He also said in the carriage from Bideford railway station to Westward Ho! "I am perfectly right now," and desired me to bring the razors to him. I put the razor case in my pocket, and went up to Col. Hutchinson's at eight o'clock the Monday evening. Hoping to give over my charge with my doubts to his brother-in-law, I left the house at ten o'clock and then went back and rang the bell, and asked the servant to tell Col. Hutchinson on his return that I wanted to see him most particularly. I walked about waiting for the carriage. About half-past ten p.m., SIR WILLIAM came out of the house and came towards the Hotel. He saw me, and said "you did not give me back my razors. I had not forgotten to do so. I did not wish to give them up to him until I had seen his brother-in-law. I gave him the razors, and waited for Colonel Hutchinson who arrived soon after, and t whom I told the state of SIR WILLIAM'S mind, and the strange fancies he laboured under at times. I asked him to go and judge for himself, and act as he thought fit. At 8 a.m., on Tuesday, Feb. 1st., I was sent for at the Royal Hotel where I had slept the night. I went up to Col. Hutchinson's and found SIR WILLIAM had cut his throat. The razor was in his bed at his right hand side. The razor was one of those I delivered to him on the previous night. I remained with him until he died. In reply to a question Col. Gordon said SIR WILLIAM GORDON lived by himself in London, he was very sensitive, and took things to heart more than most men. When I got to SIR WILLIAM'S bedroom on Tuesday morning after he had cut his throat, his first words to me were, "You thought I would never do it." The mental excitement, under which he laboured culminated to this act. I am sure he would have been the last man to commit the rash act had he been in his right mind.
Dr Ackland of Bideford, said that on February the 1st between eight and nine o'clock a.m., a messenger on horseback called at my house t request me to see SIR WILLIAM GORDON at Golfton. On my arrival I found SIR WILLIAM in bed very much exhausted from loss of blood. There was an extensive transverse wound high in the neck. The upper part of the air passage was completely divided. The gullet was partially so. The larger blood vessels were uninjured. I attended in conjunction with Dr Thompson and the usual mode of treatment in such cases was adopted. The centre and front of the wound were kept free and the parts retained in position by depressing the head upon the chest. Mentally he was in a very depressed condition, and was subject to many delusions and in this state he continued until he died. Up to Monday evening, the 7th inst., he was progressing favourably having passed many of the dangers that usually happen in the early stages of such an illness. Great prostration then set in, he had a bad night, and on Tuesday morning at half-past eight, when I again saw him he was sinking fast and died at 1 p.m. that day. I am of opinion that the cause of death was exhaustion intimately connected with mental alienation. Up to Monday he was going on favourably, and arrangements were made to remove him to a private lunatic asylum. This was the whole evidence. The Jury after a short consultation returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Thursday 17 February 1870
EXETER - Fatal Accident On The North Devon Line. - A fatal accident occurred on Friday evening to a young man named BENJAMIN OXENHAM, about 30 years of age, a stoker in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company. He was engaged in cleaning and oiling an engine on the Company's line, near Ashburton, when he missed his footing and fell to the ground, pitching on his head. He was uninjured by the engine, but sustained a concussion of the brain. He was at once taken up, but died soon after reaching Exeter. Deceased, who had been married only about two months, formerly resided at Bideford, but he has lately been living in Exeter. An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, before Mr Coroner Hooper, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Inquest By The Borough Coroner. The Late Accident in Bear-Street. - The poor man ASHTON who was run over in bear-street last week has since died from the effects f the injuries he received. An Inquest was held on Friday, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Mr R. I. Bencraft (Borough Coroner), when the following evidence was adduced:-
Mr Robert Spicer Symons, of Barnstaple, grocer, deposed: - I live at No. 1, Alexandra Place, in this borough. I have known the deceased for many years. He was an inmate of the Barnstaple Union Workhouse. He used to fetch the vegetables for the Workhouse with a donkey and cart. For the last six months I have seen him pass my shop on a Friday, about four o'clock, with a horse and a two-wheel gig. On Friday, the 4th instant, I saw him drive by my shop window. He was driving much faster than usual. He turned the corner too sharp and one of the wheels lurched out over the curb by Mr Hiern's wall, and I saw deceased fall out on the flat stones outside Mr John Barry's. After he fell out the horse fell down into Gaydon-street. I ran over to the deceased and endeavoured to lift him up, and a man who was passing assisted me. My son procured a chair, and we placed the deceased on it. He was unable to speak, and was breathing very hard. His right arm appeared to be broken. Some brandy was brought, which I endeavoured to give him, but he could not open his mouth. A donkey and cart was soon afterwards obtained from the Union Workhouse, and the deceased was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary. After the horse was raised up it did not try to run off, and it appeared very quiet. The deceased had not, I believe, the whip in either of his hands. I believe it was in the socket.
Mr J. W. Cooke, surgeon, stated:- The deceased was brought to this Institution, on Friday last, the 4th inst., shortly before five o'clock in the afternoon. He was put into bed, but was perfectly insensible, and was breathing stertorously. On undressing him, I found his right arm was broken, his left arm paralysed, and his left leg was perfectly stiff. There was a mark of a blow on the point of the right shoulder, and a contusion on the right side of the head. I saw no evidence of any depression of the skull. He continued much in the same state of insensibility until Wednesday night, when he died, about eleven o'clock. I have since made a post mortem examination of his head. I found a very extensive fracture of the skull, extravasation of blood over both sides of the skull, and also laceration of the brain. His death was caused by the injuries sustained to his head, as above described. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 February 1870
TORRINGTON - Singular Suicide. - Intelligence was received at Barnstaple on Tuesday that a woman of Torrington name WAKELY, upwards of 60 years of age, had committed suicide by opening one of the arteries of her arm. An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner. It appeared from the evidence of Mr John Copplestone Hole, surgeon, that the deceased had been suffering from dyspepsia, and that she had made a wound in the bend of her right arm about two inches and a-half long and half-an-inch in depth, which brought on symptoms of erysipelas, and ended in mortification in her arm, which was the cause of her death. The following was the verdict: "Died from the effects of a wound inflicted by herself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

BRAUNTON - Inquest Held By The County Coroner. - Suicide Of A Domestic Servant. - ELIZA CHUGG, a young woman about 21 years of age, in the employ of Mr Joslin, farmer, of Beercharter, committed suicide on Saturday night. Being missed for some time a search was made, and she was found in the shippen, suspended from the roof by a rope, and quite dead. She was under notice to leave her situation, having confessed to stealing some articles belonging to her mistress. This is thought to have preyed on her mind and led to the committal of the rash act. - An Inquest was held on Monday, before the Deputy County Coroner (Mr J. H. Toller) when the following depositions were taken:-
William Foxford stated:- I live with Mr John Joslin, at Beercharter Farm, in the parish of Braunton. I knew the deceased, ELIZA CHUGG, who also lived at Mr Joslin's as a servant; she was about twenty-one years of age. On Saturday evening last, when I came to supper about a quarter past seven, she was putting bread into the oven. She said nothing. Other servants came in and we all went to supper, leaving her in the kitchen where the oven was. We were at supper from about twenty minutes to half an hour, and when we went back to the kitchen the deceased was not there. Martha Delve, also a servant of Mr Joslin's, wanted her, and called, but she did not answer. My master desired us to go and look for her, which we did, and after searching about ten minutes, opened the door of the shippen and saw her there hanging. We were frightened, and ran into the house and told our master what we had seen, who ordered us to go immediately and cut the rope. Thomas Saunders, another servant of Mr Joslin, went with me to the shippen, and we found the deceased hanging by a rope from a beam. I cut the rope whilst Thos. Saunders held a light, and she fell to the ground on her back. There were no symptoms of life in her. I took off the rope from her neck and she was placed on a board on her face and hands. I went and told my master what we had done, and he ordered me to go to Braunton for Serjt. Quick, of the Devon County Constabulary, who rode back my horse. I never saw anything wrong in her mind, and she appeared to be in her sound senses. It was about eight o'clock when we found her in the shippen hanging.
John Joslin deposed:- I am a son of Mr Joslin, of Beercharter Farm. I knew the deceased, ELIZA CHUGG. I last saw her in the pound house, about a quarter past seven, on Saturday night last. She was standing on the cider vat. I did not know whether she was going to a room above or coming down. I was attracted to the pound house by a noise, which I thought might have been caused by rats. The deceased's back was towards me. She was in the habit of going to the pound house several times a day in the course of her work. She did not speak to me and I cannot say whether I spoke to her or not. I did not think it was anything unusual to see her in the pound house. I never saw anything wrong about her mind. I am about fourteen years of age.
Mrs Mary Joslin stated:- I am the wife of Mr John Joslin, of Beercharter Farm. I knew the deceased, ELIZA CHUGG; she was my servant, and came with me on the 16th of June last. She was a very good servant, but I did not intend to keep her beyond Lady-day, as I found some things missing, which were not of very much value, but I did not know what it might come to. If she had remained with me beyond Lady-day I intended to have given her 5s. a year additional wages, as she had before asked, and on Saturday she asked me whether I would give her the additional 5s., but I said to her "No, as I should not keep her after Lady-day." I saw her several times during the day, when she appeared very low. Four or five times during the afternoon she asked me whether I would keep her beyond Lady-day. She confessed to having taken some things and promised me if I would keep her that she would not take anything more; but I told her if I kept her I should always be suspecting her, and that Lady-day would be a good time to part. In the morning on Saturday her face was red as if she had been crying, but in the afternoon I saw no signs of her crying. The wages I gave her were £7 15s. a year.
Martha Delve sworn:- I live at Beercharter Farm as a servant, and ELIZA CHUGG was my fellow servant. On Saturday last, I saw her many times. At my mistress's request I called her to make some butter, when she told me it would be the last time she should make butter. Her nose was bleeding at the time. Later in the day I saw her washing some dishes, and she said it would be the last time she should wash any dishes. She also went out to the pound house to throw water on the clothes, and said it would be the last time she should throw water to the clothes and should not wash any more. I asked her if she intended leaving that night as she ought to give a month's warning, but she said she should go a little sooner than I expected. She also said we should all wish before that day week that we had not told of her. When I mentioned to her about giving a month's warning, I said to her that she would not have her wages or her box, when she said there were plenty to take her wages and her box and all that was in it.
There being no more witnesses, the Coroner summed up the evidence with great care, and the Jury returned the following verdict: "That the deceased ELIZA CHUGG, came to her death by hanging herself, but in what state of mind she was in at the time there was no evidence to shew."

EXETER - Death By Drowning In Exeter Canal. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at Exeter, on the body of a woman, named HENLEY, who was drowned on Saturday night in the canal. The deceased and her husband, who is a labourer, were at the 'Okehampton Inn,' St. Thomas, between eight and nine o'clock on Saturday evening. Just before nine the wife left for the purpose of going to the 'Welcome Inn,' just below the first drawbridge on the Exeter Canal, to look for a man who, she said, had some money due to her husband for breaking stones. She seems to have gone over Exe Bridge, and to have recrossed the river by the quay ferry. She told the boy to wait a few minutes for her, but she did not return. The husband subsequently found her body in the canal, quite dead. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 3 March 1870
BARNSTAPLE - The Sudden Death at Derby. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS WOODWARD, who was found dead in his bed, at Derby, that morning. The following was the evidence of the wife and surgeon:- ELIZABETH WOODWARD deposed: The deceased was my husband. He was a labourer, and seventy-one years of age. We have received 4s. a week from the parish for the last few months. He worked occasionally as a carter for Mr Thomas Lee. He worked for Mr Lee, yesterday. He went with a one horse timber wagon to Ilfracombe, and returned in his usual health about six o'clock. He complained of being tired, but ate his supper, consisting of fried potatoes and bacon and two cups of tea, and after warming himself went to bed, about eight o'clock. He usually coughed a good deal during the night, but I did not hear him cough at all last night. I awoke this morning shortly after six o'clock, and on endeavouring to awake him, as he appeared asleep, I found he was dead. I then dressed myself and called in a neighbour, Daniel Eames, who came at once to my house, and on seeing my husband said he was dead. Mr Fernie was sent for immediately, who arrived within five minutes and saw the deceased. He had lately been taking medicine for his cough from Mr Cooke. Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon stated: This morning about half-past seven o'clock, I was called to the residence of the deceased by a Mrs Lewis. I went immediately and found him in bed, lying on his right side. He was quite dead. His face was pale, but his body was warm. I do not think he had been dead more than a couple of hours. I examined his body, which appeared to be well nourished. From the appearances his body presented, I think he died of disease of the heart, and from natural causes. - The Jury returned a verdict accordingly. They kindly gave their fees to the widow, who was stated to be in great distress, and the Coroner also added a donation.

HEMYOCK - A child of a labourer, named MORGAN, living at the village of Hemyock, has been accidentally poisoned by laudanum, which has been sold by the village shopkeeper in mistake for Godfrey's cordial. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 10 March 1870
NORTHMOLTON - The Suicide Of An Old Woman. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner, on the body of MARY PERRIN, aged 75, who committed suicide by hanging herself with a silk handkerchief tied round her throat, from an iron bar in the window, on the previous Tuesday afternoon. The following were the depositions of the witnesses:-
Ann Smyth deposed:- I live at Bentwitchen, in the parish of Northmolton, and am the wife of Henry Smyth, farmer, of Bentwitchen. The deceased, MARY PERRIN, was my mother, and was 75 years of age. She sometimes resided with me, and sometimes with my brother. I last saw her alive on Tuesday last, when I dressed her, and she came down stairs. I fancied she appeared to be somewhat strange. She appeared to stare very much, and ate her food very heartily, which she did not usually do. She came with me this day fortnight, when I fetched her from my brother's. Since she has been with me I have remarked to others that I could not make out how it was my mother ate her food so heartily and kept wasting. She ate her dinner on Tuesday last as heartily as she had before done, and afterwards sat on a chair by the fire. About a quarter after two, she rose and was going upstairs, when I said, "Mother, where are you going?" She replied, "I am going upstairs and shall be down again presently." She then went upstairs and came down again in about two or three minutes. I said to her, "I feel poorly, and must go and lie down," and she said, "She must go and lie down." She then asked me how long before I was going upstairs, and I said, "I can't go, mother, before I have finished my butter." She then opened the stairs door and went upstairs. Whilst she was upstairs I heard no noise or anything. The butter took me about twenty minutes, and I then went upstairs to lie down, and went to our bedroom, believing she was lying down on her bed, but she was not there. I then looked at my bed, which was in the same room, but she was not there. I then looked on the beds in other rooms, but could not find her. I then went to the room where my little boys sleep. The door was closed, but I do not recollect whether it was fastened. On opening the door, I saw her, as I thought, standing, looking out of the window. She was deaf and weak, and I thought at first I would not speak to her, fearing I should frighten her. I looked at her for a moment, and I thought her head seemed hanging down. I went to the window and saw one end of a silk handkerchief tied to an iron bar in the window, and the other end tied round her neck. I cried out, "Oh my God, give me a knife," but I rushed downstairs and got one, and rushed up again. I then held one of my arms round her, and with the other cut the handkerchief and supported her until assistance came, when I desired the doctor to be immediately sent for, which was done. He came and said he thought it was useless his coming out. The handkerchief was my husband's, and she got it from a drawer in the room she slept in.
Elizabeth Thorne Kingdon deposed:- I reside at Bentwitchen, and am the wife of Richard Kingdon, labourer. I have known the deceased a great man y years. I last saw her alive about a week since, when she was in bed, poorly. On Tuesday, the 1st of March, Mr Henry Smyth, of Bentwitchen, came to me, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and said I must please to go over, as something had happened to grandmother, meaning the deceased. He did not know whether she had hanged herself or not. I went over to the deceased's house with Mr Smyth, walked upstairs, and saw the deceased sitting on the floor, with William Barrow, a workman, standing behind her, and supporting her body. I felt her pulse, which was quite still. A drop of wine was put to her lips, but it was not of the least use. She was put upon the bed, and part of the handkerchief, which was round her neck, was taken off. She was a very feeble woman, and was weak and nervous in mind.
The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased hanged herself, but there was no evidence to shew the state of her mind at the time".

Thursday 7 April 1870
COPPLESTONE - Distressing Suicide. - WILLIAM WOODROW, the driver of the mail cart between Copplestone Cross and Launceston, committed suicide early on Thursday morning by throwing himself under the engine while in motion, at Copplestone Station, on the North Devon line. He was summoned to appear before the Lifton Bench, in an affiliation case, and it is said that the fear of the result caused him to take his life away. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, has left a wife and five children. He had been accustomed to drive a one-horse cart daily 4 miles over a hilly country. On Saturday a Coroner's Inquest was held at Taylor's Copplestone Inn, before Mr R. R. Crosse. Henry Mitchell, a porter at the Copplestone-station, said he was on duty there on Thursday morning at the arrival of the 4.10 down train. Saw the deceased there; he was coughing. Said to him, "You are coughing this morning." Deceased said, "Yes, any one would think I have been drinking, but I have not." Did not see anything unusual in the manner of deceased. Left him on the platform and went to signal the train. On returning did not see deceased (he usually went into the office). Searched for him and found him lying between the metals with his head nearly severed from the body, his feet toward the station; his legs were crossed and his arms folded. Called James Ewens, another porter. Did not remove the body, but sent for P.C Blackmore. Discovered blood and hair on the metals some distance from where the body lay, and his hat was about a landyard distant. Deceased had no business to be on the line. Deceased might have been standing on the edge of the platform; he usually did. Could not say whether deceased met with his death by accident. - James Parkin said he was guard of the train; had been guard of the morning train ever since deceased had driven the mail cart. Deceased was generally on the platform to receive the mail bags from the Post-office guard. Noticed that deceased was not there on Thursday morning. The train came in very steadily; it arrived 13 minutes past 4. The train overran the station and was backed. Was not aware any accident had occurred. - James Clements the engine-driver, observed that deceased was not on the platform as usual. Did not know of the accident till returning. Examined the carriages at the Yeoford Station; there were no marks on the engine, but there was blood on the near wheels of the wagons. - JOHN WOODROW, son of the deceased, said he saw his father last alive on Wednesday evening at his (witness's) house, Northtawton. Observed he was in low spirits. His father had to answer a charge of bastardy before the Lifton magistrates. In answer to Mr Lemon, foreman of the Jury, witness said deceased's father and grandfather were both insane. Charlotte Bibbings, charwoman at the 'Copplestone Inn,' said deceased was in the habit of sleeping at that in. Observed deceased on Wednesday evening to be rather strange in his manner; he was in general very talkative, but he said very little that evening. He did not have any supper. The Jury, after being addressed by the Coroner came to the conclusion "That deceased had caused his death by placing himself on the rails while in an Unsound State of Mind."

BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday night at the 'Lamb Inn,' before the Borough Coroner, on the body of the infant child (aged 15 months), of JOHN ROBINSON, labourer. It had been reported that the child had been thrown down and killed during that day, a statement which appeared from the evidence to be without any foundation whatever. The child had been poorly for some days through dentition and was nursed by the mother's sister, a girl about twelve years of age. During the morning of Monday the girl took the child into the house of a neighbour to nurse, and while there it appeared to get worse, and she was advised to take it in to its mother. The girl took the child to the house of its parents, and a doctor was sent for, but on the arrival of Dr Hoyle he found that the child was dying. There were no marks upon it, and it appeared to have been well treated. The verdict of the Jury was that the child died from Natural Causes.

BERRYNARBOR - Death Of A Boy By Hanging. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, the 29th ult., by Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, touching the death of ALFRED RICHARDS, aged nine years, son of MR JAMES RICHARDS, of this parish, who came to his end by hanging, under the peculiar circumstances stated in the following evidence:-
THOMAS RICHARDS deposed: I live at Berrynarbor, and am the son of JAMES RICHARDS, of Berrynarbor, farmer. The deceased was my brother, and was about nine years of age. On Sunday last, about a quarter to one o'clock, the deceased and myself went out to cut a half-bushel of mangolds. When we had done so, he said he would go and put up the swing for us to swing upon. He went away, and I cut a bucket and a half more mangolds. After I had done so, I followed the deceased into the linhay, where the swing was to be put up. I saw the rope and his head before I got to him. When I went near to him I saw the rope was round his neck, and that he was hanging from the swing. I touched him and spoke, but he did not answer. I then went to my father and told him what I had seen, and he immediately came out. I never heard my brother say he would go and hang himself. JAMES RICHARDS said: I live at Berrynarbor, and am a farmer. The deceased, my son, was about nine years of age. On Sunday, my son THOMAS came to me just before one o'clock, and said "Father, father, ALFRED won't speak to me!" I asked him where ALFRED was, and he said "Out in the orchard, father." I ran out and my son followed me. I said to him "Where is he, THOMAS?" and he said "He is in the cart linhay." I went to the linhay, and saw the little fellow hanging by the rope, which was round his neck. His toes were touching the ground. I took a knife out of my pocket, cut the rope, and caught the deceased in my arms. I laid him on the ground, and moved him about to see if there was any life in him, but he did not move. I was dreadfully distressed and ran into the house to tell what I had seen, and he was brought in. I never heard him say that he would hang himself. He was always very cheerful, and I generally knew when he was coming into the court by his whistling. - The Jury returned as their verdict, "That the deceased came to his death by hanging, but whether it was the result of accident, or design no evidence appears."

Thursday 14 April 1870
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - On Wednesday night an Inquest was held at the 'Barley Mow Inn,' before the Borough Coroner, Mr T. L. Pridham, touching the death of the infant child of MR H. LEE HUTCHINGS, auctioneer, which was found dead by its mother's side that morning. From the evidence of the mother and the servant it appeared that the child had been poorly during the previous day, and that some medicine was given to it. The medical evidence of the Coroner showed that the child had not been overlaid, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 12 May 1870
COLYFORD - Supposed Murder of a Man at Axbridge. - An Inquest was opened on Friday afternoon, at Colyford by Mr Coroner Cox, and a respectable Jury, of whom Captain Dick was foreman, on the body of a man named JAMES PEPPRELL, who was found on the previous day in the river Axe. A large number of witnesses were examined, but the principal evidence was that of Dr Snook, surgeon, which went to show that the unfortunate deceased did not meet with his death by drowning. Mr Snook had made a post mortem examination. He found a blow under the left ear which he considered was the cause of death. There was only one ounce of pulpy matter and a few currants in the abdomen, and the intestines was nearly empty. The inquiry was adjourned until Monday, the 16th inst., at half-past eleven. A man named James Harris, of Lyme Regis, is in custody on suspicion of being concerned in the murder.

Thursday 19 May 1870
COLYFORD - Murder in East Devon. - On Monday Mr S. M. Cox held an adjourned Inquest at Colyford, near Seaton, on the body of JAMES PEPPERELL. The deceased, a labourer, of Membury, was thirty years of age, and of rather dissolute habits. On the 22nd of April he went to the East Devon steeplechases, at Colyton, where he indulged pretty freely in drink, and on the same evening he was drinking at the 'White Hart,' Colyford, with James Harris, a labourer, of Lyme Regis, and a woman of ill-fame, named Gunn. At eleven o'clock Harris left, going in the direction of Axminster, and PEPPERELL followed alone about ten minutes afterwards. Nothing more was seen of PEPPERELL until a fortnight afterwards, when his body was found floating in the river Axe, about a couple of hundred yards from the 'White Hart' - where he was drinking on the night of the races. When taken out of the water his head was found to be covered with bruises, and it was evident that he had met with foul play. Suspicion at once fell on Harris, who bears but an indifferent character; on his being apprehended he denied any knowledge of the affair, stating that he was at home, at two o'clock on the morning of the races, and that he never had any stick in his possession on the night in question. ( A stick, which was stated to be similar to that carried by Harris on the night of the murder, was found near the spot.) When the Inquest was opened, about a week since, evidence was given shewing that the statements respecting the hour on which he arrived home, and that he had not any stick with him, were false. Yesterday other evidence was called corroborating this. It was also stated by a Mr Fowler, a farmer, that about half-past eleven on the race night he heard loud cries as if of a man in distress coming from the direction of Axe Bridge - near where the body was found - but the cries did not frighten him, as he thought it was merely a row between people returning from the races. His daughter also stated that she heard cries of distress. Mr Hoare, a miller of Shute, said he found the prisoner sleeping in a field about half a-mile from the scene of the murder on the day after the races. The prisoner complained of being cold and thirsty, and when witness offered to give him some beer if he came as far as the public-house, he took off a "slop" he was wearing, remarking that if he kept it on, as it was torn, people would think he was a rough fellow. When nearing the bridge, where the body was afterwards discovered, Harris crossed from one side of the road to the other, and on coming to the bridge he looked over into the water on the same side as where the body of the deceased was found. Sergeant Gunn apprehended Harris, and on his "slop" were marks of blood, which he said were caused by a rabbit which he caught. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against James Harris," who was afterwards removed in custody to Axminster.

