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Help and advice for Inquests 1832-1854 - from the Plymouth & Devonport Weekly Journal, etc.

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon 

1832-1854

Articles taken from the

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal and General Advertiser for Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included: Abbott; Acford; Adams; Alford; Algar; Algeo; Allen; Alpin; Ambrose; Anderson; Andrews(2); Anning; Anstey; Anthony; Arthur; Ash(2); Aston; Austen; Austin; Avery(2); Bailey; Banks; Bargin; Barry; Bartlett; Bassett; Bayley; Beer(4); Bell(2); Bennett; Benoy; Best; Bickford; Bidlake; Bignall; Bigwood; Bill; Binmore; Bird; Blackmore; Blagdon; Boolds; Boon(2); Bourne; Bovey; Bowden(2); Bowhay; Bownday; Bowyer; Bradford; Brasscombe; Bratt; Bray(2); Brayley; Bridgeman; Bridges; Bright; Brimmacombe; Bringham; Brock; Brown(4); Browning; Buckingham; Budge(2); Bulley; Bully; Bunker(3); Burns; Burring; Burton; Butters(2); Cairnes; Call; Callard; Cann; Carter; Chesil; Chissell; Chubb; Church; Clark; Clarke(2); Clatworthy; Clinker; Clinton; Colley; Collicott; Collings(2); Collins; Collis; Colmar; Cook; Coombes; Coram; Cork; Cornish(2); Corsey; Costello(2); Couch; Courtice; Cowles; Cowley; Cremer; Crews; Crocker; Croft; Cross; Crossman(2); Cruise; Cuerton; Cumming; Cummings; Curry; Curtis; Damellwick; Dann; Dart; Date; Davey; Davidson(2); Davis; Dawe(2); Deacon(2); Denham; Dennis; Dingle; Dodge(2); Dodridge; Dogherty; Doidge; Dole; Dolling; Dougall; Douglas; Down; Downing; Drewe; Duckham; Dunlop; Dunn(2); Dustin; Dyer(3); Eales; Easill; Eastman(2); Eden; Edmonds; Edwards; Elliott(2); Ellis(6); Eveleigh; Evens; Fall; Fenwick; Ferris(3); Fettock; Finch; Finn; Fletcher; Flood; Foale; Foel; Folland; Fook; Foot; Foss(2); Fowler(2); Fox(2); Fragil; Frost; Full(2); Furze; Gall; Gard; Garlick; Gay; Gibbs(2); Gidley; Gilbert(2); Gilding; Gill; Gilpin; Glanville(2); Glen; Goard; Gooch; Good; Goodman; Goss; Gough; Gould; Graves; Greenslade(2); Greet(2); Gregory; Halfyard; Hall; Hallett; Halliday; Halls; Halpin; Ham(2); Hambly(2); Hamlyn(2); Hammond; Hancock; Harding(2); Harris(5); Hart(2); Hartop; Harvey; Hatherly; Haydon; Haynes; Hazel; Heard; Heath(2); Hele; Herbert(2); Herman; Hext; Hill(3); Hilton; Hine; Hockin; Hocking; Hockridge; Holdsworth; Holmes; Holsan; Holwell; Hook; Hooke; Hooker; Hooper(4); Horn; Horndon; Horton; Hudder; Hunderey; Hutchings; Hyne(2); Isherwood; Jackman; Jackson; James(2); Jarvis(2); Johns(2); Johnson(2); Johnstone; Jones(3); Jordan; Jude; Keep; Kelly(3); Kemble; Kemp; Kendle; Kent; Kersteman; Key; Keys; Knight(2); Knowles; Knox; Lakeman; Lamb; Lambell; Lambert; Lane(2); Lang; Laughlin; Lean; Lear(2); Lego; Lewis; Ley; Lians; Linwell; Lipson; Littlejohns; Lock; Locock; Lovell; Loys; Luke; MacDonald; Macfarlane; Magee; Mallardine; Mallett(2); Malony; Mandill; Marks; Marsh; Marshall; Martin(5); Maunder; May; Mayne; McCarthy; Meddows; Medland; Menhennick; Merrifield(2); Merryfield; Metters; Millward; Mitchmoore; Mizeon; Modley; Moore(2); Morgan(3); Morris; Morrish(2); Mortimer; Moysey; Munday; Mundell; Mundy; Munro; Murch; Murphy; Murray; Myers; Narramore; Neame; Nehm; Netherton; Newberry; Newell; Newton; Nicholson; Noble; Northmore; Northway; Nosworthy; Oldfield; Oldridge; Osmond; Page(2); Palmer; Parish; Parker(2); Parnell; Parsons(3); Partridge(4); Passmore; Pawle; Payne; Pearce(2); Peard; Pee; Peneluna; Pengelley; Penn; Penny; Perry(2); Peters; Peterson; Petherbridge; Petherick; Phillips(2); Pickard; Pile; Pine(2); Polhill; Pollard; Poore; Popplestone; Porter; Pouchetti; Press; Pring; Probert; Prout(2); Prowse; Putt; Quick(2); Rabbidge; Reddecliff; Reddicliff; Reeby; Reed; Rees; Rendle; Rice; Richards; Riggs; Roberts(3); Rogers(3); Rosedean; Rositer; Rossiter; Row(2); Rowe; Rundle; Rutt; Ryder; Salmon; Salter; Sambells; Sampson; Sanders(2); Sandover; Scantlebury; Scarroll; Screech; Searle(2); Seccombe; Secombe; Sercombe; Sergeant; Setcher; Seymour; Sherrel; Shields; Shore; Shorland; Short(2); Sircombe; Skinner(3); Slaney; Sleeman; Sloman; Smale; Smith(4); Snape; Snell; Snowden; Sparks; Spriddle; Stabb; Stacy; Stancombe; Stanbury(2); Stanton; Steed; Stephens; Stephenson; Stert; Stevens(2); Stibbs; Stiddiford; Stideford; Stoneman(2); Stranger; Stroud; Styles; Suhr; Sydenham; Symons(2); Tapp; Tatchell; Taylor; Thomas(3); Thompson; Thorn; Thorne; Tickle; Tincombe; Tinney; Tothill; Towell; Townsend; Tozer; Tree; Trenhick; Trist; Truscott(3); Tucker(5); Tuckerman; Tuckett; Turner; Utermark; Vear; Venton; Verran; Vicary; Voisey; Vosper(2); Voysey; Walker; Walters; Waring; Warn(2); Warren; Waters; Weakley; Wedlock(2); Wellington; Wharton; Wheeler(2); White(7); Whiteway(2); Whitfield; Wilcocks; Willcocks; Williams(5); Willoughby; Wilmot; Wilson(3); Wilton; Windsor; Woolcock; Wotton; Wreford; Wright(2); Wyatt; Wyse; Yelland(2); Yeo; Youlton; Young;

 

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 5 January 1832
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday, by R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, for the Borough, on the body of JOSEPH NORTHWAY, who threw himself into the sea, from the Fisher's Nose, on the 16th Dec., and a verdict of Felo de Se was returned. The body was buried last night, according to the recent Act of Parliament, at the Ebenezer Chapel, between 9 and 12 o'clock at night

Royal Devonport Telegraph, and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 21 January 1832
EXETER - Suicide of T. STEVENS, Esq., Recorder of Exeter. - It is with pain we record the death of this gentleman by his own hands. Educated for the Bar, he early displayed talents of a superior order, and having been selected by Mr Courteney, Recorder of this City, on several occasions, in his unavoidable absence, to officiate as his deputy, his services were thought so highly of, that on the resignation of that gentleman, in 1820, was invited by the Chamber to fill the situation in his stead. As a country gentleman, MR STEVENS had ever taken an active part in the business of the district in which he resided, and long held the commission of Major, in the North Devon Regiment of yeomanry Cavalry, in which situation, as in all others, he was beloved and respected. The deceased was 49 years of age, a remarkably affectionate husband, and tender father; a good and considerate landlord, and kind master. Late events in his neighbourhood had much distressed him, and threats towards one who designed nothing but good, preyed upon his mind. He had been subject to walk in his sleep, and it is imagined that having in this way quitted his bed, under apprehensions that the conspirators were attacking his mansion house, and the servants (at that hour) not instantly answering his call, he first fired a loaded pistol in the direction of the shrubbery, and with a razor cut his throat. This sad event, took place at his seat, ---- Cross, near Torrington, about half-past one o'clock, on the morning of Saturday last, the 14th inst. On the same day, an Inquest was taken before Francis Kingdom, Esq., Coroner, when Edmund Herring Caddy, Esq., of Great Torrington, Surgeon, was the first witness examined:- Saw the deceased on Thursday last, at Great Torrington. His spirits appeared very low and dejected; saw him again on Friday between the hours of 4 and 5 in the afternoon, he appeared still more dejected in mind and very low in spirits - he stated that he had not slept for several nights, and that his mind had been much harassed; advised deceased t put his feet in warm water and go to bed, and that he would send him some medicine; deceased complained of a pain in his head, and said that his stomach was in a disordered state from bile; was again sent for between the hours of 1 and 2 o'clock on Saturday morning, when he found him dead, deceased was lying on his back in the dressing-room which was covered with blood, an open razor on his bowels, and a pistol on the floor; on examining the body found a large wound on the throat extending from ear to ear, which had divided the carotid arteries and the windpipe, the wound extended back to the vertebrae of the neck, which must have caused immediate death, and which was the cause of the death of the deceased; found no other wound on the body, nor any marks of violence; has n doubt that the deceased died by his own act; the symptoms under which the deceased has laboured very frequently produces delirium and temporary derangement of mind. - Thomas Sandford, a servant to the deceased; have observed my master has failed in his appetite for some time past, and that on Friday he appeared quite melancholy, that he was continually passing from room to room, and was so weak that he could scarcely walk upright; remarked to the servants the state in which my master was in; my master retired to his bed about 5 o'clock in the evening; about half-past 1 my master's bell rang continually which awoke me; went down in my small clothes and Mary Elsworthy who had answered the bell called out "He is killed, he is killed;" saw nothing more until Mr Caddy arrived, who examined the body; is quite sure that no person could come into the house as he had himself secured the house, and is of opinion died by his own act. - John Upstone, heard my master's bell ring about half-past 1 on Saturday morning; struck a light and went down to my master's dressing room, and entered it with Mary Elsworthy, the maid servant; saw the deceased lying on the floor covered with blood; his throat was cut from ear to ear; lifted him up with the assistance of Mary Elsworthy; saw no sign of life left, but heard on laying him down again a rattle in the throat of deceased three times; saw a razor on the upper part of the thigh which was covered with blood; washed the body after Mr Caddy, surgeon, had examined it; there is no possibility of any person entering the room of the deceased by the window; has no doubt but deceased died by his own act; there was also a pistol lying on the floor, but did not examine it. - The evidence being gone through, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury delivered their verdict, That the Deceased, labouring under a grievous disease of body, and being delirious and out of his mind, had inflicted on himself a mortal wound of which he died. - MR STEVENS has left a widow and two daughters, of tender years. - MR STEVENS was heir to Lord Rolle's domain of Stevenstone, in the North of Devon. He was brother to Archdeacon Moore, having adopted the name of STEVENS on account of his title to the property. He was an exceedingly good looking man, and from his healthy appearance, gave promise of as long a course of years as his venerable and noble relation. He was a rigid and zealous Tory, and was supposed to possess uncontrolled power over the corporation of this city. Mr Praed, son of Mr Sergeant Praed, and brother to the member for St Germains, has been named for his successor. Mr Crowder is spoken of as a candidate, but Mr P.'s interest is justly supposed to predominate with the corporation of Exeter.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 26 January 1832
EXETER - Death Under A Heap Of Rags. - On Tuesday and Inquest was taken before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at the Plume of Feathers Inn, Exeter, on the body of ANN FERRIS, who was about 50 years of age, and who had that morning been found dead in her room, on St David's hill. The deceased was a native of, and well known in this city, as a gatherer of rags, and any kind of old materials from the streets and such courtlages, as she could obtain entrance to; always appearing in great distress, and as if deficient of the commonest necessaries, still without ever having been known to ask alms or in any way solicit charity. On Tuesday morning it was noticed by the neighbours that she had not made her appearance, and the door of her apartment being found locked, and no answer to their inquiries returned, it was at length forced open when a scene presented itself of the most abject poverty and distress. In one part of the room there appeared a heap of rags, of a quantity it is computed to have half filled a cart, under which the deceased was laid, quite dead, and had been so for several hours. There were no marks of any violence, but the whole appearance of the body was that of a person in an extreme state of emaciation and filth. On taking an inventory of the articles in the room, there were discovered in a box, 15 good gowns, besides shawls, and bonnets, and, wrapped n several inclosures, a Bank Book of the National Saving's Bank, Interest Notes, and other securities for money to the amount of £155, besides some loose silver and pence in a tea-caddy. The only articles of provision were about half a quarter of a small quantity of butter, and a little salt. There was no appearance of any bed, except an old mattress, and no kind of bedding save the rags already spoken of. The Jury, after some consideration, returned their verdict of "Found Dead, from denying herself the common necessaries of life!!" - The rags were ordered by the Coroner to be removed which was deemed absolutely necessary from the mass of foul matter adhering to them.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 4 February 1832
DARTMOUTH - At Dartmouth, on Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken on the body of MR WM. GIBBS, late master, and part owner of the schooner Ninus, of that port, who was taken up drowned, that morning. It appeared MR GIBBS spent the preceding evening at the George and Dragon Inn, and left it at rather a late hour in order to proceed home, which was but a short distance. In the morning he was discovered off the Quay, in front of the bonded warehouses. No evidence was adduced to show how he came there, and property to the amount of upwards of £200 was found on his person. A short time since he buried his wife, and for several days had been noticed to be depressed in spirits, and under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 23 February 1832
PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - An Inquest was held by R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on Saturday last, the 18th inst., at the workhouse of this town, on the body of THOMAS STYLES, painter, who destroyed himself by hanging. As many reports are in circulation, attributing his making away with himself to the cause of extreme pecuniary distress, which are totally at variance with the evidence given on the Inquest, we take the liberty of presenting it in a compressed state to our readers:- Francis William Paddon sworn: - On Thursday last having occasion to call at Mr Parker's store in Duck's Lane, alias Week Street, and observing no one there, he left the premises and proceeded to Mr Parker's shop, where he had been about five minutes, when Thomas Cleather came in, requesting witness to follow him, for that STYLES had hung himself in the cellar. Witness immediately accompanied him, and observed the deceased suspended by a rope tied round his neck, and fastened to the ridge-beam of the roof. Witness, with the assistance of Mr Parker, eventually cut down the body of deceased, and on the arrival of Dr Baldy, it was removed to the Plymouth Workhouse. - Edward Parker, broker, sworn: - Having substantiated the evidence of the preceding deponent, witness went on to state that the deceased had worked for him about two years, and that for the last nine months he has worked on the premises where he was found suspended. Witness told him he should pay no rent, and that there was always work for him, and that if witness was from home he might take pieces of furniture from the shop to paint. Witness is satisfied that STYLES was not in pecuniary distress. Witness on Saturday last, the 11th inst., asked deceased what he (STYLES) owed to him, and deceased had replied "nothing" - he next asked witness to lend him five shillings, which request witness had complied with. Witness has on several occasions heard the deceased complain that he had nothing to do, when work was around him, which witness had pointed out to him and required to have done. On Thursday morning last, witness employed him at the said premises to paint a dresser and chairs, the charge for which would have amounted to nine shillings, and in less than half an hour deceased was discovered hanging. Witness thinks deceased has been in a desponding state for some time, and that at times he did not appear to know what he was about. Two other witnesses were adduced, but we refrain from giving their depositions, and the Jury having consulted together, returned a verdict of "lunacy."

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 8 March 1832
EXETER - On Wednesday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a man named ISAAC OSMOND, who was in the employ of Messrs. S. W. Kingdom, of Exeter. The man was attending some part of the machinery of the steam-engine, when his foot slipped and he fell against the principal wheel, by which his head was literally scalped from the back to the front, and he was thrown with great force, the engine being working in full power, to a distance of eight feet below the floor of the engine house. The engineer was at hand, and immediately stopped the machine, so that the wheel did not make a single revolution after the accident occurred, otherwise the poor man must have been torn to pieces. He was taken up in a most deplorable condition, and immediately conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, about half-past nine o'clock the same evening, he expired. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, on Thursday, at the Hospital, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was a single man, and had not been long in Messrs. Kingdom's employ.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 8 March 1832
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday, by R. J. Squire, Esq., on the body of THOMAS ANDREWS, aged 49, the landlord of the East and West Country House, at the Barbican. It appeared that the deceased was fond of social pleasures, and had been indulging in excesses. Several witnesses were examined, and he was traced from house to house, until eight o'clock, on Saturday night, to the Plymouth Inn, Southside street, but no evidence could be obtained as to where he then went, but on Sunday morning, on the tide ebbing, his body was discovered in the mud, adjoining the Southern end of Vauxhall Quay, where, it is supposed he must have fallen the night preceding. The Jury pronounced a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how or by what means no evidence appeared." They also requested the Coroner to represent the circumstance of the unguarded state of the wharf, as there is no doubt but that the deceased mistook his road, the night being very dark, and the glare of the pier lamp might have caused him to walk towards it and thus unexpectedly coming to the edge of the quay, was precipitated into the mud and water and lost his life. This is the same spot at which Mr Jenkins, in a similar manner, lost his life a few years since, and then the authorities were also applied to, to fix proper chains and fences to the wharfs, and especially at this spot.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest has also been held by Mr Squire on the body of JOHN MAGEE, aged 60, who died suddenly, of apoplexy, on Monday night. Verdict accordingly.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 17 March 1832
WEMBURY - Coroner's Inquest. - Want of room prevented the insertion in our last publication of the subjoined Inquest, which was held on Thursday se'nnight before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at Wembury, on the body of ELIZABETH WILMOT, an apprentice to Mr Simmons, of Down Thomas, who died from the effects of poison. According t the evidence adduced at the Inquest, it appeared that the deceased had for the last six or seven weeks been observed to have altered in her disposition, and that a few weeks since she was discovered to be pregnant. Her master then sent her home to her friends at Plymouth, but she returned in a few days. On the morning of the 8th inst., her master had chastised her, and she was afterwards heard sobbing in her bedroom. Shortly afterwards she was taken sick, when she was requested to go to bed. The urging continued until three o'clock in the afternoon, when it was considerably allayed, and she complained of thirst. - Miss Simmons, the sister of her master, who remained with her during the sickness, went down stairs to get her some tea, which was taken to her by her mistress, who immediately returned much agitated, stating that she could not awake the deceased. Miss Simmons then went up stairs, and found she had expired. - Jane Wed and Caroline Babel, her fellow apprentices, both deposed that the deceased had frequently said that she was tired of this world, and should put an end to her existence either by poisoning or drowning herself, and Mr Jones, surgeon, of Plymstock, deposed, that on a post mortem examination, the body wore a very healthy appearance, but on opening the stomach, he found considerable quantity of fluid, and the internal coat very much corroded, which he had not the smallest doubt arose from a mineral poison having been taken into the stomach. The womb contained a foetus about four or five months old, but it was impossible to say whether the deceased had quickened or not. The Jury, after consideration, unanimously returned a verdict of - "Died from the Effects of Poison taken during a fit of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, and by adjournment on the following day, before R. J. Squire, Esq., on the body of MARY MYERS, who died on Tuesday last from the effects of poison. The deceased, it appeared from the evidence, had borne an irreproachable character, and had lived in the capacity of servant with very respectable families, but within the last few weeks had been seized with what is commonly termed religious hypochondria, and had often been heard to say that she should put an end to her existence, for "she felt the power of sin; and when the Lord convinced her of it, instead of turning to God she turned to the devil, and that he tempted her to destroy herself. " The surgeon deposed to the cause of her death being poison, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by taking Poison during Temporary Insanity."

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 24 March 1832
PLYMOUTH - On Thursday last an Inquest was held at Plymouth, before Mr N. Lockyer, in the absence of Mr Squire, Coroner for the Borough, on view of the body of a child named SAMUEL MERRYFIELD, who was picked up in Catwater the day previous. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 31 March 1832
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before Mr N. Lockyer, in the absence of Mr Squire, Coroner, for the borough, on view of the body of CHARLOTTE HOLSAN, who was found drowned in Catwater the day previous, and it is supposed must have accidentally fallen from the quay at Catdown. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 7 April 1832
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before R. J. Squire, Esq., at the Clarence Hotel, Southside-street, on the body of an unfortunate lad named GEORGE HONEYWELL WALTERS, who had hung himself on the preceding day. The deceased was about 13 years of age, and had from his infancy resided with Mr Rowland, of this town, painter, by whom he was treated with extreme kindness. According to the depositions taken by the Coroner, it appears that for some time past he had been afflicted with a nervous affection, and was frequently so timid that after dark he would not leave his room without a light unless accompanied by some grown person, and same days after the execution of Mary Kellaway at Exeter, for infanticide, he had spoken of her as having lived as servant with his mother, and was very inquisitive as to the method and sensation of hanging. On the day of his decease there was nothing extraordinary in his manner, and about three o'clock in the afternoon he was desired by Mr Rowland to dress himself, and to walk out with his sisters. The lad immediately left the shop as it was thought for that purpose, but about twenty minutes afterwards he was discovered suspended to a hook in the ceiling of the garret. He had never been heard to say he would destroy himself, nor had his conduct in any way excited suspicion of such intention. The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict - "That deceased whilst innocently trying the sensation caused by suspension or hanging had Accidentally and by Misfortune come by his Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was also held on Monday last, on GEORGE DUNN, a coal trimmer, on board the Thames steam-packet, who had died on board that vessel on Monday last. The deceased was apparently in perfect health on the morning of Sunday, and attended to his work as usual, but in the course of the day became so intoxicated that he was sent to his birth - some time after his services being required to get up coal for the engine, a man named Dunnovan went to deceased's birth, where he was found in a senseless state; an immediate alarm was given, and a medical gentleman on board bled him, and every other means adopted to effect resuscitation, but without success. The deceased was about 54 years of age, and had been in the habit of drinking to excess, and on leaving Dublin had supplied himself with a quantity of whiskey. - Verdict, died from Excessive Drinking.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 12 April 1832
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the York Inn, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHAS. FOX, aged 27, who was working on board the barge Hariott, lying in Stonehouse lake. The deceased and another were on a triangle cleaning the mast, when the part on which he was sitting broke in two and he was precipitated on the deck, about 25 feet, and killed on the spot. - Verdict "Accidental Death."