Thursday 26 May 1870
APPLEDORE - Accidentally Drowned. - On Saturday afternoon last a lad, named JOHN PASSMORE, about ten years old, was drowned whilst bathing opposite Newquay, Appledore; and on the following Monday an Inquest was held on the body, by the Deputy County Coroner (Mr John Henry Toller). The evidence adduced was as follows:-
William Heard deposed:- I live at Northam, and am a labourer. I knew the deceased, JOHN PASSMORE, who lived at Northam, and was also a labourer. On Saturday last the deceased, myself, and some others were at work at Hubbastone Quarry, in the parish of Northam, belonging to Mr Yeo, of Appledore. At one o'clock we went to dinner, in a shed fitted up for the purpose, by Mr Yeo. There were about twenty at dinner, who were all working for him. Whilst we were at dinner, the deceased asked if any of us intended to bathe. Some agreed to; and about six of us, after dinner, went into the water with all our clothes off. The tide was running out strong. the deceased went away from us, but came back and asked me to cross the river Torridge with him, which I refused, telling him he had not better try to cross it; but he went on and got into deep water, and the tide being very strong he was taken off his legs and sank. The water was nine or ten feet deep. The deceased could not swim. He came up once and went down again. No assistance could be rendered to him. George Tucker said: I live at Appledore, and work for Mr Yeo, as a labourer, at Hubbastone Quarry. I knew the deceased. On Saturday last, I saw him and several others bathing in the river. I was standing on the shore looking at them. I saw the deceased go down, gave the alarm, and went away to get a boat, but when we came up in the boat we could see nothing of him. It was thought that the body was taken down with the tide. Philip Lamey deposed: I am a mariner, living at Appledore. On Saturday last, I was informed that a boy was drowned. I went into a boat with some others to try to find him. When we were about twenty feet from the shore, my brother looked over the stern and saw a body floating in the water, where it was about seven feet deep. We got up the body by the aid of an oar and took it on shore. We tried first of all to get up the body with a rope, but could not succeed, and then we used the oar. The body was that of JOHN PASSMORE, who was about eighteen years of age. He was quite dead. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing."

Thursday 9 June 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest Held By The Borough Coroner. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the 'Exeter Inn,' by the Borough Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft), on the body of a lad, named SIDNEY HERBERT DREW, about nine years of age, who was drowned whilst bathing in the Taw, off the anchor Wood bank, opposite the North Walk, on the previous day. The following are the depositions of the witnesses:-
James Mock, of Trinity-street, a boy about ten years of age, deposed:- Yesterday morning, about ten o'clock, I met the deceased, who is the son of a tailor and nine years of age, in company with a boy called Bertram Toms, on the green, beside the river, below Mr Westacott's yard. He was undressing to go into the water, opposite Pottington Point. The tide was going back, and after he had been in the water some time I saw him go under and not come up again. I was frightened and ran home directly to tell the boy's mother he was drowned. When I ran away Bertram Toms went out towards the deceased to try to save him.
William Conibear, of Pilton, sawyer, stated:- Yesterday, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down the Anchor Wood Bank towards the railway to bathe, when I met a little boy called Bertram Toms, with some clothes in his arms, who said a boy had just been drowned. He pointed out the place in the river; I ran down and saw the body lying on the sand close to the water. There was some water over him. He was in a large pit, about a gun-shot from low water. I undressed, as I had to go through the pit, the body being on the opposite side. I took him by the hair and pulled him through the pit or gut, and brought him in upon the land. A man called Norman, and some other men from Mr Brady's yard carried the body into Barnstaple to his father's house, in Zion Place. The boy was quite dead when I first laid hold of him. He was quite cold and appeared to have been dead some time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing in the river Taw, near Pottington Point."

COMBMARTIN - Fatal Accident to a Child. - An Inquest was held at the 'King's Arms Inn,' on Saturday, before the Deputy Coroner (Mr J. H. Toller), on the body of a little girl three years of age, the daughter of ELIZA WILLS, a widow, whose death was caused on the previous day by the wheels of a two-horse cart, driven by John Lerwill, in the employ of Mr Handford, passing over her. The evidence did not show that any blame was attached to the driver, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 June 1870
Suicide of a Prisoner in the Devon County Gaol. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the gaol before Mr R. R. Crosse, on the body of THOMAS PHARE, of North Lew, who was committed at Hatherleigh Sessions, last week for trial for arson. He was placed in the gaol on Saturday, June 11th, since which his demeanour had been rather sullen, but there was nothing particular to excite suspicions of his sanity. On Thursday he was violent, and smashed every pane of glass in his cell. The chief turnkey (Rainsford) reported the outbreak to the Governor, who directed that should it be repeated, the deceased was to be removed to a different cell. He was not, however, removed. Later in the forenoon of the same day, the chief turnkey saw the man, who was somewhat quieter, though still apparently excited. Three quarters of an hour after this visit, Turnkey Windeatt looked into the cell and saw the man hanging by the neck. He (Rainsford) and the Governor immediately went in and cut down the deceased, who was warm but quite dead. He had tied his canvas braces together, fastened one end to the window bar, in the other he made a slip knot by which he committed this self murder. The Jury, after two hours' investigation, returned a verdict of "Committed suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Thursday 21 July 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Accident On The Bideford Extension Railway. Inquest at Barnstaple. On Friday morning, a porter named HAMMETT, belonging to the Fremington Station, was engaged in shunting some goods trucks when he was unfortunately caught between two buffers and received severe internal injuries. He was immediately taken up and conveyed on a "trolly" to Barnstaple Station, whence he was taken to the North Devon Infirmary, where his case was promptly attended to, but the poor fellow gradually sank under the injuries he received. HAMMETT was a trusted servant of the Company - a very sober and industrious young man. On Monday morning an Inquest was held before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, at the Infirmary, on the body of the deceased. The foreman of the Jury was Mr W. Rowe, sen. The Coroner, in the course of a few preliminary remarks, said the attention of the Jury would have to be directed to ascertain whether any negligence was to be attributed to anybody connected with the place where the deceased performed his somewhat perilous duties, or whether the man himself acted in a careless manner. The Jury then proceeded to view the body, after which Robert Cann, the first witness, was called. He said he was a horseman, employed on the Bideford Extension Railway, at Fremington. At five minutes past seven on Friday morning last, witness was engaged in holding a pair of points to let the 6.40 goods and passenger train from Bideford to Exeter into a siding for the purpose of joining to it some trucks from Fremington. On the arrival of the train witness saw HAMMETT divide it, and after the trucks that he uncoupled were shunted into the siding, he signalled the driver to come backward. The trucks to be coupled were very near the points. The deceased must have proceeded to couple the Fremington wagons without having first opened the points. Immediately afterwards witness heard him utter a sharp cry of pain, and saw him crawling out from underneath the train. He ran towards him to render assistance, when HAMMETT exclaimed, "My God, I am torn to pieces." In reply to a question as to whether he would prefer to be taken to his home or the North Devon Infirmary, he replied, "Take me where you like; I am afraid I shall never do anything more in this world." Witness and several other of the officials then carried him into the station office, and he was subsequently conveyed to the Infirmary. It was the duty of the deceased to have attended to the points before he went to couple the carriages, as when the trucks were running slowly on parallel lines of rail the buffers did not meet, but struck against the ends of the carriages, leaving no room for a man to stand between without being knocked down. In this way the deceased must have been caught by the waggons before he was aware of their approach. There was a sufficient number of men present to shunt the carriages and attend to the other trains. Joseph Buckingham, a guard on the London and South Western Railway, said that on the morning in question he was in charge of the train which was timed to arrive at the Fremington Station at 7 o'clock. On the arrival witness saw deceased, and told him the wagons to be uncoupled. HAMMETT separated them, and put them into a siding, after which he signalled the driver to back the train so that he could couple on more wagons to it. Witness did not see the accident take place. Mr Blackmore, the station-master at Fremington, said the deceased had been a very steady man, and had left a sickly wife and three children. Mr J. W. Cooke, house surgeon to the North Devon Infirmary, said he examined the deceased, and found a bruise on the abdomen, and also a slight scratch on the arm. He complained of great pain in the lower part of his person. He was perfectly sensible, and suffered extreme agony during the day. In the afternoon he vomited severely. This continued until Saturday afternoon, when death put an end to his sufferings. The result of a post mortem examination proved that the cause of death was severe pressure on the abdomen. The deceased had been a very powerful man, and the shock must have been great to have produced the injuries he sustained. The Coroner remarked that no blame attached to anyone, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. A collection was made amongst the gentlemen of Jury on behalf of the widow of the deceased.

Thursday 28 July 1870
SOUTHMOLTON - Supposed Sun-Stroke. - A man named GEO. UPHAM, a coltbreaker, in the employ of Mr William Baker, of Johnstone Farm, Bishopsnympton, was leading a colt (which had been exhibited by Mr Baker and won a prize at Westward Ho!) from the Umberleigh Station, on Friday last, when he was suddenly taken ill on the road. His colleague, John Taylor, who was leading another prize colt, observing UPHAM'S illness, took charge of both animals, and UPHAM proceeded on the road for some distance when he fell into the hedgetrough, near Southmolton Milehouse. Information was conveyed to Mrs Bussell who lives there, by her children, who had seen the man lying in the hedgetrough and pigs tearing his clothes. A person who saw him started off for a doctor, without rendering any assistance, and soon afterwards the Mayor (Mr Ley) passed, and, with the aid of another, got the poor fellow into the Milehouse, where he received medical treatment from Messrs. Furse, but he lingered until Sunday last, when he died. Deceased is believed to have died from sun-stroke. He was about 60 years of age. An Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner on the body on Monday evening, at Milehouse: Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 18 August 1870
Fatal Accidents to Farm Labourers - Inquests.
CROYDE - Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday, at Croyde, on the body of JAMES LOVERING, 58 years of age, a farm labourer. Eliza Street, wife of Richard Street, labourer, deposed to working in a field along with the deceased on Wednesday, the 10th inst. He was on the top of a cart receiving the wheat as it was pitched up to him, and witness was on the side of the vehicle raking the corn when, on looking round, she saw LOVERING lying upon his back on the ground. The load on which the deceased was standing was six feet from the ground. George Seldon, who was engaged in throwing the sheaves to the deceased, heard him utter a cry and fall. Witness procured assistance and had the poor fellow conveyed to his home in a cart, where he was attended by Mr S. O. Lane, surgeon, of Braunton, who found that he had fractured his spine, and pronounced the case hopeless. The man was perfectly sensible, but could not bear to be moved, and he died on Thursday evening.

HUNTSHAW - Mr Toller held another Inquest at Huntshaw, on the body of WILLIAM MATHEWS, aged 60. The evidence adduced was to the effect that on Wednesday evening last the deceased, who was a farm servant in the employ of Mr Samuel Fisher, farmer, of Huntshaw, was on the top of a mow passing wheat to a man named Francis Young, who was making the stack. The work was nearly completed, and the deceased, as he was making for the ladder for the purpose of descending missed his footing and was precipitated a distance of several feet to the ground, injuring his head. Mr Rouse and Mr Hole, of Torrington, were called in, but they could not succeed in rousing the man from a state of insensibility which they said had been brought on him by a severe concussion of the brain. The deceased never rallied, and died on the following morning.
In both of the above cases a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 25 August 1870
MARWOOD - Alleged Death By Poisoning. - Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy County Coroner, has held an Inquest at Muddiford, in the parish of Marwood, on the body of a woman named EMMA MEARS, the wife of a labourer, who it was reported had committed suicide by taking poison. The first witness called was Eliza Dyer, the wife of John Dyer, machine maker, who said she lived next door to the deceased. On Saturday morning the 13th inst., she was called to the house of MEARS, who told her that she had taken something, and on witness looking on the table she saw a small pot containing a vermin-destroying paste from which smoke was issuing. She asked the woman whether she had taken it, when she replied, "I know no more than you." Witness procured a cup of raw milk from Mrs Watts, step-sister to the deceased, and gave it to her, when she drank it. She looked very strange all the morning, and appeared as if she was about to have a fit, as she sometimes was subject to 20 of them in one day. She was afterwards taken very ill and a doctor was sent for. Mrs Watts said she asked her step-sister why she had taken the poison, and her reply was "that she did not know; she was not right." She walked down to her father's house on the Saturday afternoon, and was very ill; on Sunday she went home and ate her victuals heartily. She collapsed, however, on Monday, and Mr Cooke was sent for. On the following Wednesday she was able to walk to her father's house, although in a very weak state. About 7 o'clock on Thursday evening a fit came on her, from the effects of which she never rallied, and died at half-past nine o'clock on Friday morning. She was very much subject to fits, and in witness's opinion was not altogether of a sound mind. Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, Barnstaple, said: I knew the deceased, and had been in the habit of attending her for many years. About 18 years since she had a severe compound fracture of the skull, and ever since that time she has been subject to epileptic fits. On Monday morning I was sent for to see her, when she told me that she had taken some vermin destroying paste. Having put a portion of it in a cup, and feeling thirsty during the night, she poured some water into the same vessel by mistake and drank the contents. She was suffering from a good deal of tenderness about the stomach, but did not appear to be in any danger from the effects of the stuff she had taken. I saw her again on Wednesday when she appeared to be much weaker, and I understood had been suffering from epileptic fits. This morning I was again sent for, but on my arrival I found her dead. From inquiries I ascertained that the fits had been much worse and severe during the night, and that she died in one of them. My opinion is that the cause of death was epilepsy. I do not think that the poison, which she was said to have taken, was sufficient to have caused her death, though it may have accelerated it by weakening her system. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died while in an epileptic fit.

BARNSTAPLE - The Fatal Encounter with a Bull - Inquest. - On Saturday Mr I. Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary on the body of a dairyman named WILLIAM NORMAN, aged 36, who met with his death under circumstances already reported in the Journal. The foreman of the Jury was Mr G. T. Gaydon. Anthony Huxtable, son of Mr Huxtable, farmer, of Swincombe, the first witness called, said that on the evening of Monday, the 15th inst., about eight o'clock, when returning from the stack-yard with a cart load of corn he heard a man shouting, and on proceeding in the direction of the sound he saw NORMAN reclining by the side of a hedge in a field a little distance from the house, holding his right leg with his hands and exclaiming, "The bull has broken my leg. It has tossed me three times, and we fought." Witness ran back to the farm for assistance, but on the way met his brother Richard, who bound up the leg with his neckerchief. Mrs Huxtable afterwards bandaged the wound, and had the man conveyed to his mother's home at Challacombe in a cart, whence he was taken to the North Devon Infirmary. The deceased had rented a small farm from Mr William Crang, and kept a dairy. Mrs Huxtable told witness that NORMAN had come to the farm-house late in the evening with two of his own cows, and there being no person at home at the time he went to the field in which the bull was, driving the cows before him. He then appeared to have left them inside the gate of the field whilst he went to another part of it and tried to drive the bull from amongst a number of cows, but as the animal did not seem disposed to leave them he struck it with a large stick, and it was this which made the beast so furious. The bull, which had been purchased by witness's father in May last, was about 15 months old. Had never known or heard of its having attacked anyone before. It generally grazed along with the cows, but was a "rusty" animal. MRS NORMAN, the mother of the deceased, here stepped forward and said that she warned her son not to go near the bull alone, as it had attacked him five or six weeks ago, on which occasion he had "mastered" it with a stick. When he was brought home on Monday he informed her that he had had "a hard duel" with the bull. In her opinion the beast was wicked, for Mr Huxtable and one of his servants had beaten it severely, some time since. Mr J. W. Cooke, House Surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, stated that NORMAN was admitted into the hospital shortly after eleven o'clock on Monday night. He found that he had received a very severe compound fracture of the right leg, just above the ankle. The bone protruded through the skin. He reduced the fracture and put the limb into splints in the usual way. The man was perfectly sensible, and related to him how he had received the injury. He continued to progress favourably on the Tuesday, but towards the evening of that day he became worse and got delirious. He gradually sank, and died on Friday at noon. The Coroner remarked that it was a very melancholy case, but the deceased had paid the forfeit of his life by his own foolhardiness, because it was a most imprudent act to strike a bull on a sensitive part at that time of night when he was alone in a field. He, therefore, thought that if any blame was to be attached to any person it was to the poor fellow himself. He felt it his duty, however, to tell Mr Huxtable, to take steps to have the beast confined, or placed somewhere out of the way of strangers, as if it attacked another the consequences to him would be serious. It would be the duty of the Jury to find a verdict of 'accidental death,' and if they agreed with him he would record a verdict to that effect. The Jury, through their foreman, strongly advised Mr Huxtable to take care of the animal for the future. Mr Huxtable said that he would have the animal, which was at present in close confinement, killed in the course of a week. The Jury expressed their satisfaction at Mr Huxtable's decision, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - [The bull belonging to Mr Huxtable, which gored to death the unfortunate dairyman, NORMAN, was shot on Monday morning at Mr Clifford's, Brickfield Farm, Derby.]

Thursday 8 September 1870
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday evening an Inquest was held before the Borough Coroner on the body of CHARLES HEARN, a boy thirteen years of age, who had been employed that day in a field belonging to Mrs Dannell, of Hedgefen, with a horse and stone roller, when by some means the boy fell, and the roller passed over him, crushing him in a fearful manner, from the effects of which he shortly after died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 September 1870
A Child Accidentally Suffocated By Its Mother. - An infant named CHARLES THOMAS COLEMAN was on Thursday accidentally suffocated by its mother in protecting it from the rain while returning by road to Stonehouse from Ivybridge, whither MRS COLEMAN, her husband, and some friends had been on pleasure. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Thursday 29 September 1870
APPLEDORE - The Recent Case of Drowning. - On Saturday the body of MR JOHN HAYNES, drowned at West Appledore under circumstances already reported, was found floating down the river. An Inquest was held, and a verdict returned of "Accidentally Drowned." He was interred at Appledore on Sunday.

Thursday 13 October 1870
TORRINGTON - Fatal Boiler Explosion. - On Friday evening a sad and fatal accident occurred at Drummett's Mill, in the parish of Frithelstock, by which an infant child lost its life, and a man and girl were dangerously injured. The following are the particulars, as far as can be ascertained: - During the late dry season a steam engine has been in use at the above mills for the purpose of grinding corn. John Rew, of this town (who has been for many years in the employ of the Rolle Canal Company, the owners of the engine and lessees of Drummett's mill), has been engaged in working the engine. On the evening of Friday, the engine was being worked as usual when the poor fellow (Rew) discovered that something was going wrong, and endeavoured to find out the cause. Whilst doing so one of the tubes suddenly burst, and the result was that he was dreadfully scalded about the face, hands and other parts of the body with the steam and water, some of which also went down his throat, which was severely scalded. At the time of this painful accident a nurse girl living with MR and MRS GENT at the mill, was in the place with their baby, which is about ten months old. Both the girl and child were severely scalded. The latter only survived a few hours, and the nurse girl lies in a very precarious state from the dreadful injuries she received. Mr Rouse, surgeon, was soon informed of the accident, and hastened to the spot. He at once intimated (it is said) that he could do nothing for the unfortunate man, Rew. The latter, however, expressed a wish to be taken to the North Devon Infirmary at Barnstaple, which was complied with the same night. Great sympathy is felt on behalf of the poor fellow. By this unforeseen accident his wife and family are placed in circumstances of great and urgent need and we cannot but hope that some of the affluent will shew their sympathy by tendering some assistance to his family during this painful trial. Any donations would be thankfully received for this object by Mr N. Chapple, of this town. The injured man was admitted into the North Devon Infirmary about two o'clock, on Saturday morning, and on being examined it was found that he was severely burnt and scalded all over his body. He is progressing as well as can be expected. The Inquest on the child took place on Monday before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner.

STONEHOUSE - The Effects Of A Mother's Drunkenness. - The sad and it is believed fatal results of parental neglect formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday. On Tuesday a child named JOHN LORD, two years of age, whose parents reside at Cleave's Cottages, George-street, Stonehouse, was conveyed to the Workhouse by order of Mr Perry, the medical officer, who visited the child in consequence of an information given to the relieving officer. The little fellow was in a most deplorable condition. He was covered with vermin, his hair was closely matted to his head, and he was suffering from water on the brain, but principally from starvation and neglect. He gradually sank and died between eight and nine on Saturday morning. As we stated on Friday, the Guardians decided at their meeting on the previous day to prosecute the mother, in consequence of the report given by Mr Bignell, the relieving officer, who said when he visited her she had a pack of cards telling her fortune, the child lying asleep on a heap of straw in a corner of the room, which was in a most filthy state. Her husband is a marine, at present in the hospital, and when the lieutenant of marines made his periodical visit he was shewn into the clean room of a neighbour instead of her own dirty apartment, in order that the husband should not be ordered to reside in the barracks. the woman, although young, is said to be of very intemperate habits, and the deceased was her only child.