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 26 April 1832
PLYMOUTH - On Tuesday evening last an Inquest was held at Mr Millman's the Royal Highlander, on the body of ROBERT SPARKS, Barrack Sergeant of the Citadel. The deceased, it appears, during the last three or four months, has been repeatedly noticed for is strange and eccentric habits, having been frequently heard to say that he was ordered by Lord Hill to "act mad", in order to discover all that was going on wrong in the barrack department. He has also been seen at times standing in the barrack yard waving a broomstick over his head, dancing &c., and at different times held conversations with his companions, from which it might easily be inferred that the poor fellow was not perfectly sane in mind. On Tuesday afternoon last, after being engaged during the earlier part of the day in the delivery of sheets to the troops in garrison, he proceeded to the apartment he occupied in the Citadel, and was shortly after found dead with his throat dreadfully lacerated from a wound inflicted by a razor. From the evidence of one of the witnesses on the Inquest, it appears that the deceased had been considerably injured by a wound in his head, and that the pain was occasionally so great as to completely disorder his whole frame. The Jury returned a verdict of Self-Destruction through Insanity.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 3 May 1832
BROADCLYST - Manslaughter. - On the day after the Broadclist Fair, which is usually devoted to mirth and jollity, a labouring man met his death in consequence of one of the ridiculous customs too prevalent in this country, and which it is true the "march of intellect" should chase away. The deceased, named WM. TUCKER, 51 years of age, was brought before a personage styled "The Judge" and on refusing to pay for liquor, in which he was amerced, he was adjudged to "ride the pole," which is being placed across a rather slender pole, and borne on the shoulders of the by-standers. This, deceased resisted, and the judge quitted his seat, when John Ching, a labouring man seized the delinquent with a view to reduce him to obedience. TUCKER was unfortunately afflicted with hernia, and the struggle was fatal, such injury being inflicted, that after lingering until that day week, he died. The Inquest was taken before James Partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, when, after a full investigation of the case, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Philip Bustard (the Judge), and John Ching, and on Wednesday last they were, on the Coroner's warrant, lodged in the County Gaol in order to take their trials for the offence.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 12 May 1832
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday last an Inquest was held by Mr Bone, at the Mount Edgcumbe Inn, Mutton Cove, on view of the body of THOMAS HALPIN, who was found dead lying on his face on the beach, on Sunday afternoon last, between two and three o'clock. It appeared from the evidence, that he resided in Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, and was the late schoolmaster to the Roman Catholic School established there. he had spent the evening of Saturday last with some friends, and had become much intoxicated. About 10 o'clock on the same night he was seen running down Pembroke-street towards Mutton Cove. No one saw him afterwards alive, and no account could be given of him up to the time of his being found. - There was no evidence to show how he came to the water, and the Jury therefore returned a verdict of Found Drowned. He has left a wife and one child.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 24 May 1832
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death. - Caution To The Choleric. - On Monday last, a man named SAMPSON GREET, who lived in William-street, Morice-Town, had a dispute with a young girl, who lived in the same house. The excessive irritation under which he laboured brought on a fit of apoplexy, and caused instant death. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 7 June 1832
TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident. - On Friday an Inquest was held at Tawstock, by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner on the body of MR SAMUEL SLOMAN, who, about six o'clock on the Wednesday evening preceding, was found lying in the road a short distance from his house, nearly dead; he had been drinking at a public house in the parish at four o'clock, and left not the worse for liquor, and it is supposed was thrown from his horse in his way home; medical assistance was afforded him, but without avail, life became extinct in a very short time. Twelve months since he narrowly escaped a premature death by the roof of his house falling in upon him and his family, whilst they were in bed, by which accident his wife and daughter were both killed.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 14 June 1832
NEWPORT - On Wednesday evening, the REV. ED. O. HOLWELL, of Plympton, arrived at the Red Lion Inn, at Newport, from Gloucester, and made arrangements for sleeping there and proceeding the next morning to Exeter. He appeared very cheerful and well, and desired to be called at half-past seven o'clock, at which time the chamber-maid went to his bedroom door, and knocked for some time, but could not obtain any answer, and, on opening the door, found the Rev. Gent. in bed, but quite dead, and appearing to have been so for some time. He had complained, when at Gloucester, of a pain and oppression on his chest, and had taken some simple preparation, which had much relieved him. He was Rector of Plymptree, Devonshire, and formerly Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford. An Inquest was held before W. J. Ellis, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of Sudden Death by Visitation of God was returned.

EXETER - NICHOLAS TRIST, cabinet maker, who had been employed in fitting up a shop into which Mr Western, grocer, High-street, Exeter, was about to remove, was taken into custody, on Saturday, for a felony, in having stolen articles, the property of Mr W., and being taken to the Guildhall, was placed in the small lock-up room upstairs. Here he remained about an hour and quarter, when he was ordered to be brought before them to be examined, but on the officer going for that purpose, he found him lying on his back, and quite dead. Having affixed his handkerchief to his neck, and fastened the end of it to a piece of wood work from three to four feet from the floor, he had then laid himself down, the space just giving the handkerchief tension enough to produce strangulation. He was a native of Exeter, and 59 years of age. An Inquest was taken before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, on the same day at Richards' Turk's Head Inn, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 21 June 1832
STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Fighting. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday evening last, at the Rising Sun, Fore Street, on the body of a young man named CURTIS, of Plymouth, who was killed in a fight with another youth, on Wednesday. It appeared, from the evidence adduced on the Inquest, that the deceased, in company with a young man named W. Algar, of Stonehouse, and two or three others, had been drinking together during that day, and that about seven o'clock in the evening, they went to the Spread Eagle in Cumberland-street, when they ordered two quarts of beer and some tobacco, and on the landlady demanding payment, a dispute arose who should defray the expense, when the deceased called Algar a paltry fellow and a humbug, and said he had been sponging upon him all day. Upton this, Algar left the room, followed by the deceased, and when in the passage a scuffle ensued. They then returned to the tap-room, where Algar challenged the deceased to fight, and they adjourned to the Timber-pound for that purpose; they were driven from thence by the person having charge of that part of the Government ground, and they again adjourned to the Brickfield, where they fought for about a quarter of an hour. In the last round both parties fell, the deceased undermost and on their recovering each sat on his second's knee, when the deceased turned faint, and broke into a profuse perspiration. Algar said he had had enough, and would fight no more, and they shook hands. The deceased again sat upon his second's knee, and in a few seconds afterwards fell senseless. He was subsequently taken to the nearest public house, when Mr J. P. Baldy, surgeon, was called to his assistance, who used every means to recover him, but unfortunately without success. The Inquest was adjourned from Thursday to next day, when the Jury again sat, and after a lengthy investigation returned a verdict of Manslaughter, and Algar was committed to take his trial. The remains of CURTIS were interred on Sunday last, in St. Andrew's Church yard, in the presence of a large concourse of spectators.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 14 July 1832
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Occurrence. - On Wednesday last, three masons named THOS. MERRIFIELD, THOS. YEO, and WILLIAM PARSONS, were killed by the falling of a scaffold in Caroline Place, Stonehouse. The deceased with two others, named Hutchins and Waterfield were at work on the scaffold, which was fixed in the gable end of the house, by being placed through the wall and fastened to the principals of the building and about five o'clock in the afternoon on Wednesday a large portion of the wall gave way, and in its fall brought with it a stack of chimnies containing nine flues. The scaffolding deprived of support also fell, and four out of the five men were precipitated a height of fifty feet. The fifth man, Hutchins, saved himself by getting hold of one of the beams. The labourers at work in the quarry, who observed the accident, immediately went to the spot, and with much exertion got from amid the ruins the bodies of the unfortunate men, two of whom were quite dead, the third expired within an hour, and Waterfield, still lies in a very precarious state. MERRIFIELD has left a wife and five children, PARSONS was but lately married, and YEO was a young man under 20 years of age, and was a native of Stonehouse. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Workhouse, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 19 July 1832
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday last at the Workhouse, by R. J. Squire, Esq., on view of the body of WILLIAM WHITFIELD, a lunatic, formerly an actor and scene-painter of considerable ability at the old theatre at this place. At half-past twelve on the same day he took his dinner as usual, and appeared in good health, about three he was observed reading his bible, but was found dead in his bed on the attendant visiting him with his supper, somewhat about an hour after. - Verdict, Apoplexy. - The Jury and Coroner expressed in high terms their approbation of the conduct of the governor and guardians, for the admirable state in which the Workhouse appeared, the whole having been thoroughly cleansed, ventilated, and fumigated.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 28 July 1832
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday lat an Inquest was held at the William the Fourth Inn, on the body of HARRIET KNIGHT, aged 37, wife of THOS. KNIGHT, who resided at No. 26 queen-street. According to the evidence on the Inquest it appeared that the deceased had taken three different doses of some mixture from a quack doctor, an inhabitant of the same house named Henry Penny, a portion of which according to Penny's own admission, was composed of oil of jalap, oil of roses, and gin. Dr Hingstone, and Mr Fuge, surgeon, stated that the deceased came by her death from having some deleterious substance introduced into her stomach, which they conceived to be a strong vegetable narcotic. The Jury, after two adjournments, occupying upwards of twelve hours, and a secret deliberation, returned a verdict of Felo De Se, adding their conviction, that had proper medical treatment been applied, for the unfortunate woman's life, it would probably have been saved. On the verdict of the Jury being recorded, the Coroner issued his warrant, under the late Act of Parliament, for the private burial of the deceased, between the hours of nine and twelve that night. The overseers, bearers, and police consequently attended, and waited until past eleven o'clock, but could get no admission to the house, whilst Mr Penny appeared at the window, and dared anyone to enter, and threats were expressed that the first person who entered would be fired at. By this time a large assemblage of persons had collected, and the pressure was so great that the door gave way, and the bearers were enabled, without molestation, to remove the body, which had been, but a short time previously, put into the coffin.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 1 September 1832
EXETER - Important Verdict. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday se'nnight at the Red Lion Inn, St. Sidwell's, Exeter, before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAS. VICARY, a travelling vender of sweetmeats and nuts, who was taken ill of the cholera at Dawlish, on Wednesday evening, at the Swan Inn, in that town, and at ten o'clock at night, by order of the overseer and other gentlemen, conveyed to Exeter, with no other apparel on but his stockings, and where on the following morning he died, at Kekewich Place. It appeared from the evidence of William James, a licensed hawker, that the deceased was seized with vomiting on Wednesday afternoon, and witness went with him and got some brandy and rhubarb; after taking the medicine deceased vomited again. Witness then got deceased to the Swan, where he used to lodge, and went to get a doctor. The first he applied to refused to come, because he did not attend the landlady of the Swan. About an hour after he procured Mr Goss, junr., who came and saw the deceased. As soon as he had seen him he took his horse and went to the justice, directing witness to call at his house; Mr Goss wrote a paper, directing that the deceased should be taken care of and put into a hot bed, and his feet bathed in hot water; this paper he gave to the overseer, and the deceased had two pills and some medicine directed by Mr Goss. When he came to the house with the paper and the medicine, he had great difficulty in getting the landlady to let him have a tea-spoon full of brandy, as ordered by the doctor for the deceased. He afterwards saw Leeson at the Swan, who said "d--n your blood what do you do here," and he was afterwards refused admission to the deceased's room, and ordered out of the house by Leeson in a most insulting manner. He then went to the Red Lion, where he lodged, and after he had been to bed some time the overseer sent to him and offered him 15s. if he would go to Exeter with the deceased. He went to the Swan to enquire into it, and was obstructed from seeing the deceased, after which he went away and said he would have no more to do with it. About ten o'clock he heard the cart, and a great noise in the street. He asked if they were going to take the poor old man away, and the mob hooted and cried out that witness ought to be sent with him, for he had brought the disease into town. Witness thought a "dog could not have been served worse than the deceased." The conduct of the landlady of the Swan Inn, the gentlemen, and the people about the house, was very inhuman. Several other witnesses corroborated this statement. Mr Goss, Surgeon, of Dawlish, deposed that he had given a certificate for the removal of the deceased, under the belief that he was to have been sent to Exeter in a chaise, and had particularly stated that it would be attended with a considerable danger to remove him in a covered cart as proposed. Dr Pennel, Surgeon, Exeter, stated that he was called from the Guildhall about 4 o'clock on Thursday morning, to see a man whom he was told was in a cart in St. Sidwell's, ill in the cholera. He went to the spot, opposite Kekewich-place, where he found deceased in the cart, and ordered him to be taken to a room, which being complied with, he examined him, and thought he was in a very dangerous state; he considered, from the symptoms, that deceased was decidedly labouring under cholera. He was informed that he had been conveyed from Dawlish to Exeter, and was of opinion that the removal of the man from such a distance as Dawlish, particularly after night, was calculated t increase the danger of the disease, and to lessen his chance of recovery. He had visited him two or three times after, and found he was sinking; on his last visit between ten and eleven o'clock, he was informed the man was dead, did not know, of his own knowledge, when the man died. The Jury after some consideration, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Capt. Hall, Mr Leeson and Mr Ferris, overseer of the poor, and the Coroner issued warrants for their apprehension.

Royal Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle - Saturday 27 October 1832
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held n Thursday evening last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Town Hall, Stonehouse, on the body of a woman, named ANN CHISSELL. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that a woman named Pain, had stolen a shirt from a flasket of clothes belonging to the deceased, and which she had placed in a room near that occupied by Pain, and on discovering the theft (having reason to suspect Pain) she went to her room and accused her of the felony, and whilst there became extremely agitated, and fell senseless on the floor, in which state she remained for some hours until her death. A report was current during the day that Pain had murdered the deceased, which was clearly proved to be false at the Inquest, evidence being adduced that Pain on the deceased's falling, had called for assistance, and that the daughter of the deceased and several other persons came into the room. The Jury after an investigation which lasted several hours, were satisfied that no violence had been offered to the deceased, and returned a verdict that she died from a fit of apoplexy, and not from any person violence.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 1 November 1832
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by John Robins, Esq., in the room of R. J. Squire, Esq., at the Prince of Wales, kept by Mr Farley in Russell Street, on the body of HENRY KEY, a watchman, who died suddenly on the steps of Mr Veale, pawnbroker, Exeter-street on Tuesday night. Verdict died by the Visitation of God.

DODBROOKE - Singular Case Of Suicide. - About a fortnight since a Coroner's Inquest was held at Dodbrook on the body of MR CUERTON, a person in easy circumstances and who enjoyed the reputation of being very religious. On the morning on which the unfortunate event took place, MR CUERTON arose rather earlier than usual, leaving his wife in bed, who was rather surprised on coming down to find his shoes and stockings deposited by the side of the water-cask. Not finding him about the house, she became greatly alarmed, and sent out people in various directions, in order, if possible, to obtain some information respecting him. Shortly after, however, the servant, in accidentally looking from the bedroom window, discovered him in the water cask, where he had seated himself on a low stool, in a stooping position, with his head partly immersed in water. Unfortunately the discovery took place too late, MR CUERTON being already dead, though but only 3 feet of water was in the cask at the time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity". It is said that £200 were found deposited in the coal-pit after his death.

Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal - Thursday 29 November 1832
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - We regret to state that a most melancholy instance of this nature took place on Sunday morning last, at Lower Stoke. MR AUSTEN, who was formerly a mercer and linen draper in Devonport, but who has lately been a lodger with Mr Chapple, boot and shoemaker, was found in the apartment he occupied, with his throat dreadfully lacerated, being nearly cut from ear to ear. On the morning in question, he had been asked by the family if he intended going to church, to which he replied in the negative, and on their return he was found in the state we have described - the door of his apartment being locked. For some time past he has laboured under severe depression of spirits, and at the Inquest held before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 December 1836
EAST STONEHOUSE - Another Inquest was held on Tuesday at Stonehouse, on the body of MR THOMAS SYMONS. It appeared that the deceased early that morning had gone into the house of his next door neighbour, in the parlour of which he was left busying himself at the window. On some person entering the room a few minutes afterwards, he was discovered lying dead or dying on the floor. Mr Burrows was called in, but life was extinct. Mr B. had not the least reason to doubt that the death had been produced by natural causes. The deceased had been unwell for some time past. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 January 1837
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquests. - The following Inquests have been held during the past week, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner:-
On Wednesday, the 11th inst., on the body of JOSEPH TUCKER, hackney coachman. It appeared from the evidence of Lieut. Dawson. H.M.S. Thunderer, that the deceased, about 5 o'clock on the evening of Monday, drove him from George-street, Devonport, to Hoe Gate-street, Plymouth, and returned for him at that place at 10 o'clock on the same evening. Lt. Dawson perceived as deceased was driving towards Devonport, that he was intoxicated; in consequence of this, Lieut. D. took the reins and drove the coach to his lodgings in George-street. When in George-street, Lt. D. took deceased from the box and placed him inside the coach; he was then in a state of stupor. A person took charge of the coach and drove the deceased home. He remained insensible till the next morning, when he died. It did not appear from the evidence of those who were in his company during the evening that he had drank to excess. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

EAST STONEHOUSE - At Stonehouse, on Monday, 9th inst., on the body of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, a private in the Royal Marines, who died in the Naval Hospital. The deceased, who had formerly belonged to H.M.S. Thunderer when at sea, had fallen from the combings of the after hatchway on a bar of iron which goes across the hatchway, and seriously injured his spine, of which he had languished up to this time, when he died of its effects. Verdict accordingly.

On the 9th inst. on the body of JOHN COLLIS, late foreman of blacksmiths in the Gunwharf. MR COLLIS appeared in good health on Sunday, and on that evening took tea with some of his relations - he appeared very cheerful. Soon after tea he went to the chapel in Princess-street. During the singing of the first hymn, Mr Halse, who was in the seat with deceased, observed something peculiar in his appearance - he took up deceased and carried him into the vestry, he was quite dead. - Verdict: Died by the Visitation of God.

At Richmond-walk, on the body of THOS. LINWELL, a waterman. Deceased left Mutton-cove on Tuesday afternoon, for the purpose of going to Millbrook, where his family resided. He was intoxicated at the time. Between 7 and 8 o'clock on the same evening he was seen in his boat among the vessels in Stonehouse Pool. The mate of a vessel, Geo. Gilpen, called to him, and soon after saw deceased, when attempting to stand in his boat, fall head foremost into the water. Assistance was speedily rendered, and deceased was removed to Mr Harris', Richmond-walk Inn. He was put in bed, and the means recommended by the Humane Society tried for his recovery. He appeared to be recovering the next morning, and took some tea. Soon after noon he grew worse and died in the afternoon. Verdict - Died from the effects of his Immersion.

EAST STONEHOUSE - At Stonehouse on the body of JANE MOORE, a child 5 years old, whose death was occasioned by her clothes taking fire. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 February 1837
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Accident And Loss Of Two Lives. - On Saturday morning last, as some men, at work on Mr Franklyn's new building, Fore-street, Devonport, were, with the assistance of shears and a tackle, endeavouring to raise a large block of stone to its place, and had nearly succeeded, when some part of the gear suddenly gave way, and the mass of stone was precipitated outwards with great violence, and striking a large scaffold pole, which stood against the building, broke it into three pieces. The shattered pole fell towards the opposite side of the street, and the fragments, in their descent, struck two boys on the head with such fatal force, as instantly to deprive one of them of life, whilst the other linger'd for but a very few minutes. The heads of both were woefully shatter'd, and must have presented a heart-breaking sight to their bereaved parents. The names of the little sufferers were JOSEPH HORN (son of a workman in the employment of Mr Cox, optician), and GEORGE EDWIN ANSTEY, son of MR J. ANSTEY, of the New Inn, Knackersknowle. - An Inquest was held the same day, before Mr Bone, (Coroner) on view of the bodies, and the circumstances having been detailed in evidence, and no fault appearing to attach to any party, - Verdicts of Accidental Death, were recorded in each case.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - An Inquest was taken on Monday last, before A. B. Bone, Esqr. (Coroner), on view of the body of NICHOLAS RUNDLE, late of John-street, Devonport, and formerly one of the commissioner's boat's crew in the Dock Yard. It appeared that the deceased had been for a short period suffering from influenza, and was also affected with an inflammation of the lungs, but did not appear depressed in spirits; however on the morning of the above day, on one of the inmates of his house going into his room, he was found lying on the floor with his throat cut in a most determined manner. A razor was found under the body, with which the fatal act was committed, and a looking glass was placed on a chair opposite, so as that the gash might be rightly directed. No motive could be assigned for the fatal act: nor had the deceased any family. Verdict, Temporary Insanity.

DAWLISH - Dreadful Accident In The River Exe. Eight Lives Lost. Starcross, Evening. - On Tuesday last, a man named PRING, who resides near Exmouth, went, accompanied by his two daughters, on board the brig Hinde, then in the bight, to visit a son who had arrived from a voyage; and in the evening about seven o'clock, four sons of the Boatman(Pine of Exmouth) took PRING and his two daughters and the son into their boat to put them on shore, at Exmouth, when, from some accident, (the cause of which is not known), the boat sunk and the whole of the eight persons were drowned. The Father, both daughters, and one of Pine's sons, have been picked up. Mr Gribble, the Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the youngest daughter, this day, at the Mount Pleasant Inn, when a verdict was found accordingly. From the evidence of the mate of the Hine, it appears that the boat was a very small one, not fit to take such a number of persons. The three other bodies at present found are taken to Exmouth. The melancholy catastrophe has caused the greatest sensation in Starcross, Exmouth, and the surrounding neighbourhood.

Western Courier, West of England conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 February 1837
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Accident. - On Sunday last, four persons, named JOHN SPRIDDLE, THOMAS ANDREWS, FRANCIS SPRIDDLE, and PASCOE SPRIDDLE, put to sea, from Cawsand, in the pilot boat "Elizabeth," and after sailing some distance southward they fell in with an Indiaman, from the commander of which they received a mail for delivery at the Plymouth Post Office. They were also given two bottles of spirit, of which, it appears, they drank freely in their way back to Plymouth, when, after delivering the letters, they again drank together until they became intoxicated. In this state three of the party determined to return to Cawsand, the third man, PASCOE SPRIDDLE remaining behind. They reached Cawsand in safety, but finding their punt was gone adrift, went in search of it, when, in attempting to put about near Hoo Lake, the craft missed stays, and was driven upon the rocks. Two of the unfortunate men, according to the evidence taken at the Inquest, then left the vessel and attempted to swim ashore, contrary to the wishes of the third. The other man, after some time finding himself alone, made a similar attempt, and with much difficulty effected his purpose, and reached the beach. From some cause, probably from stupefaction, this man, JOHN SPRIDDLE, instead of giving the alarm, or making inquiry as to the fate of his companions, retired to bed; and, in the morning, the vessel, valued in about 400l. was seen upon the rocks a complete wreck, and the two unfortunate men, THOMAS ANDREWS and FRANCIS SPRIDDLE were missing. Their bodies were subsequently picked up, and an Inquest held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury, after a patient Enquiry, returned a verdict of Found Dead, but would not take upon themselves to say from what cause they came to their end, as from the extraordinary conduct of the man JOHN SPRIDDLE, they could not put faith in his testimony.

DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held last week at Dartmouth, before Mr Richard Anthony, Coroner for that borough, on the body of a fine girl, named MARY ANN MITCHELMOORE, aged 10 years, who was accidentally burnt to death, being the second child who has lost its life by the devouring elements in that town within a fortnight.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 March 1837
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WINDSOR, of Fore-street, grocer, who put an end to his existence by taking a quantity of arsenic. The deceased was an unmarried man, and bore an excellent character for sobriety and punctuality in business, but some circumstance had of late appeared to prey heavily on his mind, and, on Monday evening last, he retired to bed earlier than usual, and early in the morning of the following day was taken with violent vomitings. John Bone, Esq., surgeon, was called in, and deceased confessed that he had taken arsenic. The Jury, after some consultation, returned a verdict - "That the deceased died from the effects of Arsenic; but whether the deceased was in a sound state of mind, at the time of so doing, the Jury would not take upon themselves to say."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 April 1837
HIGH BICKINGTON - Horrid Murder of MR JAMES KNIGHT, of Exeter. - We regret again to have to have to record the perpetration of a wilful murder in this county. The unfortunate victim is MR JAMES KNIGHT, of Exeter, known as a herbal doctor, in which character he travelled the country. On Monday the 20th ult., he called at the Ebberly Arms Inn, in the parish of High Bickington, on his way to that place, about 28 miles from Exeter, between Chulmleigh and Barnstaple. Here he found a person of the name of Robert Alford, who learning from the conversation which ensued, that KNIGHT was going to Bickington, said, that's my road, but I'm not going within a mile and a half of the village. Alford, however, proposed that so far as their route lay in the same direction they should go on together. From what cause this apparent understanding was not acted upon, does not appear; but KNIGHT quitted the Public-house alone. He had not, however, been gone about five minutes, when Alford also left, having with him a bill-hook. Nothing more was heard of MR KNIGHT until the following morning when he was found by a waggoner lying dead in the road. On his head and neck were two severe wounds, apparently inflicted with a bill-hook, or a similar instrument. One of these extended from the back of the head round by the ear, (a part of which had been completely severed,) and across the upper lip. The other was a little lower down, extending from the back of the neck to the under jaw, severing the fleshy part of the chin so completely that it had fallen down over the neck cloth. Information of this horrid transaction having been given to Henry A. Vallack, Esq., one of the Coroner's for Devon, that gentleman directed the immediate summoning of a Jury, which met on Wednesday, and from the evidence of the landlord of the public-house, Alford was taken into custody. The Jury pursued their Inquiry, adjourning from Wednesday to the following day, and at length returning a verdict of Wilful Murder against Robert Alford, who on the prisoner's warrant, was on Saturday lodged in the Devon and County Gaol. Alford is 27 years of age, a married man and has one child. He is by occupation a farm labourer, and is the son of a small but respectable farmer in that neighbourhood, the sensation in consequence of this tragic event is very great.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 May 1837
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Workhouse, before R. J. Squire, Coroner, and a most respectable Jury, on view of the body of JOHN COURTICE, whose body was found on the beach under the Hoe, where it had been washed on shore the same morning. The deceased, it appeared, lodged at a beer-shop in Southside-street, and was in the habit of occasionally leaving without saying why or wherefore: his landlord knew nothing of his mode of life, nor did he ever say how he got his living, but after those occasional absences, he was in the habit of getting change for a sovereign. He had left his lodgings the day previously, evidently labouring under a depression of spirits, having been previously suffering from cold and influenza and on Saturday morning the wretched man's body was found lying on the beach by a man named Palmer, who was breaking stones. After a patient investigation, the Jury returned the following verdict - Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 May 1837
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, on the body of a man named WALKER, aged 81 years, who was found dead in his bed at his lodgings, Dove's Court, Saltash-street, the same morning. The deceased has been known for many years as a dealer in books in the Plymouth market, and always bore the character of a most exemplary, upright, and honest man. He was in the market (where he held a stall) on Thursday last, and went to bed on Friday evening in his usual health - but his hour was come, and he was found the next morning placidly sleeping the sleep on death. There was no trace of the slightest struggle, and his death must have been easy, as his life was irreproachable. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of - Died by the Visitation of God.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 May 1837
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - A Coroner's Inquest was held last night at No. 7 Chapel-street, before R. J. Squire, Esq., on view of the body of THOS. KENDLE, aged 70, who came by his death under the following awful circumstances. The deceased had been in the habit of Drawing a Bath Chair for the Rev. Septimus Courtney, whose wife is an invalid; and on yesterday afternoon as the old man was (after having eaten a hearty breakfast and dinner, and leaving home in his usual health) pursuing his accustomed avocation; whilst going between Gibbon-street, and Chapel-street, assisted in his task by his Rev. employer, he staggered and falling, was supported by Mr Courtney, and being carried into the house of Mr Banks, No. 7, Chapel-street, was promptly attended by Messrs. Denton and Giles, Surgeons, but without effect; the vital spark had fled, and the aged man was called from a life of care and labour, to an eternity, as we hope, of peace and rest. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 May 1837
BARNSTAPLE - Forgery and Suicide. - A lamentable and awful occurrence has recently taken place in this town, A man named THOMAS KELLY, by trade a mason, who resided at Newport, was apprehended on Friday the 3rd inst., under suspicion of forging two cheques on the West of England and South Wales District Bank, it appears that, in the afternoon of the above day, he went to the shop of Mr Alexander, a watchmaker, in High Street, to purchase a watch, in payment for which he tendered a cheque for £18 6s. drawn in favour of Richard Gilbert, and signed Francis Squire. Mr Alexander, suspecting that all was not right, went immediately to the bank, leaving KELLY in his shop, for the purpose of getting the cheque cashed. On his way there he met Mr Thorne, the manager, who discovered it to be a forgery, KELLY was, in consequence, apprehended and identified as the person who had succeeded in passing a forged cheque for £14 8s. at the shop of Mr Kenward, linen-draper, on the 17th of April last, when he purchased some cloth and received about £12 in cash. The deposition of Mr Kenward was taken before a Magistrate and KELLY remanded to prison until the following day. In the course of the night, however, he put an end to his existence by hanging himself. - On the following day an Inquest was held on the body before T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury after hearing the evidence retired for about five minutes, and then returned with an unanimous verdict of Felo de Se. The Coroner accordingly issued his warrant for the body to be interred between the hours of nine and twelve the same night, without the rites of burial. - The circumstances being one of very rare occurrence, great sensation was excited; and from the hour of nine up to the body being conveyed to the churchyard for interment, which was about a quarter before twelve, crowds of persons were assembling; and, upon the whole, it presented one of the most disgraceful and horrifying scenes we ever witnessed. The body was inclosed in a rough shell; and as soon as it made its appearance the rush to obtain entrance to the yard, and for getting nearest to the grave was excessive. A vast number of the persons assembled were of the working classes; and being Saturday night, not a few of them were merry, so that any chance of preserving order was totally out of the question. It was, indeed, with very great difficulty that the persons entrusted to perform the last office for the unfortunate deceased could execute their task. One man jumped into the grave when the shell was let down, and wrote with chalk upon the cover "THOMAS KELLY," the name of the deceased - for what purpose we could not ascertain; but we suppose for the mere boasting of the act hereafter. We believe the general opinion is, among all who knew the circumstances connected with this melancholy affair, that the jury could not conscientiously have returned another verdict; but, of the revolting exhibition consequent upon it, we can only say that we never wish to look upon the like again. Deceased was a widower, but has left two or three children (one the wife of Moore) to lament his untimely end. - North Devon Advertiser.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 August 1837
CHAGFORD - MR JOHN ELLIS, son of MR ELLIS, of Lower Drewston, Chagford, was killed on Friday last, by a fall from his horse. He had left his father's house on the preceding day to go to Moretonhampstead, but not returning as expected his brother went in search of him, and not far from the house found the horse without its rider, and proceeding on towards Moreton found his brother lying in a senseless state. The unfortunate young man was removed to his house and medical assistance procured, but it was of no avail, and after lingering speechless till Saturday night, he expired. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased, who was about 28 years of age, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. It is supposed the horse fell with him as its knees were much cut.

PLYMOUTH - On Friday morning the 17th, considerable curiosity and excitement took place in Moon-street, Plymouth, in consequence of a report of the sudden death of the infant daughter of JOHANNAH SEYMOUR, the wife of one of the persons who travel at fairs with sticks and snuff boxes. The Coroner soon received information of the circumstance, and immediately attended and discovered the body of an extraordinary small and emaciated child, and from circumstances which wee elicited, it was feared that the infant had died from the want of proper nourishment, or some deleterious drug being administered. The Jury soon after assembled and the parish surgeon, Mr Peter Belamy, and at the request of the Jury, Mr Andrews, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, and analyses of the contents of the stomach, and of a grey powder found in the possession of the mother; but after a patient investigation, and two adjournments, the surgeon's evidence enabled the Jury to give their verdict, that the deceased infant died of Natural Causes, in all probability existing at the time of birth.

PLYMOUTH - On Saturday, Mr Squire, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, was called to inspect a body of an abandoned woman, called JANE HERBERT, aged 52 years, who was found dead on the floor of her room, in a house in Castle Street. It appeared in evidence that she had been in the habit of drinking fermented liquors to excess for many years, and sold and pledged everything she could get, for the purpose of gratifying that propensity. She received 1s. 6d. from the workhouse on Fridays, which she would call her christening day, and forthwith get beastly drunk, and she frequently expressed a desire to die drunk, which desire was gratified, for she was found dead in her room on Saturday morning, the surgeon, Mr Rattenbury, being of opinion that she died of apoplexy, owing to excess of drinking. The Jury found a verdict accordingly

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 September 1837
PLYMOUTH - On Friday last, the dwarf, JOHN LIPSON, was found dead in his bed, in the Plymouth workhouse; he had been an inmate for some time, in consequence of having been subject to epileptic fits. The Coroner for the Borough, Mr Squire, held an Inquest and it was satisfactorily proved that he died from a fit, and a verdict was given accordingly.

TEIGNMOUTH - Sudden Death. - The uncertainty of life and of all earthly enjoyments was perhaps never more exemplified than in the instantaneous death of MR BENJ. GREGORY, late draper of Teignmouth. The above gentleman had lately retired from business; having had considerable property left to him by the death of a relation, he had about ten days since been to London, in order to have the property which was in Chancery, the deceased relative being a lunatic, transferred in his own name, and having settled everything, and got possession, he hastened again to Teignmouth, to collect in his debts; he was stopping a few days with Mr R. Shimell; on Tuesday last, about half past four, he came down stairs from where he was writing out his accounts, to enquire if tea was ready, but not being quite ready, he returned again; in a few minutes Mr S. went through his room with something, and perceived him sitting upright in his chair, he spoke to him but got no answer; being alarmed he went over to him and to his great consternation found him quite dead; he must have died without a struggle, as he sat quite upright and his spectacles were on. An Inquest was held on the next day, when a verdict was returned "Did by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 September 1837
PLYMOUTH - The man named CORNISH, who met with an accident as stated in our last, at the National Provincial Bank, Plymouth, died of the injuries which he received, on Monday evening. On the following day an Inquest was held on the body, and after a patient investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" with a deodand of 1d. on the rope. The unfortunate man has left a wife and five young children totally unprovided for, and an appeal has been made to the benevolent for assistance.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 October 1837
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Accident. - On Thursday last, a lad called PETER FINN, while working as a mason's labourer, at the New Dispensary in Princess Square, Plymouth, fell from the second flight of stairs to the area below, and was killed on the spot; his head was literally dashed in pieces. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 November 1837
TAVISTOCK - Death From Drunkenness. - An Inquisition was held at Tavistock on Thursday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM VENTON, who met his death under the following circumstances: - Deceased had been for some time past in the habit of drinking to great excess, and on the evening of Tuesday was seen by several persons in the streets of Tavistock in a helpless state of intoxication. He fell many times, and was at last placed by some bystanders in a wheelbarrow and taken to his own house, where he was put to bed. On the following morning he was so ill, that Mr Mitchell, surgeon, was called in, who found his breathing very laborious, the face was livid, limbs cold, and the pulse at the wrist almost imperceptible. There was a wound on the back part of the head, occasioned, it is presumed, by falling on the previous evening, about half an inch in length and extending inwards. He died about three hours after Mr M. visited him. The body was opened by Mr Mitchell, who found the vessels of the head gorged with blood, which appearance he thought sufficiently accounted for by the extreme intoxication, and falling of deceased on the night previous. The verdict returned was in accordance with the circumstances related.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 November 1837
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - On Thursday evening last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Stoke on the body of a child named DYER, who had been for some time ill in the workhouse, and was a day or two previous to her decease removed from thence. It appeared, contrary t report, that every proper and possible care had been taken of the girl. Verdict - Visitation of God.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 February 1838
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - On the morning of Wednesday last, about 9 o'clock, MR ACFORD, grocer, Barrack-street, was found hanging to the bed-post in his sleeping room. He had been for some time previous suffering from illness, and the day mentioned was seen by his mother between 8 and 9 o'clock, when she took him his breakfast, some short time after she entered the room, and her son was kneeling at the bed side - he seemed in prayer, and his mother again left the room, but not hearing him move she shortly returned, and found that he was quite dead, having fastened one end of a silk handkerchief round his neck and attached the other to the top of the bed post, which was so low that his knees nearly touched the ground. Mr Jno. Rutter, surgeon, was called in, but all medical assistance was in vain. An Inquest has been held on the body and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 April 1838
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, a little girl, daughter of MR BENOY, of this Dock-yard, while standing near a bonfire, lighted in front of Navy-row, Stoke, caught her clothes on fire, and was so severely burnt that she died yesterday. A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Masonic Inn, Navy-row, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 May 1838
BOW - Melancholy Accident. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at Bow, before T. Copner, Esq. on the body of THOS. MORTIMER, a waggoner in the employ of Mr Durant, Northtawton. He was sitting on the shaft of the waggon, it is supposed asleep, and fell to the ground, when the wheel passing over him, fractured several of his ribs, and caused serious injury about the head. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 April 1839
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Instance Of Sudden Death. - A man named PEARCE, residing in one of the cottages on the Hoe, was found dead in his bed by his wife on Thursday morning:- on her awaking she discovered that his appearance was unusual; she spoke to him, and he made no reply; and melancholy to relate, on further examination she found that life was totally extinct. An Inquest has been since held on his body by Mr R. J. Squire, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 April 1839
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on the 9th inst., at the Anchor and Hope, Plymouth, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on the body of BOUNTIFUL MAY DEMELLWICK, who met his death under the following circumstances. It appeared that the deceased who is a native of Plymouth, was employed as pilot, and one of the crew on board the fishing lugger Elizabeth and Mary of Stonehouse, Jacob Collins, master, and on Monday morning 8th inst., being on the fishing ground, was engaged with two men in delivering a quantity of fish on board the smack Anne, of Weymouth, lying off at a short distance, when the latter vessel bore up for the purpose of meeting them, and not having let go the jib sheet quick enough, unfortunately ran the boat down; two of the men succeeded in saving themselves, one by laying hold of the bobstay of the Anne, and the other by holding on to the keel of the boat which had been capsized, but DAMELLWICK met a watery grave. A few hours after the occurrence the body of DEMELLWICK was accidentally taken up in the trawl of the smack Pheasant, of Plymouth. - Verdict Accidental Death. The deceased was an excellent seaman and much respected.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 May 1839
DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held last week at Dartmouth, by Joseph Gribble, esq., County Coroner, upon GEORGE STERT, a pauper, who had died in the Totnes Union Poor House, and was interred at Dartmouth - various reports about the cause of his death were in circulation; among the rest, that his death was caused by ill treatment in the Union House. The body was disinterred and several medical gentlemen were examined, who gave it as their opinion, that he died "By the Visitation of God," and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect. It has caused great excitement both at Totnes and Dartmouth.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser- Wednesday 8 May 1839
EXETER - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of WM. TREE, of Sowton, 63 years of age, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the preceding Thursday night. The deceased was a labourer and helper in the stables at the residence of the Rev. Dr. George Barnes, and on the preceding Sunday had received a severe kick from the horse he was attending. He was removed to the Hospital where amputation of the left leg was found necessary and performed with great skill; but he sank under the injury he had sustained; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER - An Inquest has been taken before Mr Warren, at Ash's George and Dragon Public House, Black Boy Road, Exeter, on the body of ELIZA JORDAN, an infant 16 months old, whose death was occasioned by falling into a sink in the courtlage in which its parents resided, during the temporary absence of her mother for a pitcher of water. The time from the child being missed by the mother, to that of being discovered in this situation, did not exceed three minutes: and Mr Besley (Land and Besley, surgeons) was called in, but all efforts to restore animation were fruitless. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 June 1839
EXETER - Death Of An Infant Child By Drinking Hot Water. - On Saturday morning last, as a woman named MODLEY, residing in Mary Arches Street, Exeter, was frying some meat for her husband's breakfast, her child, aged 20 months, went to the tea-kettle of boiling water, and drank out of it without its mother's knowledge. The child began to cry violently, and the mother then perceiving what it had done, administered such remedies as were near at hand, and subsequently took it to the dispensary, where it received every attention, but without avail, and it expired in dreadful agonies on Sunday morning. An Inquest was held on Monday at the Courtenay Arms, and a verdict returned of "Died in Consequence of Drinking Boiling Water."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 January 1840
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in Barnstaple, before Thomas Codner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY DOWNING, aged 3 years, who was killed by the wheel of a cart passing over her body. The child was coming out of a house in Bibberly-street, to pass across to her mother's with a jug in her hand, when a cart drawn by two horses came down the street, and the forehorse touching the child, she fell, and the wheel passed over her body, before the driver had time to pull up. Two women were near the spot at the time, who gave their evidence that the man was driving at a steady pace, and they thought the driver did not see the child, before the horse knocked her down. The man had the reins in his hand. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of one shilling on the wheel.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 March 1840
AXMINSTER - Deaths From Clothes Catching Fire. - An Inquest was held at Axminster on the 24th ult., before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WM. CROSS, an infant, 4 years of age, whose death was occasioned by his clothes catching fire on the Saturday previous. The child with two others was sitting round the fire which was on the hearth in the care of an elder sister, about 13 years old, when its pinafore suddenly caught fire, the girl tried to extinguish it, but it communicated to the other clothes and the child was so severely burnt as to occasion death on the following morning.