Thursday 20 October 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Military Hero. - CAPTAIN ANDREW HENRY, R.A., V.C., commanding the 4th division of coast brigade, died suddenly at Plymouth on Friday night. The deceased was a gallant soldier, and greatly respected, having by his own exertions and merit won his way to the position he held. He has been for many years stationed in the Western District, and on Friday he had been over at Bovisand (accompanied by his wife and one of his children, and a lady friend) to superintend gun practice by a detachment of his division, on which occasion he appeared to be in his usual excellent health and spirits. The practice over, he returned to the Citadel about 6.30 p.m., and whilst sitting at the table in his quarters, in cheerful conversation with his family and friends, including Capt. Grier, he was suddenly observed to put his hand to his head, at the same time complaining of an unusual sensation of giddiness, and changing colour. Before medical aid could be procured he had fallen from his chair. Dr McAdam, who attended immediately afterwards, pronounced him quite dead. On Saturday evening the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on the body, and the Jury, after hearing the facts, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

MARWOOD - Suicide of CAPTAIN LEY. - The Inquest. It is our painful duty to record the death of CAPTAIN HENRY LEY, which occurred on Tuesday, at his residence (Ley House) under very melancholy and distressing circumstances. About 9 o'clock he came downstairs, and as was his custom, went into the courtyard before partaking of his breakfast for the purpose of visiting the stables. After speaking to one of the servants, he proceeded in the direction of the stables, and a short time afterwards John Gammon, one of the out-door servants who was performing some work in the yard, heard the report of a gun apparently in one of the adjoining stables. He immediately proceeded to the back of the premises and informed Joshua Harris, the coachman, and his uncle, Elias Harris, who was also engaged in the yard, and they all went to the place from which the report of the gun proceeded. On entering the saddle-room a shocking sight was presented. Their master was found lying on his back on the floor in a pool of blood with his head frightfully shattered, and his brain scattered over the ground. A double-barrelled gun was lying by his side, one of the barrels of which had evidently but recently been discharged. The unfortunate gentleman was quite dead. A messenger was at once dispatched to Barnstaple to Mr Law, surgeon, who was soon on the spot, but of course his services were of no avail. The sister of the deceased, MRS MULES, and his cousin, Miss Winter, were on a visit to Ley House at the time of the dreadful occurrence. The deceased, who was between fifty and sixty years of age, was a retired navy officer, and has for several years held a commission in the Royal North Devon Hussars. The Inquest was opened on Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner. Mr John Crang was foreman of the Jury.
John Gammon, labourer, in the employ of MR LEY, was the first witness called. He said:- This morning about 9 o'clock, Mr Harris, a butcher, came to Ley House to kill a pig. I assisted in dressing the animal, and after we had nearly finished the work I saw my master pass by and go into the stable. In less than a minute he came out and walked smartly past me, as I was carrying a pitcher of water, and then I observed him immediately afterwards come out of the "green" door of the house and go up to the stable, which he entered, and in half a minute subsequently I heard the report of a gun. I went to Joshua Harris, who proceeded to the saddle-room but came out weeping, after which all three of us entered and saw our dear master lying upon his back with a gun by his side. The deceased was about 57 years of age. MR LEY was with us making cider on Saturday morning, when he was as cheerful as ever I saw him.
Joshua Harris deposed:- I am coachman and gardener at Ley House. My master came to the house when the pig was hanging and remarked to my uncle that it was a "pretty pig." He then went away and I did not see him after alive. My attention was called to the report of a gun by the man Gammon, and on going into the stable I saw my master lying on the floor dead with a gun at his feet. The gun was a double-barrelled one, and belonged to MR LEY. I had been shooting rabbits some time ago with it, and about a week since I placed it in the saddle-room, where it is generally kept. The gun was not capped at that time, and only one barrel was loaded. This morning I found that there was no cap on it and that only one of the barrels was loaded. My master very seldom used the gun. I fancied he was rather depressed in spirits during the past few days. We made an alarm and sent for Mr Law, surgeon, of Barnstaple, and Mr Brown, MR LEY'S steward. - [The gun was produced, and upon being examined it was found that both barrels were empty, and that there was an exploded cap on the right-hand barrel]. - By the Jury: The right-hand barrel was left loaded and the other half cocked.
Elias Harris deposed:- I am a butcher living at Marwood, and was employed by the deceased to kill a pig this morning. I was assisted by John Gammon and Joshua Harris. MR LEY came out as I was engaged in dressing the animal. He bade me good morning and remarked that the pig was a very pretty one. He did not stop any time, but turned round and went in the direction of the stables.
Mr T. S. Law, surgeon, of Barnstaple, said: I was called this morning at about a quarter before 10 to the residence of CAPTAIN LEY who has been a patient of mine. The messenger informed me that he was severely shot. I hastened to the spot and found the deceased lying in a small saddle-room inside the stable. He was lying nearly straight on his back across the room with his left arm drawn up, and the right nearly straight by his side. A gun, which seemed to have been recently discharged, was lying near the body towards the feet. There was a large quantity of brain as well as blood lying on the floor, and there were marks of blood and shot on the higher part of the wall behind him, and on the ceiling. The back of his head was nearly removed, and the palate forced upwards. His moustache was slightly singed and some of his teeth were displaced. A false tooth, with the gold plate attached, was lying on the floor. The deceased was dressed in his ordinary morning suit. He had a gold ring on his finger, and his watch and chain were in his pocket, the time it indicated being correct. I have no hesitation in saying that the cause of his death was a gun shot wound the muzzle of the gun having evidently been placed in his mouth and fired.
Harriet Quick, housemaid, stated that her master came downstairs that morning and placed his tea in the teapot as usual. He then went out. As a rule he was very reserved, but during the last week or ten days he had been rather free; sometimes he appeared to be low spirited, and at other times he was very cheerful. He frequently heaved deep sighs lately. - By the Jury: He went to bed last night at his usual time, quarter past 10. He was away from home yesterday. For the last three nights I have observed that his bed clothes were very much disarranged, which, I suppose, resulted from his extreme restlessness.
Mr G. Brown, of Roborough, Pilton, agent to the late MR LEY, said: On Wednesday last MR LEY came into my office and seemed very distressed at the state of his affairs. He said he was a ruined man, and a beggar. He was very distressed for some little time, and he said he felt so miserable that he thought he should destroy himself. I remonstrated with him on the absurdity of talking in that way, and showed him a statement of his accounts which proved that he was not in such a condition as he had represented, but I failed to remove the impression from his mind that he was a ruined man. He repeated his visit on the following day, but I was from home. I received a letter from him on Friday morning still complaining of the unhappy state in which he was. On Saturday morning he came to my house about ten o'clock, in a more excited state than usual. He continued saying that he was a ruined man, and requested me to come and take possession of what he had at Ley House, as there were several people who were waiting to come into his house. He further stated that he had no food in the house, and that it was no good for him to go back to his residence. He complained generally that he was afraid to face his servants because he could not pay them their wages. There was no foundation for this. He remained with me some time, and after I had reasoned with him he became more quiet. He went with me to Barnstaple, and requested that the whole of his property should be disposed of, and he was very anxious that all his affairs should be settled this week. He said if they were not he should not live out the week. He paid me another visit on Sunday morning, when he was very excited, and said that he had been unable to sleep. I rode back with him to his residence, as I did not think it safe to allow him to be alone. Yesterday, he came to me again and confirmed the arrangement which he had previously made. He seemed in a more desponding state, and said he should hang himself. There was no cause whatever for his being in a low state because of the condition of his affairs, as they were not in a state to cause him any anxiety. He seemed to have other troubles which weighed heavily on his mind.
The Coroner read the following passages from two letters written by the deceased to his agent Mr Brown: - "I am so distressed I scarcely know what I say or do. .... I am quite wretched and miserable .... I am writing to you now in the greatest distress and wretchedness, bordering upon madness. What time tomorrow shall I come to you, for something must be done? Life is uncertain, and God only knows what will take place. ... I am half mad now, only with thinking of it. I scarcely know what I have written. For God's sake help me out of this misery. Send me a line by the bearer to tell me what to do, for you see I am broken-hearted."
Mr Law said, after hearing the evidence of Mr Brown, he had no hesitation in saying that the balance of CAPT. LEY'S mind had been upset at the time he committed the act which led to his death. William Lynch, carpenter, living at Marwood, said the father of the deceased had shot himself 40 years ago in the same room in which the Jury were then assembled. Witness made his coffin.
The Deputy Coroner remarked that there could scarcely be any doubt that MR LEY committed the rash act whilst in a state of unsound mind. If the Jury did not think there was sufficient evidence to support this view he advised them to return an open verdict, to the effect that "MR LEY destroyed himself, but in what state of mind he was at the time there was no evidence to show." The Jury were unanimously of opinion that CAPTAIN LEY had died from a gunshot wound, and that he had killed himself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity, and a verdict to that effect was returned. On the Coroner presenting the usual fees to the Jurymen for their attendance, the Foreman announced that there was a general feeling amongst the Jury that the money should be handed over to the North Devon Infirmary, which was accordingly done.

FRITHELSTOCK - The Fatal Boiler Explosion At Frithelstock - At the Inquest held at Drummett's Mill, before Mr J. H. Toller, Coroner, to inquire into the cause of the death of LUCY GENT, the following evidence was taken:- Mr Richard Augustus Rouse said: I am a surgeon, residing at Torrington. I was sent for on Friday, the 9th inst., about 7 p.m., to see the deceased, LUCY GENT. I went immediately to this house and found the deceased, the child of JOHN GENT, almost denuded of skin, with the exception of the right arm. It was on its mother's lap, wrapped in a woollen shawl. I examined the body and applied the first remedies at hand. I had the child placed in a cradle. I told the parents the child would die. She died in about an hour after. I did not hear any blame attached to anyone from the parents or others. I also found John Rew, the engine driver, and Emma Spry Shute who had been scalded at the same time. I examined them, dressing the injuries of the girl and man, wrapping him in blankets, and, at his request, sent him to the Infirmary at Barnstaple. I have great doubts as to the recovery of the girl Shute. The immediate cause of LUCY GENT'S death is shock and exhaustion. JOHN GENT deposed: I live at Drummett's Mill, in the parish of Frithelstock, and am a joiner. I am the father of LUCY GENT; she was ten months old. Whilst standing near the fire place in my house about 6.30 p.m., on Friday last, I heard an explosion, followed by screams from John Rew, the engine man, and Emma Shute, who had taken up the child. I ran out and met them half-way from the engine. I ran through the water and steam, and I could not see the deceased, but heard it cry. I searched around and picked it up by the box close to the engine; it was enveloped in steam. It was much scalded. I then went for Mr Rouse. The child died about 7.30 p.m. Hubert Henry Pidgeon said: About three weeks since, John Rew told me that he had plugged one of the boiler tubes that leaked a little. I asked him if he was perfectly satisfied it was a good job? He said he was quite sure of it. I have seen him two or three times since, when he stated that everything was right. the last time was about ten days ago. It is a common occurrence for engine tubes to be leaky, when they are either plugged or renewed. This particular engine was thoroughly overhauled by Messrs. Bodley, of Exeter, about 12 months since, when several tubes were replaced by new ones. About £25 was expended on the occasion. I believe the accident occurred through Rew's accidentally hitting the plug with the iron rod when raking out the fire on Friday last. The Coroner then said he had seen John Rew that morning at the Infirmary. The medical officer told him that he would not be recovered sufficiently to be removed in less than a month. He also read a statement made by Rew, who said that at Drummett's Mill on Friday last, when about to leave work, on opening the fire box one of the tubes burst. He had observed the leak before. He had worked the engine for several years; and when he applied about anything to his masters they always attended to it. He did not think blame attached to any one. After consultation, the Jury thought the Inquiry ought to be adjourned. They also recommended the examination of the state of the engine by a competent person. The Coroner, agreeing with these views, adjourned the Inquiry to the 14th November next.

Thursday 27 October 1870
NEWTON ST. CYRES - Mysterious Death In North Devon. - A Yeoman Shot. At about 7 o'clock on Thursday morning MR JOHN PASSMORE, Morton Farm, Newton St. Cyres, took a double-barrelled gun with the avowed intention of shooting magpies. Shortly afterwards a loud explosion was heard, and MR PASSMORE was discovered dead, and weltering in his blood, in a room adjoining the hall. Mr Body, jun., surgeon, Crediton, was sent for, and found a hole in the top part of deceased's head, corresponding in size with the bore of the gun. It is conjectured that MR PASSMORE'S head was close to the muzzel of the gun when it exploded. Deceased was a man of considerable wealth, and took a leading position among the yeomen of the district. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Shocking Accident On The Devon & Somerset Line. - On Monday afternoon, shortly after one o'clock, a lamentable accident occurred on the line of railway now in course of construction from Barnstaple to Taunton, by which one man lost his life, and another, we regret to say, is so seriously injured that he is not expected to recover. It appears from what can be gathered, that a train of twelve or thirteen trucks was proceeding up a short incline about fifty land yards distant from the temporary railway bridge at the back of Swymbridge village, when by some means or other the engine ran off the line, and the trucks from the impetus they received dashed forward, and two men who were sitting in the foremost one, were precipitated to the ground, and received shocking injuries from being crushed between the buffers of the locomotive and the truck from which they were thrown. One of the poor fellows, named WILLIAM WEBB, a young man, aged about 23, had his chest bone forced in upon his lungs, from the effects of which he died almost instantaneously. The other navvy, named John Gaydon, who is also a young man, with a wife and family dependent on him, was fearfully injured. As soon as the accident happened Mr John Jackman, surgeon, of Swymbridge, was sent for, and he was very soon on the spot. He pronounced life to be extinct in the man WEBB, whose body was then removed to the 'New Inn,' Swymbridge; and ordered Gaydon to be at once taken to the North Devon Infirmary, whither he was immediately conveyed, in Mr William Shapland's cart. On being examined by the medical staff of the Institution it was found that haemorrhage of the lungs had set in, and that they were so gorged with blood that the injured man could scarcely breathe. He is not expected to recover. It is alleged by some that the cause of the engine going off the rails was the "dogs" giving way, thus causing the metals to become dissevered. On the other hand the engine driver, Frederick Wilkins, it is said, is totally unable to account for the accident. Fortunately the driver, and a ganger, named Henry Smith, who was on the engine at the time, suffered no injury whatever, as the moment it ran off the metals it was brought to a standstill without any damage being done. WEBB, who is said to have been a steady, well-conducted man, lived at Bishopstawton, and Gaydon resided at Derby, Barnstaple. When the accident occurred the engine was proceeding at the rate of not more than five miles an hour. An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of WEBB, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner.

BRADWORTHY - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Mr John H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday, at the public-house kept by Mr Westaway, Bradworthy, on the body of MARY ANN HANCOCK, aged one year and eight months, the illegitimate child of a labouring woman named SOPHIA HANCOCK. It appears that the mother fell asleep with the child in her arm; and when she awoke she found it was quite dead. Mrs Ann Johns, who lived near the house of SOPHIA HANCOCK, having stated that the child had been for the past twelve months very delicate, and Mr Rouse, surgeon, having given his opinion that it had died from natural causes, the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 3 November 1870
CHULMLEIGH - Inquest. - On Tuesday the 25th inst., an Inquest was held at the 'Fortescue Arms,' Newnham, on the body of JOHN TRIGGER, a youth aged 14 years, by Mr J. H. Toller, County Coroner, and a very respectable Jury, of whom Mr Pearse was foreman. According to the evidence of Elizabeth Skinner, the deceased was riding on a cart at Elstone on Thursday when the horse took fright and ran away. Deceased, in order to save himself, jumped off the cart and fell into the road, when the wheels passed over the lower part of his body. He was at once taken home where he died on Sunday from the effects of the injuries he received. - Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 November 1870
COOKBURY - A Labourer Killed By A Chaff-Cutting Machine. - Mr R. Fulford, Deputy Coroner for Devon, has held an Inquest on the body of JOHN HARRIS, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Charles Saunders, of Upcott, in the parish of Cookbury, who had been killed on the previous day by becoming entangled in a chaff-cutting machine, worked by water power. The machine was under the charge of Mr Saunders' son, who requiring to stop it in order to get assistance in uncoupling the shafting, told HARRIS to go down and shake the fly. Just as the belt was shifted, the fly-wheel went round with a whirl, doubling deceased up round the axle and killing him on the spot. Dr T. Linnington Ash, of Holsworthy, attended immediately, and found that the injuries which had caused death were chiefly of the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", in which the Coroner concurred, recommending, however, that for the future the key of the wheel-room should be in the custody of one person only, and that no one should be allowed to touch the fly-wheel so long as the gear was on.

Thursday 17 November 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Fall From A Horse. - On Friday evening as WM. PUGSLEY was riding through Derby, his horse shied at some object, by which the rider was flung on some rough stones immediately opposite the gate of the lace factory. He was at once taken to the North Devon Infirmary where it was found that the ankle of his leg was dislocated, and that he was also suffering from a contused wound on the knee. The man has since died. An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the North Devon Infirmary by Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PUGSLEY, groom, who died in the institution on Monday morning from the effects of an accident which he met with on Friday last. Mr John Hopkins was the Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was John Popham, scavenger, Derby, who stated that about one o'clock on Friday he was attending to his duties, seven or eight landyards above the gate of the lace factory, when he saw the deceased riding a pony belonging to Mr Seldon, in a canter. The animal slipped and fell on its side, deceased's leg being underneath it. Witness immediately jumped out of a cart which he was driving and ran to his assistance. He seemed in much pain, and said his leg was broken. The right leg of his trousers was cut, and he was bleeding profusely from a wound in the knee. At this time a man named Robert Thomas, in the employ of Mr Thomas Seldon, came up, and procuring some straw, the injured man was placed in the vehicle and conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary. In answer to a Juryman, witness said he heard PUGSLEY say that the pony had shied when opposite the gate of the lace factory. The road was macadamised where the pony fell. He appeared to be perfectly sober, and had a "gammer" in his hand. Mr J. Cooke, House Surgeon at the Infirmary, deposed that the deceased was admitted into the establishment about half-past one o'clock on Friday. He was immediately placed in bed, being assisted into the ward by two men. The trousers of his right leg was very much rent and blood was flowing from a large wound above the cap bone of the knee. A large flap of skin was hanging down over the leg, the skin having been removed six or seven inches. There was a comminuted fracture of the fibuloe just above the ankle, and dislocation of the joint of the latter. On Saturday morning last, a severe attack of erysipelas set in, and also symptoms of delirium tremens. He began to get worse at twelve o'clock on Sunday night, being seized with difficulty of breathing, and on being called to him at four o'clock on the following morning witness found him breathing with great difficulty, and remained with him until about five o'clock when he died. Witness was of opinion that death arose from the effects of the injuries to his leg. A Juryman remarked that there was a rumour that the man died in awful agony, swearing fearfully. Mr Cooke said that PUGSLEY was insensible for about a couple of hours before his death and that he died very quietly. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 24 November 1870
GOODLEIGH - Suicide By Hanging. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on Saturday, at Goodleigh, on the body of THOMAS HARRIS, labourer, aged 40. The first witness called was Thomas Courtenay, labourer, who said he was called into the house of the deceased by the mother of the latter, and on entering he heard that lady, her son, daughter-in-law, and daughter all talking very loudly. Witness advised them to be quiet and to go to bed. Shortly afterwards he was again visited by the same woman, who entreated him to go to their house at once as "TOM was going to run away." On arriving at the place a second time witness saw HARRIS push aside his wife, who was endeavouring to hold him, and run up the road, upon which he followed and asked him whither he was bound, when he replied, "I don't know where I am going." Witness begged the man, who did not seem to be tipsy, but in a "strange way", to go back to his house, and the reply was, "I cannot now." - Mr Thomas Watts, Goodleigh, farmer, deposed to being accosted, as he was walking along the road, by a woman who told him to make haste to the garden of TOM HARRIS'S house as that person had hanged himself there. On reaching the place indicated, he saw the deceased hanging by a rope from the limb of an apple tree. He cut him down at once, but found that he was quite dead. The wife of the deceased, JANE HARRIS, stated that she attended, on Thursday, the "North Country Inn," where her father was holding a tithe meeting. In the evening her husband came to escort her home, and on the way they had some words. Her husband, who "had drank a little, but nothing out of the way," on reaching home, ordered her to go to bed. Before doing so a quarrel ensued between them which ended by the deceased going out and witness going to bed. He returned shortly after, and retired to rest, but rose at six o'clock and went out of the house. Witness did not feel alarmed, because she thought he would soon come back, and great was the fright which she felt, when she heard at seven that he had hung himself. About four years ago, when she and her husband lived at Bristol, he at that time attempted to cut his throat in consequence of some difference which he had with his brother. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

LANGTREE - Singular Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Langtree, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner, on the body of JOHN QUICK, a labouring man, aged 35. William Mounce, of Frithelstock, said he was a labourer, in the employ of Mr Smale, farmer, in whose service the deceased was also engaged. About six o'clock on Tuesday evening, QUICK said he was going to take home a dead "mote," which witness should say was about eight stone in weight. He intimated that he would take it home in a wheelbarrow. - ELIZA QUICK, the wife of the deceased, deposed to her husband arriving home about a quarter before seven o'clock the same evening in an exhausted state. He was nearly "two double," and crawled upstairs with the greatest difficulty. Witness, after hearing the cause of the accident, was told by the injured man to send for Mr James Huxtable, farmer, who was soon on the spot, and on seeing the condition of the poor fellow, he dispatched a messenger for Mr Hole, surgeon, of Great Torrington. Deceased stated, in answer to Mr Huxtable, that as he was in the act of "heaving up the dead mote on his back" his foot slipped and he fell on his back, part of the mote striking him in the abdomen. Mr Hole arrived about ten o'clock, when he examined the man and found that he was very seriously injured. QUICK lingered in great agony until the evening of the following day, when he expired. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death from a certain mote falling upon him."

CLOVELLY - Fearful Struggle for Life - Gallant Conduct of Two Fishermen. - On the morning of Friday, the 28th ultimo, WILLIAM EVANS, a fisherman, and his son, JOHN BERNARD EVANS, aged about 23 years, went out into Clovelly Bay in their fishing boat, called the Jim, for the purpose of catching herrings. They started at six o'clock, the weather being stormy, and at about half-past eight they found themselves in a somewhat rough sea, about a mile and a half from the shore. Just as they were vainly endeavouring to cast their nets a tremendous wave dashed over them, filling the boat, which immediately sank, and precipitating the occupants into the water, where they were struggling for dear life. Father and son were holding on, side by side, one to an oar and the other to the mizen mast, for some little time, when the latter cried out that he could not hold on to his support, and the words were scarcely out of his mouth when he was washed off the mast by a heavy wave. The father shouted to his son to make one last effort to regain his original position on the piece of wreck, but the despairing answer that reached the anxious parent was that he could not do so, after saying which he disappeared beneath the waters. At this critical moment two fishermen, named John Whitefield and John Boyles Jewell, who were riding at their nets in a herring boat, fortunately saw the men floating and with praiseworthy promptitude immediately let go their net and made with all the speed in their power to the assistance of the poor fellows. When they reached the spot father and son were very much exhausted, the former holding on to an oar, and the latter had succeeded in clutching the mast; but, sad to say, just as his rescuers had at considerable risk to themselves brought their boat abreast of him in the midst of a very boisterous sea, he let go his hold and the next moment a wave swept him away, and he was not seen again. The father was picked up and transferred to the lifeboat Alexander & Matilda Boetfeur, which as this time had come up to the scene of the catastrophe. A few days afterwards the dead body of JOHN BERNARD EVANS was washed ashore at Peppercombe, and at the Inquest on the body held by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was drowned by the sinking of a fishing boat, coupling with their verdict a deserved eulogium on the gallant and exemplary conduct of the two fishermen, who, at the risk of their lives and property, saved the life of the father, and made a strenuous attempt to rescue the son - an act of gallantry to which the Jury begged to call the attention of the Royal Humane Society.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Of An Old Woman. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening by R. I. Bencraft, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of TABITHA BAKER, aged 72, who was an inmate of No. 2 Alms House, in Pilton-street. The following evidence was adduced:- ABEL BAKER, servant, deposed: The deceased was the widow of my late brother, JOSEPH BAKER. She was about 72 years of age. She lived in No. 2 Alms House, in Pilton-street. I reside in No. 1; they are both under the same roof. She has been attended by Mr Fernie, the surgeon, occasionally for several years, but has lately been in her usual state of health, and rather better than formerly. She went to bed last night shortly before 9 o'clock; I heard her going upstairs, and she wished me good-night. A Mrs Mary Curtis occupied the same room with deceased by day, but they slept in different bed rooms. This morning I rose about half-past seven o'clock, and heard the deceased come down stairs about five minutes afterwards. She spoke to me and asked how my wife was. I replied; she then went into her kitchen, and I heard her lighting her fire. About three-quarters of an hour afterwards a boy came to the door with milk as usual. I took my own, and called to the deceased, saying the milk was come. She did not answer, and on opening her door, which was not fastened, I saw her sitting in her chair. Her head was lying back over the chair. I went to her, and called to her; she made no reply, and I saw she was quite dead. Her tea things were on a table in front of her. I at once procured assistance, and in about twenty minutes Mr Fernie arrived and examined her. She was not moved from the position I found her in until Mr Fernie saw her. She went to Bradiford yesterday, and attended a christening in the Parish Church here. She had 2s. per week from the parish, and house rent free. Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, deposed: This morning, between 9 and 10 o'clock I was called to see the deceased, at No. 2 Alms House, in Pilton-street. I found her lying on a chair. She was quite dead. She appeared to have died without any struggle. Her body was warm. She must, I think from her appearance, have died suddenly from faintness. I have known her several years. She used to come occasionally for medicine. She had a slight affection of the heart, and a swelling in her throat. She used to spit blood occasionally. I have not attended her professionally lately. I am of opinion she died of disease of the heart. - Verdict: "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

TORRINGTON - The Late Fatal Boiler Explosion. - At the Inquest on the body of EMMA SPRY SHUTE, who was scalded on the occasion of the boiler explosion at Drummett's Mills, the following verdict was returned:- "That the deaths of LUCY GENT and EMMA SPRY SHUTE were accidentally, and by misfortune, caused by the defective plugging of a tube of an engine belonging to the Rolle Canal Company, and we recommend to the Rolle Canal Company that the engine be thoroughly repaired by a practical and efficient man before working it again, and so to be kept in repair."

Thursday 8 December 1870
TORRINGTON - Death Of A Woman From Drinking. - On Monday, an Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., County Coroner, at Ward Farm, ST. Giles, on the body of JOANNA LANE, who was found dead on the previous day. Mr R. Bradford was chosen foreman of the Jury. It appears that deceased, who was about 43 years of age, had for some time lived as a servant with Mrs Brown, at the 'Black Horse Inn,' Torrington, and, according to report, she has occasionally given way to intemperate habits. On Sunday last about noon she left here for the purpose of paying a visit to her friends who reside at Atherington or Highbickington. Between one and two o'clock in the afternoon a farmer of St. Giles met deceased near a cottage about half a mile from High Bullen, in St. Giles, and he saw that she staggered very much. Some time afterwards Wm. Jewell, the occupier of the cottage, had occasion to leave his house, and on looking up the road he saw deceased lying by the side of the road with her face and head partially covered with water in the hedge trough. On lifting her up he found that she was quite dead, and that she had a small bottle with gin in it lying under her. She was afterwards removed to Ward Farm to await the Coroner's Inquest. The Jury having heard the particulars connected with the melancholy case returned a verdict of "Found dead through the effects of Drink."