PLYMOUTH - On Friday week an Inquest was held at the Maritime Inn, Plymouth, on the body of JOHN DUSTIN, who was found dead in the morning, in a shed situated in one of the gardens near the garrison. It appeared that the deceased, who was a kind of porter to the merchants at the port, hung himself: he had been observed to be low-spirited a few days before, but the Jury delivered a verdict of Felo-de-se, and the body was interred without Christian burial.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Saturday last as JOHN FURZE of Pilton, sawyer, was working in the Deal Yard of Mr Richard Thorne, adjoining the North Walk Barnstaple, he fell down and instantly expired. A surgeon was sent for who tried to bleed him, but the vital spark had fled for ever; a Coroner's Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., and a verdict, Died by the Visitation of God returned. The deceased bore an excellent character, and had been in the employ of Mr Thorne as foreman of the yard for a great many years.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 March 1840
PLYMOUTH - Destructive Fire, Attended With Loss Of Life. - On Thursday morning last, a fire broke out at Elliott's Royal Hotel, in this town, which, according to the Police report, was first discovered at a quarter past four o'clock, by Police constable Prowse, who observed some smoke issuing from the top of the house, and on going into Princess-street, met a man named Adams, who desired him to come into his house, when he saw the flames bursting from a bedroom window; he immediately gave the alarm in the street, sent to the Station house for the fire engine, and quickly succeeded in alarming Col. Parke, who was sleeping in front of the Hotel, and who of course awoke Mr Elliott and the other inmates. The fire was found to be raging in some bedrooms over the card room, one of which was occupied by MAJOR HORNDON, the door of which was opened by Mr James Rowe, and Mr Angelly, who were twice driven back by the force of the flame and smoke, and before a third attempt could be made, the floor fell into the card-room. Those persons, with others who soon assembled, made some vain attempts to check the progress of the fire with buckets of water, and at a quarter before five an engine arrived, accompanied and commanded by that active officer Lieut. Williams, the director of the Dock Yard police, to whom the town is under great obligation, for the high state of discipline as firemen which he has produced among the men under his command, and for which we have on all similar occasions been called upon to express our highest commendations and warmest thanks. The first engine was taken to Princess Street, and in ten minutes was, by the exertions of Inspector Brown, and the Dock Yard policemen, in full play through the adjoining court, with five hoses of 40 feet in length each, throwing a stream of water through 200 feet of hose, which being carried up on the roof of the nearest building, by Lieut. Williams's directions, and by the further aid of scaling ladders, was brought to play directly on the rooms then burning, and effectually prevented the fire extending to the ball-room at one end, and the great staircase at the other. [There then followed a long description of how the fire was extinguished].
The Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, at Townshend's London Inn, Fore-street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a Jury, consisting of the following gentlemen:- Mr Josiah Glencross, foreman; Messrs. John May, Harold Billing, Henry Stephens, Edward Ramsey, John Batten, John Eastcott, William Colman, William Richards, James P. Symons, Richard Adams, William Heath and Thomas Franklyn. The Jury having viewed the body. Mr S. Kerswell, surgeon, being sworn, stated that about 5 o'clock on the morning of Thursday he was alarmed, and informed that the Hotel was on fire; he went to the hotel, and heard that MAJOR HORNDON was missing; found the hotel was on fire; went into the coach-office, and looking through the window found that the room in which deceased slept was destroyed, as well as other parts of the house contiguous thereto; the flooring of the Major's room was destroyed; he knew the deceased more than twelve months; had attended on him about four months; he was aged and infirm, from his being wounded in the service; could walk without assistance; his intellect was perfect. Saw masons employed in removing a quantity of rubbish from the room under that in which deceased had slept; saw deceased last alive on Tuesday. The rubbish was composed of the destroyed part of deceased's room, and of the roof, saw a small portion of the knee joint on the rubbish, and just below, on removing the rubbish, the head and trunk; from circumstances, he had no doubt of its being the body of MAJOR HORNDON; the portions of the body were taken to the adjoining room, and are the same viewed by the Jury. - Eliza Sargent was chambermaid at the Hotel - knew deceased, who had been staying at the Hotel about 5 months previously to Thursday last; he was an old and infirm man; knew the room in which the body was found, which was under the room occupied by the deceased ever since he was there; saw him last at a quarter past one in the morning: visited him the last thing before going to bed; she and her fellow servant did so alternately ever since he was there, by his request. He went to bed at ten; she then had bathed his arm. On visiting him at half-past ten, she found him fast asleep. There was on the floor a rush-light in a shade, and there was also a candle in a bed candlestick, not lighted. He was a sober, steady man. There was also a fire in the grate at half-past ten, but believed it was out at half-past one. Saw nothing likely to take fire to occasion an accident. Closed the door, but did not lock it. It is not the custom of the house for a person to stay up all night; she was one of the last person to bed. John Truss, the under waiter, retired at the same time, immediately after she had visited the deceased. It was the card room in which the body and articles produced were found. The rushlight was five feet from the bed, and an equal distance from the dressing table. Early the same morning, she was awoke by the smoke; on coming outside her door, heard Colonel Parke crying "fire" on the circular landing of the staircase. He called for water, she gave him a bucket full; he went to the room of deceased with it; saw the flames issuing from the door way of that room. They all went into the street and gave the alarm. - Lieu.-Colonel Parke, of the Bengal Army, sworn: - Has been residing at the Hotel for some months; knew the deceased since he had resided at the Hotel; knew the room occupied by deceased; went to bed between 10 and 11; his room was on the same floor. On Thursday, between half-past three and four, was disturbed by the rattle of watchmen, crying "fire;" he got out of bed, and looked into the street; was informed by the police that the Hotel was on fire; left his room, and went immediately to the room of deceased; saw the fire proceeding from the floor of the passage near the room; there was much smoke in the passage, which prevented his approach towards the door; from the appearance of the fire, it must have passed along the floor; the portion on fire was about two feet long, six inches wide, but not very high; he returned to the staircase and gave an alarm. Went down stairs, where he met Mr Adams, of Fore-street; he perceived that the fire had reached the room above that of deceased; about two hours after he saw the cupols fall in. The fire had extended over all that of the Hotel; the first engine arrived about 40 minutes after the alarm was given; there was great difficulty in getting water; he supposed that an hour had elapsed before water was obtained from the plugs; the first supplies of water was from the Hotel, Mr Batten's, Mr Richards and other houses; he saw a man digging the pavement for the purpose of getting at the plugs; the portions of the Major's room which was destroyed, fell into the card-room below. From every appearance, it was the part of the house from which it originated. The house was particularly quiet that night. - Mr James Rowe sworn:- On Thursday morning at about 4 o'clock, he was alarmed with cries of "fire"; on arriving at the back of the Hotel in Princess-street, he saw flames issuing from the room next to that in which deceased slept; he entered the Hotel and assisted in removing the stage coaches. He then inquired of the female servant if any persons were in the rooms; she replied "yes, the poor Colonel"; they were in the habit of calling the Major, Colonel. He (Mr R.) on hearing this felt very much alarmed supposing she meant Colonel Parke. Saw Colonel Parke, who directed him to the room of the deceased, and succeeded in opening the door, but was obliged immediately to retreat from the flames rushing out. The fire was also raging in the adjoining room. He then went into every other bedroom. He was convinced that no one could be living in the bed-room of deceased for an hour previously; he went into the card-room immediately under the room of deceased. The ceiling was on fire and falling into the card-room. He assisted in throwing water on the floor of the card room; the first engine he saw was in the body of the Hotel, about three quarters of an hour after. About a quarter of an hour later he saw another engine pipe brought up. The fire raged for the first 2 hours very fiercely, and was got under about half-past seven o'clock. - John Bonney sworn:- Is a peace officer; came to the Hotel soon after six o'clock, went to the card room, about eight o'clock, in which was a great quantity of rubbish; all the roof was gone above the card room, but a few of the joists of the room was left in a very burnt state; was present when Smith the mason, dug up the body, and the articles now produced. The body was placed in the adjoining room, in which it is now laying. On the card plate is engraved "MR J. D. HORNDON." He took possession of the articles and has retained them since in his possession. The chambermaid was recalled, and stated that it was not customary to have fire in the rooms; no one had a fire but the major. - William Heddon, sworn:- Had been a servant to MAJOR HORNDON three months and nine days; and saw him last alive on Wednesday last in bed at about eleven o'clock. He got into bed by himself but could not undress himself; he always assisted him to bed; his intellect was perfect. He appeared quite cheerful at eleven o'clock, and wished him "good night." He went to his lodgings, which were out of the house, immediately after he left the deceased - he heard that the Hotel was on fire at half past seven o'clock. He identified some of the articles found as having belonged to his late master. Had spoken to his master frequently to be allowed to sleep in the room. There was a bed in the room for that purpose, but he had an objection and would not allow it. One morning, about a fortnight since, he found a bed-candle upset on a blanket, with two holes burnt in it: shewed it to him, and he said he could not put out the candle. About six weeks or two months ago, he burnt a hole in his shirt. Communicated this to Mrs Elliott, and stated it was necessary that some person should sleep with him. He never communicated with his family on the subject. He said to Mrs Elliott that one day he would set himself on fire; she said, "I think he will Heddon." He generally was the first in the morning to visit his master; sometimes he found the candlestick near the bed; his master sometimes left his bed to light his candle, in order to take his medicine; he used to get into bed by sitting on it, and laying down. One evening, about three weeks since, he found him in his sitting room, on his back; the deceased stated that he fell on his back in attempting to stir the fire. He was subject to lightness in his head, but was not, to his knowledge, subject to fits. About five nights previously he got out of bed and severely injured his back, in consequence of which, he desired permission to sleep in the room, but he replied that he should leave for Callington on Tuesday, but subsequently altered his mind. He did not think his master was capable of managing his business; he found silver and gold laying on the floor of the room. He had six sovereigns and a five pound note in a tin box; after he (witness) had paid his bill. He had no other reason for saying that he was incapable of managing his own affairs but his losing his money; - His intellect was sound. The keys now produced by Bonney belonged to the Major. - John Thomas Towson sworn:- About 20 minutes before 5, he attended with the Dock Yard engine at the back of the Hotel; he passed the house through the passage of an adjoining house; assisted with Mr Gormudy in directing the engine into the card room through the window of which he could view the interior of the room of the deceased through the joist which was in flames. The only cessation of the operation of the engine was during the period occupied in bringing in a ladder. After the fire had been reduced on the premises he went into the Hotel. At about 7 o'clock he went into the card room and assisted in removing the ruins to search for the body. Saw some small portion of hair and feathers on the joists of the room in which the deceased had slept - on its being thrown down into the room below he observed three portions of human bone mixed up with portions of the bedding. On coming into the adjoining closet he observed the chimney to be on fire, which appeared to him to contain the flue of the room in which the deceased slept. - The Coroner having called the attention of the Jury to the leading points of the evidence, they returned the following verdict:- "That the said JOHN DOIDGE HORNDON died from the effects of fire, which from some cause unknown to the Jurors, took place in the said Hotel."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 March 1840
UGBOROUGH - On Friday last, as a quarryman of the name of HENRY HUDDER, was engaged at work at Bowcombe slate quarry, in the parish of Ugborough, when at the depth of 40 feet, the archway above him fell in, and completely buried him in the rubbish; he was shortly after dug out quite dead, with his skull fractured in a shocking manner. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, by Mr J. J. Gribble, Coroner of Ashburton, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 April 1840
EXETER - Suicide For Love. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday at Exeter, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE WILLIAM TRENHICK, a fine young man aged 27, who had been found the same morning, suspended from a beam, in an apartment occupied by him, in a house in the neighbourhood. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was a stonemason, his friends resided at Torquay, and he was a young man of sober and religious habits. He had lodged with a Mrs Salter, the wife of a servant in the employment of Mr Mortimer since September last. About that period, he formed an attachment for a young woman, a female servant, which at Christmas was broken off, in consequence of her having gone to a ball without his knowledge. Since the termination of this acquaintance a marked change had taken place in the manner of the deceased, and latterly he had become silent, reserved, and apparently labouring under distress of mind. On Sunday last and for some days previously, he ate scarcely anything, and his conduct at times was very strange. He returned home on Sunday night quite sober, and went to bed without saying anything. On Monday morning, at half-past 5, he called to his landlady, who was still in bed, to make out his bill for the week, as was her custom, and went down stairs. The front door was heard to shut violently, as if he had gone out, but it was shown that if he had done so, he could not have come in again, without its being opened from within, as it had a latch key. Shortly after six o'clock he was found by Mrs Salter suspended to a beam from a rope made of small twine, carefully twisted together and formed into a running knot, in his bed-room. He was immediately cut down, but proved to be quite dead. - "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 May 1840
ASHBURTON - Sudden Death. - On Sunday 20th inst., about 7 o'clock, MR WM IRELAND FERRIS, school-master of Ashburton, left his house to walk a short distance, and on reaching the house of a relative, he complained of being faint, and was provided with a chair to sit down, when his symptoms of illness became very alarming - a medical gentleman was immediately sent for, who promptly attended just as he breathed his last. He has left a widow and four children to lament their loss. An Inquest has been held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict "Died by the Visitation of God" returned.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death At Bideford. - On Sunday last, on board the Robert, (a London Trader) lying alongside the quay died HENRY BUDGE, a young man aged about 21, one of the crew; - he had been spending the morning on shore, and was seen to go on board about half-past 11 o'clock and at 12 the poor fellow was found dead. An Inquest returned a verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 20 May 1840
EAST STONEHOUSE - On Monday morning se'nnight, LIEUTENANT YELLAND, R.N., lately residing at Newton Ferris, went out on the whiting ground for the purpose of fishing, in company with another person, but after being there a short time, he was taken unwell, and exclaiming he was dying, he laid his head on the gunwale of the boat and expired. The deceased was afflicted by asthma, and on a post mortem examination of the body, it was apparent that the cause of death was that disease in a spasmodic form. An Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq., on Thursday last - the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - On Wednesday morning last, the wife of a blacksmith in H.M. Dock-yard, named METTERS, living at No. 18, Ordnance-street, in this borough, came by her death in a most shocking manner. On that morning her son had left her washing clothes in her room, and shortly after she was found by a neighbour quite dead, with her back against the wall of the fire-place, the room was full of smoke, and the deceased's body was dreadfully burnt; her clothes being also entirely consumed. The deceased was subject to apoplectic fits, and it is supposed that she had fallen into the fire during an attack of apoplexy. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body by A. B. Bone, Esq., on Wednesday last, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 May 1840
On the morning of Wednesday, the 13th instant between two and three o'clock, a boatman, in the Coast Guard Service, on the Sidmouth Station, being on duty about a quarter of a mile from the Station House, heard a noise as if some earth and stones were falling from the cliff, and on watching, saw something being hauled up the face of the cliff by persons above, which looked like a sack with tubs of spirit in it, and on the beach near the spot he saw some tubs, but no men near them. He fired his pistol immediately to give the alarm, and after having so fired he saw the body of a man lying on the beach near the tubs, and about seven or eight yards from him between himself and the cliff. he went up to the man and lifted him up thinking he was drunk. He fired his pistol three or four times till his comrade, another guardman, came up, who still thinking him tipsy they laid him down on the beach, and the first man stopped by him till daylight in order to prevent his running away, when he discovered the man was dead. The body was lying on its back about 20 yards from where the sack was seen being hauled up the cliff, and a quantity of earth and stones had fallen from the cliff at that place. A wound was observed under the chin of the deceased which appeared fresh, but not bleeding, full of dirt and red earth, of the same colour with the earth of the cliffs. The sack which was hauling up at the time the alarm was given did not come down again, and another sack, with three tubs in it and room for one more, was found near the tubs on the beach. - An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, the 14th inst., when a report having been extensively circulated that the deceased had been shot, a post mortem examination was made on the body, when three small jagged cuts were found under the margin of the chin, a small one on the upper part of the right side of the forehead, and an incision in the scalp at the back part of the head, the skull was not fractured - no bones were broken and there was no dislocation of the neck. On opening the chest the pericardium was found full of blood, which was caused by the escape of blood from a rupture in the right auricle, large enough to admit the finger, which was sufficient to account for the rapid if not instantaneous death of the deceased. Such a rupture, in the opinion of the medical gent., was likely to occur from a violent fall on a yielding substance, such as the shingle of the beach, while on a hard substance such as a rock, a fall would be likely to be accompanied by fracture of the limbs. No penetrating wound whatever was discovered on the body, and the external wounds were not sufficient to occasion death. The body was identified to be that of a man named CHICHESTER MANDILL, a carpenter, of Southleigh, who had left his home the day before. It is supposed that the deceased was engaged with others in hauling the tubs up the cliff, and while holding on by the rope, either missed his footing or his hold and fell violently on the beach. The muscular straining and inflation of the lungs necessary on such an occupation at the moment of the fall, must, we think, have greatly aided in producing the rupture discovered on the examination of the body.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 June 1840
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman, named LOVEDAY GIDLEY, who resided in Cherry Garden street. It was industriously rumoured that the cause of her death was from starvation, during the absence of her daughter who lived with her; it appeared that by her intemperance, and self neglect, she had reduced herself to extreme destitution and had for a long period slept on the floor of her apartment, with hardly anything to cover her, but from the assistance of her friends and a pension she has received since the death of her husband, she never wanted food. After Mr Rutter, jun., surgeon, had examined the body and reported to the Jury his opinion that the cause of the woman's death was from diseased lungs, a verdict was given of "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 July 1840
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at the Cross Keys, in Queen Street, on the body of a man named JOHN BEST, aged 89, late a superannuated cook from her Majesty's navy. The particulars elicited were as follows:- The deceased left his residence at Morice-town on Wednesday morning, and went to the house of Mr Granville, boot lane, for the purpose of seeing a friend, and while a neighbour was in the act of calling for the person he wanted, he fell down insensible. It was at first supposed to be a fit; but Mr Squires, surgeon, came in at the time to see a patient, and on being told the circumstance, immediately went to the deceased, and endeavoured to bleed him, but found life was extinct. Up to the time of his death, the deceased was in pretty good health. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 September 1840
EAST STONEHOUSE - Man Killed On Board The Vanguard. - An Inquest was held at the Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, on Friday evening last, by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an ordinary seaman, named MIZEON, who was killed on the preceding day, by falling from the yard of her Majesty's ship Vanguard, then lying at anchor in the Sound. From the evidence of Mr Henry Leg, mate, it appears that deceased was employed in painting the cross-jack yard, which is the lower yard of the mizenmast of the ship, between two and three o'clock on Thursday afternoon. He was sitting on the yard in the usual way; he had one arm round the yard, and he was using his brush with the other. A short time after he noticed him about his work, he (Mr L.) observed the paint brush fall on the deck. He immediately inquired of deceased his reason for letting the brush fall, but he got no answer, deceased was looking on the deck and directly fell from the yard down on the poop. He went over to him and held him up. but he was quite senseless and motionless; blood was flowing from his mouth and nostrils and he groaned a little. He was immediately taken below, where he received surgical aid, but to no effect, for her had expired. The height of the yard from which he fell was between 40 and 50 feet; he did not strike against anything in his fall. There was no person on the same yard from which deceased fell, nor was there anyone near the yard so as to have occasioned his falling therefrom. It was fine weather and there was nothing calculated to confuse or disturb the deceased. Mr Leg had heard since his death that deceased was subject to fits. The surgeon's assistant and other persons were examined and all tending to prove that the deceased met his death accidentally, verdict was returned by the Jury accordingly.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death. - On Saturday morning another Inquest was held at the Armless Man, by A. B. Bone, Esq., on ANN STEED, who suddenly dropped down dead at her residence, Newpassage. Her daughter, ROBINA STEED, stated to the Jury that her mother was in the 51st year of her age. On Friday afternoon, about half-past four o'clock, her mother was sitting on a form in her apartment, and was about to make a pasty when she suddenly called out "My dear girl, there has something took me." Her daughter seeing her falling immediately went to her assistance, and supported her, and with the help of her sister laid her on the ground. Deceased never moved nor breathed afterwards. Mr Cole, surgeon, came and bled her. Mr Swain, surgeon, stated that when he visited the deceased (about half-past six) she was quite dead. She appeared to have died within a half an hour. The body was pallid; but not fairly emaciated. He had opened the body and was satisfied that the cause of death was disease of the heart; he had attended her for three years at different times, and her symptoms were always those of a diseased heart; after a few remarks from the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Disease of the Heart."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 September 1840
PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the No Place Inn, Eldad, by R. J. Squires, Esq., Coroner, on the body of LYDIA BILL, aged 25, a domestic servant, living at Wyndham Place, who committed suicide by cutting her throat. She had lived 15 years with her master, who gave her an excellent character. She was particularly fond of reading, and extracting poetry from books; but within the last month a decided change in her manner and conduct was observed; and on Saturday morning her behaviour was very inconsistent. She suddenly threatened to leave the house and then as quickly, on being talked to, became composed, and attended to her duties. Her mistress or one of the family was constantly with her until five o'clock, when she was left for a few minutes; and on one of the family returning to the kitchen in consequence of the deceased not answering her call, she was discovered on the floor motionless, and surrounded by blood. Dr Reed instantly attended and found by one incision she had severed the left carotid artery, which caused instant death. The Jury returned a verdict "Destroyed Herself During Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 October 1840
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esquire, on Monday evening last, on the body of MARY VOSPER, of Cornwall street, widow. It appears that on Friday night about nine o'clock, one of the tenants of the house in which she resided in opening the door leading into the court-yard found some difficulty in doing so, from a weight which appeared to be pressing against it. He placed his hand under the door to ascertain the cause of the obstruction, when he felt some female's apparel and at the same time heard a noise like that of a female groaning, he then pushed open the door, and perceived the deceased on the ground. no one else was in the courtlage - she was quite insensible and was fast losing her breath. Having procured a light, and called some women to the deceased, she was removed to her room. Mr Evans was called and bled the deceased, but she died in a few hours without becoming again conscious. There was a slight wound on her head, apparently produced by a fall. The deceased had suffered from giddiness of the head for some time past, and it was supposed that she must have been seized with a fit of apoplexy on going into the courtlage, and had so remained until she was found. Verdict - Natural Death from Apoplexy.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 November 1840
LYDFORD - Prince Town, Dartmoor. - An Inquest was held by Mr Bone, on Saturday last, at the Ducky hotel in Prince town, on WILLIAM PENELUNA, a child under the age of 6 years, who died from the effects of an injury caused by his clothes catching fire. It appears that the child had been left at home with several other children younger than himself by his mother, who had gone to pay a visit and to take tea with a neighbour; there being a fire lighted in the grate and a kettle of water on the fire in the room where they were. Within a few minutes after the mother's departure from the house, the poor child went to the fire to remove the kettle, the water in which was boiling over, and in doing so caught his apron on fire, and thereby became so burnt as to occasion his death. It was stated that this was the third child of the same mother who had died from a similar cause. The Coroner remarked on the very great number of cases of this kind which appear to have recently happened and animadverted on the want of parental care of the mother in the case in question. The Jury unanimously concurred with the opinion so expressed and appended to their verdict a declaration that the conduct of the mother had been highly negligent and improper.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 December 1840
LAPFORD - Alleged Murder Of Two Persons. - During the last fortnight the inhabitants of Lapford, a little village near Chulmleigh, and adjoining the turnpike road from Exeter to Barnstaple, have been very much excited in consequence of the death of two of their fellow parishioners, under circumstances calculated to induce a strong suspicion that they had come to their end by violent means. It seems, that MR R. TUCKER, one of the deceased persons, resided at Lapford, and carried on business there as a maltster, although not, we believe, to any great extent. He was married to his present wife, MARY ANN TUCKER, formerly MARY ANN PARTRIDGE, about two years since, and has by her one child aged about 12 months. In MR TUCKER'S house resided himself and his wife, and a person named WILLIAM PARTRIDGE, the half-brother of the latter, being the son of their mutual father by a former wife. PARTRIDGE used to assist TUCKER in his business as a servant and is generally reported to have been a harmless and inoffensive man. The only remaining member of the family was a little girl, named AGNES PARTRIDGE, of between 11 and 12 years of age; she is a younger sister of MRS TUCKER, and had gone to live with her, three or four months since, to assist her in doing her work. On the morning of Sunday the 15th of November, all these parties breakfasted nearly at the same time, in MR TUCKER'S kitchen, on some bread and milk, which MRS TUCKER appears to have prepared for them. After the bread and milk had been eaten, MRS TUCKER also produced some bread and cream, of which they all partook, but whether it was cut into slices by her or not, it is a matter of some doubt. Within two hours after breakfast, TUCKER felt himself very unwell with a sickness and a cold shivering, and retired to bed. His wife procured some elder blossoms from a neighbour, for the purpose of making him some tea, and it does not seem to be denied, that she paid him as much attention as could be expected of her in the course of the day. At two o'clock he was seen by his father, who had been sent for at his request; he complained to him of being very ill, and described to him the symptoms under which he laboured. His father suggested to him the propriety of sending for a surgeon, and his brother, who was also present, offered t go for one, but the sick man would not consent for some time, saying he would rather wait until the morning, and he should see how he was by that time. While they were discussing about sending for the doctor, it was suggested that WILLIAM PARTRIDGE might be despatched to get one, but on going to the back part of the house in search of him, he was found in the hay loft very ill, and with precisely the same symptoms as those from which MR TUCKER was suffering. In this state he was seen by MRS TUCKER herself and by MR R. TUCKER. He continued very unwell and in a short time came in and went to bed. In the course of the same afternoon; the little girl, AGNES PARTRIDGE, whom we have spoke of above, was taken sick and vomiting, and she too was obliged to go to bed. In the evening about nine o'clock the surgeon, Mr Tidbould, of Chulmleigh, who had been sent for in the meantime, arrived, and continued in attendance until the decease of MR TUCKER. On the afternoon of the Monday, PARTRIDGE died, but TUCKER lingered until about half-past seven o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he also expired. On that same morning the girl was sufficiently recovered to be able to come down stairs and she is now quite well. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday week, on the bodies of TUCKER and PARTRIDGE, at the Malt-scoop Inn, before the Coroner of the District. At this Inquest, Mr Tidbould, the surgeon, stated that he had ordered the evacuations from the stomachs of the two deceased persons to be carefully preserved and that since their death, he had analysed them and found that there was arsenic combined with them. He stated his opinion also that the men did not die from the natural causes. In consequence of this statement the Coroner judged it expedient that a post mortem examination of the bodies should be made, and he adjourned the Enquiry for that purpose, confiding the task of examination to Mr Empson, surgeon, of Crediton, in conjunction with Mr Tidbould. The result of the chemical experiments made by these two gentlemen, as will be seen below, fully bore out Mr Tidbould's former impression that the men had died from poison, and that the poison was arsenic. The adjourned Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the School-room, in Lapford Church Town. MRS TUCKER was present during the whole of the examination. She is about 19 years of age, and has been very respectably educated, her father being a man of some substance, living now at Southleigh, to which place he has recently removed from Lapford. Her personal appearance presents nothing remarkable, but her demeanour during the whole of this day was subject of general remark. She sat, throughout the proceedings, unmoved, and apparently unconcerned, and had not our attention been drawn to her incidentally, we could not have conceived that the person before us had been only one short week a widow, even had the circumstances of bereavement been very different from what they actually were. Once and once only, she showed signs of being slightly affected - it was when old MR TUCKER was repeating his sons dying request, that he would be kind to his wife. The Jury consulted for about an hour and a half, and returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against MARY ANN TUCKER. The verdict occasioned great surprise among those who had heard the evidence, as a different result had been generally anticipated.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 December 1840
EXETER - Distressing Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at St. Sidwell's, Exeter, before S. H. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of PETER COLLINS, journeyman coach-maker, who was found with his throat cut from ear to ear, in a field. From the evidence given to the Jury, it appeared that his wife who was at Plymouth, attending to some repairs to her property, which the late gales had rendered necessary, was taken ill, and deceased, who had never been cheerful since her departure, on being made acquainted with it, fell into a state of despondency, and it is supposed that his having been out of work, and the dread of expenses consequent on the repair of his property and his wife's illness, so preyed upon his mind as to lead him to commit the fatal act. The barking of some dogs attracted attention to the body of the deceased; a razor covered with blood was found near the spot and identified as his property. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - Man Killed By Fighting. - On Friday last, William Mallett, aged about 17, who appeared to be much bruised was brought before the Magistrates at the Guildhall, charged with killing a lad named BROCK, the son of a man who was formerly a port butcher, residing in Old Town-street. From the evidence given, it appeared that the deceased and prisoner who were companions had quarrelled about a book, which the prisoner lent to a young female, which book she gave to her brother, who had taken it to sea with him; and on the prisoner asking her for it, she told him she had given it to BROCK. The prisoner then asked BROCK for the book, and he led him to believe he had it, and said he had lent it and should not return it. Some words ensued and the deceased threatened Mallett with a thrashing and challenged him to fight; but he refused and left him. Challenges were afterwards sent to the prisoner, but he declined them. They met, however, in a field near the Hoe, and the result was that after fighting for nearly an hour, BROCK was taken home insensible, surgical assistance was procured, but he expired at twelve o'clock. - An Inquest was held in the evening, by R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, at Farley's, Golden Lion, Old town-street, Plymouth, on the body of the deceased, when the following evidence was adduced:- James Redburn, being sworn, stated that he had known the deceased for six months and he never knew him to quarrel with anyone. He saw the deceased on Thursday evening at eight o'clock, and nothing particular passed. They walked up Old Town-street, and he (the witness) went down towards the church, in Bedford-street, where he met William Mallett and Edward Cove. They asked him if he had seen the deceased, and he told them he had just gone up Old Town. William Mallett said he expected him there, and was waiting for him. He (the witness) separated, and they walked to and fro Bedford-street. In about half an hour (witness) again saw the deceased with James Cole, and several others. The deceased then said he was going to fight Mallett that evening. Witness went with them, and on deceased meeting Mallett near the Hotel, deceased said "Now Mallett," and they walked up Athenaeum-street. Witness was close to the deceased on the way to the field, and he heard no threats made use of by either nor did they seem angry. They stripped and deceased asked who would be his second - no one answered. James Cole said he would pick up Mallett and William Lyne said, if no one would come forward, he would pick up deceased. A partial ring was formed, and they set to. They continued fighting nearly an hour, neither expressing a wish to be separated. Deceased was ready before Mallett. In the last round, deceased fell under Mallet, no blows were struck on the ground, and when Lyne lifted up the deceased, he was speechless and insensible. Several young men carried him to the Prospect Inn, and washed his face. He never spoke, he breathed but was not able to move. There was nothing unfair during the fight. There was no one encouraging or exciting them, both appeared determined to continue the conflict. Deceased said the round before the last, that he could take the composition out of Mallett. He heard no violent expressions from Mallett. - Edward Cove, a lad about 17 years of age, stated on his examination, that on the Monday evening previous he heard the deceased and William Mallett disputing about a book, and the deceased said - "let him (Mallett) come to me, and I will give him the book, and a --- good walloping." Witness did not see the deceased until the Wednesday evening following. he then met him near St. Andrew's Church, and deceased said he was waiting for Mallett; he (witness) told him that Mallett had gone away because he did not wish to fight. Witness heard nothing about seconds until Friday night, when deceased and prisoner met by accident near the Hotel, between eight and nine o'clock. Deceased then asked Mallett if he was going to fight; Mallett said he did not care. The deceased then went away and witness remained with Mallett. Neither of them said they would wait for his return; but in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour he came back, and addressing himself to Mallett, said - "Now Bill, are you ready." Mallett said - "No, I have no one to pick me up." Deceased said "Here comes Jim Coles, he'll be your second;" the deceased and several others then walked up Athenaeum-street, towards the fields, and Mallett followed. The witness here corroborated the foregoing statement made by Redburn. Deceased and the prisoner used to be companions, and witness did not know of any malice or ill will existing between them. They had been friends up to the previous week. - The other witnesses examined corroborated the testimony of the two preceding. - The Inquest was adjourned to the following day. - On Saturday, among other witnesses, John Durant was examined. He said that the deceased, usually called TOM BROCK, asked him on Wednesday evening to go to Mallett's house and ask if William was in, and if he was, to tell him that he (deceased) was ready for him. He (witness) went, but he was told he had gone out. On returning to the deceased he said that Mallett "was a --- funk;" witness understood deceased to mean by that expression, that Mallett was a coward. Witness was not at the fight, nor did he see Mallett or the deceased until Friday. The Inquest was then adjourned. - On Monday evening the depositions of Dr Cookworthy, the Mayor of Plymouth and S. Derry, Esq., surgeon were received. - Dr Cookworthy stated that he was sent for to attend a person called BROCK, at a house in Old Town-street, on Thursday night about eleven o'clock. He found him in bed undressed; his mother was sitting near him. Deceased was quite unconscious of anything, arising, in his opinion, from some injury to the brain, which, from the appearances on the face and forehead, he believed to have been occasioned from some personal violence. He (Dr C.) adopted the usual applications, but had no hopes of recovery. He saw him dead the next day, and attended with Mr S. Derry, a post mortem examination of the body. The forehead, brows, sides of the neck, and arms, more especially the left, were covered with bruises; the lips were also bruised severely; the lips and nose particularly, were swollen and bloody. On opening the head, the blood vessels of the brain were conjected with blood; and a large clot of blood was found on the left side of the brain, between it and the membrane, sufficient to destroy life. Dr C. was of opinion that the combined effects of exertion, passion and blows received, would account for the conjected state of the brain, in which state the blood vessels would be likely to give way, and pour out their contents upon the brain, under any violence, caused either by a blow or fall. He also gave as his opinion, that the deceased had not been drinking any spirituous liquors. The body identified by James Robinson and James Coles, as the body of the boy BROCK who had been fighting on Thursday evening with Mallett. A great many other persons who were discovered to be present at the fight were examined, but each only confirmed portions of the evidence we have given in detail, and did not implicate others culpable of the awful fight. - The Jury after a most patient and deliberate investigation, and three adjournments, occupying upwards of 15 hours, found William Mallett as principal and William Line and James Cole as seconds, guilty of Manslaughter but wished to recommend them to the mercy of the Court.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named RICHARD HAM, who was found dead on the mud of the Mill pond, adjoining the Five fields, Plymouth. - Mr Thomas Mayne, jeweller, of Union Street, Stonehouse, stated that on Saturday evening, between 5 and 6 o'clock, he was taking a walk over the Five fields, and went down towards the beach of the Mill pond under the second field, lying between Stoke and Plymouth. The water was out and his attention was attracted by observing man lying on his face on the mud, about 15 or 16 feet from the field; he went near him and ascertained he was dead. There was no one in sight, and he immediately gave notice of it to the No Place Inn, and then to the Coroner. One of his shoes was off; the hat had a handkerchief tied lightly over it, and under his chin, closely pressed on his head. On examining the hat, he found written on it "RICHARD HAM'S hat, May 19, 1839." One leg was muddy, but there was no appearance of his having struggled. When the tide was up in the pond the water must have covered the body. - John Dodd, son of the landlord of the No Place Inn, found the body in the situation described. He pulled the body out of the mud and laid it under the fence. On searching the body he found two papers, one of figures, and the other a bill, and a part of a halfpenny cake, quite wet. He observed no marks of violence on the body. The mark on the forehead of the deceased he believed was occasioned by the falling of the body from the workhouse bier, as they were removing it. He (witness) lived near the spot, he heard no cries of alarm previous to finding the body. There were no traces of footsteps on the mud; the pond is generally emptied every tide. - James Laghton, assistant to Mr Davy, draper of Plymouth, recognised the body of the deceased as that of RICHARD HAM of Launceston. Deceased married witness's aunt about 9 months since; he was about 33 years of age; he was poor. he left him six weeks since, saying he was going to buy a hat, and he had not heard anything of him up to the present time; his family were at Launceston. He believed he was a sober man. - James Stephens, landlord of the Turk's Head, Plymouth, said deceased came to his house at eleven o'clock in the forenoon of Wednesday last. He did not call for anything, but warmed his hands by the fire, and observed it was very cold; he appeared destitute of money but did not ask for any assistance; he seemed very low in spirits. - The Jury after a short time returned a verdict of "Died from Suffocation in the Mud of the Mill pond adjoining the Five fields."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 December 1840
DARTMOUTH - Suicide By A Little Boy. - A child about ten years old, named JOHN THOMAS HILL, was found hanging to the branch of a tree, in the road leading to Townstall Church, Dartmouth, within but a few minutes walk of his home, on the 9th instant, and when cut down was quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body, before Mr R. Anthony, Coroner for Dartmouth, when it appeared the poor little fellow had up to that time been a most obedient and dutiful child; but within a short time, from his schoolmaster's evidence, had been rather inattentive in coming to school. He had remarked of late that he was unfairly treated, which it is supposed preyed on his mind, and was the cause of his destroying himself. On the morning of the day on which he committed the fatal deed, he had been absent from school by his mother's permission, and had been a few miles in the country with another lad, who deposed at the Inquest that he noticed that the deceased was much less talkative than usual. After coming home with this boy, he dined with the family as usual, and after dinner washed his face and hands, and cutting the rope from a pair of "slings" used to carry milk-pails, took it with him; his mother supposed he was going to school, but alas! it was the last time that she was destined to see him alive. He must have gone immediately and committed the rash act. The opinion of the Jury was, that he did it whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 December 1840
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Fire. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of a boy, six years of age, named GEORGE POUCHETTI [POCHITTY], living in Dodge's-wells. The cause of his death was stated to be from playing with lighted paper with another little boy, about sixteen days' previous, when his apron caught, and he ran out of the house, and was burning for ten minutes, before it could be extinguished. He lingered in great pain from that time till his death. Verdict - Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - On Friday se'nnight last, a little boy aged between six and seven years, son of JOHN ELLIS, a seaman of H.M.S. San Josef, and living in St. Andrew Street, Plymouth, was so severely burnt that he died on Thursday last. The little fellow had been playing with snow balls and while warming himself before the fire his clothes by some means caught fire. Inquest was held by R. J. Squire, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Cold. - On Wednesday the 19th inst., an Inquest was held at Plymouth Citadel Canteen, on the body of THOMAS JOHNSTONE, a private in the 53rd regt., now lying in this garrison, who died on his passage from Dublin to Plymouth. The deceased had been on furlough for six weeks, to his native country Cheshire, and embarked at Dublin on board the royal William, steamer, for Plymouth, on the preceding Wednesday. It was stated that the weather was so intensely cold, that the deceased among other deck passengers crowded into the vacant horse-stalls. he was observed to leave the horse-stall about seven o'clock and lay down on the deck outside; and on the following morning about four o'clock he was discovered in that place quite dead. He was quite sober when he came on board. A fisherman stated that the weather on the night in question was such that he believed if any man had been exposed to its inclemency, with only a jacket such as the deceased wore, he must have perished. The Jury returned a verdict - Died from the Effects of Cold Weather.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 20 January 1841
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday last an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Gloucester Inn, Morice Town, to Enquire as to the death of an elderly man named BELL, carpenter of the Lively hulk lying in Hamoase, whose body was found in the Canal at Morice Town on Sunday morning. J. Stocker, supernumerary boatswain of H.M.S. Lively examined. On Saturday afternoon he and deceased came ashore from the Lively, they went to a public house in Devonport, where they remained drinking moderately until half-past nine in the evening; they then went to the Ferry House, Morice Town, where they remained until half-past ten; they then left the house, and deceased went up the hill in the direction of Portland Place, saying that he was going home; deceased was under the influence of liquor but not drunk, he could walk steadily and was fit for duty; witness then went to North Corner to get a boat to go on board his ship but the weather being boisterous he was unable to procure one. Mr Pool, landlord of the Royal Standard public-house, William Street, Morice Town, examined: about quarter before eleven on Saturday night deceased came to my house, and went into the parlour; about twelve minutes past eleven witness told him that it was time to go, and he left the house; deceased seemed to have been drinking, but could walk steadily and apparently knew what he was about. There were no persons with him and witness never saw him afterwards. T. Tregenner, a waterman examined: early Sunday morning witness had been informed by a passenger he was conveying on board H.M.S. San Josef, that the body of a man was floating in the Canal; he went there and found two boys attempting to grapple the body, he hooked up the body with a boathook and conveyed it on shore; the trousers of the deceased were covered with mud up to the knees. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 January 1841
DARTMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday, the 19th instant, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Dartmouth, before Mr R. Anthony, Coroner, on the body of HENRY HOLDSWORTH, of Mount Galpin, Esq., aged 67. It appeared that on Saturday, his servant, when in the kitchen, heard a crash, and on proceeding up stairs with a light, on the first platform he found the deceased lying on his back, grasping the top of several stair rails that were torn away with the grasp and weight of the deceased, and one iron was broken close out at the bottom previous to his fall. It was a rounding staircase, and no candlestick being seen he must have been coming down stairs in the dark - and the evidence of the medical gentlemen, who were summoned to the aid of the deceased, was, that the deceased had had an apoplectic fit and that the concussion from a fall, from the circumstance of the stair rail having been torn away, accelerated his death. He lingered until three minutes after 12 o'clock the same night and died; he did not speak after he was found on the platform. The deceased was on good terms with his servant, who had lived with him 21 years. The Coroner having summed up, and the Jury having consulted, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy named JOHN COWLES, aged two years, who had been buried on the Saturday previous; but had been disinterred, in consequence of it having been officially notified to the Coroner, that the deceased had not died a natural death. The Jury viewed the body of the child, and from the evidence of the mother, who is in the greatest distress, it appeared that she resides in Baker's Place, and her husband is a bargeman; on New Year's day last, in the afternoon, she left deceased and her other children in her room for the purpose of going to see if her husband was returned from Millbrook whither he had gone; when on returning soon after she met deceased at the door screaming; she caught the child in her arms and carried him up stairs when she found his left leg, thigh and abdomen severely scalded. When she left the house there was a small saucepan on the fire with potatoes boiling in it, and it is supposed that the child who was left sitting on the bench near the fire had fallen off, and knocked the handle of the saucepan which caused it to upset the boiling water over him. The child was taken to Mrs McKenzie in a house adjoining, every care was taken of it up to the Thursday following, when the child became worse, and Mr Laity, the parish surgeon, was sent for, who continued to attend the child until it died. Mrs McKenzie and others corroborated the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. Mr Bone very feelingly sympathised with the poor mother, and learning she was in distressed circumstances, proposed to the Jury to make her a present of five shillings out of the allowance of their expenses, in which they readily and cheerfully accorded.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 February 1841
PLYMOUTH - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by R. Squire, Esq., Coroner, of the Borough of Plymouth, on the body of a woman named SUSAN GARD, aged 77, residing in Lower Batter-street, who was found dead in her bed on the morning of that day, when after a short investigation the Jury were of opinion that she died from the Asthma and the Cold.