Thursday 15 December 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Suffocation. - On Tuesday night the illegitimate child of MARY ANN WESTACOTT, of Newport, Barnstaple, was held on Thursday, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., at the ' Rose and Crown Inn,' Newport, when a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was returned.

Thursday 22 December 1870
TORRINGTON - The Fatal Accident On The Railway Works. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Board Room of the Torrington Union, before J. H. Toller, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PUGSLEY, who was killed near Rothern Bridge, on the previous day. A Jury having been impanneled, Henry Chapple, of Frithelstock, deposed: - Yesterday morning, between the hours of 8 and 9 o'clock, I was working on the Torrington Extension Railway, by the fir trees near Rothern Bridge. I was near where the deceased was working, with another gang. He was undermining the earth with a pickaxe, and was just lifting the tool to give a blow when the earth suddenly gave way and fell upon his left side. I should think about two tons weight fell which almost buried him, with the exception of his head. Help was at once rendered, and he was released, whilst I went for medical assistance. I returned with Dr Jones to the Union, but on our arrival the man was dead. We were all working comfortably together up to the time of the accident. Charles Merchant, stated that he had charge of the men. He left the deceased, about half past 8 on the preceding morning, undermining a piece of earth. This was about five minutes before the accident happened. He saw no signs of the earth giving way when he left him. As he was returning from a visit to some other men he heard some one shout that a man was buried. He went at once to the spot, and found that the men were digging him out. After he had been got out, he was laid on a horse-cloth and some brandy was administered to him, after which he was removed to the Union Infirmary. He never spoke after the accident, and died shortly after being admitted to the institution. The bank of earth was about 7 feet high and he was working about a foot under the level. William Buckingham, sworn: I work on the Torrington Railway, I was standing with WILLIAM PUGSLEY, with my back towards the deceased, when all at once a lot of earth fell upon myself and deceased. I was knocked down senseless; I afterwards assisted in carrying deceased to the Union. - John Budd, porter to the Union, deposed that he was present when the deceased was brought to the Infirmary. He thought at first that he was dead, but he fancied that he saw him breathe once after; he, however, saw no other symptoms of life. The Jury having heard the evidence at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was in his 33rd year, and has left a wife, but no family.

Thursday 5 January 1871
LYNTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Cottage Inn,' Lynbridge, on the 27th ult., on the body of DAVID BERRY, (who met with his death in consequence of a fall from Lynway on Christmas eve), by J. H. Toller, Esq., the Coroner. The Jury, - Messrs, Medway, Latham, J. Hooper, G. Fry, J. Ridge, Thos. Jones, John Jones, J. Crick, Z. Edwardes, Wm. Groves, W. Blake, and W. Rawle, - having chosen as their foreman Mr Medway, proceeded to view the body, and then proceeded with the Enquiry. It appeared from the evidence of the first witness that deceased was discovered on Sunday morning (Christmas Day), at about 7 o'clock lying on the Barnstaple road, and with his face bloody. He was then able to speak and witness sat him up and left him, thinking it a mere case of drunkenness but consi9dering the intense cold of the weather and the appearance of deceased the witness was blamed for his carelessness, to say the least of it. William Norman, the next witness, on discovering the deceased, acted in the most praise-worthy manner; he immediately procured assistance and deceased was taken home where he died on the Monday, never recovering his senses sufficiently to give any account of how he met with his accident. It was only too clear, however, that deceased fell in a state of drunkenness and Dr Fairbank proved the injuries he received were sufficient to cause death to a person in the state of health and body of the deceased, aggravated as his injuries were by his not being discovered until after passing a night (one of the coldest this winter) where he fell. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, coupled with a recommendation to the proper authorities to see to the fencing of the Lynway (the place where the deceased fell), which Mr Bedwell, who attended to watch the case, promised to lay before the Board.

Thursday 19 January 1871
BARNSTAPLE - Death Of A Prisoner In Barnstaple Gaol. - An Inquiry was held at the Barnstaple Borough Gaol on Saturday morning, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Gayton was foreman, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM CHAPPLE, who died somewhat suddenly on the previous day. Mr W. Trawin, the Governor of the Gaol, deposed that CHAPPLE had been confined in the gaol since the 23rd of October, for having stolen some carpenters' tools. He was brought up for trail at the Quarter Sessions, on the 22nd of December, and sentenced to eight months' imprisonment, but was to have served only four months in consideration of his having been incarcerated for some time previous to his trial. CHAPPLE was about 30 years of age, a carpenter by trade, and for many years he has suffered from asthma and chronic cough. In consequence of deceased's being in bad health he was placed in the Infirmary cell about two months since, where there was a fire burning night and day, and some little time before his trial he was improving, but afterwards became depressed and complained of the sentence. For the last two or three days he had been in a very weak state, and on Friday he died whilst he (the Governor) was at the market, where he had gone to procure some mutton for CHAPPLE. - A Juror: Did he ask you to send for his wife and family? - The Governor: I asked him whether I should send for them, and he replied that he should not like them to be sent for, and that he should e better in a day or two. I gave him some wine, brandy, arrowroot, and tea yesterday morning, and he got up about 10 o'clock. Mr Cooke, surgeon, of the Borough Gaol, said that deceased had been under his care since the 5th December last. His chest was deformed from spinal curvature, and he was told that he had suffered from asthma and chronic cough for many years. He requested the Governor to keep a fire in CHAPPLE'S room by day and night, and pay him every attention. On the 12th inst. he found him much worse than he had been previously, and he ordered him brandy, arrowroot, tea, sugar, and mutton broth. On Friday he was called to see him shortly after four o'clock in the afternoon. On examination he found that he was dead. His opinion was that his death resulted from disease of the lungs, and that a sudden faintness had come on from which he had never rallied. He believed that he had received every care and attention since he had been in the gaol. Robert Knill, a prisoner, who has recently assisted deceased, said that on the previous afternoon (Friday) he was undressing CHAPPLE to put him to bed when he noticed that one of his feet was quite cold, and the other warm. He told CHAPPLE of it and he said "Yes," which was the last word he spoke. He asked him if he was worse, and whether he should call the governor, but he shook his head. CHAPPLE'S breathing then stopped, and he shortly afterwards heard a rattling in his throat. He immediately called the matron, and poured some wine down his throat, but he did not move again. Deceased had received every care and attention, and could not have been treated better in his own house. The Coroner, in summing up, thought it had been satisfactorily proved to the Jury that the deceased had long suffered from disease of the lungs, but in cases of death in gaol it was always necessary to make a full enquiry into the treatment of the prisoners, and they would know for themselves what treatment CHAPPLE had received from the words of Knill, who said that he could not have been taken greater care of in his own house. It must be a matter of satisfaction to them all to hear that the Governor was so humane, and that the deceased had received such kind treatment. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was immediately returned. Deceased leaves a widow and two children.

Thursday 26 January 1871
BARNSTAPLE - Two Sudden Deaths In Barnstaple. - On Friday morning an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.), and a Jury of which Mr Trawin was foreman, at the 'Mason's Arms,' Hardaway-head, relative to the death of a married woman named MARY ANN BATE, who died suddenly the previous morning. LOUISA BATE, 13 years of age, daughter of the deceased, said her mother, who was 38 years of age and the wife of a sailor at sea, had been in good health lately. On Wednesday evening, however, she complained of being unwell, and retired to bed at half-past six o'clock, and did not take one of her children to sleep with her as usual, saying she could not bear anyone with her. Her mother told her to be a good girl and asked her to look after her little brother and sister because she did not think she should lie the night out; that was shortly before nine o'clock. Her mother drank a glass of peppermint just previous to going to bed. She (witness) got up about eight o'clock the following morning, and her sister and brother first went into her mother's room, and called to her to come in. On entering the room she saw her mother lying out over the bed, with her head nearly touching the floor. She spoke to her, but received no answer, upon which she called some of the neighbours, and the first who arrived said her mother was dead. Her mother had been sick in the night several times before, and she noticed that she had been sick that night. Ann Thomas, a neighbour of the deceased, said a few months since Dr Budd attended deceased for a second attack of yellow jaundice, but since then she had appeared much better. The husband of the deceased allowed his wife £1 15s. a month. Her habits, so far as she knew, were very steady. About half-past eleven o'clock that night deceased called to her and complained of being sick, but she could not go to her in consequence of her own baby being ill. Mr Cooke deposed to having been called to see deceased on Thursday morning and on his arrival he found her quite dead. He examined the body and found no marks of violence; the body was quite warm, and had apparently not been dead more than an hour or two. From the appearance of the body he could not say what was the exact cause of death, but from the account he had received from her friends he believed she had been suffering from disease of the liver and heart, and that her death had resulted from it. He was of opinion that she died suddenly. There were no appearances to lead him to believe that she had died from any other than natural causes. He was of opinion that whilst vomiting she had died from heart disease. The Coroner remarked that there was not much doubt from Mr Cooke's evidence that the deceased had died from natural causes, but from the fact of her having lived alone with her children, and not having been lately attended to by any medical gentleman, he thought it a case in which enquiry should be made. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

BARNSTAPLE - The Coroner and the same Jury then proceeded to Waytown to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH LANE, who was found dead in her bed on Thursday morning. Susan Prideaux, a neighbour of the deceased, who lived in Waytown Cottages, said that she spent the evening with MRS LANE on Wednesday, and left her apparently in good health shortly after nine o'clock. One of her (witness's) children slept with deceased, as her husband, who was a mason, was away at Bideford at work. MRS LANE was rather nervous. On Thursday morning, about eight o'clock she heard deceased's three children - all of whom are under four years of age - crying, and she went to see what the matter was. Her own little girl opened the door for her, and on her proceeding to the bedroom she found deceased in bed lying on her side, with her head thrown back, and quite motionless. A baby 12 months old was lying at her bosom. She called assistance, and the first person who came saw deceased breathe five or six times. Mr Fernie, surgeon, was sent for, and on his arrival he pronounced her to be dead. Deceased enjoyed very good health, and had a good appetite, but frequently complained of headache, and could not sit near the fire. Previous to going to bed on Wednesday night deceased drank a cup of tea and ate some bread and butter. Her little girl told her that deceased was sick in the night. Mr Fernie said he was called on Thursday morning to see the deceased, and on arriving at her house, about nine o'clock, he found her dead but still warm, and he did not suppose she had been dead more than an hour. Her face was drawn, and there was froth about her mouth and on the pillow. She died no doubt from an epileptic fit and he had been told that she had a serious attack of epilepsy about three years ago. He was of opinion that suckling her child and the cold weather would weaken her and predispose her to epilepsy. Had she received proper attendance she might have rallied. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from Natural Causes.

Thursday 2 February 1871
HOLSWORTHY - A Pauper Committed for Manslaughter. - An Inquest has been held at Holsworthy relative to the death of JOHN HARRIS, who in an affray with John Earle, another inmate of the Workhouse, received such injuries on the 20th as caused his death. The evidence produced was to the effect that on Friday morning last HARRIS, Earle, and a man named Piper, also a pauper, were working together by the master's direction in the garden. HARRIS was an idiot, but harmless and quiet. Some time afterwards Earle was heard to say to HARRIS, "Now thee heave thicker stone," and subsequently to strike him. In return HARRIS kicked Earle, when the latter struck the deceased two or three times on the head with an iron bolt. HARRIS was afterwards found sitting on a piece of wood holding some straw to his head, which was bleeding profusely. He said Earle had struck him, and the nurse, discovering three cuts on his head, applied some sticking plaster. Mr Pearse, the surgeon, saw the deceased, and observing that the plasters had been well put on by the nurse, simply "pressed the head with his fingers." HARRIS ate his dinner with the others, and at four o'clock went to bed. The doctor was sent for at six o'clock, but did not come. He, however, sent a powder, and at eight o'clock the master went himself to see Mr Pearse, who was not home, but his assistant, Mr Euston, recommended that some brandy should be given to HARRIS, and that cold water should be applied to his head and hot water to his feet. At eight a.m. on Saturday it was found that deceased's right arm and leg were paralysed, and the doctor was sent for an hour later. He came at eleven o'clock and saw him twice during the day. HARRIS died on Sunday, and a post mortem examination shewed that death had been caused by the blows on the head. Earle, in reply to the master, stated that he was on his way to the pig-house to bolt the door with a piece of iron, when the deceased asked him to help him. Earle replied that he could not, as the matron had told him to bolt the door; whereupon HARRIS kicked him, and he (Earle) struck him with the iron. The Coroner (Mr Braund) in summing up, expressed the opinion that the provocation on the part of HARRIS was not sufficient to reduce the crime to manslaughter, and that a verdict of wilful murder was necessitated by the evidence. The Jury, however, found Earle "Guilty of Manslaughter under strong provocation."

Thursday 23 February 1871
BARNSTAPLE - Sad And Fatal Accident Near Barnstaple. - On Thursday afternoon a very sad, and what unhappily proved a fatal accident occurred at Higher Dean Farm, about four miles from Barnstaple. MR JOHN HUXTABLE the occupier of the farm, who is about 40 years of age, was loading his double-barrelled gun in his kitchen, when from some unexplained cause one of the barrels went off. The charge entered MR HUXTABLE'S chin, and proceeding upwards, smashed the jaw, and tore the flesh of the face in a frightful manner. It came out just above his left eye, carried away the left brim of the hat and lodged itself in the ceiling overhead which was much bespattered with blood and shot. An Inquest was held on the body before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Stone was foreman, on Friday evening at Dean Farm, when the following evidence was adduced:- Ann Vallacott, servant at Dean Farm, said that deceased appeared quite well on Thursday and was engaged about the farm superintending his men. About 3 o'clock on the afternoon of that day she went into the kitchen where she saw her master loading his gun, and within a very short time of her going into the adjoining room she heard the report of one of the barrels. Thinking some accident had happened she ran out into the yard and called the farm labourers who immediately came with her into the kitchen where she saw the deceased lying on his face and hands, and bleeding profusely from a wound in his face. H. Searle, farm labourer, at Dene Farm, deposed to having heard the report of the gun in the house on Thursday afternoon. As his master was often in the habit of going outside the house to shoot rooks he did not take much notice of the report. When Ann Vallacott asked him to come into the kitchen he immediately did so, and he there saw deceased lying on his face and hands and the double-barrelled gun near him. Deceased rose upon his hands and knees, and held out his hand which he (witness) took hold of, but his master quickly withdrew his hand and fell on the floor again. He hastened to Barnstaple and fetched Mr Fernie, who arrived at Dean Farm about 6 o'clock. He had heard his master say that one of the triggers of the gun would go off at half cock. He never heard deceased speak after he first saw him on the floor of the kitchen. Mr Fernie, M.R.C.S., said that on his arrival at Dean Farm, on Thursday evening, he saw deceased lying on his right side on the floor of the kitchen, with his head resting on a pillow. He saw a frightful gunshot wound on the left side of his face from which blood was flowing very freely. In a few minutes deceased vomited a large quantity of blood which had run back into his throat. He was restless and breathed with difficulty. He cleared the blood from his throat and applied cold water to his face to stay the bleeding. His skin was cold and his pulse feeble, and about 7.30 his breathing became worse and he died just before 8 o'clock. Shock to the system and loss of blood was the immediate cause of death. He believed deceased was conscious till 7.30 although he could not speak. He had since examined the wound and found that the left side of the jaw bone was shattered and the bones of the face shattered to pieces. The left eye was also much injured and the flesh very much torn. He saw no trace of burning about the moustache or whiskers or about the skin of the face. He should think the muzzle of the gun was at a distance of certainly not less than one foot at the time the gun went off. He was led to suppose it was accidental from the fact of the deceased's whiskers or face not being burnt for in cases where persons wilfully shot themselves the gun was generally held close to the face so that the whiskers and the skin would be burnt by the powder. - It was here stated that deceased's widow was ill in bed through the shock. She was at a neighbour's house at the time the sad affair happened with her baby, the only child. The Coroner in summing up said it would be the duty of the Jury to say whether they believed the deceased came to his death accidentally or wilfully. Certainly from what Mr Fernie had said as to the whiskers or skin not being scorched they would be led to suppose in all probability that the gun went off by accident. He thought that under the circumstances the best thing for the Jury to do would be to return an open verdict. The Jury then retired, and after a short deliberation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ROMANSLEIGH - A Strange Case Of Drowning. - A little boy about five years of age, the son of MR COOKE, of Road Farm, Romansleigh, has recently met with his death under the following strange circumstances. On Monday last the little fellow left his father's house in company with a lad named Henry Punchard (14 years of age) to go to the moor near the house, where the latter was engaged in drawing furze. Punchard shortly afterwards missed his little charge, and on looking about could see nothing of him. He then heard him calling, and on going to the place whence the sound proceeded he saw deceased in the lake, which at that place was shallow and very clear. He immediately pulled the child out, when he observed him move his hand, but that was the only movement. Punchard, in a state of great agitation, rushed off to the house and told MRS COOKE of what had occurred, upon which she instantly made her way with all speed to the bank of the lake, where she found her little boy quite dead. At an Inquest held before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Wednesday, the above facts were adduced, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

Thursday 2 March 1871
EXETER - The Mysterious Disappearance Of A Lady From Exeter. - About a month side, a lady somewhat mysteriously disappeared, and has been missing ever since. It is, however, believed that her dead body has now been found. The body, which was almost in a state of nudity, was discovered in a marsh on the river Exe, near Stafford's weir, jammed between two trees. The lady whose body this is supposed to be was very respectably connected, and about forty years of age.
An Inquest has been held at the 'Cowley-bridge Inn,' Exeter, on the body of MRS ANNE DICKER, 40 years of age, whose body was found near Stafford's Weir, in the river Exe, on Wednesday. Deceased was the widow of a clergyman, who had served as a missionary on the West Coast of Africa, and who died about five or six years since. In 1865 MRS DICKER was placed in the Wonford Asylum, Exeter, and Mr Thomas Lyle, M.D., the resident medical superintendent of that establishment, noticed then that her state of mind generally was one of depression, whilst her general bodily health was good. She was not at all violent. She left the asylum in 1865 with the consent of her friends, but returned in a month. During the last two or three years she repeatedly wrote to the commissioners in lunacy, maintaining that she was sane, and urging that she should be discharged from the asylum. The commissioners wrote to Dr Lyle, but he did not then feel so satisfied with her state of mind as to discharge her. On the 28th of September, 1868, the commissioners who inspected the asylum, after a conversation with the deceased, made a note in a book recommending that she should be allowed to leave, but with this Dr Lyle did not concur, and she did not go. After this deceased gradually got better, and in 1870 again urged that she was in a fit condition to leave the asylum. Before consenting to this Dr Lyle allowed her to go out whenever she pleased to call upon her relatives, and then return to the establishment. This went on for some months, and, as she continued well, on the 14th of September last deceased finally left the asylum and went to her friends. On the 26th November she went to the house of Mrs Townsend, in Friar's-walk, Exeter, where she stopped until the 21st January last, when she removed to 3, Southernhay. During her stay at Mrs Townsend's she was very quiet, but appeared to be much depressed. On one occasion when Mrs Townsend asked her what troubled her, she said "perhaps she would tell her one day." On the morning of the 26th January she came down to breakfast at nine o'clock, and then wore a brown dress. She left the house at ten o'clock the same morning, and as the ladies who occupied the premises - Miss Allen and Miss Mayo - knew she had been invited to visit her cousin, Miss Medland, at Hill's Court, nothing was thought at her going out in that way. She did not return that night, and inquiries at Hill's Court on the following morning led to the discovery that she had not been there. Her bedroom was then entered, and it was discovered that the brown dress which she had worn at breakfast was hanging up behind a door, and a black one, with white spots, taken away. Her watch and chain, purse (containing money), and keys were also found in the room. Every possible inquiry was made, and advertisements giving a description of MRS DICKER were issued; but nothing was heard of her until Wednesday. At about twelve o'clock on that day William Sirey, of Stoke Canon, who said he was employed "in looking after the river Exe," whilst walking in the marshes near Stafford's Weir noticed something white between two elm trees, and on going to the spot found it to be the body of a woman, clothed in her under garments only. She was lying on her back, with her knees bent up, one shoulder resting against a railing and the other against a tree. Near her head was found a red flannel petticoat, but no other garments could be seen, nor had any been found, although a very careful search was subsequently made. the body was a considerable distance from the river, and had not been in the water at all. On her finger were found her gold wedding ring and keeper. The body was much decomposed. Dr Lyle said he saw deceased in December and was then very sadly depressed, and he advised her to take a little medicine. She had been with her husband at Sierra Leone, and had had a fever there, and he had often thought that the climate must have affected her. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead," it being the general opinion that deceased had died of the cold, one of the Jurors remarking that "a more bitter night than that of the 26th of January he had never known." Deceased has two daughters, one aged 18 and the other 14 years.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death At Pilton. - An Enquiry was held at the 'Ring of Bells,' Pilton, on Saturday evening, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Trawin was foreman, into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOSEPH LARAMY, woolstapler, an old and respected inhabitant of the place, who was found dead in his bed on that morning. The following evidence was adduced:- Miss Annie Berry, who resided in the same house as the deceased, stated that she had lived with him as his housekeeper since the death of his wife, which occurred about two years since. During the past twelve months deceased's health had been bad, and he had been subject to fits. she heard that he had a fit about a fortnight since, but she had not seen him in a fit for some time. On the previous day deceased went to the Barnstaple market, as usual, in the course of his business as a wool dealer, and returned about 5 o'clock. He subsequently went into Barnstaple, and came back within a short time. He appeared quite well, in fact better than usual, and was quite sober. He retired to bed at 9 o'clock, and wished her good night. She believed he was about 65 years of age. On Saturday morning she came downstairs at half-past seven o'clock, and not finding deceased there as usual she called to him, but received no reply, upon which she became alarmed, and called to a person living in the same house. Mr Edward John Stevens, tailor, said he lived in the house with the deceased, whom he had known about eighteen months. He had known deceased have two fits a week, the last time he saw him suffering from one being a fortnight since. On that morning, in consequence of the last witness calling MR LARAMY and getting no answer, he, at the solicitation of his sister, went into deceased's bedroom, and found him lying on the bed quite dead. The deceased was lying on the top of the bedclothes, with his great coat across him. One of his legs was drawn up, and there was a good deal of froth about his mouth. Mr J. Harper, M.R.C.S., said the deceased had been a patient of his for the past ten years, during the whole of which time he had been subject to epileptic fits, which had been more frequent and severe of late. He saw the deceased on Friday, and walked down High-street in his company. MR LARAMY then told him he was better than he had been for some time past. That morning at eight o'clock he was called to see the deceased, whom he found quite dead. The body of the deceased was quite cold and stiff; his teeth were clenched, and his tongue was between them. He was of opinion that deceased had been dead for several hours. From the appearances he believed the deceased's death resulted from epilepsy. Deceased appeared to have got out of bed, and in getting in again a fit had come on and he had fallen back on the bed. A verdict in accordance with the medial testimony was returned.

Thursday 9 March 1871
TORQUAY - A Young Woman Burnt To Death. - An Inquest has been held at the 'Clarence Hotel,' Torquay, on the body of SARAH COLES, aged twenty-three, who died on Sunday from the effects of burning. The deceased, who was a servant at Normount, was cleaning out the kitchen on Saturday, and was moving backward towards the stove, when her clothes caught fire. She was so frightfully injured that she died on Sunday afternoon. Jane Ham, her fellow servant, exhibited much intrepidity in putting out the fire with a blanket, for which she was complimented by the Coroner and Jury. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 16 March 1871
NORTHTAWTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. Fulford, at South Zeal, on Thursday, on WM. COOMBE, ten years of age, who was killed by being crushed between two waggons on the Okehampton Railway, now in course of completion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 30 March 1871
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Sudden Death. - MRS GRADDON, of Deptford Farm, Chittlehampton died suddenly at her residence on Saturday last. At an Inquest held on Monday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, a verdict of death from Natural Causes was returned.

Thursday 6 April 1871
FREMINGTON - The Fatal Accident Near Fremington. - In our issue of Saturday we briefly stated that MR JOHN BALE, farmer, of Worlington Farm, Westleigh, met with his death on the previous day whilst returning from Barnstaple market, by being thrown from his trap. On Saturday afternoon J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body at the 'New Inn,' Fremington. Mr John Bartlett was chosen foreman of the Jury. The subjoined evidence was adduced:- Martha Hancock said:- I reside at Instow. The deceased was my uncle and I lived with him. He was a farmer and was about fifty years of age. Yesterday morning I went with him to Barnstaple in a market spring cart. He drove. We put up at the 'Golden Anchor,' and after the business of the day we left the 'Golden Anchor' about half-past seven in the evening. He was not tipsy. I drove home. When we came to Bickleton Hill the horse could not get up, the cart being heavily laden. We then turned and came down Woodland-road, and on to Gullincott-road, when all at once I found myself under the cart, with bags of seed with which the cart was laden upon me, so that I could not get up. After being there some little time a man came to my assistance, and I saw that my uncle was lying in the road. - James Rendel said:- I live in the parish of Fremington, and am a road contractor. I knew the deceased. Last evening, between nine and ten o'clock, I was walking from Fremington to Rookabear, when all at once I heard the voice of a female crying for help, and looking round a corner I saw a cart on its side, and underneath some bags a young woman, who I am informed was Martha Hancock. I sent my wife who was with me to the 'New Inn,' at Fremington for assistance. She went, and I tried to lift Martha Hancock up. I lifted a bag from her which gave her ease, and as the horse who was lying upon its side, was getting restive, I went to his head and kept him down until assistance came, when Martha Hancock was liberated. The deceased was lying in the road, and I went up to him and touched him, but I believe he was quite dead, as he never moved or spoke. The deceased was then taken to the 'New Inn.' - Robert Cann said:- I am horseman at Fremington Station. I knew the deceased. Last evening between nine and ten o'clock, I happened to be at the 'New Inn,' at Fremington when Mrs Rendel came in and said there was a cart upset in the Road at Gullincott Corner, and she thought it was a miller's cart, as there were bags attached to it. I went with her, and when we came to Gullincott Corner, Miss Hancock said, "Where is Uncle?" I lifted her from the hedge trough. She directed me to the spot where the deceased was lying, and I saw that he had pitched into the hedge trough. With assistance I got him out into the road clear of the cart. I thought he was dead. I left two men in charge of him, and went down to the 'New Inn,' for medical assistance to be obtained, and the deceased was taken on a door to the 'New Inn.' I found a large hole in the back part of the crown of his hat. - Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, said:- About half-past ten last evening I was sent for to go to Fremington to see MR BALE, who had met with an accident. I accordingly went to the 'New Inn,' where I was directed, and I found the deceased lying on the parlour floor. I could find no injuries about his trunk, but his neck was broken about the fourth cervical vertebrae. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 April 1871
PLYMOUTH - Shocking Neglect Of A Wife. - A shocking case of neglect by a husband has been brought to light at an Inquest held by the Plymouth Coroner. On Monday evening, between six and seven o'clock, MARY ANNE WYATT, fifty years of age, wife of a labourer, was making some oatmeal porridge for her son, who was blind, when she was taken with spasms, and called for some one to come to her. Her daughter - a married woman - who was at the bottom of the stairs, ran up, and found that her mother had fainted. She put her on her bed, and then waited until her father came home, at about eight o'clock, the mother meanwhile remaining unconscious. WYATT went to a relative at Stonehouse, who came and stayed in the house all night, and went away in the morning, without calling in any medical man to see the woman, who was still unconscious. ~The husband went to his work as usual in the morning, and at about 9.30 the daughter went to Mr Mayell, relieving officer, who gave her a note to take to Mr Jackson, surgeon, adding that the case was urgent. The daughter took the note to Mr Jackson's house in Clifton-place, but not finding him there, she took it to his visiting room in Glanville-cottages, and left the note with his servant. On arriving home about one o'clock her mother was dead, so that the woman had lain in a state of insensibility about fifteen hours, without being visited by a medical man. The Jury severely censured the husband for his shameful conduct, but returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 20 April 1871
MARWOOD - Sad And Fatal Accident At Marwood. - On Monday, the 10th inst., a miller named HENRY CLEMENT, of Marwood, sustained injuries which resulted in his death on the following day. On the day in question, the deceased was leading a horse by the head down over Westgate Hill, in the parish of Eastdown, when the animal started off, dragging the unfortunate man along the ground a considerable distance. At the bottom of the hill, CLEMENT let go his hold of the horse, which went on with the waggon which it was drawing at the time. A man named John Beer who had witnessed the sad affair, procured assistance, and the deceased who was bleeding profusely from a wound in the thigh was taken to his home. Mr Cooke, surgeon of Barnstaple, was sent for, and he found that CLEMENT had sustained a punctured wound on his left thigh, and severe contusions on the lower part of his body. In spite of medical skill deceased died on the following morning. At an Inquest held at Marwood on Wednesday, the 12th, before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, Mr Cooke stated that the injuries CLEMENT had received were the cause of death, and that they were such as might be produced by being dragged along the road, or by the waggon going over him. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury.

Thursday 27 April 1871
DEVONPORT - A painful case was investigated by the Devonport Coroner on Friday. HENRY MOORE, who had formerly been in the Metropolitan police, from which he was invalided, committed suicide by hanging on Thursday, in consequence, it is supposed, of depression of spirits caused by being told that he would never recover from his illness. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Thursday 11 May 1871
BARNSTAPLE - The Inquest. Vote Of Censure For Inhumanity. - The Inquest on the body of JOHN SMITH was held in the evening at the Infirmary by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr W. May was foreman.
The Coroner commenced the proceedings by observing that it seemed to him that unskilful hands ought not to be employed about machinery, for they all knew how dangerous any machinery connected with steam must be. He was exceedingly sorry to hear that some persons who had been applied to, to render assistance to bring the unfortunate man to the Infirmary had refused, for one would think their common humanity would prompt them to give needed help at such a time.
The Jury then proceeded to view the body, which presented a shocking spectacle; after which the following witnesses were examined.
Christopher Vickery, the turncock of the Barnstaple Water Company, who resided at the "Reservoir Cottage," in the parish of Pilton, deposed to having been awoke at four o'clock that morning by the groans of the deceased who was outside his house. He opened the window, and asked him what was the matter, to which he replied, "I've scalded myself just to death." SMITH was then lying by the side of the hedge opposite his house, at Westaway corner. He dressed himself and went to his assistance as quickly as possible, and asked him his name, which he told him, and also that he had come from Mr Abbott's Paper Mills. He helped deceased up, who, at the time, appeared to be suffering very much. With his assistance SMITH walked on so far as the Maretop path gate, when he said he could go no further. He left him by the gate whilst he went to Mr Leverton's, at Westaway, in order to get some conveyance. He woke up Mr Leverton, and told him the circumstances of the case, and asked him if he would lend him his donkey and cart to take SMITH to the Infirmary. He refused to lend his donkey and cart, ("oh! oh!" and cries of shame!") saying he could not let it go.
Mr Rowe:- Didn't he say his reason why he would not let the cart go?
Vickery:- He said his reason was that he must attend to his business! In continuation he said he went back to SMITH, and told him to remain where he was whilst he tried to get some conveyance. He then went to Mr Abbot, the master of the deceased, who lived at the bottom of Pilton, and told him what had taken place. Mr Abbot, within a very short time, went with him to where SMITH was. On the way up through Pilton they met a man named Wm. Harding, in the employ of Col. Harding, loading a cart of dung, and he asked him to tip the cart, and take SMITH to the Infirmary, but he declined to do so, saying he could not leave his work. (Oh! oh!). Some person then went to a milkman named John Allen, who immediately lent a horse and cart, with which they went back to the deceased, who had crawled or staggered on from Mare-top gate to the steps of a house at the top of Pilton. Deceased did not make any statement to him as to how the accident occurred except from the boiler. When he saw deceased first, the skin of his hands was hanging down from the tips of his fingers (sensation), and he was spitting blood. He undid the buttons of SMITH'S wristbands at his request, and as he did so the skin came off. They arrived at the Infirmary at a quarter past five o'clock.
George Huxtable, dairyman, living at Pilton, deposed to having heard dreadful groans that morning at about 4.30. He looked out of his window and saw deceased passing by, bent nearly double. He knew SMITH very well, and he asked him what was the matter, to which he replied, "Oh, George, I have burned myself most to death." He dressed as quickly as possible to tell deceased's mother. A man named Stoyle went over to Mr Ireland's nursery for assistance but it was denied (oh! oh! "That is number three"). Mr Ireland told Stoyle he was going to market and could not. When he came back deceased was about seven yards further down. He asked for Col. Harding's man to lend the butt to take SMITH to the Infirmary, but he would not (oh! oh!). Deceased was groaning fearfully (oh! oh!).
Mr Cooke, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, said that at about half past five o'clock that morning the deceased was brought to the Infirmary. On examination he found that he was severely scalded on every part of his body, there being scarcely a sound place. He had also a compound fracture of the frontal bone of the skull. He was very much collapsed, and had severe rigours every few minutes. Every means were used to resuscitate him, and after a short time he got warm; but he died from the effect of shock to the nervous system. He died about a quarter past eight o'clock. From the moment of his admission he saw there was no chance of his recovery, his injuries being of too severe a nature. In answer to a Juror, Mr Cooke said it was a difficult question for him to answer as to whether SMITH could have recovered if he had been attended to directly. If stimulants had been administered at once, he could not say they would not have made any difference. The injuries were so great that he felt that in all probability even if he had been attended to at once, he would not have recovered. Generally such cases, where there was such injury to the skin, were fatal. He did not believe the blow in the head made any difference, as its effects would not have been felt for a day or two. Deceased did not tell him how it occurred.
Mr Wm. Joseph Abbott, the proprietor of Playford mills, said the duty of the deceased was to chop the material, and fill and empty the boilers. His proper hours were from six to six o'clock, but he was a very persevering man and wished to make overtime. On Monday evening deceased asked him if he should come early in the following morning, and he told him he could come at three o'clock if he liked. SMITH had the keys of the gate of the engine house. It was not deceased's duty to draw off the boiler in the morning, but it was his duty some part of the day. He asked deceased how it happened, and if he had meddled with the revolver and he said feebly, "Yes." He had described to SMITH the dangerous nature of the boilers. Some three years since a slight accident occurred at the same boiler, and he took the precaution from that time of knowing when the steam in the boiler was exhausted, and he had a hole bored, which would occasionally get chocked, but there was a long wire kept to put down through the hole to ascertain if there was any steam left in the boiler. In his opinion he must have opened the cover before putting the wire down the smaller aperture in order to ascertain if there was any steam in the boiler. It would be the duty of the deceased early in the morning to chop rags. He had been there three weeks, and had nothing to do with the machinery. The deceased must have set the watermill going directly he went to the mill.
Benjamin Abbott, brother of the last witness, deposed to having seen the deceased sitting on the steps of Mr Lee's house at Pilton that morning. He asked him what he had done and he said, "I don't know; I have cut off my fingers." On arriving at the mill he found the cover of the revolving boiler blown off and the rags scattered about the room. The window on one side of the boiler was blown out, and on the fragments of glass there were spots of blood. The bolts of the cover were taken off the cover; the nuts of the bolts had been slackened. The safety-valve was clear when he left the mills on the previous evening, and on examining it after the accident he found it to be clear. He accounted for the explosion in the following manner: SMITH must have set the mill going and gone direct and stopped the steam from going into the revolving boiler, and slackened the screw before the steam had evaporated. That would cause the cover to rise. The cover was blown up from the boiler and was lying on the floor. It was secured by six one inch iron screws, and could not have been blown up unless interfered with. When he left the mills on Monday evening the steam was escaping a little: it was then all safe. He had cautioned SMITH never to slacken the screws whilst there was steam escaping.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was quite clear that deceased had met his death through an explosion - although there was no direct evidence as to how it happened; and they could only conjecture by the appearance of the machinery how it happened, viz., that the deceased was interfering with the cover, and that his interference caused an explosion which must have sent the boiling water all over him, and must have caused the cover itself or some portion of it to hit him in the head, and cause the fracture which the house surgeon said he found on the forehead. It was a sad thing for a man in health and strength to be cut down in such a way, but there did not seem to be any blame attachable to anybody. They had all heard, and their feelings had coincided with his own as to the inhumanity of those persons who were asked to help that poor creature- suffering as he was - into the Infirmary, and who refused. It was hardly possible to believe in these days, that three persons had found excuses to satisfy their minds that they should not help a fellow creature in distress. It was a shocking thing to be brought before their notice, and he hoped to have few instances of such inhumanity, which made the blood curdle in their veins. The first person who was applied to and was told that the poor fellow was suffering and could not reach the Infirmary, said he could not render assistance because he wanted to go about something else. There was little credit due to a person who could give such an answer. They would fancy that anyone would have been only too happy in a case of that sort to render a little trifling assistance; and it was rather a refreshing contrast to find that Vickery did all he could to help the deceased, and did not leave him till he brought him to the place where he could be attended to. He hoped they should not often hear of such cases. It made one feel sad that such cold-blooded answers could be given, and that men thought it better to go about their own business than to help a man in such distress. However, there was no culpability in the matter. The mangled remains of the poor fellow must have told them, better than he could describe, what he must have suffered till death put an end to his sufferings. He thought their verdict must be one of accidental death, but he was sure they would join with him in expressing their pain and astonishment that persons could be so cold-hearted as to refuse to help a fellow creature. They might not have known he was so bad as he was, but they could have gone for themselves and have seen; and he thought if they were told that a man wanted to get to the Infirmary and had not strength to get there, the least they could do would be to assist him there.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and appended the following expression to the verdict: "The Jury wishes to express its strong sense of disapprobation at the unfeeling manner in which the parties acted, in refusing to help the deceased to the Infirmary." The Coroner observed that that was a very proper expression of feeling in the matter.
A Juror: I hope they will be held up to public indignation and to scorn.
Vickery: The horse and cart belonging to Colonel Harding stayed in Pilton all the time we were there.
[No one who knows the man's master (Col. Harding) will require to be told that Harding acted on his own responsibility only, and that his master, on being informed of his conduct, expressed his great indignation and deep regret at it. the man, however, says that he did intend to afford the required assistance, and had taken down the tail-board of his cart for the purpose when the other came up.]

SHERWILL - Another Fatal Accident. - The old adage that "mishaps seldom come alone" is often painfully verified. On Tuesday morning, a fatal accident occurred at Playford Mills, being the first in this neighbourhood for a very long period, and yesterday another happened. In the afternoon of yesterday several men were engaged ripping and felling trees in a copse known as "Hammett's" Wood, Sherwill. Amongst them was an elderly man, named SAMUEL BOATFIELD, who, with three others, was ripping a tree with iron crowbars. At a short distance off some other men were felling a tree, which, it was expected, would have fallen in an opposite direction from where BOATFIELD and his fellow-labourers were at work. However, the tree fell towards them, upon which they were immediately made aware of their danger, and they all endeavoured to get out of harm's way. In this attempt they all succeeded with the exception of BOATFIELD who fell on the ground whilst in the act of running, and the tree came down close against him. One of the branches struck him a fearful blow on the side of the head, smashing his skull in a shocking manner. A horse and cart was procured from a farm-house near at hand, and in it BOATFIELD was placed and driven carefully towards Barnstaple. On arrival at Sherwill Cross, the unfortunate man succumbed to the injuries he received, in fact it was scarcely possible that he could recover, for a large portion of his brain was protruding from the skull. His body was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, where he awaits an Inquest. Deceased was about 54 years of age, and leaves a widow and four children to mourn his sad end. He belonged to Atherington, and was in the employ of Mr James Eastman.

Thursday 18 May 1871
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident At Sherwill. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, on Thursday last, by Incledon Bencraft Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr George Gaydon was foreman, relative to the death of SAMUEL BOATFIELD, 54 years of age, who came to his end under the following circumstances. James Eastmonde, of Burrington, said the deceased was in his employ as a ripper. On the previous day he, with deceased and 23 other men, was engaged in ripping and felling trees in Hammett's Wood, in the parish of Sherwill, the property of Sir Bruce Chichester, Bart. Several men were felling an oak tree, near where BOATFIELD and some others were ripping a tree. The tree which was being felled took an opposite direction from what was expected. He called out, "Look up." BOATFIELD and his fellow workmen ran off, but he fell over a heap of loose stones, and one of the branches of the falling tree struck him on the side of the head. He ran and picked deceased up, and he saw blood issuing from his nose and mouth, and from one of his ears. Mr John Fry, of Woolley, a farmer living near, on being applied to, took a horse from his plough and attached it to a cart, in which he placed straw and a rug, and in it deceased was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary. BOATFIELD never spoke after being struck by the tree, and he died near Sherwill Cross. The tree was pointed to fall in a northerly direction, but by some means it fell in a south-easterly direction. There was no rope attached to the tree to steady its fall. The tree was only about eleven inches in girth at its thickest part.
William Heale, son-in-law of the deceased, who was working in Hammett's Wood, gave similar evidence. He did not think there was any blame attachable to any one. It was not customary to put ropes to small tress.
Mr J. W. Cooke, house surgeon at the North Devon Infirmary, deposed to having examined deceased on his admission into the Infirmary. Deceased appeared to have been dead but a very short time. There were marks of a severe b low on the left side of the head and the left ear, but there was no external wound. On closer examination, he discovered a very extensive fracture of the skull on the left side of the head, and a laceration of the brain, some of which was protruding from his ear. There was no doubt that death resulted from injuries to his head.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was quite clear that deceased met his death accidentally, for, had he not stumbled and fallen, he would have escaped as well as his fellow-workmen. No blame appeared to attach to any one, and it was satisfactory to find that there was no difficulty in getting a conveyance in which to take BOATFIELD to the Infirmary. It formed a pleasing contrast to the case they had had before them on the previous day, where a considerable time was lost, and no fewer than three people were found to deny a conveyance to a poor fellow who was in great agony, and who had met with a very serious accident. The Jury, after a very brief deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquiry was held at Pilton, on Friday morning, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, relative to the death of a married woman, named FOLLAND . It appeared from the evidence adduced, that on Thursday evening last the deceased went outside the door of her house to look after her children, when a vein in her right leg burst. She immediately returned, and said to her sister, who was in the room, "I don't know what is the matter with me." At that time blood was running from her right leg, which she tied up with her apron. She desired her husband to be sent for, and he was at once fetched from Mr Williams's lawn, at Pilton, where he was at work. Seeing that she was becoming faint and insensible, medical assistance was sent for to Barnstaple. Mr Kiernan, assistant to Dr Harper, arrived within a short time, but MRS FOLLAND was then dead. On examination, he found that the internal saphenous vein of the right leg had burst, and that she had lost a great quantity of blood. Her leg was in a varicose condition. He gave it as his opinion that her death resulted from excessive haemorrhage, consequent on the rupture of the vein. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly from Natural Causes." Deceased, who was about thirty years of age, leaves four young children to mourn her death.

Thursday 1 June 1871
WESTWARD HO! - Shocking Affair At Westward Ho! Suspected Child Murder. - Infanticide is, happily, of very rare occurrence in this neighbourhood, but it is just now our painful duty to record a tragedy - for it is nothing less - of a most terrible and sickening character. For the past six weeks a single woman, named ZENA MAYNARD, forty years of age, has been living at a lodging-house called Rowena, on the road from Westward Ho! to Northam, where she was employed as a cook. Her mistress (Mrs Murray) has lately had suspicion as to her being enciente and she accordingly taxed her with being in that state, but she strongly denied the truth of the accusation, and did so no later than on Monday. On Tuesday she went about her work as usual, and was engaged in "ironing" up till about five o'clock in the evening. Whilst the family were at tea MAYNARD was missed for about an hour, and on her making her re-appearance at about six o'clock, it was noticed that she was looking wan and haggard. On being asked what ailed her she replied, "Oh, nothing in particular." Mrs Murray, being of opinion that MAYNARD was shortly about to become a mother, ordered a lad to drive her in a pony and trap to her aunt's (Miss Dennis), who resides at 46, Honestone Lane, Bideford. She was in consequence conveyed to Bideford, taking a bundle with her, and she arrived at her aunt's at nine o'clock. After her departure from Rowena, Mrs Murray went up to the woman's bedroom, and on looking about the room observed spots of blood. Nothing, however, was done in the matter that night; but on the following morning a closer examination of the bedroom confirmed Mrs Murray in the belief that the cook had been confined, and she accordingly proceeded to Bideford, and accused her of it, upon which she admitted that it was so. Mrs Murray then went to Supt. Vanstone, of the Bideford Borough Police, and informed him of what had transpired. He immediately repaired to Honestone Lane, where the woman was stopping. On going into one of the rooms he saw her sitting on a chair near the fire place, in which, however, there was no fire burning. He charged her with having given birth to a child, which she freely confessed to be a fact, and added that she had destroyed a part of it by burning it in the stove at Rowena. Supt. Vanstone then asked her what had become of the other part of the body, when she rose from her chair and went to the fire place, lifted a screen, and took from the chimney a bundle (which is more than likely to have been the identical one she brought from Westward Ho! in the cart). On opening the bundle, the outer part of which consisted of a dirty black rag, Mr Vanstone was horrified at finding the body of a newly-born male infant - minus the head and right leg. So far as could be judged from the dirty state of the body, the missing members had evidently been severed with a not very sharp instrument and MAYNARD herself stated that she had cut them off with a knife. The remains were thereupon taken to the police station in charge o the police. Supt. Vanstone ordered the unfortunate woman to be removed from her aunt's to a house in Union Street, where she was given into the custody of a female attendant, and was placed, indirectly, under the supervision of a police officer. As may be readily imagined, she was in a very weak condition from loss of blood, excitement, and abstinence from food, she having partaken of no nourishment of any kind for a great many hours. In the evening, Supt. Vanstone went to Rowena and examined MAYNARD'S room, but failed to find any trace of the missing portions of the child. Had not Mrs Murray's suspicions become aroused, there is a probability of the horrible affair never being brought to light, for on the Wednesday morning, while at her aunt's, the wretched woman got up at six o'clock, and was downstairs, although she did not do any work. On the Sunday preceding she walked from Westward Ho! to Bideford on a visit to Miss Dennis, and returned in the evening on foot; and her aunt, at that time, had not the least idea as to her being pregnant. The prisoner - for she is now to all intents and purposes in legal custody - is a native of Littleham, a village about three miles from Bideford, and, in spite of the fact of her being the mother of two illegitimate children - one of whom is 13 years of age, and the other about six years old, she has borne a pretty fair character, and was a quiet, hardworking woman. Up to within six or seven months since she was in the service of the Rev. Edward Vincent, of North Down Cottage, Bideford; and, on his leaving the neighbourhood, she went as cook to the 'Globe Hotel,' at Torrington, where, however, she only remained three or four weeks. She had been out of a place from that time until her engagement at Mrs Murray's, at Rowena. During the summer season of 1869, MAYNARD was engaged as cook at Rowena, the scene of the present tragic event. Of course, nothing is as yet known as to whether the child was born alive or not, - the prisoner stoutly affirming that it was still born, - and, although it at first seems strange that she should have mutilated it in such a horrible way if it had been dead born, it may be accounted for on further consideration by supposing that it was her intention to cut the body up in order to burn it piecemeal. There is little chance of discovering any remains in the stove at Rowena, as there was a fierce fire burning in the grate at the time she is thought to have destroyed the head and leg. On the affair becoming known in the district, a general feeling of horror and disgust was excited, and it was the all-absorbing topic of conversation in Bideford and Westward Ho! Thursday. As a proof of the freedom of such crimes in the neighbourhood, we may mention that it was 12 years since a case of infanticide occurred at Bideford; and for a long period previous to that there had been nothing of the sort so shocking in its nature. The crime having been perpetrated out of the borough of Bideford, Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy County Coroner, was communicated with, but he referred the police authorities to the Borough Coroner (Mr Pridham), the remains of the child being found within the borough. On the last named gentleman being applied to, he fixed the Inquest to be held at the Town Hall, Bideford, this (Friday) evening, at six o'clock; and instructed Dr Ackland to make a post mortem examination in the meantime. Several days must necessarily elapse before the accused can have so far recovered as to be able to appear before the magistrates.
The Inquest. - The Inquest on the remains of the infant was held in the Town Hall, on Friday evening, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr James Joce was foreman.
Supt. Vanstone, of the Bideford Borough Police, said: On Wednesday about 12.30, I went to the house No. 46, Honestone Lane. I there saw ZENA MAYNARD sitting on a chair, looking pale and ill. I said, "I understand you have been recently confined;" and she said, "Yes, I had a dead born baby last evening, at Mrs Murray's, Northam. I destroyed one part; I burnt it in the stove; but I could not destroy the other part as my mistress had a suspicion. I took it with me when I left." I said, "Where is it?" She said, "It is here, but aunt nor no one else knows it." She then rose from the seat where she was sitting and went to the chimney. She lifted the screen, and from the flue took the remains of the child wrapped up in an old rag, which I now produce. I opened the parcel in her presence, and she said, "I cut off the other parts with a knife and burnt them in the stove." The head and right leg were missing. I took possession of the remaining portion of the child, and charged MAYNARD with concealment of birth.
P.C. Ireland was then sworn, and he gave the following evidence: At about a quarter to twelve o'clock on Wednesday, Mrs Murray gave me information, and I went with Supt. Vanstone to Honestone-lane. Mr Vanstone asked MAYNARD what she had been telling Mrs Murray; and she replied that she had told her that she had had a dead born baby, and that she had destroyed a part of it by burning it in the stove. Mr Vanstone asked her where the other part was; and then she took down a parcel from the chimney. I remained in charge of her until six o'clock in the evening, when she was removed to a house in Union-street. There was no fire in the grate of the room in Honestone-lane. She said she intended to destroy the whole of the child. After Supt. Vanstone left, her aunt was angry with her and she said she did not think she was so near her confinement by two months. From what I could understand, she intended to destroy the child a little at a time. She told her aunt that as the child was dead-born she did not think there was any harm in making away with it. Her aunt asked her why she did not tell her when she was there on Sunday that she was in the family-way, and she replied that she did not think she was so near her confinement.
Dr Ackland deposed as follows: This afternoon at one o'clock, I examined the body of a mature new-born male child. It was decapitated and dismembered, the arm, trunk, left thigh, and cord, were covered with a black substance like soot. the child was well nourished. The head was severed from the body high in the neck, and the wound was very jagged. The right leg was removed at the neck of the thigh bone. Behind the right shoulder and near the spinal column, there was a bruise 3 inches in length having a small punctured wound leading to and separated from the parts beneath. At the back of the neck were six cuts, irregular and out of shape, not deeper than the skin. On the right side of the neck there was a skin wound, a quarter of an inch in breadth; and on the other part of the right arm, from the shoulder to the elbow, there were ten small scratches. On opening the body, I found the cavity of the chest, well occupied by the lungs and heart; these I found floated when placed in a roomy vessel containing more than a foot of water in depth. The lungs when separated, likewise floated in the water, and although divided into eight separate and distinct pieces, each portion was buoyant. On cutting through the lungs in several places a crepitating sound was plainly heard. By a gentle pressure a very pale but frothy liquid escaped. Doing the same under water, numerous very fine bubbles came to the surface. I repeated the process several times. After this experiment, I am of opinion that the child evidently lived during and after birth. I base my opinion upon those facts, and I believe they are indisputable.
A Juror: Was the body in a state of decomposition?
Dr Ackland: I said it was a mature newly born child. The facts I have stated are considered by the best authorities to be conclusive evidence that the child had an independent existence. It was a well-nourished and remarkably healthy child: a more healthy child I never saw.
A Juror: Can you form any idea from the extent to which the lungs were inflated as to how long the child lived?
Dr Ackland: No! I cannot! I wish to confine myself to this opinion - that the child had an independent existence; that it was born alive, and lived after its birth. At some future time I am afraid I must go into a painful critique. On Wednesday evening I visited ZENA MAYNARD, and found that she had been recently delivered of a child.
The Coroner said he thought the only question was as to whether the child had an independent existence of not. With regard to the other part of the case, it was so clear that he did not think they required any further evidence.
A Juror: I think it very important that we should have Mrs Murray here.
Dr Ackland: She expects to be confined in a few days, and I think it would be imprudent to have her here.
Elizabeth Reeve, a young woman residing at Rowena, said that after the prisoner left there on Tuesday evening she went up to her bedroom and saw spots of blood on the floor. She informed Mrs Murray of the fact; and the latter went to Bideford about it on the following day. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury, after deliberating an hour, decided to adjourn the Inquest until Friday, June 16th.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Enquiry at the 'Globe Inn,' Queen-street, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of SARAH COURTNEY, 66 years of age, who was found dead in her bed that morning.
Mary Lane, daughter of the deceased, said that her mother resided with her in Aze's-lane. Deceased who had been a widow about 10 years, was a strong healthy woman, but complained sometimes of her heart. On Friday, her mother got up at seven o'clock, and went to Mr Chanter' at Fort Hill, to wash, and stayed there all the day, returning at half-past nine o'clock in the evening. She then appeared in good health, and was very cheerful. She slept in the room adjoining that in which she (Witness) slept. At about half-past seven o'clock on Saturday morning she called her mother, telling her it was time to get up; but she made no answer, although she repeatedly shouted to her. She thereupon went into her mother's bedroom, and on looking on the bed she saw that she was lying there quite dead. She immediately called some of the neighbours, who came up, and on examining her mother found that she was dead but warm. Her right leg and arm were slightly drawn; but there were no signs of any discharge about her mouth.
Mr M. Cooke, surgeon, deposed to having been called to see the deceased shortly after eight that morning. He found her lying on her left side in such a state as she would have been if sleeping. She was quite dead, and had apparently been so for many hours. From the appearance of the body he was of opinion that death resulted from disease of the heart, and that she had died quite suddenly; and most probably whilst she was asleep. After a few words from the Coroner, the Jury of whom Mr Ross was foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