PETER TAVY - An Inquest was held yesterday, at Petertavy, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of a farmer, named WILLIAM RICE, of Dartmoor, who was found on Coffin Down, on Sunday afternoon, about 5 o'clock, being on the ground in the snow, quite dead and stiff, apparently frost bitten. When discovered the body was down by the hedge of a field, which composed part of the farm which belonged to the deceased, about a quarter of a mile from his residence. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that RICE left Tavistock on Friday evening about nine o'clock in a state of intoxication, in company with a man who was going the same road with the deceased, and they parted on the road about two miles from Tavistock. About three o'clock on the following morning, Mr Willing, a respectable farmer, living on the moor, not far from the house where RICE had lived, was roused by a noise in his courtlage, and on opening his window, he was asked by a man, whom he is confidence was RICE, the name of the place where he was; when he was informed at Ringworthy. Willing then endeavoured to persuade him to remain there until daylight, the weather being extremely severe; but the deceased on being told the name of the place, immediately went out of the courtlage, and was not again seen until Sunday afternoon last, when he was found dead, midway between Ringworthy and his own residence. Mr Pearse, surgeon, of Tavistock, was examined on the subject, and stated as his opinion that the deceased has died from exposure to cold, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 March 1841
LEW TRENCHARD - WILLIAM DOWN, aged between four and five years, son of a labourer at Lew lime stone quarries in the parish of Lewtrenchard, died on Sunday last from the effect of an injury occasioned by his clothes catching fire. He had gone with other children to a lime kiln in the quarry contiguous to the cottages of several of the labourers to play, and having sat down on the edge of the kiln which had been filled with lime stone on the previous day the fire of the kiln caught the child's clothes. An older boy attempted unsuccessfully to put out the fire and then sent to the mother of deceased whose house he had left about a quarter of an hour before; she came to the kiln where she found the poor child with his clothes nearly burnt off; he died a few hours after. An Inquest was held yesterday on the body, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 March 1841
MARYSTOWE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Maristow, on WILLIAM TICKLE, husbandman. he had come home from work at Sydenham at his usual time, and having taken his supper went to bed, his wife on going to rest some time afterwards found him asleep. During the night she thought she heard him breathing loudly, and taking his hand spoke to him, but receiving no reply she called a neighbour, who on bringing a light and looking on him found him to be quite dead. The Jury after hearing the evidence of the widow and others, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 April 1841
CHUDLEIGH - Dreadful Suicide. - On Monday an Inquest was held at Chudleigh, on the body of a man named SAMUEL TUCKETT, about 30 years of age who committed suicide on Sunday morning, in the most determined manner. It appears that the deceased between 6 and 7 o'clock in the morning first cut his throat and afterwards hung himself to a beam in a stable belonging to his mother. While in this position it is supposed he must have been kicked by one of the horses, as marks were found upon his person. His own mother was the first that discovered the body, but not until life was extinct. The instrument with which he first attempted self-destruction was a small clasp knife, which was picked up near him. The deceased had been for some days past obviously labouring under lowness of spirits, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

SHEEPSTOR - A young man called BOWDEN, a labourer at the Dartmoor Stone Quarries, died on Monday last, from an injury he received whilst at his work. He and a fellow workman were standing at the bottom of the quarry by the side of a waggon, on which a piece of granite weighing about 2 tons was about to be placed. The stone had been lowered by a machine from the top of the quarry, (about 40 feet above the ground where the men were standing), and had just reached the hind part of the waggon, when one of the dogs which clasped the stone slipped from its place, and the stone consequently fell suddenly with its whole weight upon the waggon. The bolt which secured the waggon from tipping, was consequently so bent that the waggon canted over, rolling the stone over it. BOWDEN who was on that side of the waggon to which it rolled, was immediately crushed by the stone which fell upon his side and pinned him to the ground. Several of the workmen at the quarry immediately came to the poor fellow's assistance, but some minutes elapsed before the stone could be taken off from the deceased who was carried home, but he died on his way to his father's residence at Sheepstor. An Inquest was held yesterday on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and adjudged the slab to be forfeited to the crown as a deodand. This is the second fatal accident which has happened within a very short time from the same cause, viz., the tipping of the railway waggons; the deceased was about 21 years of age.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 April 1841
EGG BUCKLAND - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Egg Buckland, on a lad named COLMAR, who died from the effects of an injury received whilst at his work, at Efford Mill, which caught his smock frock and drew him into the pit, when the wheel struck him on the head inflicting several wounds. He was immediately attended by Mr Fuller, surgeon, at Compton Gifford, under whose care he was going on very favourably for two or three days, when lock jaw ensued, and he expired on Thursday. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned, and the wheel was adjudged to be forfeited as a deodand.

LIFTON - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at Lifton, on the body of PETER DAWE, a quarryman, who was working near the side of a quarry which he and others had been excavating, the top of which suddenly gave way and several tons of rubbish fell on him in which he was instantly buried. He was dug out in a few minutes dreadfully mutilated and quite dead. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 April 1841
HOLBETON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in the parish of Holbeton, respecting the death of PHILIP EASILL, a bargeman, who was drowned in the river Erme on the preceding Saturday. EASILL and his partner had loaded their barge with coals from a collier at Mothecombe on Saturday and in the afternoon about four o'clock the deceased proceeded up the river in his barge towards Fleet. He was then in a state of intoxication, his partner and others begged him not to take the barge up that night, but he not only determined on doing it, but refused to allow his partner, William Easton, to come on board. Easton, who though he had also been drinking, was sober, went up in a boat and kept near the barge, the wind blowing very fresh. The men work the barges up by means of poles, the deceased had got the vessel about half way up the river, and when he stuck his pole fast in the mud and could not get it out, Easton got it out for him, and then begged to be allowed to get on board to help the barge up; the deceased however, still refused, swearing that he would get his barge to the head of the river before some men who were in another barge ahead. Almost leaving immediately afterwards the deceased fell over the side of the barge into the water and sunk; Easton and one of the men in the other barge pulled their boat to the spot but could see nothing of him, although they used every means in their power. He was found the next morning at low water, in the river very near the spot where he fell overboard. Verdict - Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday last, on the body of JOHN HARRIS, a shipwright in this Dock-yard, who whilst at work on a stage, erected by the larboard bow of the Minden at the Stern Dock, accidentally fell off the stage into the dock, a depth of about 40 feet. The poor fellow was picked up by those who instantly ran to his assistance, but he was dead; his head being literally dashed to pieces. The stage appeared to have been properly constructed and placed, and the Jury expressed their opinion that no blame was attributable to anyone. The deceased has left a wife and 3 children, he was about 37 years of age; Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 May 1841
Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, on the body of the late MR BOON, a layer of rope-makers, in this Dock-yard, who died from the effects of an accidental fall in the yard, on the 31st of March last.

STOKE DAMEREL - On the same evening, on the body of THOMAS EDWARD CALLARD: he had for a considerable time been an inmate of the Lunatic Asylum, at Devonport, and died rather suddenly in the afternoon of Saturday. The body was opened, when a perforation of the duodenum was discovered, which, of course, occasioned his death. The friends of the deceased, who were examined, expressed their entire satisfaction with the care and attention which had been paid to the deceased during his confinement in the Asylum.

MARYSTOWE - On Monday an Inquest was held at Marystow, on the body of a young girl aged 15 years, named MARIA CRUISE, of Lifton, who died from an injury she had received by her clothes being caught in the pinions of the wheel attached to the grinding mill of the Trehill Manganese Mine, in that parish. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and found the wheel to be forfeited, as a deodand. Some improvement of the machinery was suggested on the Inquest, which will be immediately made.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 June 1841
PLYMOUTH - On Thursday last a young man named RICHARD MENHENNICK was accidentally killed at the Sugar Refinery, Mill-street, Plymouth. The deceased was engaged on an upper floor lowering some bags, when the staple gave way to which the tackle was fixed, the deceased lost his balance, and fell through six trap-hatches, to the bottom of the building, a height of 50 feet. He was picked up in a state of insensibility, and was taken to the Devon and Cornwall Hospital, but the concussion was so great, that medical aid was unavailing, and he died about 3 hours afterwards. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, with a deodand of £2 on the rope and staple. It was stated by the proprietors of the sugar refinery, that the persons connected with the winch had reported that the staple was in good condition or it would have been replaced.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 July 1841
EXMOUTH - Extraordinary And Dreadful Suicide. - This town was thrown in great consternation on Friday last, by a report that a private in the party of the 9th Lancers, quartered here during the Election in Exeter, had destroyed himself in the most deliberate manner, by blowing his brains out with a pistol. The report proved unfortunately too true, and the following are the circumstances of the case. The deceased, whose name was TERENCE SHIELDS, was billeted with several of his comrades at Bastin's Globe Inn. They slept in rooms at the top of the house. In the morning the deceased had been out on parade, and had returned to his sleeping-room for the purpose of shifting his parade dress. This was about half past 8 o'clock. One of his comrades was with him for the same purpose, but, having changed his dress before the deceased, left the room and went to the stables. About five minutes afterwards, the report of fire-arms was heard in the room, and an alarm being given, the unfortunate man was found extended on the floor quite dead, half of his face being blown off. An Inquest was held on the body by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on Saturday last, when evidence was given eliciting the above facts. It appeared that the pistol with which this dreadful deed was committed belonged to the deceased; and so determined had he been in his purpose that he had actually loaded it with 4 rounds of ball cartridge. The balls were found lodged in the ceiling, with a portion of the scalp of his head. The deceased had betrayed no symptoms of insanity, excepting a slight melancholy, previous to destroying himself, and one of his comrades deposed that 5 minutes before his death, he was perfectly cool and collected. He was somewhat given to drinking and had been intoxicated two days previously, which circumstance seemed to have preyed on his mind. His sergeant gave him a good character, describing him as a quiet and inoffensive man. He was 24 years of age, and not married. After deliberating upwards of four hours, the Jury returned a verdict of Felo-de-se, and the unhappy man was buried privately the same evening, no funeral service being read over his body.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 July 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide In Barnstaple Workhouse. - On Saturday an Inquest was held by Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named WILLIAM CROSSMAN, who committed suicide in the sick ward of the above establishment, by cutting his throat with a razor on the previous Wednesday; the unfortunate man lingered until the Saturday following, when death put a period to his sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 August 1841
STOKE DAMEREL - On Friday an Inquest was held at the Peartree Inn, on the body of WILLIAM CORNISH, a boy 16 years old, who was drowned in Keyham lake while bathing. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased who could not swim, had got beyond his depth, and after struggling some time sunk, nearly an hour had elapsed before the body was recovered, when of course life was extinct. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 September 1841
PLYMOUTH - A most determined suicide was committed on Wednesday last by JOHN HUNDEREY, a shoemaker, at the shop of his brother, a hair dresser, in Russell Street, Plymouth. It appears that the deceased who was 30 years of age, had been afflicted with epileptic fits for many years, and was very violent in disposition; he had his dinner at his father's house where he lived on Tuesday, but after a quarrel left the house apparently delirious at six, and returned about half past ten; he was then very violent and threatened to break everything if he could get into the house; and was in consequence taken to the police office but not charged with any offence. Next morning at seven o'clock he came back and broke four panes of glass; after which he went to his brother's shop in Russell Street, and cut his throat with a razor. Mr Jenkin Thomas, a neighbour, hearing that a man had cut his throat, went to offer assistance, on entering he saw deceased sitting on a chair, and blood issuing from his neck, he had a razor in his right hand, no other persons were present, he said to deceased "my God, what have you done?" - he made no reply, but flourished the razor towards his throat, and then rose up and went forward to the looking glass and placing himself in front of the glass made another cut at his throat. Mr T. caught hold of him immediately, and pinned him against the wall and a person took the razor from his hand. A surgeon was sent for; in about ten minutes Dr. F. P. Bellamy came, and deceased appeared infuriated at his presence, and rising up suddenly from the chair, attempted to fight, said "be off," and slipped between Dr B. and the wall, secured another razor, and inflicted another severe wound across the throat, when Dr B. took hold of him, and they both fell on the floor, and deceased instantly, without a struggle, expired. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of "Insanity" was returned. The Coroner and the Jury expressed their approbation of the humane and prompt conduct of Mr Thomas in reference to this melancholy affair.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 November 1841
PLYMOUTH - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on the body of W. GOOCH, late seaman of the General Brock, Capt. G. Darlley, who had been landed at this port on account of his ill health, and subsequently conveyed to the Workhouse, where he died of fever. In consequence of medical and other evidence, on certain external and internal marks on the deceased, as well as the information of the deceased before a magistrate, the Coroner adjourned the Jury until next Monday, in order that further evidence might be obtained, and that persons on whom imputations had been cast, might have an opportunity of attending. The Coroner has restrained the publication of evidence in order that no prejudice may be created.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 December 1841
PLYMOUTH - An adjourned Inquest was held in Plymouth, on the 20th ult., before R. J. Squire, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM GOOCH, a seaman of the General Brock, who died at the Workhouse on the 6th November. The Jury after a careful consideration and repeated adjournments, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Joseph Bayley Pezzey, mate of the General Brock. A warrant supported by the London authorities and the Secretary of State, has been issued for the apprehension of the culprit, who is a fine young man of 25 years of age.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 December 1841
TOTNES - Great sensation has been created in Totnes, by the death of a man, named KELLY, a travelling pedlar, in consequence of severe blows given him with a poker, by a woman with whom he was in the habit of travelling. - At an Inquest held on Friday last, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, the following evidence in reference to this melancholy case was elicited:- John Symons sworn - Am ostler at the Kingsbridge Inn; Saturday week last, about seven in the evening, I saw deceased in company with a woman; the woman was sitting in the settle in the kitchen of the Kingsbridge Inn; the man was standing before the fire; I saw the woman take up the fire-poker and strike the man over the left side of the head; she was about to repeat the blow, when I took the poker from her; on receiving the blow, the man did not fall off his seat; saw no blood flow; they both appeared very tipsy; there appeared to have been no quarrel about another man; the landlady came and ordered both of them out of the house, and they left quietly together. Mr Wm. Killock, surgeon, sworn:- The blows received by deceased, in my opinion, produced violent inflammation, which was the cause of death; he told me that the woman struck him with the poker; he said her name was Sarah Baker; he was never married to her; - when I told him he was in a dangerous state, he appeared to be aware of it. The room having been cleared, the Jury consulted for about a quarter of an hour, and then returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Sarah Baker. The woman, Sarah Baker, is a very tall and masculine-looking creature. She left this neighbourhood a few days ago, in company with another travelling pedlar, and has been traced by Bishop, the constable.