ROBOROUGH - Another Victim To Drunkenness. Most Inhuman Conduct. A very sad case, swelling the countless hecatombs of the "slain by strong drink," occurred in this parish on Thursday night last, in the death of MR RICHARD BLACKMORE, a farmer, aged 62, of the adjoining parish of St. Giles-in-the-Wood, who was discovered lying by the road side, close to the village, early on Friday morning, quite dead, having been left there to perish by some boon companions with whom he had been drinking over night. Deceased, who was in fair position and circumstances, and was spoken of as in other respects a very decent man, had unfortunately contracted the habit of drinking to excess. He had been indulging himself at a public-house in this village the evening before, in company with a neighbour called Hammond; and as night drew on they left to go home, deceased at the time being very much intoxicated. They had to pass another public-house in their way, the 'New Inn,' where there had been a rent-dinner of the tenantry of the Ebberly estates. The deceased would insist on going in, and did so, but does not appear to have drunk much there. Shortly before midnight, the landlord said he must clear his house, and helped deceased on his legs, and procured him to be led out of the house on his road home, which was half a mile distant. He had not travelled many yards, when he was overtaken by the man with whom he had gone into the 'New Inn,' and by two of the tenants who had been there drinking themselves drunk, who found him lying on his face in the road. They got him up and placed him against the hedge, and there left him, and there he was found the next morning dead! The body, when discovered, was taken to a neighbouring outhouse, and Dr Jones was instantly sent for from Great Torrington; but he could only pronounce that the vital spark had long quitted its dishonoured tenement, which, at his instance, was removed to the house which deceased had quitted only a few hours before in perfect health. Information was given to the Coroner for the district, John Henry Toller, Esq., who held his Inquest on the body on the next day (Saturday), before respectable Jury, of which the rector of Roborough, the Rev. W. W. Gurney, was the foreman, and before which the following evidence was adduced:-
John Maynard: I live in the parish of Roborough, and am an innkeeper, and keep the 'New Inn,' in Roborough. I knew the deceased, RICHARD BLACKMORE, who was a farmer, and lived in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Wood. I last saw him alive on Thursday last, about eleven o'clock at night. Frederick Hammond, of Roborough, a young man, and the deceased came into my house together. They were walking. The deceased was the worse for liquor, but Frederick Hammond was perfectly sober. The deceased rambled a little in walking, but I had seen him worse. I desired the deceased to sit down in the settle, which he did. He did not ask for anything. When my customers were going, which was about half-past eleven o'clock, I said to the deceased, "Now, MR BLACKMORE, they are going, and it is time for you to go." He then got up, and as he was the worse for liquor I told him I would lead him down over the pavement in front of my house, which I did. He then walked away, and I said to him, "Good night, MR BLACKMORE. Go straight home." He replied, "All right, old boy." Two men named William Heale and Richard Trigger were in my house at the same time the deceased was. Heale, Trigger, and Hammond lived in the direction of the residence of the deceased; and in about five minutes after the deceased left my house Heale and Trigger left also, saying "Good night." They were rather the worse for liquor. Hammond had left before. There was a rent collection at my house on the same day, and Heale, Trigger, and Hammond paid rents and dined there. I did not serve the deceased with any liquor, and I did not see him drink at my house.
Frederick Hammond deposed: I live in the parish of Roborough, and work on my grandfather's farm. I knew the deceased. On Thursday evening last, between ten and eleven o'clock, I had occasion to go to the 'George Inn,' which is in the village of Roborough, kept by James Ford. the deceased was there drinking; and, seeing him in the state he was, I asked him if he was going home, and we left together. When we got to the 'New Inn,' he said he must go in and have a glass, but I told him he had better not as he had had plenty. He, however, went to the 'new Inn.' Upon the table there was a glass of ale of a customer's, which the deceased drank off. When the company at the 'new Inn' broke up, Mr Maynard let the deceased out of the house, and he pursued his way homeward. He could not walk straight, and a boy named Thomas Huxtable, about 15 or 16 years of age, took him by the arm. In a few minutes after the deceased left I left for home, and Heale and Trigger followed me. We shortly met Huxtable, who said, "FARMER BLACKMORE is a-head." After going a little way I said, "Halloa, here's one man sunk," and we found the deceased lying in the road upon his back, with his head towards the 'New Inn.' Heale came forward and said, "We will not let him lie in the middle of the road in case some cart should come by." He made a noise as if he was snoring, and Heale dragged him across the road on to some furze, which was near a rick by the road side, out of the way of the carts, and we all three left him. He was very tipsy. He was in the habit of lying about in the roads at night in a drunken state.
Robert Pincombe: I reside at Roborough, and am a cordwainer. I knew the deceased, RICHARD BLACKMORE. He was much given to drink, and was in the habit of lying about in the roads at night in a drunken state. I last saw him alive on Thursday night, between six and seven o'clock, walking in the village towards the 'George Inn,' not in a sober state. Yesterday morning, after I got up, I walked out of my court, and looking towards the west end of the village of Roborough, I saw a man lying by the side of the road. I went to him, and saw it was the deceased, RICHARD BLACKMORE. I spoke to him but received no answer. He was lying on his face and hands, with his mouth upon the ground. His clothes were not disturbed. I called for assistance, and he was further examined, and froth was coming out of his mouth. He was quite dead.
William Heale: I live at Roborough, and am a mason. I knew the deceased. I last saw him alive at the 'New Inn,' Roborough, on Thursday night last, between eleven and twelve o'clock. I did not see him drink anything. He left the house before me. I was last in the house, and I left it by myself. About ten land yards from the 'New Inn' I over took Trigger and Hammond. They were standing by a man, and on my asking them who he was they said it was RICHARD BLACKMORE. He was lying upon his back, and his hat was off. I said, "Don't let him le there, because if a cart should pass it would go over him." I spoke to him, but he did not answer. I thought he was asleep. I took him by the collar, and pulled him to the other side to prevent any cart going over him. I put him on one of his sides, which I think was his right side. I put him by the furze rick, but I did not think he was dead. I have seen him before lying in the road in a drunken state. When I took him to the side of the road I put his hat upon his head.
Richard Trigger: I live at Roborough, and am a farm labourer. I knew MR BLACKMORE. I was at Mr Maynard's, at the 'new Inn,' on Thursday last, at a rent dinner. I saw the deceased there between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I did not see him drink anything. I left the 'new Inn' before twelve o'clock by myself, and heard some one walking on before me, and heard some one say, "Holloa, there's some one here sunk." I then saw Frederick Hammond, who said the man was RICHARD BLACKMORE, and that he was drunk. I said, "If you'll help him up, I'll try to tow him along." William Heale, who had come up, seeing who it was, took him by the collar, and pulled him to one side of the road, out of the way of the carts. I have seen him before lying in the roads drunk. He was very much addicted to drinking. I could not see him home because I was not fit to do so, having dined at the 'new Inn,' at a rent audit, and drank much beer. The night was very dark.
Charles Richard Jones, Esq., M.D.: I reside at Great Torrington, and am a doctor of medicine. I knew the deceased, RICHARD BLACKMORE. Yesterday morning I was sent for to see him. I saw his body in an outhouse, belonging to Mr Harris, of Roborough, laid on a stretcher. The face was dirty, and much swollen. It was also discoloured, and the nose was flattened, which would be accounted for by the position in which he was found. There was a wound on the back of the head over the occipetal bone, from which there had been some haemorrhage. There was a bruise on the centre of the forehead, immediately above the nose, which was not of recent occurrence. I could detect no fracture of the skull. I do not think the wounds on his head caused his death, but my belief is that he had a fit of apoplexy induced by excessive drinking, and whilst in that state died.
The Coroner then summed up the evidence, and the Jury were left to themselves to consider their verdict, which was - "That the deceased died from apoplexy induced by excessive drinking, and the Jury wish to express their abhorrence of the inhuman and unfeeling conduct of Frederick Hammond, Richard Trigger, and William Heale, for leaving the deceased by the roadside uncared for in the condition he was in."
Hammond, Trigger and Heale were then called in, and the Coroner having read over to them the verdict, at the request of the Jury, administered to them a severe rebuke, remarking that their conduct had been most inhuman and unfeeling in leaving a helpless man in a state of intoxication in the dead of the night, exposed to the cold, by the side of a public road, in the insensible state in which he was. Had they followed the common dictates of humanity they would have taken him to his home, where he would have been cared for and medical assistance obtained, when possibly his life would have been preserved, and he would have continued a useful member of society, for, with the exception of his one great failing, he was a respectable member of the community. From them better treatment was demanded, inasmuch as he, the deceased (the Coroner was informed), was at all times a kind friend to them. His earnest hope was that they would abstain from drunkenness, which led to ruin and misery, and that the death of the unfortunate deceased would operate as a warning to them, and that they would not refrain hereafter from helping those who need it. The deceased was unmarried. He lived at Little Whitaley farm, in St. Giles, and was a tenant of the Hon. Mark Rolle (and not of Charles Hole, Esq., as our Saturday's telegram incorrectly stated.)

Thursday 8 June 1871
SOUTH MOLTON - Dreadful Suicide Of A Southmolton Tradesman. - The body of MR WILLIAM TRICK, of Southmolton, poulterer, was discovered last (Wednesday) night in a disused limepit near that town, having his throat cut and a rope round his neck. An Inquest will be held this (Thursday) evening.

SOWTON - Suspected Infanticide At Sowton. - Great excitement has been caused in this village in consequence of a report, which turned out to be correct, that MRS FLAY, a widow, and said to be the mother of eight children, had been taken into custody on a charge of infanticide or concealment of birth. It appears that the dead body of a child in a partial state of decomposition was found in a box under the woman's bed. A post mortem examination has been made, and the Inquest on the body will be held on Thursday.

Thursday 15 June 1871
SOUTH MOLTON - Determined Suicide Of A Tradesman. - In our last we stated that the body of MR WILLIAM TRICK, of this place, poulterer, had been found on Wednesday night last drowned in a pond near the town. Death had taken place by drowning; but the awfully determined character of the act is shown by the fact that a wound in the deceased's neck, and a bloody knife found in his pocket proved that he had before attempted to cut his throat, while a rope round his neck also proved that he had tried to accomplish his purpose by hanging himself. There is no room to doubt that this is another added to the numbe3rless victims of drink. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday last, at the Guildhall, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Hodge was foreman. Evidence was given by Maria Fisher, wife of the keeper of Cross-lane toll gate, that deceased passed through the gate about half-past three the previous afternoon, and she had seen nothing of him afterwards. The last time she spoke to him was on Monday, when he was not sober. Richard Slowman, labourer, deposed to his having gone in search of deceased, at MRS TRICK'S request, the previous evening about seven o'clock. Having gone to Ford and Summeridge in vain to make enquiries, he returned and met MRS TRICK and Henry Knill, and with the latter he went back again and searched the deceased's and Mr Harding's fields, but to no purpose. They then went as far as the pond, and there by the side of the pit, saw a hat on the bank, which Knill knew to be that of deceased. They obtained a large pole with a nail at the end of it, which they put down in the water several times, and at last caught the body of deceased by the clothes, and got it to land. there were marks of blood about the neck and also a rope tied round it. The body was dead and cold. The last time witness spoke to deceased was on Sunday, when he was very tipsy. SARAH TRICK, the widow, deposed that deceased was her husband. He lived in Barnstaple-street, and was a poulterer. He left home between two and three the previous afternoon, and she went afterwards to look for him. He had been very low-spirited the last fortnight, and did not care to be alone. On Tuesday she induced him to accompany her into the country, but he did not drive as usual, and appeared very strange. On Wednesday he said he should never "get over this," but did not explain what. He had been drinking freely the last three weeks, and had scarcely eaten anything, and could not sleep, even with the aid of a composing draught. His hands shook very much, and he could scarcely hold a spoon. His mind was affected, and he would when telling anything forget what he was talking about. He had been very restless for the last two or three nights, scarcely staying in bed for more than ten minutes at a time. Yesterday morning he said, "If I thought I should have to go through another such a night as last night I think I should be almost inclined to do away with myself;" that, of course, made her anxious. She did not know that he had ever before attempted suicide. William Palfreman, of Bidder's Court, deposed to deceased's manner having lately been very strange, in consequence of his drinking. Had heard him say he must die, and asked witness to come to his buying. Witness was not at all surprised at hearing that he had made away with himself. William Henry Fisher, Superintendent of Police, deposed to having engaged a waggon to bring the body home. He found deceased quite dead, lying on the ground in a field belonging to Mr John Cridge. There was a knife in his left hand pocket, which bore fresh marks of blood. There was a wound in the neck, and a rope around it. Had seen him often in the streets of late in a state of semi-drunkenness, but not incapable or quarrelsome. After hearing the foregoing evidence, the Jury unhesitatingly returned a verdict, that deceased committed Suicide while labouring under Temporary Insanity. The deceased was well-known in the neighbouring towns as a carrier and poulterer, and was 35 years of age.

Thursday 22 June 1871
BIDEFORD - The Case of Infanticide at Northam. Verdict of Wilful Murder. - The adjourned Inquest relative to the death of the newly-born male child of ZENA MAYNARD was held at the Townhall, Bideford, on Friday afternoon, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Wm. Joce, chemist, was Foreman. The interest in the case has greatly increased since the last hearing, and long before the hour at which the Inquest was fixed to commence - 3 o'clock - the approaches of the Townhall were besieged with an eager throng of persons anxious to obtain an entrance, the principal reason which influenced them being, no doubt, a hope that they should see the unfortunate woman who is the miserable author of one of the most heartless and sickening crimes that have occurred in this neighbourhood for many years past.
The Coroner, who spoke in a very low voice and who could scarcely be heard even by those close by his side, made a few introductory observations, in the course of which he was understood to say that it would be the duty of the Jury to give the case their most serious consideration, and that they must have good proof of any presumption they might form as to MAYNARD having murdered her infant. One of the Jurors at the end of the table asked Mr Pridham to be kind enough to speak a little louder in order that they might hear what he said, but it was painfully obvious that he was unable to do so.
Dr Ackland, in answer to a question from Mr Vinson, said the child was a remarkably healthy one: it was born alive, and it appeared to him to have lived and moved. He examined the body very minutely, but could discover not the slightest indication whatever of any disease. Of course, the head being missing, he was not able to examine the brain.
Mr Vinson said it was possible in that case for some disease to have existed which might have led to its death.
Dr Ackland was understood to say that he did not think such to be the case. Judging from the appearance of the wounds, they had evidently been inflicted whilst the child was alive.
Mr Vinson asked if, supposing the wounds had been inflicted immediately after death, they would not have had a similar appearance.
Dr Ackland replied that they would not have had an exactly similar appearance. Mr Whittaker said he understood that the Inquest was adjourned in order that ZENA MAYNARD might make any statement she was disposed to offer.
The Foreman observed that although the child was born alive it might have only breathed once or twice, and they had no evidence to his mind, that the woman murdered the child. He believed the woman ought to be present.
Mr Whittaker asked whether the woman possessed any discretionary power as to whether she would come before them or not. The Foreman said it was quite optional whether she spoke or not. ZENA MAYNARD was then brought into the room by Supt. Vanstone, of the Bideford Borough Police, and she was cautioned by the Coroner that she need not say anything to criminate herself, or answer any question put to her unless she liked. Supt. Vanstone's depositions were then read, and on being asked whether she wished to question any statement he had made, MAYNARD said, "That is all true he says." The depositions of the other witnesses were also read over, but MAYNARD did not ask any questions or make any further remark.
Sabina Slater, cousin of ZENA MAYNARD, said she was a fellow servant with her at Rowena, Northam, and slept with her on the night before the occurrence. She suspected her of being in the family way. MAYNARD did not complain at all on the night before she left Rowena. She was in the kitchen most of the morning, and also in the afternoon. At about five o'clock MAYNARD went up to her bed room, which was on the floor above the kitchen, and stayed away about half-an-hour. When she returned she sat down, and drank, she believed, a cup of tea. She did not hear the cry of a child whilst MAYNARD was in her bed room: if a child had cried she must have heard it.
The Foreman: Did you remain in the kitchen with her before Mrs Murray came in?
Witness: Yes, sir.
The Foreman: Did you smell anything burning.
Witness: No, I didn't smell anything burning.
Mr Whittaker observed that, according to the evidence of the witness, all that transpired was completed within about half-an-hour.
Witness said she went to MAYNARD'S bedroom and helped to dress her. After she left she saw spots of blood on the floor.
ZENA MAYNARD said Slater had made a mistake about her (Slater) being in the kitchen the whole of the time: her work was upstairs and not in the kitchen.
Witness said she went upstairs after tea, and MAYNARD remained in the kitchen.
MAYNARD - I was left alone by myself in the kitchen at the tea table.
Supt. Vanstone informed the Coroner and Jury that Mrs Murray was not in a fit state to attend.
Mr Whittaker asked Dr Ackland whether he considered the wounds of such a nature as to indicate great violence, such as would extinguish infant life. Something had been said by the doctor when examining the body about the wounds having been inflicted during life, because he could lift the skin from the flesh.
Dr Ackland replied that he believed the wounds were inflicted during life, and he thought great force must have been used, because the bones were severed. It was his decided opinion that the wounds were inflicted during the child's life.
The Jury then retired for deliberation, and on returning into Court after an absence of about a quarter of an hour. The Foreman said the Jury had unanimously agreed to a verdict, the effect of which was that ZENA MAYNARD wilfully murdered her infant child - the remains of whose body they had viewed - in the parish of Northam, on the 23rd of May last.
The Coroner: I don't think there is any proof she murdered the child.
Mr Vinson: Excuse me, sir, the verdict is ours and not yours.
Mr Whittaker also protested against any remarks from the Coroner. If he had had anything to say, he should have said it before they retired. The Coroner's clerk suggested a verbal alteration in the verdict, but the Jury insisted on its remaining in its present form. At the conclusion of the Enquiry, Supt. Rousham, of the County Police, took ZENA MAYNARD into custody under a warrant signed by a County Justice.

Thursday 29 June 1871
TORQUAY - A Child Killed In The Streets At Torquay. - Mr Michelmore, the Coroner for the district, and a respectable Jury held an Inquest on Wednesday evening at the Torbay Infirmary touching the death of REGINALD GEORGE PEDERICK, aged three years and nine months. It appeared that about two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon the child left home for school. Whilst proceeding along Brunswick-terrace, a timber waggon belonging to Mr Stookes, of Kingskerswell, was being driven along by Thomas Hansford. Seeing some fodder on the waggon and some flowers in it, the child sprang forward to seize some, and in doing so it fell under the wheels and was killed. It was stated that there was no blame to be attached to the driver, who at the time of the accident was walking by the side of the horses. The catastrophe was witnessed by two policemen, who took the body to the Infirmary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 July 1871
KINGSBRIDGE - The Lamentable Death Of A Lady. - An Inquest was held by Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on Friday evening, at South Huish, on the body of MRS BALKWILL, who was found dead on Thurlstone Sands, on Thursday morning. It appeared from the evidence of MR HENRY BALKWILL, who appeared almost overwhelmed with grief, that he was married to the deceased on June 1st last. He never had a quarrel with his wife. They lived happily together. She appeared to be in good health lately, and on Wednesday night was apparently quite well. They went to bed together at ten minutes past ten, and she was then very cheerful. He awoke next morning at half-past five o'clock, and found his wife was not in the room. He took no notice of it, thinking that as they were to have company that day she had got up early to make preparations. She was very nervous about this party for some days previous, and appeared to be afraid that it would not pass off all right. He dressed leisurely, and hearing someone in the stairs, who he thought was his wife, spoke, and was replied to by the servant. He asked her where her mistress was, and she replied that she did not know. He then went down stairs, looked in all the rooms, garden, outhouses, and all the premises, but could not find her. The front door he found unlocked and unbarred; the night previous he had locked and barred it. Had never known his wife to walk in her sleep. She had never by word or deed given him the least idea that she medicated self-destruction. Mr Thomas Adams, of Hope Barton, the deceased's brother, deposed that five years ago deceased had a fright, and had never recovered from the effect. He had never known his sister walk in her sleep. Other evidence was given, and the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 13 July 1871
APPLEDORE - Fatal Accident. - We mentioned in our last that the poor man, ADAMS, who met with an accident on board the Brenda, had died of his injuries. An Inquest was held on his body, on the 5th inst., before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the 'Royal George Inn,' where the death took place. The name of the deceased was PEARSON COLWIN ADAMS, and he was a mariner, residing at Whitstable, Kent, and about 19 years of age. He was of the company who were engaged in raising the cargo and ship which had sunk off Lundy. They came down in March last, raised the cargo and eventually floated the ship, which, with the assistance of three steamers, they got safely to Appledore on Sunday se'nnight. The ship's tow rope was fastened to the windlass bits on the forecastle, and while she was in tow it unfortunately slipped, and the bit hit the deceased. Edmund Stroud, another of the company, had observed that the rope was becoming "taut," as the sailors term it, and remarked to the deceased that if the hawser should break it would cut their heads off. Stroud thereupon walked off to the leeward, and deceased seemed to be walking away also when the hawser suddenly gave, and the bit flew past him, sending him to the ground with great violence. His comrades (Stroud and Goldfinch) instantly went to the poor fellow's assistance, and found him insensible and bleeding a good deal. They got him into a boat as quickly as possible, and took him on shore, and landed him at the 'Royal George Inn,' where the attendance of Mr D. E. Limbard, surgeon, was quickly obtained. He found him insensible, bleeding from the nose, and vomiting blood. On examining him, he found he had received a scalp wound on the left side of the head - not a very severe wound, but there was a great deal of swelling around it. There was also a fracture of one of the bones of his right leg. No other external injury was apparent. He lay insensible, vomiting a great deal, was very restless, and sometimes exceedingly violent, and so continued until his death, which occurred on the Tuesday after the accident. The opinion of the surgeon was that the bit hit him in the leg, and that he fell on the deck head foremost. The Jury unhesitatingly returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

PARKHAM - Horrible Murder near Bideford. - A few weeks since we were called upon to chronicle a shocking case of infanticide at Northam, near Bideford; and it is now our painful duty to record a horrible murder which has been committed at Parkham, within the Bideford Union. Parkham is a small village about six miles from Bideford on the Clovelly road. Between Parkham and a place named Fairy Cross is a hamlet named Goldworthy. At about the distance of half a mile from Goldworthy, in a bye-road, and just on the brow of a hill, are two thatched cottages, or, more properly speaking, one cottage, for there is only one roof, although the house itself is divided by a thin partition. In one part of the cottage dwelt an old man named ANTHONY CLEMENTS, 82 years of age, who held a lease of the premises, which were of very small value, the other part being occupied by a labouring man named Short and his wife, both of middle age. CLEMENTS was a widower, his wife having died about 12 months since, and he lived quite alone in his cottage, for although he had several children they were all grown up and living away from him. The old man was in receipt of parish pay to the extent of 2s. per week, but it was generally thought in the parish that he had a few pounds by him; his wife - who was a "pack" woman, that is to say, she collected the gloves made by the glovers in the neighbourhood, and walked with them to Torrington, a distance of several miles - having been a very frugal and careful woman, and it is thought she left the old man a little money. CLEMENTS has for some time past believed himself to be next of kin of an old aunt, who had died in London, and from whom he had expected to receive a fortune; in fact, he had been to the Metropolis on an errand connected with this matter. On Wednesday, the 28th June, CLEMENTS, according to the statements of the parties who lived under the same roof with him, said he was going to Hartland, with the object, it was supposed, of seeing a man who was interested in the money which he was of opinion had been left to him. From the evening of that day nothing more was seen or heard of him by the villagers until Friday last, on the evening of which day, in consequence of Mrs Short, the person residing in the same cottage, becoming alarmed about his lengthened absence, an entrance was effected into his bed-room by means of the window, the door of the lower room being locked, when a most awful sight presented itself, the body of the unfortunate old man being on the bed in a frightful state of decomposition, and the head smashed in a shocking manner. The bed-room was similar to those in old-fashioned country cottages, and was very low, the ceiling being only about six feet from the floor, and the stairs led from the room below. Lying on the floor, by the side of the bed, were fragments of a chamber utensil; but the broken pieces being free from blood precluded the idea that the old man had come to his death by falling out of bed and his head coming into contact with the utensil. There were two beds in the room, the one in which CLEMENTS usually slept being near the window, and this was the one in which his body was found. Those who entered the room by the window made a diligent search for the key of the door, but their efforts being unsuccessful they forced the door open. On a close inspection, it was seen that the old man was lying on his right side, with his arms crossed, as if in a calm sleep. The bed clothes were thrown over his body, and there was no blood about them. On the clothes being turned down, however, the body was seen to be lying in a quantity of blood, reaching to his waist, and which had almost become dry. He had on his fustian trousers, shirt, necktie, and stockings. The face was quite black, which was the result of decomposition, and was swollen to an extent which rendered the features quite unrecognisable. Above the left ear the skull as broken in several places, and from the wounds thereon inflicted the blood which covered the bed had proceeded. On the ceiling, immediately above, were several spots of dried blood, but no other traces of blood were seen about the room. On further examination, however, some spots of blood, which were smeared as though swept by a woman's dress, were discovered on the last step of the stairs leading to the bed-room, and on the wall close by was a spot of coagulated blood. There were no appearances of a struggle having taken place, and from the peaceful attitude of the body it was evident that the cold-blooded monster or monsters who murdered the old man made quick work with their victim. It seems somewhat strange that the body was partly dressed, but this may be accounted for by supposing that the deceased was in the habit of lying down with his clothes on, or that he had fallen asleep whilst sitting on the bed. The bed clothes seemed to have been thrown over the body after the commission of the horrible deed, and this view of the matter is strengthened by the fact that there was no blood on them. The opinion of the medical gentleman who examined the body was that the blows which had caused death were inflicted with a round instrument, such as a hammer, and that they were dealt whilst the old man was in a sitting posture. This would go, to a certain extent, to show that the old man had fallen asleep, whilst in the act of undressing, and that his body had subsequently been laid in the bed and the clothes thrown over it, after the murder; but the position of the body when found, and the circumstance that there was no blood on the floor, militate against this assumption. It is more probable that the blows were struck whilst CLEMENTS was in bed, and in the position found, for, as he was on his right side, the left side of his head would present a fair mark for a blow, which, if not immediately fatal, would render him incapable of resistance. There was nothing beyond the chamber utensil which appeared to have been interfered with, and it is very likely that that was broken by accident, for it does not seem probable, if it was broken with the view of leading people to believe that the old man had struck his head against it, that the person or persons who committed the dastardly crime would have left if free from blood. That the whole and sole object of murdering the old man was to obtain possession of the little money he had by him was clear, for all that was found on him was a three-penny piece, which was in a purse in his trousers' pocket, and that before the murder he had some money is beyond all doubt, for Mrs Short says he asked her to change a sovereign or a half-sovereign, but that as she could not he borrowed 2s. from her. Whoever committed the foul deed must have obtained access to the bedroom through the door below, and have locked the door from the outside on leaving, and have taken away the key, and the blood on the stairs without doubt dropped from the weapon used in the murder. At the Inquest, Mrs Short spoke of having seen a strange woman in the garden with the old man before he was supposed to have left for Hartland, and it is rather remarkable that she should not have, with the usual inquisitiveness of women living in isolated country villages, who are proverbial for their eagerness in ascertaining the why and wherefore of new arrivals, made enquiries as to who the stranger was. She also stated that she heard a noise in the old man's room on the night of Thursday, the 29th of June, - when CLEMENTS was believed to be at Hartland, - and one would naturally have thought that either she or her husband would have endeavoured to find out the cause of this nocturnal disturbance, or have communicated the fact to their neighbours. It is also remarkable that they should have allowed so long a period as that from the old man's supposed departure for Hartland till Friday last to have elapsed without taking steps to find what had become of him; and it is even matter of surprise that they did not perceive the horrible stench arising from the decomposed corpse, which was so great on Saturday that it was with difficulty the Coroner and Jury could enter the room, and it was quite perceptible in the road outside the house. The length of time between the murder - for it is evident that he must have been killed on the night of the day he said he was going to Hartland - and it s discovery will enable the murderer or murderers to get rid of anything covered with blood which might lead to their detection; but we trust that the efforts of the police, who, under Superintendent Rousham, are making an active search, will be successful in bringing the guilty to justice. Superintendent Rousham on being informed of the dreadful affair, immediately communicated with the Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., of Barnstaple, who held an Enquiry, which lasted from one o'clock till six o'clock, on Saturday, at Mr Andrews's ' New Inn,' Parkham.
The following evidence was adduced at the Enquiry:-
Mary Short, the next door neighbour, deposed: I last saw ANTHONY CLEMENTS on last Wednesday week. He said, "I am going to Hartland to see a man who owes me some money." He came to me and asked me to change a sovereign. I said I could not. I was uncomfortable about his absence. I spoke to my husband about it, and he said he would look in and see if ANTHONY was there after another day. I never missed him before. I live under the same roof. I live at Cross-Park Cottage, and both houses are under one roof. Deceased lived by himself. I last saw him alive on Wednesday, the 28th of June. It was a little after two in the afternoon. I saw him before between eight and nine o'clock on the same morning. He came into my house and asked of me if I could change a sovereign. I said I could not. He said, "Could you change me half a one?" I said, "No, I wish I could." He said, "I am short of silver, could you lend me 2s.?" I said, "Yes," and I gave him the 2s. He said he was going to the garden to pick some gooseberries before going to Hartland to take with him. He did not say who he was going to see. He then went into the garden, and after that he put away his donkey. He said he would go with Gist, the carrier. After that he came back to the garden. Will Bartlett, who is blind, brought back his pay, and I carried a shilling to him into the garden. He did not say whom the gooseberries were for. He had 2s. a week of the parish. When he saw me coming in the garden, he came up towards me. There was a woman picking gooseberries with him. I did not know the woman: she was stooping as if picking gooseberries. It was not the girl I had seen before, but a biggish woman with something like a sealskin jacket on. I then came out of the garden. I could recognize the jacket if I saw it. About a quarter of an hour after deceased came to my door, threw down the key of the garden, and said, "There is the key, child: you can lock the door or not, as you like, and ask the maid to untie the donkey" (meaning my little girl), "he is down in the Mill lane, and put up the shutters. Put the donkey in the house." He did not say how long he was going to stay. He never went away before since I have been there. He shut my door, and I never saw him afterwards. Never saw the woman either. I heard him afterwards in his own house, both upstairs and down. There is only a thin partition between our houses. I did not hear him speak. I thought I heard a noise on Thursday night in the house. Between twelve and one o'clock I heard a noise as if something broke, like earthenware, and then a groan. I thought deceased had come back. I did not hear a scuffle. I was in bed at the time, and it woke me up. My husband was fast asleep at the time. I awoke him and said, "The old man is come home." I passed a remark to my husband about the smash and the groan.
By a Juror: I did not hear other footsteps. I did not see the money when deceased asked to change.
Examination continued: I did not make any inquiry after the smash and groan. I did not ask, because my husband said it might be some one outside in the road. I had mentioned this before the body was found. I took down the shutters without entering the house. I have tried the door. I saw there was no key. Deceased was in the habit of taking out the key. Deceased has not complained of illness. I called Samuel Lewis's attention to the absence of deceased. I thought he was at Hartland the whole time. Lewis said he would look in deceased's bed-room. I saw Lewis go up by standing on a gate, and look into the window. He said the chamber utensil was broken, and that there was something on the bed. I was then afraid the poor old man was there, and desired Samuel Lewis to go after his son, which he did. I have not seen the strange woman since. Deceased had on fustian trousers when I saw him.
Samuel Lewis, of Goldworthy, Parkham, labourer, deposed:- I saw deceased about three weeks ago. He was quite well. Yesterday morning I was passing Mrs Short's, at Cross-Park Cottages. She called to me, and said, "The governor is not home." I said, "Is he not home yet?" She said, "No." She had told me before that deceased was gone to Hartland. I then put up the gate to the window, and looked in. The window was not open. I saw the chamber utensil was smashed, and I fancied some one was on the bed. All that Mrs Short said was that I should send for deceased's son, by one of my little maidens, which I did.
Edward Pearce, miller, Parkham, deposed: I saw deceased about three weeks ago, and he was quite well. They sent for me last night, and said they thought ANTHONY CLEMTNS was there in the house dead: Samuel Lewis and Mrs Short said so. I went up the house immediately. They told me they had put up a gate, and Samuel Lewis had looked in. I did the same, and I fancied I saw some one there. I then said we had better see who was there, and tried to unhang the door, which I could not. I then went up and opened the window with my knife. I went into the window first, and SAMUEL CLEMENTS followed. I said, "There he is," and I went down and opened the door. The door was locked, but there was no key, which I searched for, but could not find. The chamber door was wide open. I opened the door with a pair of pincers. It was not bolted, but only locked. Deceased was lying on the right side. There was a quantity of blood upon his head and behind the shoulder. There was blood at the head of the stairs, and on the ceiling and partition. The chamber utensil was broken in several places. The room was not disturbed. His jacket and hat were on the spare bed. There was no blood on the bed-clothes, which partially covered him. They looked as if they had been thrown over after. The blood was sprinkled on the ceiling. Deceased's arms were folded.
SAMUEL CLEMTNS, son of ANTHONY CLEMENTS, deposed: Deceased was well a month since when I saw him last. I heard last Monday that my father had gone to Hartland the previous Wednesday. I thought that he was gone there about money matters, as he had gone there before. A man named Jolliffe told me my father had not returned from Hartland, and that Mrs Short seemed in a way about it. Jolliffe begged me to go and see about it, as Mrs Short was in distress of mind about his absence. Ellen Lewis soon after came to me about it, and said, "Your father is dead in bed." I went to the cottage, and Mrs Short said she was afraid my father was dead. I went up and looked in and saw my father was dead. I said so. Mary Short said, "Don't say so! don't say so! if you do, I shall die." Assistance was obtained, and Mr Pearse went into the window. I went also through the window. We both searched for the key, but could not find it. I searched father's pocket, but we could not find it. I found his purse on his right side pocket with only threepence in it. I gave the purse and money into P.C. Courtenay's possession. Several persons were there, and we thought violent hands had been laid on him.
By a Juror: He slept the side on which he was found dead. He had never been accustomed to take the key out of the door, but was in the habit of bolting it.
Dr Ackland, of Bideford, deposed: I saw the body of ANTHONY CLEMENTS this morning. I found him in bed, with his clothes on, with the exception of his coat, lying on his right side in a mass of coagulated blood, extending as far as his waist. The forehead, left temple, and the upper half of his face were much swollen and bruised, the bruises being of a bluish-black colour. On dividing the scalp and dissecting the parts down to the skull, a large quantity of dark blood was found occupying the whole half of the head. Above the left ear were marks of violent blows. These had broken the skull in four places, the bones having been beaten in. From the fractures a fissure or crack extended as far as the middle of the forehead, and another in an upper direction to the crown of the head. These injuries had evidently been the cause of death.
In reply to the Jury, the witness said: The instrument used appears to have been of a circular character, such as a hammer. It was done with great violence, with more than one blow. He was sitting, or nearly so, when it was done. The blows were on the left side. It was a blunt instrument it was done with, and not with the chamber utensil. The man was murdered, no doubt. The blood on the stairs had been wiped with a cloth or swept.
Supt. Rousham applied for an adjournment of the Enquiry in order that a thorough examination of the premises might be made; and the Coroner consequently adjourned it till Saturday next.
Previous to the Inquest having been held, the general impression in the neighbourhood was that the old man had met his death from accident; but when it became known he had been murdered, the most intense indignation was awakened, and there is great excitement in all the villages adjacent and even in Bideford.
The Coroner gave an order for the immediate burial of the corpse, and this sad ceremony was performed on Saturday evening.

Thursday 20 July 1871
Two more long articles regarding the Adjourned Inquest and appearance before the Magistrate of Mary Short and Izet Williams, both suspected of the murder of Anthony Clements. The Inquest was again adjourned.

BICTON - Sudden Death. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at Mr Thomas Hart's, Yettington Farm, before W. Every, Esq., on the body of MR JOSEPH SANDERS TUCKER, a farmer, of Woodbury, aged 73. On Monday afternoon the deceased went to his brother-in-law's, Mr Philip Salter Sanders, farmer and farm bailiff to the Hon. Mark Rolle, Bicton. He left there at ten in the evening. He was sober. The deceased was found the next morning by William Podbury and John Goslin, dead. He was lying on the ground, having one foot in the stirrup; the saddle was under the horse's belly. The horse was quite quiet, and there did not appear to have been any struggle. The deceased had a large wound at the back of his head, and other bruises about his body; his leg was fractured, and his clothes torn. His hat and stick were picked up about a quarter of a mile from where he was found, but there were no signs of any scuffle having taken place. Mr Christopher, of East Budleigh, was of opinion that death resulted from apoplexy, and before the fall. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from apoplexy.

Thursday 27 July 1871
Another long article regarding the adjourned Inquest on Anthony Clements. Again adjourned.

BARNSTAPLE - The Case Of Drowning At Pilton. - On Thursday, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Enquiry at the 'Ring of Bells,' Pilton, relative to the death of a little child named JOSEPH BAKER, three years of age. Mr William Knill was foreman of the Jury.
Richard Moore, cabinet maker, said that at about half past eight o'clock on Wednesday morning his attention was drawn to a little girl looking over Pilton Quay, from her appearing to be frightened. On going to the spot he saw the body of a child in the water, which was about a foot in depth, and he immediately ran down the slip and pulled it ashore. He gave the child to a man named Vickery, who handed it to another person, by whom it was conveyed to the house of its parents, a distance of about thirty yards. He saw the child move one of its arms whilst in the water, but it did not move or breathe after he took it in his arms, and he believed it was dead when he took it from the water. Every effort was made to restore the child to life but without avail. Mr Fernie, surgeon, said he was called to Pilton to see the deceased child, and on his arrival he found it quite dead. It appeared to have been dead about half an hour, and he believed its death resulted from drowning. On turning it over on its face water came from its nose and mouth. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

Thursday 3 August 1871
BIDEFORD - Drowned. - On Monday evening a little girl, named CORDILLIA MAYNE, about five years of age, fell over the slip, East-the-Water, into the river, and was drowned. The body was picked up about two hours afterwards near Mr Phillip Colwell's limekiln. On Tuesday an Inquest was held on the body by the Borough Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq., when the Jury, after hearing the evidence, which went to show that the deceased with several other children were at play by the river, when she accidentally fell into the water, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 10 August 1871
Inquest resumed on ANTHONY CLEMENTS - long article resulting in the verdict: "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."

Thursday 17 August 1871
SOUTHMOLTON - Distressing And Fatal Accident. - On Friday last an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before James Flexman, Esq., and a respectable Jury, on the body of the boy, JAMES WARREN, who was accidentally killed by falling from a waggon which was driven by his father on the Wednesday previous, as mentioned in our last. The particulars of this distressing occurrence will appear by the following evidence which was taken on the occasion. - JOSEPH WARREN, on being sworn, said he was a labouring man, lived at Southmolton, and worked for Mr Smyth, of Fursebray. On Wednesday last witness went to Southmolton Road Station with a horse and waggon, and his son, the deceased, went with him. Witness took a load of rags to the station, and loaded back with a ton of coals. On returning his son was riding on the front part of the waggon. He had left his son to speak to James Hill, who was coming on behind with another horse and waggon. On going back, witness saw the deceased attempting to come off the waggon and halloaed to him to sit fast, but he (witness) did not think he heard him. As he got close to the waggon he saw the deceased attempt to get off, and in so doing he fell, and the wheels of the waggon went over his body. Witness went to his son, and on taking him up he said, "Oh Father, I can't stand, I am hurted here in my belly." He turned sick and died immediately. The accident and death took place in the parish of Chittlehampton. Witness placed the body in March's spring waggon, which came on just at the time, and rode as far as Flea House, when Mr Trawin overtook him with his trap and witness asked him to allow him to put the body of his son into his trap that he might get home as quickly as possible to get a doctor, which he did. Mr Furse, surgeon, was sent for, who came and pronounced the child to be quite dead. John Hill deposed that he was a servant of Mr Smyth, of Fursebray, and that on Wednesday last he went with the former witness to Southmolton Road Station. Had heard all JOSEPH WARREN had said, and it was true. Witness did not see the accident happen, but on coming forward to the waggon driven by JOSEPH WARREN he saw he had deceased in his arms, who was vomiting. He saw the deceased move his arms and legs and then die. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The unfortunate little fellow was six years old.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Of An Infant At Pilton. - On Thursday evening last MRS ROUTCLIFFE, of Pilton, retired to bed with her infant female child, one month old, and on awaking the following morning she found that the little creature was dead. The infant had been in good health since its birth, and its mother suckled it on Thursday night as usual. Mr Fernie, surgeon, was called in to see the body of the child, and he was of opinion that death had resulted from a convulsion or fit, its lips and face being of a purple colour, and its hands clenched. There were no marks of pressure on the body, and there was an absence of congestion or determination of blood to any particular spot. At an Inquest held at the 'Unicorn Inn,' Pilton, by R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, a verdict to the effect that the child had died suddenly, from Natural Causes, was returned.

Thursday 24 August 1871
WINKLEIGH - A sad instance of sudden death occurred in this place on Tuesday last, to WILLIAM TURNER, a cattle drover. About 11 p.m., he was standing at the front door of the Seven Stars, when he went out to the back door to retire to rest, but shortly after he was heard to burst open the door, which was latched at the time, greatly alarming the landlady, Mrs Weeks. On his entering the house it was found he was bleeding profusely from the mouth. He was placed in a chair but he never spoke, and in about half an hour from the time he left for the back door he was a corpse. It was supposed the blood choked him. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday by R. Fulford, Esq., when Mr Dingley, surgeon, attended, and gave his opinion that he died from the rupture of a vessel of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

SHALDON - Sad Drowning. - Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at the 'Crown and Anchor Inn', Shaldon, on Saturday morning, on the body of MR DAVID SMITH, of Brixton, London, who met his death on the previous day by drowning under very melancholy circumstances. Deceased, with his wife and two children - a son and daughter - had been staying at Shaldon for a short time, and had lately lodged at the house of Mrs Hallaham. On Friday afternoon, deceased and his wife and son went to the Ness Rock, and whilst there MR SMITH said he would have a bathe, and, leaving his wife and child, went some distance further round the Ness, and got into the water. It seems that it is not very safe place for bathing at any time, and on this day the sea was running very high in consequence of a strong wind. MR SMITH had not been in the water long before his wife observed that he was being swiftly carried out to sea. She immediately made an alarm, and some Teignmouth fishermen, who were on the beach at Shaldon, immediately proceeded to the Ness, but too late to render any assistance. MR SMITH soon sank. They did all they could do to recover the body, which in two hours afterwards was washed in by the tide and conveyed to the 'Crown and Anchor Inn.' It is supposed that MR SMITH was first carried off his feet by the strong under current which was running at the time, and being unable to stem it, was carried away. MR SMITH was only 36 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Much sympathy is felt in Shaldon for the deceased's widow, the calamity having cast quite a gloom over the place.