SANDFORD - Melancholy And Fatal Accident From The Careless Use Of Fire Arms. - On Saturday morning last, a young man of the name of SAMUEL CROSSMAN, a labourer, having a gun with him, left his father's house in the parish of Sandford, and proceeded towards a farm called KINNEFORD, in the parish of Stockley, and was not seen from that time until Sunday morning, when his body was found dead in a copse on Emathay estate, in the parish of Stockly, the butt end of the gun between his legs, his hat several feet from him; there were marks of blood about the face; the lips were unhurt, but the muzzle of the gun must have been in his mouth, as the upper jaw was completely driven into the head, and a large hole in the back part of the head; there were several shots in the hat, and it was scattered over with blood and brains: on the lock of the gun there were the remains of a cotton handkerchief, which must have caught fire by the blasting of the powder, it being burnt to a cinder, as were also the knees of his breeches, gaiters, and stockings. His legs were also greatly scorched. Deceased had but one load of powder and shot, and that he had borrowed with the gun, from a young man of the name of Cousins. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Wooland Downes, before J. Partridge, Esq., Coroner, when the following verdict was returned - "That the deceased came to his death by the Accidental discharge of the gun."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 January 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An awful instance of sudden death occurred near Barnstaple, on Tuesday se'nnight. WILLIAM CHAPPLE PAWLE, Esq., the Comptroller of the Customs for that Port, was proceeding to Paige's Pill, a small inlet on the river Taw, and at a short distance from the town got on a mail coach, immediately behind the driver; they had not proceeded a mile on the Bideford Road, before the coachman felt the deceased fall forward, and turning round found him in a state nearly inanimate. Mr John Pugsley, who was proceeding to Bideford with his van, happened to be passing at the moment, and Mr Passmore of High-street, jeweller, was also in the road hard by, and both of them immediately proceeded to the assistance of the unfortunate gentleman; he was conveyed to Barnstaple in Mr Pugsley's van, Mr Passmore supporting him all the way on his arm, having first taken the necessary precaution of loosening his neckerchief and the collar of his shirt; but before they arrived at the town the vital spark had fled. Surgical attendance was promptly secured, but pulsation had entirely ceased. Alfred Drake, Esq., and a respectable Jury held an Inquest on the following evening. Mr Cooke, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was occasioned by internally of cold affecting the chest, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 March 1842
PLYMOUTH - On Monday last an Inquest was held by R. J. Squires, Esq., on the body of a cartman, named BENNETT, in the employ of Messrs. Reynolds and Son, Plymouth. The deceased was driving his cart over Stonehouse hill, when the pin of the breeching of another cart belonging to the same owners which was behind, having slipped out, the horse in it took fright, ran away, and came in contact with the deceased's cart, which was overturned. BENNETT was thrown out with such violence upon his head that he died shortly after. Verdict - Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - A man named HAMLYN was killed in a fight between some fishermen at Plymouth on Tuesday week. Deceased interfered to make peace and was so beaten by a man named Lammas, that he died shortly after. A Coroner's Inquest had been held on the body which sat by adjournment last night, and returned a verdict of Manslaughter against John Humphries, alias Lammas, as principal and George Allen as accessory. They are both at large.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 March 1842
EXETER - Suicide. - On Saturday last Mr Farrant, draper of Fore-street, Exeter, while walking near the Head Weir, discovered a bonnet and cloak on the small bridge that crosses the mill leat there. This led him to suppose that someone had jumped into the water and he communicated his suspicions to other persons. A search was made, and the body of a young female was found in the river near the spot. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, before J. Warren, Esq., the same evening, and from the evidence then adduced it appeared that deceased was named ELLEN MARTIN, aged about 18, daughter to MR MARTIN, of Fore-street-hill. She had been apprentice to Mr Burdon, staymaker of North Street, and kept company with his son, with whom she was on good terms up to Friday night. Deceased often complained of pains in her head, and was likely to be affected by insanity. Verdict - Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death. - A commercial man travelling in the glass trade named WILLIAMS, expired at the King's Arms Tap, North-street, Plymouth on Tuesday last from excessive drinking. Deceased generally drank a pint and a half of brandy a day, besides a bottle of wine, and always took a pint of brandy to bed with him which he consumed by the morning, in fact, he could not live without this excessive stimulant. An Inquest was held on the body on Wednesday last, when the medical men who had examined it, deposed that death arose from a diseased stomach and liver induced by alcoholic stimulants and not from any violent means. Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 March 1842
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday an Inquest was held before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, on the body of CATHERINE FULL. The deceased had been for a period of 7 years confined as a lunatic in the Devonport Parish Asylum, where she had received every care and attention. Shortly before her death she was subject to dropsy, from the effects of which she died. - Verdict, "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 March 1842
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening, respecting the death of MRS CHRISTIANA KENT, of Pembroke-street, who died suddenly on Sunday morning last. Her husband and daughter had gone to Chapel, leaving her in her bedroom. Within a few minutes after they had let her, a person living in the house heard a noise from MRS KENT'S room. On entering it she found the deceased in a dying state, blood was flowing from her mouth and nostrils. She died in a few minutes. Verdict, Natural Death.

PLYMOUTH - On Monday last an Inquest was held on MRS PARSONS, the wife of a sawyer in the Dock Yard, who died on Sunday evening. She was putting on her gloves to go to Morice Street Meeting, when she complained of pain in her head, and immediately fell on the floor. Her husband who was ill in bed in the same room instantly raised her from the floor, but she appeared to be dead. Mr Crossing, surgeon, was sent for and examined her. Within a few minutes she expired in the arms of her husband immediately after his coming to her. Verdict, Natural Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 May 1842
PLYMOUTH - A man named SEARLE, residing in Looe-street, Plymouth, was found hung in a linhay, near Lipson-hill, on Thursday last; he had been missing for several hours, and on a search being made, his body was discovered as above described. The deceased had been a dairyman for many years, and it is rumoured that distressed circumstances disturbed his mind and drove him to the committal of the dreadful act. He had been in a desponding state for some time. An Inquest has been held on his body, and a verdict returned of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 June 1842
STOKE DAMEREL - Yesterday, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY PAGE, a widow, aged 82 years, residing in Quarry-street. The deceased was very decrepit from her great age, and on Sunday evening as was usual, she was assisted to bed by a neighbour. An hour had scarcely elapsed when her body was found in a well in the washhouse. The water was not more than five feet deep and on her being taken out the usual means were used to restore animation but without effect.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 July 1842
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Affair. - Suicide of JOHN REES, Esq., - It becomes our very painful duty to announce the decease of JOHN REES, Esq., who committed suicide at his residence in Fore-street, on Saturday morning last. It appears that for some week since, MR REES had been in a very desponding state of mind, arising from illness and the harassing recollection of some unhappy circumstances which had marked his early years and embittered his whole life. On Saturday morning last MR REES remained in his bed-room after his usual hour of rising, and as he was very punctual in his habits, his servant, fearing he was ill, went to his room to call him. He knocked at the door, but received no answer; on examination too, he found it locked. A forcible entrance was therefore made, when the unhappy gentleman was discovered sitting on the sofa quite dead, having his throat cut. On the dressing table a piece of paper was found, the contents of which we have printed below, clearly showing that he had committed suicide in a fit of depression; while his right hand, which rested on the sofa, grasped the razor with which he had effected his purpose. - MR REES was much esteemed by his fellow townsmen, and the intelligence of his deceases spread gloom and consternation throughout the town. MR REES had resided among us comparatively a short time, yet he had placed himself in the first rank of its inhabitants. He was an able and indefatigable public man, and a zealous supporter of the interests and character of the town. He contributed largely, both by his personal exertion and his purse, to our charitable institutions. Upon the incorporation of the town he was elected one of the members of the Town Council, and shortly after his fellow councillors chose him as an alderman, which office he held at the time of his death; of the corporate body he was a very useful member, as its records will testify, and there, at least, it will be impossible to supply his loss. had he lived it is more than probable that he would have been elected Mayor for the ensuing year. A short time since MR REES was placed in the commission of the peace for this town by her Majesty. In private life MR REES displayed social qualities of a high order. He was a warm friend, a kind adviser, an agreeable companion, and truly an ornament to society. To those who knew him, this unhappy termination of a life spent in private and public usefulness, is very shocking; and it is the frequent remark that it could not at all be imagined that his firm and sensible mind would be disordered by recollections of a distant day. But his death is another instructive example that even the spring tide of prosperity will mar as well as make; for it is clear that the social and public estimation which this gentleman obtained, kindled and did not extinguish the sense of past sorrow; poisoning not sweetening the springs of life. - On Saturday evening an Inquest was held on the body, at the residence of the deceased in Fore-street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury. - Charles Derrington, servant to the deceased, examined:- I reside in this house with the deceased, I have been his servant for eight months. Deceased dined at home yesterday at five o'clock, and did not leave the house afterwards as he usually did. Deceased took tea in the evening, and rang his bell for me at quarter to eleven. I answered the bell, and he told me to go to bed; he was sitting alone in the dining room, but I did not observe whether he was reading or what he was doing. Usually he did not take any refreshment after tea, but last night he had some spirits and water. My bed room is one story above that in which deceased slept; I did not hear any sound during the night from my master's room. About five days since he told me not to place any wine glasses on the dinner table until he gave me other orders, and he has taken no wine since that time. I have observed something very heavy about him since Sunday last; I was sorry to see it and I asked him on Sunday if I could do anything for him, he said no, but told me he was ill. This morning I got up at a quarter to six, about an hour after I was sweeping out the bank when I saw my master come into the bank from his office. He went to his own table; I saw only his head; I could not see whether he was dressed as there was a screen between us; he did not sit down; he merely came in and went out again and did not speak, I never knew him come down at that hour before this occasion; I saw and heard nothing of the deceased until I went to his room at five minutes past nine this morning; when I went up to his room I had an idea that my master was not well, as he was very regular at his breakfast which he usually took at quarter before nine; I thought to myself "I am his servant and he cannot be offended if I go to his door," I knocked at the door but received no answer, I knocked again several times loudly, and receiving no answer, called up the cook that we might be positive that there was no reply; I then tried the door which was locked. I went to Mr James Husband and told him of the circumstance, after which I returned to the bank. As I returned I met Mr Jago, the clerk, and while acquainting him Mr Husband arrived. Mr Jago desired me to get a man to break the door open; I procured a man at Mr Distin's, the ironmonger, and he broke the door open. Mr Jago was near the door when it was forced. I went into the room, and there I saw MR REES; he was sitting on the sofa in a reclining position; his back was at the back of the sofa, his legs hung down and nearly touched the floor; he was perfectly still and quite dead. I saw a wound in his neck and a great quantity of blood on the sofa and the carpet; his left hand was under his side, and his right hand was lying on the sofa with a razor covered with blood in it; there was nothing extraordinary in the appearance of the room, nothing disarranged. About half an hour elapsed between the time that I knocked at the door and when it was forced. My master usually shaved himself, but I have not noticed whether he had shaved this morning; the bed clothes presented nothing unusual. I saw a paper in the room, which was taken by Mr Jago; on the dressing table was his watch, his eye-glass, and the paper, taken by Mr Jago, written with pencil. I said to Mr Jago, "that (the paper) concerns you," and he took it. - By a Juror: I noticed when he came into the office this morning, that his features were sharp and quick. On Sunday he was very poorly and took medicine. When I announced dinner he told me he did not think he could eat it. - By the Coroner: Mr Jago was with the deceased in the bank during last evening, but I do not know what time he left. I do not know whether my master usually locked his bedroom door, as I never went to it before this morning. During the last week my master appeared much dejected, I never knew him so before; his manner of speaking was altered, his appetite had fallen off very much. The articles now produced were taken out of the pockets of the clothes which he last wore. (These were some memoranda of no importance to the Inquiry, a pocket book, card case, and some money.) - The witness gave his evidence in a most feeling and creditable manner, and it called forth warm expressions of commendation from several of the Jury. - Mr John Jago examined: - I am clerk in the National Provincial Bank of England in this town. MR REES had been the manager of the branch for eighteen months. MR REES was in the bank all day yesterday, attending to the bank business: at times he seemed low in spirits, and he was excited by the most trivial thing. I did not observe anything else unusual in his conduct: we were together from half past five till nearly ten engaged in bank business; after it was concluded we retired into his parlour to take some spirits and water; we took one small tumbler of brandy and water each. I remained with him until quarter to eleven; there was nothing in his manner which struck my attention. He seemed much annoyed about the light sovereigns; he spoke of the annoyance and anxiety which they gave him, some person had come to the bank for change for a £5 note, and full weight sovereigns were given, but the person soon after brought them back stating they were light: MR REES said if it continued so it would drive him mad. Last evening as we were going on with the work there was a number of pensioners outside the door talking very loudly and making a noise and he said, "If I were in my usual spirits I would bundle them away; I am not in my usual spirits, however, and, therefore, do not take any notice of them." His manner has been altered during the last four or five weeks; he has been much depressed and very excitable; I am not aware whether he had received any letter calculated to depress him, he never told me the cause of his depression, but I imagine something had been preying on his spirits. He has no disputed account that I know of. The paper now produced I took up in his bedroom this morning; it was pointed out to me by the last witness; it is his hand-writing, but the style is very hurried. The Coroner read the contents of the paper which are as follows:- "My mind weakened by the many disappointments which I have experienced in everything, is by recent circumstances completely prostrated. I have strove hard, but find myself quite unequal to the discharge of the ordinary duties of my station. I cannot bring anything like energy of mind to bear upon matters, while the merest trifle causes the greatest irritation like madness, with most unaccountable delusions. A mere miserable wreck of what I was even a few short weeks since; but let no one be alarmed, if my mind give way; no one will lose anything, even if my just claims are never recovered, they will be found quite and more than enough to set everything right. I miserable, lone being, with a mind prostrated and a broken heart, how can I bear up amid the vexations with which I am surrounded. And yet they are all trifling circumstances, but they have destroyed my peace and energies. I am so bewildered I cannot discharge my duties. There is a difference of £150 in the notes - nothing more." - Examination continued:- I find there is a deficiency in the accounts of the deceased amounting to £150, independent of his salary. There is a bundle of notes in the drawer, marked £1,500, from which $150 have been taken; his own private account is credited about £50, the actual deficiency, therefore, is £100; I believe that he has private property quite sufficient to cover the deficiency. - By a Juror: The paper in the deceased's handwriting has been out of my possession; I was much unhinged at the time and cannot say whether I gave it to Mr R. M. Oliver, or Mr T. Husband. - Mr Gibson, a Juryman: There is something very extraordinary in this paper, the writer when he wished to make an erasure has drawn a line through the word, the names after "claims" are obliterated by the finger being rubbed over them. - The paper left by the deceased was then minutely examined by the Coroner and the Jury. It was written in a very hurried and indistinct manner, but the words spoken of by Mr Gibson as having been erased were discovered to be "they will." The context also showed that these words alone agreed with the sense. The Jury was perfectly satisfied that the erasure was caused accidentally by the folding of the paper, but in order to prove the point the gentlemen who had had the custody of the paper was examined as follows:- Mr R. M. Oliver, examined:- I received the paper produced from Mr Husband this morning between 10 and 11 o'clock. It is in the same state as it then was; the words obliterated are "they will". I gave the paper to Mr Jago just before he came up to give his evidence. - Mr Thomas Husband examined:- I cannot tell how I got the paper this morning, I was so hurried and alarmed. It was put into my hand immediately that I came to the bank; I read part of it, but it was in and out of my hand in less than a minute; I gave it to Mr Oliver; MR REES owed me money, he was not in pecuniary difficulties; he owed me about £70, I did not ask him for the money he owed me, or talk about money matters yesterday; I saw him last evening for about half an hour, he seemed very much depressed and I noticed something peculiar in his manner. Some time last week he called on me in the evening as he frequently did; he was much depressed, I rallied him on giving way to these feelings, and he said he was sadly disappointed about a bill of £200 or £300 which he had discounted with his own money before he went into the bank, and the amount of which he feared he should never recover as the party was in prison in London. On Tuesday I met him in Fore-street; I asked how he got on with the light sovereigns? in an exceedingly excited manner he said, "it will make me mad if it continues in this state." He seemed to feel very deeply on the subject; I was never aware that he had made a will until today, I have not read it; I saw the seal broken by my brother in the presence of Mr R. M. Oliver. - Mr John Jago, recalled:- For the last month or six weeks, MR REES has suffered from continual head ache from morning till night, which prevented him from taking his usual rest; he has not slept after four in the morning during the time; this he told me last week. - Mr James Husband examined:- I have known the deceased about seventeen years; I saw him alive last at the Conservative Reading rooms on Thursday evening; he appeared to me to be in a very excited state. We had attended a meeting of one of the Committees of the Town Council together, and upon its conclusion I invited him to my office, to take a cigar with me. A few minutes after he had lighted our cigars I turned round and saw him sitting quite fixed with his arm extended; I said "REES your cigar's out, why, what's the matter with you?" He looked at me in a vacant manner, then breathed a heavy sigh and said, "Oh! I am a most miserable man;" I said to him "nonsense, you a miserable man, you have every comfort, you are above the world, what can make you a miserable man? You have a comfortable house, comfortably furnished, and an independent situation." He said, "these would indeed be comforts but for my miserable domestic affairs - they kill me - they destroy me. What is the use of my house to me? none in the world. I go home lonely, there is no one there to confer with me and comfort me." He asked me if I thought any person in the town knew about his unhappy marriage? I told him there was not. He said "Oh yes there are persons, there is Josiah Glencross; he seems to shun me now and it's all about my marriage, I am sure of it." He also said "All my life I have been a master, what am I now? a servant, a clerk." I said "REES you are 'hipped,' you are misrepresenting things; why when you were in the barrack department you were a servant." He said, "then - when I was at the brewery, too, I was happy. But now I am cut off from society; no families visit me; and its all owing to my unfortunate marriage." He was very much dejected and I tried to rouse him. He also said "I feel it more now; I am sorry I have got a house; for I go home and brood over my marriage. When I leave your house I feel the comforts you enjoy; I might have had the same comforts; I ought to have them. There was a time when I could shake off these feelings but I cannot now." I took him to the Conservative Reading rooms afterwards, and left him there at a quarter before nine. I never saw him alive again, I am satisfied that his domestic affairs weighed heavily on his mind; although I have known him so long he never spoke of them to me but three times. Whether he received any letters of an unpleasant nature I know not; he has contributed to the support of his wife and son for twenty years, but I never saw them. Whenever domestic comfort was spoken of in his presence, he invariably became depressed. He was a very warm friend, but a very excitable man. - Mr Josiah Glencross:- The deceased never visited me, and he was quite mistaken with regard to my feelings towards him. Family afflictions have prevented me from seeing him as often as formerly; but so far from treating him coolly I intended inviting him to my house within the last few days. - Mr Husband's examination continued:- The deceased said to me at his time of life he could not bear up against these feelings, and they broke his heart. He made a will which bears date in August 1841. He came to me and said "life is uncertain: I place great confidence in you; I now place my will in your hands; you will see I have not forgotten you." The will was opened this morning in the presence of Mr Oliver; nothing is given to his wife but to his son; I know not where they or any of his relations reside. - A gentleman present corroborated the evidence of the last witness. He had dined with deceased on Sunday week, and the deceased made similar statements respecting his domestic affairs. As regarded the bank he said he was happily situated though if he had known the difficulties of the position he would never have accepted the situation. - This was the whole of the evidence given, and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity. - It appears that MR REES was married about 23 years since to a lady of suitable condition in life, who, within two years of her marriage, eloped from her house with a military officer, and has resided for several years with her paramour at Brussels. Her companion has recently died, leaving her with a family of 7 children.
Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 August 1842
CULLOMPTON - Great excitement was caused at Cullompton on Sunday last, in consequence of MR JOHN FROST, aged 29, of the Red Lion Inn, having shot himself. He had for several years been paying his addresses to a young lady in the neighbourhood, yet as her father was averse to the engagement, she would not consent to a marriage. The matter was broken for some time since, and MR FROST paid his addresses to another lady and was on the point of marriage, when that affair was broken off. He then renewed his former suit, but the old difficulty again intervened, and in an interview with the lady, on Sunday, he bid her farewell, and said she would never see him more. Soon after he shot himself through the head, in an outhouse behind Mr Farrant's dwelling house. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned. Deceased was very much respected in Cullompton.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 September 1842
ASHBURTON - As a man named RICHARD WILLIAMS, 74 years of age, was walking in Ashburton on Monday evening, a boy riding a horse at full gallop knocked him down; he fell violently on the back part of his head, and received some severe contusions and internal injuries, which caused his death. An Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Killed by being Rode Over by a Horse," returned, with a deodand of 1s. on the horse.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 November 1842
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GRACE SERGEANT, the landlady of the Prospect Inn, Millbay. It appears that on Saturday a m an named John Spiney, who was in a drunken state, came to the house and was served with some beer. Shortly after the deceased went into the room where he was sitting to check the noise he was making, when Spiney ordered some more liquor, which she refused to draw, unless he paid a former debt. Angry words were exchanged and Spiney pushed the deceased aside, when she fell to the ground and ruptured a blood vessel near the brain. The deceased rose up and addressing Spiney, said, "Will you strike me again, you villain," and then staggered and fell to the ground and died. - Verdict, "Manslaughter." The accused remains in custody.

PLYMOUTH - Also the same day, on the body of DANIEL BARGIN, a discharged pensioner from the 65th regiment. The deceased died on board the Duke of Cambridge, steam-packet, and was on his voyage from London to Cork. He was intoxicated, and layed down near the boiler, where he was found lifeless, his body being very much burnt. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 November 1842
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest Before A. B. Bone, Esq., - On Saturday last at the Workhouse, on the body of JACOB PHILLIPS, aged 50 years, who was found drowned in the dock at Bullock's Quay. A waterman named Crocker, observed the head of a man projecting above the surface of the water, it being then nearly low tide and having passed to it in his boat he quickly removed it to the shore. On examination it was found that life was quite extinct. No cause can be assigned as a reason for the death of the deceased, and in the absence of sufficient evidence the Inquest stands adjourned to this day. The deceased has left a wife and two children and was foreman at the quarry at Pomphfleet in the parish of Plymstock. When last seen the deceased did not exhibit such symptoms that would at all tend to account for this melancholy occurrence.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 November 1842
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Catastrophe. - A sad accident, which has caused the death of a human being, from an accidental explosion of a gun in the use of which a too frequent want of that scrupulous caution in its direction, which is indispensable to safety, is shown, occurred on Thursday last under these circumstances:- Two young men, accompanied by a retired sergeant of marines, sauntered out of town on the morning of that day taking with them a gun with which they intended to indulge themselves in shooting small birds. When midway between Morice Town and the Magazine, one of the party, named Spurraway, fired and then reloaded his gun, JAMES TATCHELL being at the time in advance of his companions, when the instrument was given to Kemp, who was unskilled in its keeping, having, it is said, never before handled fire-arms, who then presented it at a bird but missed his object. On the gun being reloaded it was again given to this individual, and he essayed to fire but did not, and as he was carrying the gun without having changed the cocking, Spurraway observing the usual precaution was not taken, he told Kemp of the danger, when he replied he did not know how to uncock it; for the purpose of showing him how that was done, Spurraway took the gun and after proving it he returned it to Kemp who was in the act of practising the example when unhappily the cock slipped, and the whole discharge entered the back of poor Tatchell. The deceased fell to the ground and exclaimed, "Oh! God, Kemp, you have shot me." and he expired almost instantly. The young man from whose hand this awful calamity inadvertently proceeded, evinced the deepest distress on beholding the untimely end of the deceased, and for some time he was lost in a swoon. An Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on Friday last tat the St. Aubyn Arms, Morice Town, when a verdict of "Accidental Death," was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 November 1842
TORQUAY - Suicide. - On the 20th inst., the body of MR ROBERT HUTCHINGS, a master mariner, was found drowned outside Torquay Pier. An anchor weighing 40 lb. was fastened to the waist of deceased by a silk handkerchief, and other circumstances left no doubt that he had been the cause of his own death - owning, it is supposed, to some reverses of fortune. Deceased was 40 years old, and had left a widow and three children. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict returned "Found Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 December 1842
EXETER - Sudden Death. - On Saturday morning last, MR JAMES HILTON, of Gascoyne Place, Plymouth, was found dead in his bed at the Globe Hotel, Exeter. Deceased was agent for the houses of Sir Charles Price and Co., Messrs. B. Hawkes and Co., and other establishments in London, and frequently visited that city on their business. He retired to bed apparently in good health on Friday night and was answering when called the next morning, his room was entered, and he was found dead in bed, life having to all appearance fled some hours before. An Inquest was held on his remains on Saturday and a verdict returned "Died by the Visitation of God." MR HILTON was largely concerned in commercial transactions, and was always distinguished by the highest integrity in business. He was a kind and sincere friend, and was greatly esteemed and beloved by a large circle of relatives and friends in Plymouth and in the North of Devon, by whom his sudden demise is deeply deplored.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 January 1843
PLYMOUTH - Fire And Loss Of Life. - On Friday evening about 7 o'clock, a fire broke out on the premises occupied by Messrs. Balkwill, in Norley-street, in consequence of some chemical preparation bursting into a flame, which set fire to some part of the workshop, but fortunately it was extinguished without doing much damage. A melancholy event arose out of this circumstance. THOMAS SMITH, a child about 7 years old, whose parents reside in Hampton-street, on hearing the cry of fire, ran out of the house towards the Providence Chapel, where a great concourse of people had assembled, many of whom had mounted upon the coping of the iron railing surrounding the burial ground, when a portion of the rails and coping gave way, which, falling upon the child, he was killed on the spot. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday before R. J. Squire, Coroner, verdict "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 February 1843
PLYMOUTH - Charge of Infanticide. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Wednesday, on the body of a male infant, which resulted in the Jury returning a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the mother, calling herself ANN HART. It appeared from the evidence adduced at the Inquest, that on Tuesday night ANN HART engaged a bed at the "Recruiting Serjeant" public house, kept by Mr George Elliott. She retired to rest about six o'clock, and about twenty minutes to eight the following (Wednesday) morning she asked for a flannel to wipe up some water she had spilt about the room, when, not suspecting anything, a pail with some water was given her, which she carried up stairs, and afterwards returned with it to the court. She then left the house. Mr Elliott shortly after saw a child in the privy, and he immediately gave information of the circumstance to the police, who traced the prisoner to a house in High-street, where she was apprehended in a very exhausted state. She stated that she was unmarried, was 29 years of age, and had lately lived a servant at Egg Buckland. Mr Henry J. Andrews, surgeon, stated, that having opened the body of the infant, he had found apparent evidence in the lungs that the child had breathed, but had discovered no evidence of the child's death having been caused by violence. The prisoner had stated to Dinah Baker, (who has since had charge of her, and who has paid her every attention the prison discipline will permit) that she was suddenly taken in labour at seven o'clock in the evening, and that the child remained on the floor all night, she being too bad to take it up. She declared that she never saw the child alive.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 April 1843
TORQUAY - Shocking Accident. - A carrier named MEDLAND, of Torquay, met his death on Thursday evening last, under the following distressing circumstances. It appears MEDLAND was riding on the front rail of his waggon, near Kingsteignton, about 7 o'clock on the above evening, when the waggon was overtaken by the Bristol and Devonport mail. MEDLAND, from evidence given at the Inquest held at Torquay on Saturday, held a whip in his right hand, and the top of the whip reached beyond the side of the waggon arriving alongside the waggon, a passenger named Liverton, a constable of Plymouth, caught the top of the whip, and persisted in taking it from MEDLAND, who was holding it with both hands, and melancholy to relate, MEDLAND was pulled off and fell down between the mail and the waggon, the wheels of the waggon ran over his head, and the wheels of the mail over his legs, and killed him on the spot. No blame is attached to the coachman, and the waggon was as near the hedge-row as it could go. The Inquest was held at Torquay on Saturday before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, and a most respectable Jury, Mr R. Stark being chosen the Foreman. It was adjourned to the 5th May next, when the dreadful occurrence will be fully investigated.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 May 1843
TORQUAY - The adjourned Inquest on the fatal accident which occurred to MR JOHN MEDLAND, of this town, about a fortnight since, took place on Friday last, and a verdict of Manslaughter was returned against John Leverton, a constable of Plymouth.

STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy ten years and a half old, son of MR TRUSCOTT, bootmaker, Union-street. The child thoughtlessly ran against a brewer's dray unperceived by the driver, by which it was thrown to the ground and was sadly crushed from the wheel passing over it, and was killed on the spot. Verdict "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth on yesterday se'nnight, on the body of GEORGIANA JANE DUCKHAM, aged 16, daughter of a shipwright, who it is said had died in consequence of taking a quack worm medicine. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased who had long suffered from chlorosis or general weakness of the frame had taken two doses of a worm medicine vended by a man called Donally, in the Devonport market, believing that the symptoms described in his bills were precisely those she felt. Shortly after she took the medicine she became violently ill and although a medical man was called in her body became violently convulsed, her teeth firmly clenched, her eyes shut, and her arms and legs drawn in every direction; and she continued in this shocking state, with only short intervals from two o'clock in the morning till eight, and expired two days after. Mr Harper, the medical man who had attended the deceased stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, with the assistance of Mr Andrews. The internal appearances were decidedly healthy, considering her weak state, and the only symptom of disease was in the stomach, and adjoining intestines, which were in an exceedingly inflamed state. The stomach contained about two ounces of a yellowish fluid. These inflamed appearances were quite sufficient to account for the death of the girl. They could hardly have resulted from a natural cause, but might have been produced by a drastic purge, such as the medicines usually administered for the expulsion of worms. The Jury consulted about half-an-hour, when they returned a verdict that "The death of the deceased was occasioned by Inflammation in the Stomach, which inflammation came on a few hours after taking Donolly's worm-cakes."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 May 1843
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) at the Devonport Workhouse, by A. B. Bone, Esq., on MR THOMAS RUNDLE BRIGHT, late of Devonport, ironmonger, who died in the Devonport lunatic asylum. The deceased had suffered for some years past from fits of epilepsy, which had deprived him of his sight, and a very severe fit on Tuesday last terminated his life on the following day. Verdict, Natural Death caused by Epilepsy.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 July 1843
STOKE DAMEREL - On Saturday last an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT THOMPSON, apprentice to Mr Gent, ship-builder, Plymouth. From the evidence of Adolphus Warren and other apprentices, it appears that on Friday evening last, deceased, John Beard, and Adolphus Warren were working on the deck of the brig "Alison," then lying in the shipwright's yard at Plymouth. Beard was calling deceased names, and deceased struck him in the face with the flat of his hand; Beard did not return the blow. Deceased then went below. Almost directly after Matthew Rundle, another of the apprentices came up to Beard and said "Jack, I thought you'd strike him again when he struck you." Beard said, "He didn't strike me hard." About five or ten minutes after this conversation deceased came up again, and just as Beard was going to sit down, struck him in the face. Beard then said "Why did you do that," to which deceased answered "I'll let you know what you told Rundle." Deceased continued to strike him, but Bear did not return any blows. Rundle then jumped between them in order to prevent deceased from striking Beard, but on deceased threatening to throw him down the hatchway, moved aside. Deceased and Beard then fought with each other, and after two or three rounds deceased got in a passion, and shoved Beard to the after hatchway, saying, with an oath, "I'll pitch you down the hold." Beard immediately laid hold of deceased in order to save himself, and both fell down the after hatchway. Beard falling first from the deck, a depth of 18 feet. They were almost immediately brought up again by some apprentices then working in the hold. Deceased was senseless, and a stream of blood was issuing from his ear. He was shortly afterwards, by the direction of the foreman, conveyed to his home at Morice Town by water. Mr Cole, said the death of the deceased was caused by the fracture of the base of his skull and by the rupture of the blood vessels of the brain. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Beard , we understand, had his thigh broken but is recovering.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 August 1843
YEALMPTON - Inquest Before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner. - At Yealmpton, on Wednesday last, on the body of JOHN RUTT, who was accidentally killed from injuries received in falling from a cart. The father of the child at his solicitation allowed deceased to ride by his side, and to prevent danger held him by the arm. The cart was proceeding at a slow rate when having to pass a narrow piece of road the father was obliged to let go the child to save himself from being jammed between it and the edge, and whilst in the act of jumping off the deceased fell on its head and expired; "Verdict - Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Suicide. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Keyham Barton, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of MR THOS. WRIGHT, late a Captain in the Merchant Service. The deceased about three months since was afflicted with fits accompanied with great despondency and melancholy, and at intervals he became violent and outrageous, insomuch that his friends were induced to remove him to a lunatic asylum. Accordingly he was placed under the care of Dr Langworthy, at Plympton Asylum, and subsequently after six weeks' treatment, he was so far recovered as to be restored to his friends. On Wednesday last, he was brought to the house of his brother-in-law, Mr Elliott, of Keyham Barton, and he appeared perfectly tranquil and in the best of health. As showing the painful presentment the deceased had of injuring himself whilst in this distressing condition, previous to his being taken to the asylum, he requested on going to bed that he might be hand cuffed. Up to Saturday night he continued without evincing any symptom of the returning malady, and retired to rest apparently well and cheerful between 10 and 11 o'clock. The following morning about 7 o'clock Mrs Elliott went to his room to summon him to breakfast, and the door being partly open she noticed a strangeness in the appearance of the bed, as the deceased was lying with his feet projecting over the edge of the bed and the clothes were spotted with blood. Mr Elliott was immediately called and on his examining the bed, he found deceased weltering in his blood with his throat cut in a ghastly manner, the wound extending from ear to ear, the head being almost severed from the trunk. He was still alive and sensible, but his eyes were closed. Mr Elliott in this agonising moment exclaimed "Good God, WRIGHT what have you done" when the deceased opened his eyes and faintly articulated "I am happy" at the same moment motioning his hand in sign to be assisted to some water. On it being given him he sipped it twice, but the fluid escaped from the wind pipe and fell on the bed. Medical aid was promptly in attendance but the skilful efforts of T. Crossing, Esq., surgeon, were in vain. After an investigation which lasted some hours, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

TAVISTOCK - Suicide. - On Tuesday morning week, JOHN SECCOMBE, aged 63 years, who had been for upwards of 20 years, waiter at the Bedford Hotel, was discovered in an outhouse, hung to a beam, and quite dead. The loss of his situation, and the prospect of poverty, is supposed to have been the cause of his committing the rash act. An Inquest was held in the evening, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 August 1843
EAST STONEHOUSE - On Monday last an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JOHN DAVEY, aged 22, who met with death under the following circumstances. It appeared that the deceased, accompanied by seven young men, went to Barnpool for the purpose of bathing, and from thence to Drake's Island, where they remained some time, in the course of which the deceased went on the ramparts, from which he fell a height of about 70 feet and fractured his skull, thereby causing his death in about half an hour afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The deceased was an assistant to Mr Penhey, Grocer, Stonehouse and was a young man much respected.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 September 1843
TORQUAY - A young man named PARISH, aged 20 years was unfortunately drowned at Tor Abbey and on Sunday week last; while bathing he got out of his depth and being unable to swim sank, and before he was taken up life was extinct.

The same day a person named W. CLINKER, 35 years of age belonging to the ship Phantom, of London, unfortunately fell over board and was drowned. An Inquest was held on both bodies by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, of Ashburton, and a verdict in both cases of Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 September 1843
EXETER - A shocking suicide was committed at Exeter, on Wednesday, by a young woman of good character named SARAH ALFORD. It appears that on that evening the deceased was sanding talking with a male acquaintance in the Cathedral yard, when her mother came up and told her it was wrong, and wished her to come home. Deceased, however, got away from her and was never seen alive by the mother again. The mother said at the Inquest "there had been not even a cross word, much less a blow, between me and her all day, I have not beaten her, nor do I know her father has, for three weeks or a month. He would sometimes give her a slap when he was vexed. She never in her life said she would destroy herself, no, she never had reason to. She was comfortable with me, and I am sure she loved me dearly. It is a simple thing to tell you gentlemen, but that same morning when she woke, she said, 'Do not disturb me, mother; I am not very well this morning; but will you come into bed with me; ' and I lay down with her. She was not well, I thought that day and so I indulged her in every little thing." A boy who was examined, however, declared that he saw the mother and deceased quarrelling in the Cathedral yard. Her mother wanted her to go home, and she would not. Her mother struck her twice. She said she would get a policeman, if her mother was not quiet. Her mother said, "will'ee, will'ee." and struck her again. She said, "yes I would." Her mother struck her again. She then said, "Oh, I will go and put an end to myself before the night is over," and ran away. Soon after she was seen by a female in company with a soldier named Scarman, belonging to the 37th regt., walking by the river side, and when they were two or three yards in advance of the witness, the deceased threw out her arms, and, turning quick towards the water, jumped in. The soldier was about an arm's length in advance of deceased, and certainly did not push her in, or touch her at the moment. He stood still all the while, and made no attempt to save her. The soldier said he was so much agitated by the rash act that he was unable to give her any assistance, but he showed the boatman where the body was, and staid till it was taken out, which was ten minutes after she jumped in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Destroyed herself, but whether under temporary insanity, or not there is no evidence to show."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 October 1843
SIDBURY - On the 22nd instant, an Inquest was held on MRS SUSANNAH ANNING, aged 83 years, wife of MR JAMES ANNING, yeoman of Sidbury. It appeared that a son of deceased, GEORGE ANNING, an idiot, aged between 30 and 40 years, always lived with his father and mother. He was generally kept chained to a settle during the day time, and to his bed at night, except when his parents were both at home, and then he was allowed sometimes his liberty. On the 11th instant, he put his hands on the shoulders of his mother and pushed her down. She immediately complained of her thigh being strained, and of a pain in her side, which gradually became worse and she ultimately died. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Friday on the body of a little boy, named WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS, aged 11 years, who was drowned on Monday. From the evidence of a brother of the deceased, it appeared that their father owned a lighter of about 20 tons burden, which the deceased had been accustomed to steer for the last twelve months, notwithstanding his tender age. On Monday the lighter was proceeding through the canal, being hauled by the witness and a man named Keerslake, who were on the bank, and steered by the deceased; and on passing the second drawbridge, the lighter went faster than the bridge turned to make way for her, and the collision threw the unfortunate child overboard; upwards of an hour elapsed before the body could be discovered.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 October 1843
EXMOUTH - Suspected Murder At Exmouth. - On Wednesday a man named JOHN BAILEY, who travelled about tuning and repairing piano-fortes, was found drowned in the Otter, near Gosford Bridge. A hat, neckerchief, seven shirt collars, and other articles belonging to him, were found in the road near the spot. Both pockets of his trousers were turned inside out, and there were bruises across the arms. The water in which he was lying was about a foot deep. He was last seen at the Fair Mile Inn, which he left on Tuesday night; he then seemed much dejected. Great sensation was excited; it being conjectured that he had been robbed and murdered. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 November 1843
STOKE DAMEREL - On Wednesday last, NATHANIEL ALLEN, 63 years of age, one of Lord Cochrane's veterans, in returning from fishing, was capsized in his boat in the eastern channel of the Breakwater. The accident was witnessed at a distance by the crew of the harbour master's boat, but by the time assistance could be afforded, the feeble old man had ceased to exist. The body on being rescued was placed in Mr Walker's boat, and taken with the greatest promptitude to H.M.S. Caledonia, in the Sound. The corpse was immediately received on board, and the greatest respect was observed whilst it remained in the ship. On the body being claimed, Capt. Milne, with the greatest kindness, ordered a boat to be manned with ten men, to take it to the shore for interment; it was also wrapped in a Union Jack, and a blue ensign was hoisted half-mast high, in the stern, and the pennant floated from the bow of the boat. The deceased has left a widow and two children. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - On the same day, on the body of MR GEORGE CORAM, of Stoke, who died from the effects of an injury occasioned by his horse having accidentally fallen with him some week since.

TAVISTOCK - On Monday at Tavistock, on a lad named WM. THOMAS FERRIS, aged 16 years, who died from taking a quantity of nitric acid, for the purpose of destroying himself. Verdict "Suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 November 1843
ST TEATH - Destitution. - A vagrant called JAMES STANTON, in a most deplorably destitute state, having for some weeks been lying in a cattle shed, in the parish of St. Teath, was on Wednesday last taken before the Rev. C. Hodgson, at St. Tudy, and committed to Bridewell for a month; but he was found a corpse in his bed on Thursday morning. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned of Died by the Visitation of God. The poor man is said to belong to the parish of Hartland, and went about as a chimney sweep.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 November 1843
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before B. V. Elliott, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Cockle's Clarence Hotel, Southside Street, Plymouth, on the body of COMMANDER HUGH DONALD CAMERON DOUGLAS, late of H.M. Sloop Tweed, recently paid off at this port. The unfortunate gentleman, it appears, removed from his lodgings at Devonport on Sunday afternoon, and arrived at the above hotel at half half-past five o'clock, when he ordered a bed as he intended sleeping there that night, and to proceed to London by steamer on the following morning. Subsequently the deceased dined and then he informed the landlord that he would walk to the quay and enquire if the vessel had arrived. Mr Cockle replied that he knew the vessel was not in, whereupon the deceased said a walk would do him good, and before he left requested that the chamber-maid might warm his bed and he would return in ten minutes. Mr Cockle saw the deceased to the door, and, believing him to be a stranger and unacquainted with the locality, he wished to accompany him, but the deceased declined his services as it was not necessary. Mr C. watched him until he was out of sight, and immediately afterwards an alarm was raised that someone had fallen overboard. On gaining the spot, he found that it was the deceased, who by this time had been taken out of the water at Smart's quay in a lifeless state. Every means were used, and medical aid promptly rendered to produce resuscitation, but in vain. When the deceased fell over the quay, a man standing at a short distance heard him cry for assistance, and proceeding to the spot whence the voice came, he observed something black struggling in the water, and presently heard a noise like the gurgling of water in the throat. There was no boat at hand, and it being extremely dark it could not be distinctly seen how to afford assistance. By the cable of a smack lying alongside the quay this person lowered himself down to the edge of the water, and with a rope with a noose attached to it, he several times attempted to catch the body, but did not succeed as a hold could not be obtained. The body floated between the quay and the vessel, when a boat arrived and it was landed. The deceased was upwards of sixty years of age, and resided at Brighton; he has left a wife but no children, whose anxious joy at his long anticipated and daily return is ere now reversed by the sad announcement of his untimely end. Verdict, "Found Drowned." The Jury accompanied their verdict with a recommendation to the Mayor and authorities, "Feeling convinced that the death of the deceased was caused from the want of any fence or protection on the Barbican adjoining Smart's quay, and they felt it their duty to call his Worship's attention to the same, as also to the unprotected state, and inefficient lighting of the quays in general."