EXMOUTH - Melancholy Tragedy At Exmouth. Criminal Carelessness. About midnight on Wednesday, MR WALTER SHRIMPTON, station-master at Exmouth, Mr Nankivell, draper, Mr Bickford, chemist, and Mr Maynard, watchmaker of the Strand, who had been spending the evening together, were in the house of the last mentioned. Mr Maynard, according to custom, placed his stock in a box, preparatory to removing it to his bedroom. After the jewellery was placed in the box, MR WALTER SHRIMPTON jocularly remarked, "Let's garotte him, and take away his watches." Mr Maynard entering into the joke, went into a room adjoining the shop, and returning with a breechloading revolver in his hand pointed it at MR SHRIMPTON, observing, "This is what settles garotters!" Mr Bickford exclaimed, "Don't point it, it may be loaded," and Mr Maynard replied, "Oh, it is not loaded," but he had no sooner spoken than the pistol exploded. MR SHRIMPTON said "Oh, George, you've shot me!" and it was ascertained that a ball from the pistol had entered MR SHRIMPTON'S body, near the right shoulder, and striking the collar bones had turned aside and entered the lungs. He was taken to his residence, and Messrs. Turnbull and Langley, surgeons, were quickly in attendance, but MR SHRIMPTON after rallying a little expired shortly before two o'clock. The deceased was greatly respected, and the sad affair has cast a gloom over the town. MRS SHRIMPTON was away from home at the time, but she was immediately telegraphed for. Deceased, who had no family, was about 35 years of age.
At the Inquest held on Thursday afternoon, Mr Maynard, who appeared deeply affected by the sad occurrence, stated that he and the deceased were great friends. Witness met him at the billiard-room on Wednesday, about a quarter after ten o'clock. They played together, and were very friendly. They left there about twelve o'clock, and went to his (witness's) shop. He proceeded to take down his watches, and the deceased said something about burglary in a jocular manner. Witness remembered he had the revolver and he thought he would shew MR SHRIMPTON the action of it. Deceased said, "Let's garotte him;" and witness replied, if the revolver were loaded, he should be able to fire six shots before a man could garotte him. The pistol then exploded, and the deceased said he was shot. He stood for a few minutes, and then fell. Witness was not quite certain when he last used the pistol, which he was in the habit of keeping loaded in his bedroom. He might have fired off the pistol three weeks ago, and he must have reloaded it then, for he had not touched it since.
Mr John Langley examined the deceased, and discovered a wound on the right side of his neck; it lay downward between the right collar bone and through the right lung. No ball could be felt, as it probably was buried in the substance of the left lung, and it was not wise to make further search for it. The symptoms generally were those of a gunshot wound. The deceased died two hours after the accident. The cause of death was suffocation from effusion of blood in the cavity of the chest. Deceased said it was an accident, and that he forgave George (Mr Maynard). A verdict of "Homicide by Misadventure" was returned.

Thursday 31 August 1871
EXETER - Frightful Fall From A Cliff. - A shocking occurrence was witnessed at Exeter on Thursday. Prince's-road, leading from Exe Bridge to the St. David's station of the Bristol and Exeter railway, passes at one point close under an almost perpendicular rock, about 109 feet high, on the summit of which are the grounds known as "Mount Dinham." Some years ago the spot now known by that name was occupied by market gardens and ample orchards, but it is now covered with several blocks of almshouses, between which are pleasant walks and nicely kept grass plots and flower beds. A fine church and some public schools also stand on the "Mount." Several of the almshouses were erected by, and others to the memory of, the late John Dinham, from whom the place received its present name. One of the paths on "Mount Dinham" runs parallel with, and only a few feet from, the edge of the cliffs, being separated from it at its highest point by a narrow flower bed, and a belt of shrubs. About eleven o'clock on Thursday morning, MR JOHN NICHOLS, residing at 1, Richmond-terrace, St. David's, who had gone to Mount Dinham for a walk, fell from the top of the cliff into the road below, and when taken up by persons who witnessed the accident he was found to be quite dead, his skull having been fractured, and his body being otherwise injured. The corpse was taken to the Paper Maker's Arms, where it lay some time before it was identified. It was at first supposed that the unfortunate man was the victim of suicide, but there is no reason to believe that this was the case. MR NICHOLS, it appeared, had been a sufferer from heart disease, and he was frequently seized with fits, and it is conjectured that he must have fallen in one of these fits. Another explanation of the accident is that the deceased was blown from the cliff, as there was a stiff breeze at the time, and MR NICHOLS was carrying an umbrella. An Inquest was held on the body the next day, at which, after hearing the facts, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the occurrence was purely accidental; but recommended that the place should be protected so as to prevent any further accidents of the kind. Mr Wippell, who appeared on behalf of the Trustees, said it was the duty of the city to make the place secure, and the existing fence was put up to satisfy the Trustees' demands.

EXETER - Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Three Tuns Inn, High-street, Exeter, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH DANIEL, eleven years of age, daughter of MRS DANIEL, High-street, who died that morning under the following circumstances:- Miss Sarah Ann Gibbs, aunt to the deceased, said that on Thursday morning last the deceased got up about seven o'clock, and having called her sister, went down stairs to light the kitchen fire. A few minutes later witness heard screams, and on running down stairs met the deceased in the passage at the top of the kitchen stairs. Her apron was in flames. She instantly with the assistance of deceased's mother, extinguished them. The deceased was much burnt about the face and chest. Dr Woodman was at once sent for, and although every remedy was applied, the deceased died that morning at ten o'clock. MARY ANN WESTLAKE DANIEL, 10 years of age, said the deceased was her sister. On the morning n question they were both in the kitchen. She was cleaning knives and forks, when the deceased, who was lighting the fire, called to her and said, "Can you blow out my apron." She endeavoured to do so, but could not, and the deceased then ran up stairs screaming. She could not tell how the apron caught fire. Dr Woodman said he visited the deceased a few minutes after the accident happened on Thursday morning. He found her very severely burnt on the chest, face and arms. He applied the usual remedies. Death resulted from the shock caused to the nervous system, from which she never recovered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 September 1871
DEVONPORT - Hideous Murder At Devonport. - A horrible murder was committed at Devonport on Friday. The victim, who was upwards of 83 years of age, was a retired tradesman residing at 7, George-street, Devonport, and James Taylor, the person now in custody charged with the crime, was a short time since a bandsman on board the Rattlesnake. The deceased and the prisoner were on friendly terms, and on Friday the former went out for a walk and returned to dinner at 12 o'clock. No one was seen to enter the house with him, but about twenty minutes afterwards some consternation was caused by the man Taylor calling from a window to the passers by to come up, as he had committed a murder. The police were soon on the spot, together with the landlord of the house, who questioned Taylor as to his right of being there, as he was a stranger. Taylor, in reply, directed the officers to go up into deceased's room, adding that he had killed MR RYDER. Taylor hereupon was detained and with a great deal of self-control told them where the body was. The landlord of the house removed the bedclothes, and there saw the deceased horribly mutilated. The weapon used was a box heater, which was put into a canvass bag and securely fixed in one of the corners. This was lying by his side. There was a deep cut over the left eye, about three inches in length, and several others of a similar nature. The deceased's face was covered with blood, and presented a ghastly appearance. Drs. Bennett, senr., and Wilson, junr., were immediately in attendance, but their services were of no avail. Among the rumours is one that the prisoner slept in the bed with deceased the previous evening. The prisoner is a very powerful man, and over six feet high. He confessed the crime at the time he was arrested, and has since made a statement to the police confessing his guilt.
It is alleged the motive of the crime was this. About four months since Taylor was paid off from the Rattlesnake, and he then took up his residence with the deceased, whose adopted child he had been known to. He cohabited with her for some time, but she subsequently married a man named Ferris, and left the town with him. Taylor, believing the deceased had brought this about, upbraided him at times respecting it, and some hard words often passed between them. Taylor, having this impression, it is thought, took vengeance against the poor old man in this dreadful fashion.
Taylor did not resist being taken into custody, but treated the whole matter with the greatest coolness. He made a statement to the superintendent of police of the manner in which he perpetrated the crime in an off-handed way, and did not appear to feel that he had committed one of the most cold-blooded murders that has ever been recorded.
On Saturday morning James Taylor, 35 years of age, was charged before the Devonport magistrates with the wilful murder of HENRY RIDER, aged 83. Supt. Lynn stated that the prisoner was brought to him just after noon on Friday. He went to No. 8, George-street, and found a man lying dead on the bed. Returning to the Station-house, he charged the prisoner with the murder, and he replied, "Yes, I did it." "When I came home from sea his daughter robbed me of all I had, and yesterday I went and asked the old man if he could do anything for me. He ate his own dinner and gave me a bit of dry bread, and this morning he offered me a penny". When asked his address, he said, "I live in Devonport, but I have no fixed place of residence. I slept in the house last night with the man I have murdered." Witness told him after taking the charge that P.C. Blackler had found a most murderous implement in the house which would appear to show that this act was not done under a sudden impulse. Prisoner replied, "It was not, I intended it." This was all the evidence taken, and the prisoner, who showed no concern whatever, was remanded till Monday.
The Inquest was held in the afternoon, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder."

ST GILES IN THE WOOD - Sad Death Of One Of The Stevenstone Grooms. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at St. Giles-in-the-Wood, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JAMES COCKS, a married man, aged 32, who had come to his death through an accident in being thrown from one of his master's horses which he was exercising. It appeared from the evidence of the head groom of the Hon. Mark Rolle, Mr Stephen Hill, and two other grooms, who were also in company at the time, that early in the morning of Tuesday last they had all set out from the Stevenstone stables for the purpose of exercising the horses. They had been out about an hour, when, somewhere about half-past seven o'clock, the hunter which the deceased was riding bolted, being teased by the flies, and ran off at full speed in the direction of a wire fence. Hill was in front of him, and as deceased passed him, riding one horse and leading another, Hill, supposing it to be the led horse which had bolted, called out to him to let the horse go or he would be over the fence; but, unfortunately, the horse dashed on at full speed against the fence, which threw the horse down, and the deceased was sent with great violence over the creature's head, and fell on his head on the hard road. His fellow servants were on the spot in a moment, and picked the poor fellow up, but found him quite insensible. He was removed to the stables and afterwards to his own house, where Dr Jones, of Torrington, was very soon in attendance. Deceased was still perfectly insensible, with his eyes closed, and with every symptom of concussion of the brain; nor was there the slightest return of consciousness until his death, which occurred on the Thursday following. Deceased was a skilful rider, and accustomed to spirited horses; but the distance from the fence after the horse bolted was not enough to permit the rider to pull him up. The circumstances permitted of but one verdict, - that of Accidentally Killed by being Thrown from a Horse.

Thursday 14 September 1871
BARNSTAPLE - Death Through a Public-House Brawl. Two Brothers Committed For Manslaughter. - Although North Devon has of late obtained an unenviable notoriety for murderous crimes, Barnstaple, happily, has been free from such distressing occurrences; but within the past few days a very sad affair has taken place in its midst, resulting in the death of an aged man named JAMES CHAPPLE, landlord of the Mariners' Inn, Trinity-street, but in this case the details are not nearly so atrocious as in the others. It appears that on Saturday night a disturbance took place in the Mariners' Inn between some members of the deceased's family and his son-in-law, John Todd, a stonemason, in the employ of Mr Gould, and it finally ended by the deceased and a younger brother of John, named Charles, about 19 years of age, becoming mixed in the altercation, and it is alleged that John knocked the poor old man down, and that Charles brutally kicked him several times in the lower part of his body, causing injuries which resulted in his death within24 hours, after under-going the most intense agony. Like the majority of such cases, there is little reason to doubt that drink was at the bottom of it, for it is quite clear that the Todds, who, when sober, especially John, are very quiet, inoffensive young men, were in a state of intoxication at the time. That, however, is rather an aggravation than an excuse. It was not at first thought that CHAPPLE'S injuries were so serious, and his almost sudden death took everyone by surprise and created great excitement in the neighbourhood in which deceased is well known and respected. On the death of CHAPPLE being made known to the police, John and Charles Todd were immediately taken into custody and charged with causing his death.
The Examination Before The Magistrates. - John Todd, 23, stonemason, and Charles Todd, 19, mason's labourer, were brought before H. Dene, Esq., (in the chair), T. L. Willshire, J. M. Fisher, and G. E. Kingson, Esqrs., borough magistrates, at the Guildhall on Monday, charged with having on the 10th September feloniously killed and slain one JAMES CHAPPLE.
Mr Lionel Bencraft said he appeared to support the charge against the two young men who were charged with causing the death of CHAPPLE; and he would not say more at present, inasmuch as an Inquest was to be held on the body that evening. He would just put the Supt. of Police into the box to satisfy them that he was prepared to bring substantial evidence against the prisoners, and he should then ask the bench to remand them till a convenient day. Superintendent Blanchard then entered the box, and, in answer to Mr Bencraft, said: I charge the two prisoners with having caused the death of JAMES CHAPPLE: he died at a quarter past four o'clock yesterday afternoon. An Inquest is to be held at five o'clock this evening. I apply to the justices to remand those men till fresh enquiries are made. I am of opinion that if a remand is granted, I shall be in a position to produce material evidence against them. The Chairman, addressing the prisoners, who seemed to be fully sensible of the serious position in which they were placed, asked them if they had anything to say or any legal gentleman to appear for them, to both of which questions they replied in the negative. The Bench then remanded the prisoners till Monday next at 12 o'clock, bail being refused. The reason for remanding the prisoners for a week was, we understood, because the Fair is being held this week, and it was not deemed advisable that the case should be entered upon during the Fair. There were a large number of persons in the Court.
The Inquest. - An Inquest was held on the body by R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the Stafford Arms, Trinity-street, on Monday evening. The following gentlemen composed the Jury: Messrs. Thomas May (foreman), H. Moore, G. B. Parse, Cyrus Hodge, J. P. Kiell, J. I. Knill, G. Tyte Gaydon, R. Ashton, Joseph Sellick, J. Garland, J. S. Tucker, and Thomas Baker.
The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said it had become his duty to call them together that evening to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES CHAPPLE, a mason living in Trinity-street, and also occupying a public-house known as the Mariners' Inn, and he did not doubt that most of them were acquainted with him, as he was a man getting up in years. It seemed that his death took place through some affray or fight in his house on Saturday night, and the result was that he died sometime on Sunday from the injuries he had received. He should have evidence brought before them of what really took place, for there were several persons present at the time of the affray; and they would hear from Mr Cooke that he saw him on Sunday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, and that he was again called to him in haste later in the day, when he found him dying; in fact, he died whilst Mr Cooke was there. He did not know that he need call their attention to anything particular in the case except this, that where death resulted from an affray or fight it was not necessary to show that the person killed was the aggressor, or had struck the first blow, for that was immaterial: it would be their duty to find a verdict of manslaughter if death resulted from violence on the part of any one in a fight, or scuffle, or any other way. Since he had received information of the occurrence he had sent an order to Mr Cooke, to make a post mortem examination, and they would hear from that gentleman what injury the man received, and there was no doubt that the injury resulted in his death: it was very serious, and affected a very important organ of his body, and resulted in death within a short time. It was caused by a blow or a kick - it was immaterial which; but it was not believed that these people who had the scuffle had any malice against him before they got into the altercation or fight with him. Still, if they found that there was a fight or scuffle, and that deceased received injuries which caused his death, it would be their duty to return a verdict of manslaughter against those persons who caused those injuries. It was a very serious thing for a man in full health and strength to meet his death in the violent way deceased had, and he was sure they would give the case their best attention.
Mr J. A. Thorne was present to watch the case on behalf of John Todd.
The following witnesses were examined:
Wm. Carter: I live in Bell-meadow, and am a cabinet maker working for Mr Fisher. I was at the Mariners' Arms in Trinity-street on Saturday night about a quarter to ten o'clock. Parsley was with me. As I went into the passage I heard the row. I went in to have a glass of ale. I heard the row just inside the kitchen, and as I came up to the door I saw John Todd strike JOHN CHAPPLE, son of deceased. As soon as I got inside the kitchen the women flew about, and there appeared to be a general scramble. On enquiring into the row I found it was between John Todd and JAMES and THOMAS CHAPPLE, about a watch or some wages. It got quieter for about a quarter of an hour, and I think they left, and about five minutes after they left Todd got excited by the women calling him a blackguard, &c. His wife rose up and put her hand before him, when he struck her in the mouth. The deceased got up to interfere, when John Todd struck him and knocked him down. Deceased tried to clear Todd, who appeared very excited. I could not see where Todd struck him, but with the same the deceased fell. It was not lower than the breast. They fell together and they had a scramble on the floor - the old man, John Todd, and the other brother. Charles Todd commenced to take his brother's part. They commenced to go down together with the deceased. They told me he kicked the old man, but I didn't see him, for they were in the midst of a lot of women. The daughters tried to clear John Todd from the old man. There were three or four daughters there. I didn't see Charles Todd do anything. He joined in the scuffle. I didn't see Charles strike him: I couldn't see him. He took his brother's part by jumping in and trying to clear his brother. In fact, altogether they appeared to be in a very excited state. I didn't see Charles before, but I think he came in from the passage. Deceased was on the floor about one minute and his daughters lifted him up. I said, "Why don't you leave the room and go to bed?" and he said, "They have kicked me in the privates, and I can hardly stand." That was as soon as he got up. With the same they got him out and put him on the stairs, and Molton, another son in law, got him upstairs. He was groaning very much. I didn't see Molton in the row at all, although he was about the place. When CHAPPLE rose up, he said, "That young blackguard," pointing to Charles Todd, "Has kicked me," but I think it was hard to tell which, because they were quite thick about him. The Todds were the only men on the ground with deceased. He was resting on my shoulder. When John Todd got up one of his shirt sleeves was broken: he had his coat off before. Neither of the Todds was sober; John was more excited by drink than his brother. I should not think they were on the ground more than one minute. The row didn't occupy more than three minutes altogether
By the Foreman: Deceased was not tipsy: I think he had had a little to drink.
By the Coroner: I think Todd wanted to get at JOHN CHAPPLE: he said to his brother, "If you don't give it to him before you go to bed, I will." John Todd married deceased's daughter about five or six weeks since. I think old MR CHAPPLE wanted to get them out of the house. JOHN CHAPPLE lives in the house. JOHN CHAPPLE from the beginning to end didn't interfere at all. I think they were up on their legs in the passage before he came in. There was a man called Parsley present all the time I was there.
Maria Woolley, daughter of the deceased, deposed as follows: I was at my father's house on Saturday night. I was there on a visit. I think it was between half-past nine and ten o'clock that the altercation began between my brothers JOHN and THOMAS and John Todd. When I came down in the passage my father thought John Todd was going to strike mother, upon which he rose up to protect her. My father was sitting on a form in the kitchen. I think John Todd would have struck my brother if he could have: I think he was in the kitchen, and he appeared to be excited and intoxicated. I saw him when he came home from work at about half-past five o'clock, when he appeared to be sober. My mother went out, and I rather think John Todd was going to follow her. He did not say anything to my mother. After my mother went out, my father caught Todd hold by the back and pulled him backwards, and then his brother interfered. John Todd had no coat or waistcoat on. Charles Todd was sitting either on the chair or settle. I saw him rise up, and he flew at father, struck him, and knocked him down, and I saw him kick him three times (Oh!) I can't exactly tell where he kicked him. John Todd did not strike my father at all. I can't tell where Charles Todd struck my father: he fell on him. I saw my father give him a slap in the face before he fell. There was not much of a scuffle before they were on the ground. I am not aware that Charles Todd interfered in the row between his brother and my brothers previously. I can't say that I assisted my father up. I heard my father say that Charles Todd had given him his death blow: he said he had kicked him. I remained with my father during the greater part of the night: he appeared to suffer very much. He said he was a ruined man. Mr Cooke came to see him at about nine o'clock. I don't believe John Todd struck my father: I didn't see him do so. I was in the room all the time. The kicks appeared to be very violent. Charles Todd was on his legs when he kicked my father.
By Mr Thorne: I think John and Charles Todd both received a slap in the face from my father before he fell.
By the Foreman: I will swear that I didn't see John Todd strike my father, and that he was not on the ground with my father.
William Parsley, a polisher, said: I was at the Mariners' Inn last Saturday night, at about half-past nine o'clock. When we came into the passage John Todd was behind me. John Todd rushed at JOHN CHAPPLE in the kitchen and struck him. John Todd's wife said something to her husband and put her hand before his mouth, upon which he struck her, when old MRS CHAPPLE came over and slapped his face, calling him a blackguard for striking his wife. The old man got up, thinking, I suppose, he was going to strike his wife, and caught hold of him by the shoulder. John Todd then struck him and they both fell between the table and the form. They got up and scuffled and then fell in the same place again. They were pulling each other about, and I don't think they struck each other much. Several women came in and pulled him away, and Charles Todd came in from the street and rushed at the old man and pushed him back. The old man got up, when Charles Todd threw him down again and fell on him. I didn't see Charles Todd strike him. We managed to get Charles away and the old man up. The old man said, "Oh! Mr Parsley, the young blackguard his kicked me in the privates." I didn't see Charles Todd strike him. At that time John Todd was not near the place. I was sober. He said he could hardly walk. When John Todd was scuffling with the old man Charles was not in the room. I didn't hear the old man complain before Charles came in. Charles rushed in and said, "Do you think I'm going to see my brother struck."
JOANNAH CHAPPLE, widow of the deceased, who was much affected, said: Deceased was my husband and was about 68 years of age. On Saturday evening, during the altercation, my husband thought John Todd was going to strike me, and he got up and caught hold of him. Whether my husband was knocked down or not I can't say. I am certain Jack Todd didn't kick him. My daughter told me she saw Charlie kick him, but I didn't see him do so. Charles and John both came into the kitchen together, and Charlie rushed at my husband because he thought he was going to hit his brother. Jack was very fond of father. Charles has lived with us for nearly twelve months, and Jack has been living with us six or seven years. Jack is a very quiet young fellow, and I think it was the drop of whiskey he had which made him quarrelsome. Charles appeared to be tipsy. When Jack woke up the next morning and asked what was the matter with father who was groaning, his wife told him that his brother had kicked him, when he said he ought to be hanged. You may depend upon it Charlie did it. They lifted Charlie up from my husband. I didn't give John a slap in the face: my husband slapped his face.
James Spurway, 16 years of age, said: I was at the 'Mariners Inn,' on Saturday evening; I went there about seven o'clock. I saw John Todd come in about 9.30: he lately married my aunt. He seemed very drunk. John Todd had a row with my uncle JOHN: he flew right away at him and tried to strike him, but was prevented from doing so. It was then quiet for about a quarter of an hour, when my aunt came in. John Todd began to get noisy, when his wife put her hand before his mouth and asked him to be quiet. He struck his wife, and Mrs Bowden said, "What a shame to strike your wife like that," and he said he would serve her the same and ran after her. My grandmother interfered, and my grandfather got up and pulled him back by the shirt because he should not strike her. John Todd pushed at him and he fell, and Charles Todd then rushed in and struck my grandfather in the face and kicked him three times. John Todd then knocked me down. Charles Todd was sitting down in the settle before he got up and rushed at my grandfather. Mr Waldron, the bandmaster, was sitting down on the settle at the time. After he kicked my grandfather, Charles Todd fell on him, and would not let him get up. I didn't see John Todd strike grandfather. I heard grandfather say he had been kicked. Charles Todd kicked my grandfather several places whilst on the ground, and it appeared to be in the side. John and Charles Todd were both on my grandfather at one time. I heard Charles Todd say he would not see his brother badly used.
The Coroner: Has any one told you not to say any thing as to who killed your grandfather?
Witness: No! I think they are one as bad as the other.
The Coroner: Who do you mean?
Witness: The brothers.
The Coroner: It is quite evident that Mrs Woolley wishes to screen John. She might not have come into the room until Charles did.
Mr Moore: Carter distinctly states that both were down on the old man together on the ground.
It being now half-past seven o'clock the Coroner intimated his intention of adjourning the Enquiry till the following day.
The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest was held at the Guildhall on Tuesday, it being the wish of the Jury that they should sit there instead of at the Stafford Arms.
The Coroner said he made enquires of Mr George Waldron who was at the Mariners' Inn on Saturday evening, but, although he was present, he had not seen what took place. He only intended calling Mr Cooke to complete the case.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, deposed as follows: On Sunday morning last at