PLYMOUTH - On Tuesday another Inquest was held by Mr Elliott, at the King's Head, Bilbury-street, on the body of JOHN MACDONALD, whose death was occasioned on Sunday by apoplexy, accelerated by his falling over a flight of steps at the Dolphin Inn, Barbican, by which he received a severe wound in the temple. Verdict, Died of Apoplexy.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 December 1843
EXETER - Melancholy And Distressing Suicide. - It is our painful duty to announce the death of the lady of H. KERSTEMAN, Esq., of Colleton Crescent, Exeter. MRS KERSTEMAN had been ill for some time back, her complaint lately having settled into a fearful religious despondency. For a month previously to Tuesday week last, she had been at Budleigh Salterton for change of air. After her return, she was visited professionally by Mr De la Garde and Dr Blackall, and the former stated his opinion to MR KERSTEMAN, that if not closely watched she would be likely to attempt suicide. An attendant was with her constantly night and day. On Monday, after MR KERSTEMAN had dined, he went up into the drawing room with her, and as she had appeared so much better during the whole of that day, he had great hopes of her recovery. He walked up and down the room with her, and afterwards they both sat down by the fire. MR KERSTEMAN took up a book, and after looking at it for a few minutes he fell into a doze. He was roused in about five minutes by one of the servants, who asked if he knew where her mistress was. The house was searched and it was ascertained that in that short interval she had left it unobserved. MR KERSTEMAN immediately dispatched the servants in quest of her, and he himself got a fly and drove to several places where he thought she might have gone. In the meantime the unfortunate lady had gone down to the river, and thrown herself into the water. The body which was seen floating by some boys, was brought to the shore, recognised by one of the servants who was in quest of her, taken immediately home, and five surgeons, who were promptly on the spot, used every means to restore animation, but without success. An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening, when a verdict of "Destroyed herself being of Unsound Mind" was returned. The deceased lady was 48 years old, and a member of the sect called the "Plymouth Brethren."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 20 December 1843
EAST STONEHOUSE - Caution. On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Lord High Admiral, Stonehouse, on the body of a child 2 years and a half old, called SKINNER, whose death was occasioned by sucking the preparation from some lucifer matches. The mother, in smelling the child's breath, was confirmed in the belief that it was from the cause stated that the child was indisposed, and on searching the bed she discovered several matches scattered about. The Inquest was adjourned to allow a post mortem examination, and on its reassembling, Mr Sheppard, surgeon, stated that death had been produced from the cause assigned, which had produced inflammation of the stomach. Verdict, "Died from taking lucifer matches." Parents would do well to remove these dangerous playthings from the reach of children.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 December 1843
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS HALLS, wife of MR JAMES HALLS, Two Trees Inn, Fore Street, who suddenly expired on Saturday night last. MRS HALLS was taken ill in the early part of the day, whilst at market, but on her return she was attended by T. Crossing, Esq., surgeon, and after the administration of suitable remedies, she became greatly relieved. Deceased had so far recovered during the day as to be able to engage in her customary duties, in the performance of which she continued in apparent cheerfulness and health until the arrival of one of the late coaches, which was much behind the usual time. Two gentlemen passengers were taking supper preparatory to their sleeping in the house, and MRS HALLS was in the bar in the act of wiping a glass, when instantly, as quick as the "passage of an arrow," she fell on the floor, a corpse. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God. MRS HALLS was generally respected, was a sterling housewife, and possessed talents for business rarely equalled.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 January 1844
PLYMPTON - Some excitement has been occasioned in the village of Plympton, owing to an investigation which is now taking place into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM DE LA HOOKE, Esq., surgeon, a highly respected inhabitant of that place. It having been insinuated, we are informed by some of the members of the deceased gentleman's family, that his death was occasioned by poison, John Strode Arscott, Esq., the brother of his widow, requested the Coroner of the borough, J. Walter, Esq., to hold an Inquest on the body, which was accordingly done on Saturday last. Dr Cookworthy, of Plymouth, who attended the deceased gentleman during his illness, was examined at great length, and stated that he was of opinion that the demise of the lamented gentleman had been occasioned by natural causes. The Jury, however, deemed it desirable for the satisfaction of all parties that a post mortem examination of the body should be made, and, therefore, adjourned the Enquiry for this purpose, and in order that the contents of the stomach might be analysed by Mr Oxland, chemist, of Plymouth. The deceased gentleman was highly respected for his many private virtues, and his generous benevolence; not only was he ever ready to lend a helping hand to the poor in the season of their distress, but he would often make work for the labourers when other employment failed, in order that they might be kept from destitution. The inquest sat again last night; the result has not reached us, though there can be no doubt that it will prove that the rumours in question are totally false.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 January 1844
EXETER - Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Heavitree, Exeter, on Tuesday, on the body of THOMAS CHARLES AUSTIN, aged 29, the son of a bricklayer of that parish, who had died on Sunday evening, from the effects of an ounce and half of laudanum, which he had taken. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had adopted vitiated habits, which often placed him in situations not only of peril to his reputation, but of constraint upon his personal liberty- having been in custody several times. On Christmas eve the deceased and another collected several sums of money from various parties for the church singers, by whom they stated themselves to be authorised, but which proved not to be the fact. The Rev. A. Atherley, Vicar of Heavitree, thought it his duty to interfere for the protection of the singers; and the result was the prosecution of deceased's assistant in the business, at the Devon Epiphany Sessions. The deceased, however, on being informed of the imputation, said it should be the last charge made against him. On Saturday evening he went to the shop of Mr Goodman, chemist, Magdalen-street, Exeter, and asked for two ounces of laudanum, stating it to be for a lady in Baring Crescent. The dispenser informed him that it was more than was usually sold, but finally furnished him with an ounce-and-a-half. Subsequently the deceased visited the Royal Oak Inn in Heavitree, drank several half-pints of beer, read a portion of a newspaper, and left between nine and ten o'clock, wishing the company 'good night' with much apparent cordiality. He then went home, where his brother, a tailor, and several of the family were up at a late hour. The deceased, however, went to his room, and nothing more was heard of him until between four and five on Sunday morning, when he called for a jug of water, which was given him by the girl. He is then supposed to have mixed the draught which was to consummate the impiety of suicide. About nine o'clock he was found breathing very hard by the side of his sister, who tried to awake him, but could not. She then gave the alarm, and the deceased lingered until the evening, when he expired. At the Inquest a long letter was produced, written by the infatuated young man, in which his companions were exhorted to take warning from his career and end, whilst much ingenuity was perverted to excuse to himself the fearful crime he contemplated and many circumstances were mentioned, and parties implicated, calculated in his mind to give a colour to his special pleas. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo-de-se, and at the dead of the night, unhonoured and unsanctified by Christian sepulchre, the body was committed to the earth.

PLYMOUTH - Supposed Death Of A Gentleman By Poison. - We gave in our last some particulars relative to the death of the late WILLIAM DE LA HOOK, Esq., of Plymouth, which it had been thought by some of the relatives of the deceased had been occasioned by poison administered by his wife. We are now able to add the substance of the evidence taken at the Coroner's Inquisition, held on the body on Saturday, the 13th inst., and by adjournment on yesterday evening week. - Dr Cookworthy, of Plymouth, was examined at great length, and deposed that on Monday, the 8th inst., he was sent for to attend MR HOOK and found him labouring under inflammation of the bowels. The Doctor having described the treatment which he prescribed, went on to state that in order that nothing might be taken to cause irritation of the intestines, he desired the patient to drink only cold water and a mixture which he had ordered. The next day witness saw him again, when he appeared much better; the witness desired the patient to confine himself to the use of cold water, barley water, or thin gruel, but the latter pleaded hard to be allowed cider which he had used when first taken ill, and he expressed his belief that he would be relieved if he took a good draft of cider. Witness at first peremptorily objected to it on account of his perilous condition; but at last in conformity with his importunity agreed that he should flavour his gruel by the addition of cider in the proportion of one part of cider, to six of gruel. The next day witness saw him again, and he was decidedly better as regarded the acute attack, but was suffering from great exhaustion; witness, however, was led to believe that his dangerous condition arose from mischief left by the disease and not from exhaustion. At midnight on Wednesday, witness received a summons to attend MR HOOK, and found him in a dying state; MR HOOK had been vomiting and complained of some medicine which he said had caused great heat in his stomach; he begged hard for some cider and said that if he had been allowed cider from the beginning he would have recovered. MR HOOK drank a tumbler of cider which appeared to afford him relief, and the witness was led to believe that in the course of the night he drank at least a quart. MR HOOK died on Thursday. On Wednesday night, the witness was informed by Mr Langworthy, that suspicions were entertained by some of MR HOOK'S family, that his sufferings had been caused by poison; that these suspicions were founded on the following allegations - some gruel had been made for the deceased and put aside, a second quantity was made and put in a basin, which a bye-stander remarked was not clean, but contained a brown powder, upon which the person who made it said it was brown sugar, the bye-stander afterwards tasted the gruel, and experienced very unpleasant sensations, and the remainder of the gruel which the patient did not take was sent out of the house. The result of witness's interviews with the surgeons, the two MISS HOOKS and Mrs Watts, was, that he took a portion of the gruel to Plymouth, and had it analysed by Mr Oxland, a practical chemist, whom he kept in ignorance of the circumstances of the case. The witness produced Mr Oxland's written report, which distinctly disproved the presence of arsenic in the gruel. Witness had no hesitation in saying that MR HOOK died in consequence of inflammation of the bowels brought on by natural causes, and by none other so likely as his frequent exposure of late whilst superintending the erection of his new house, and from the want of proper care and attention to himself when the disease first indicated itself. Witness had interviews with the sisters of the deceased relative to the gruel; they carefully avoided all mention of names but the impression left on his mind was, that MRS HOOK was the person who prepared the second basin of gruel. MRS HOOK was most attentive and affectionate to her husband, and the sisters of the deceased appeared to wish to have their minds satisfied without making the matter public. Witness had seen the stomach of MR HOOK upon the post mortem examination, and was quite certain from minute examination that the appearances of it had not and could not have been produced by poison. - Mr Richard Langworthy, surgeon of Plympton, corroborated the evidence of Dr Cookworthy relative to the illness and medical treatment of MR HOOK. During his illness, the deceased would, at intervals, when he was free from pain express himself much pleased with his medical treatment, and at other times when in pain, would declare that he had been wrongly treated, and that he had been poisoned, but witness did not know that he accused any one of having done it. It was Mr Coad, a surgeon, a relative of the deceased, who had communicated to him that he had heard that MR HOOK had been poisoned; and he understood that it was the three sisters of the deceased who made the report; and they based it on the fact of the gruel being changed, and the declaration of the deceased that he had been poisoned. MR HOOK was very averse to a medical man being called in, he had been ill several days before witness had seen him, and said that nature should take her course. Witness was called in by MRS HOOK. Witness never saw any one treat her husband more affectionately than MRS HOOK did during his illness, and deceased repeatedly expressed his grateful sense of her kindness. Witness did not believe that the deceased was aware of the accusation made against his wife. Witness made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased on Saturday night, in the presence of Mr Pode and Mr Nutt, surgeons, and was now thoroughly satisfied that the cause of death was inflammation of the mucous membrane of the bowels, and not any corrosive poison taken into the stomach. He sent the stomach to Mr Oxland sealed up. - Mr Robert Oxland, practical chemist, of Plymouth, deposed that he had applied all the tests to the gruel, and the contents of the stomach, without discovering the slightest indications of any corrosive or other poison. - Mr W. Nutt, of Plymstock and Mr T. Pode, of Plympton, surgeons, expressed their opinion that the deceased had come by his death from inflammation of the bowels. - Mr Deeble Bogen, who officiated as Coroner in the absence from ill-health of Mr J. Walter, the Borough Coroner, summed up the evidence in a very clear manner, stating his conviction that the death of MR HOOK was occasioned by natural causes, and alluding to the painful situation in which the widow had been placed by the rumour which led to this examination, and he impressed upon the Jury the necessity of the exercise of their unbiased judgment and conscience in the matter. The Jury then retired, and in a few minutes returned into Court, when the Foreman H. Treby, Esq., delivered the following verdict:- "That the death of WILLIAM DE LA HOOK was the visitation of the Almighty, from inflammation of the stomach and bowels, arising from Natural Causes only." The verdict was received by everyone present with the strongest expression of satisfaction.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 January 1844
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of ANN CALL, wife of MR CALL, of the Prince George Inn, Vauxhall Street, who died almost suddenly on Sunday morning last. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

PLYMOUTH - Same day on the body of ANN BUTTERS, aged 80 years, who was found dead in her bed. Verdict accordingly.

TAVISTOCK - Inquest before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner. On Saturday last at Tavistock, on the body of a child called MALLETT, whose clothes caught on fire, having been left with another child in a room alone. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

PETER TAVY - on the same day at Petertavy, on the body of THOMAS MAUNDER, the son of a farmer, aged 17 years. The deceased had been shooting, and his father passing near the place where he was, in endeavouring to prevent the gun being seen by him, he placed the hilt into a hole when the charge exploded and entered his breast, he died the following day. Verdict - Accidental Death.

STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday last, on the body of MR BENJAMIN KEMP, who was found dead in his bed on Sunday. The deceased was aged 92 years and was an uncle to MR KEMP, tailor, Fore-street. Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 February 1844
CHARLETON - Frogmore - An Inquisition was taken here on Monday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CATHERINE JARVIS, aged 31 years, who did in child birth. Verdict accordingly.

MODBURY - An Inquest was held here on Saturday last, on the body of BETSY DAVIS, a child, who was found dead by the side of her mother in bed. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 April 1844
TIVERTON - A shocking occurrence took place at Tiverton, on Sunday night in last week. Two men named Leath and PERRY had been drinking rather freely, and about eleven o'clock left the public house to go home. In Gold-street they were met by two young men named Acland and Winsborough who were out on the "spree." Acland and Winsborough said that they were constables, and would see the others out of town, deceased and his companion resisted and a scuffle ensued which ended in Leath and PERRY being knocked down and stunned. Leath, on recovering, found PERRY bleeding from the mouth and ear, and insensible; he got assistance but was unable to procure him a night's lodging, and therefore, they leaned him against the shop door and left him in the belief that he was not seriously hurt. He was found dead the next morning. A Coroner's Jury have returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Acland and Winsborough.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 April 1844
PLYMPTON - Inquest before A. B. Bone, Esq., coroner. On Monday last, on the body of WM. STROUD, a workman at Cann Quarry, who came by his death in an unforeseen and dreadful manner. The deceased was endeavouring, incautiously, to place the web or band round the drum of a grindstone whilst it was working, and was distending it by the weight of his feet to the scope of the drum, and endeavoured to place it in position without checking its action. The poor fellow at once became entangled with the machine and his body was revolved with fearful rapidity several times round its course, occasioning the most frightful contusion and fracture of his limbs. One of his legs was separated from the body and by the violence of the action of the drum was thrown to a distance of several feet, whilst the body was so shockingly mangled that all the bones were completely smashed in atoms. The son of the deceased, 12 years of age, witnessed this harrowing sight, and on an alarm being given, assistance was rendered though unavailing. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BERE FERRERS - Yesterday, at Beer Alston, on the body of NANCY MARKS, who expired in the act of dressing. Verdict - "Found Dead."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 May 1844
Inquests before A. Bone, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday, on the body of WM. MORRISH, whose death was occasioned by falling over the stairs of his house. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Yesterday, on the body of JOSEPH MUNDY, a mason who died from the effects of a fall from a scaffold erected in front of the Royal Hotel. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Singular and Fatal Accident. - A man seventy-five years of age, named JOHN AVERY, lost his life on Friday, on the rocks beneath the Long-room barracks, in a very singular manner. While descending the rocks it seems his feet became firmly fixed in a cavity, and losing his balance, he fell over and dashed his head against a rock with sufficient violence to cause death. The body, when found, was hanging by the legs as it had fallen, and life must have been extinct some hours, as the tide had flown over it and receded considerably. An Inquest was held on Saturday before A. Bone, Esq., and a verdict of "Found Dead" returned.

DARTINGTON - On the 17th an Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, at Dartington, on view of the body of JOHN HARDING, aged 13 years, who while engaged driving a team of oxen harrowing in a field, by some unknown means got under the harrow and was dragged some distance, and when found was lying under the harrow dead. Verdict, Accidentally Killed.

HIGHWEEK - On Saturday 25th at Newton Bushell, on the body of WILLIAM RENDLE, a fine little boy, who accidentally fell in a well of water and before taken out had expired. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

BLACKAWTON - Shocking Accident. - An Inquest was held at Blackawton on Friday, touching the death of MR WILLIAM HYNE, yeoman, aged 30 years. It appears that deceased, on Saturday, the 18th instant, ascended some stone steps which entered a barn where there was a man at work threshing, and in jumping on the floor, came in contact with a prong which was standing up in the corn, and it entered near his abdomen to the depth of two inches. Every means were tried but we regret to state without avail, and the deceased, after lingering until Thursday last, expired. Verdict, "Accidentally killed by jumping on the end of a prong."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 June 1844
STOKE DAMEREL - In our last we gave the particulars of a fatal occurrence which was occasioned by the breaking down of a swinging machine at Morice-town fair, on the evening preceding our publication. An Inquest occupying several days last week, was held at the St. Aubyn Arms, on the body of the by WARN, who was killed, and a most rigid Enquiry was entered into as to the causes of the accident. From the testimony of several witnesses, it appeared that the machine was in a broken and dangerous condition, the timbers, in fact, being fundamentally rotten, and it was proved that the men in charge of it had on the evening of the accident been repeatedly cautioned against using the machine on account of its dangerous condition. After a patient Enquiry the Jury, on Saturday, delivered a verdict of Manslaughter against John Pickering and John Shore, the owners of the machine, and they have since been committed for trial at the Assizes.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 June 1844
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Monday evening last a lamentable and fatal accident befell an invalid gentleman named GOUGH, a retired surgeon of the Navy, while taking an airing in a wheel-chair, near Lewis Jones's turnpike, on the Tavistock road, at the entrance of Plymouth. The unfortunate gentleman observing a waggon descending the hill, and the efforts which the driver was obliged to make in consequence of his omitting to put on the drag to check the wheel horse, directed his attendant to draw the chair on one side into a recess in the roadway. This had scarcely been done when the leader, which had reached the spot, shied at some object, and, in great fright, wheeled about and attempted to bolt up the hill, but unfortunately, came in forcible contact with the chair, which was overturned, and MR GOUGH was prostrated in the road. The occurrence was so sudden that the wheel horse could not be stopped, and, most unhappily, the waggon passed over the deceased, inflicting mortal injury on the head. The deceased gentleman was taken up in an insensible state, and he expired in a few moments afterwards, the most profuse haemorrhage having taken place. We believe that no blame is attachable to the driver, Woods, who is in the employ of Mr C. Elliott, Tavistock, except in his omission to drag the wheel of the waggon, otherwise his conduct was quite cautious. An Inquest was held on the body (yesterday) Tuesday, at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, with a deodand of 25s. on the horse. The conduct of the waggoner was thought blameless.

Inquests before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner:-
MILTON ABBOT - On Saturday last, at Milton Abbott, on the body of HENRY DODGE, a lad eight years of age. The deceased was returning from Dartmoor to Milton with his eldest brother, who was driving a loaded waggon, when the child complained of being fatigued, and, to afford him relief, his brother placed him on the shafts of the waggon. On going down a hill the horses trotted at a fast pace, and the driver jumped from the waggon and ran some distance with the horses, and when he succeeded in stopping them his brother was missing, but on looking back he saw him lying in the road. The child was perfectly insensible, but after the application of some water to his face and temples he revived, and at that time no external mark of injury was observed upon him. He walked on with his brother a short way, when he suddenly dropped to the ground, and was then taken up and carried in his brother's arms, who was informed by a person that passed him that he was dead, and on looking in his face he was assured of the distressing event. The deceased's breast-bone, it appeared, had been crushed. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

HOLBETON - On Saturday, at Holberton, on the body of a husbandman, named JAMES BROWN, who hung himself. The deceased had for some time previously been in necessitous circumstances, and once attempted self-destruction when ill and delirious. since that time he had been under the protection of his brother, and received parochial relief. A woman, on his behalf, had made an application for his allowance, but the relieving officer refused its payment, as it was not made by his wife, and on hearing the refusal he became affected, and said "It is a pity that I should eat bread more." His wife shortly afterwards proceeded to Holberton for the money, but on reaching there it had been paid to her daughter, and in the meantime the deceased left his cottage and hung himself to a beam in a linhay adjacent. - Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 June 1844
STOKE DAMEREL - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN MORRIS, a police inspector in the Dock-yard. The deceased, on leaving his house at 7 o'clock on the evening of that day, to go on duty, was entreated by his wife to remain at home, as he was indisposed, suffering from shortness of breath and pains in the chest. He could not, however, be prevailed upon - and on his arriving at the station-house but a few minutes after, he became so much worse that the surgeon of the establishment was sent for, but before his arrival the deceased had expired. He had been for some time affected with the complaint of which he died. - Verdict, "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 July 1844
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of a newly-born infant, which had been disinterred in order that an Inquiry might be made as t whether it was born alive, suspicions to the contrary having been excited by the testimony of a man named Hammell, who, on being brought before the Magistrates by the mother on a charge of stealing a shawl, in his defence stated, that the shawl was given him, and insinuated that the woman, CATHARINE COSTELLO, had recently been delivered of a child, which had not fairly come to its death. This led to an Inquiry, and at the request of several respectable inhabitants, the Coroner, J. Edmonds, Esq., caused the body to be disinterred and a post mortem examination to be made, and on the evening of Wednesday last the evidence was gone into from which it appeared that on the 17th of June last, CATHARINE COSTELLO gave birth to a child at the house of a woman named Weakley, residing in Little Saltram, and who in the absence of a medical man, acted as nurse. Shortly after the birth, a person calling himself Stevens, and who stated that he was a druggist, visited COSTELLO, and after remaining with her a few minutes he came out and said that the child was dead, and supplied Weakley with a certificate of the birth of the child. He also gave a woman who was present named Cox, a shilling to carry the body to St. Andrew's Church yard, and promised to send a box in which it should be placed. Weakley and Cox both confirmed that the child was born alive, and lived for a few minutes. Mr Andrews, Surgeon, who examined the body, entered into a minute scientific detail of the appearance of the lungs and other parts connected with the process of respiration, and stated it to be his firm conviction that the child had been still born. Other witnesses were examined, but there being great discrepancy in their evidence, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the child had been found dead, but that there was not sufficient evidence before them to show whether it was born alive or not. On Thursday Hammell was again brought before the Magistrates, on a charge of stealing the shawl, and committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 July 1844
ASHBURTON - Fatal Accident. - A labourer belonging to Cornwall, named RICHARD REDDECLIFF, aged 30 years, met his death on Friday last, at Penn Slate Quarry, near Ashburton. It appears he was engaged at the bottom of the quarry filling butts, which were drawn to the top by a whim, one butt descending empty while the other laden with rubbish was ascending; unfortunately, the butts when up about 20 feet, came in contact, the empty butt weighing 150lbs. was unhooked, and fell on the poor fellow's head with such force, that he expired soon after. An Inquest was held by Mr J. Gribble, Coroner, of Ashburton, on Saturday last, when a verdict of Accidentally Killed, was returned.

KINGSWEAR - An Inquest was held at King's Wear, near Dartmouth, on Saturday last, by Mr W. A. Cockey, Deputy Coroner, of Ashburton, on the body of ABRAHAM EALES. In the absence of his friends, who were gone to Dartmouth, it is supposed he took his father's boat and fell overboard, as he was found on the beach near the quay drowned after the tide had receded. Verdict, Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 July 1844
CORNWOOD - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday the 30th ult., two young men, named JOHN TOZER and Robert Jeffery, were at the estate of Mr Rd. Coulton, jun., Cornwood, when Jeffery, leaving TOZER in the yard, went into the house for the purpose of getting the key of the cider cellar; he returned with a gun, and not thinking it was loaded fired at TOZER, and the contents lodged in his face. TOZER lingered until Monday morning when, he expired in the greatest agony, 97 shots having been extracted from his face. An Inquest was held the following day when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 July 1844
STOKE DAMEREL - The body of the young lady, MISS AMELIA EDEN, who was drowned in Hamoaze by the overturning of a boat, with which the Torpoint steam-boat came in collision on the 16th inst., was picked up on Monday afternoon, and brought to Morice-town where an Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Bone, on the body. Mr Peake, Foreman of Shipwrights of the Dock-Yard and several other witnesses, were examined. The Coroner having been informed that some additional and essential evidence would be brought forward, adjourned the Inquest to Monday morning next, at 11 o'clock, when the case will be further proceeded with.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 August 1844
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Melancholy Accident In Hamoaze. - The adjourned Coroner's Inquisition on the body of MISS EDEN, who was drowned in Hamoaze on the 16th ult., in consequence of the boat in which she and a party of friends were sailing, being run down by the Torpoint Steam Ferry Bridge, was held on Monday last, at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage. It will be well to recapitulate the circumstances of the accident as they were developed in the evidence last week. The boat was lying with her head up the stream against the ebb tide in the course of the steamer, and the gentleman rowing her finding it impossible to escape, loudly called out to the people in the Bridge to stop it. Cudlip the stoker of the bridge, who was on deck at the time, seeing the boat about 30 or 40 feet off, signalised the engineer to stop, which he did, but notwithstanding, the bridge struck the boat in the centre as she was laying aslant the stream, and she was forced under the brow of the bridge, the deceased was struck on the head and being forced overboard she sunk immediately, probably from the weight of the steel springs (10lbs) which she was compelled to wear by spinal disease. The skull of the deceased was not fractured; and the opinion of Mr Swain, the surgeon who examined the body, was that the deceased died of drowning, but that owing to the thinness of her skull she was stunned by the blow. - Mrs Jeffery, wife of Mr Jeffery, druggist, sworn, stated that she was on board the steam-bridge at the time of the accident, and saw the stoker help a lady out of a boat, in which she recognised Miss Lampen, who was being helped out by Mr Ramsey. Every assistance she considered, was rendered on the part of the men belonging to the steam-bridge, to facilitate the escape of the party in the boat. - Mr B. M. Ramsey, solicitor, sworn. - On Tuesday, the 16th of July last, about 7 o'clock in the evening, he embarked in company with Mrs Peake, MISS EDEN (the deceased), Miss Lampen, two sons of the Rev. John Lampen, and two sons of Mr Peake, in a Dock-yard boat. They had proceeded about half way across from Newpassage to Torpoint, when, the wind being taken out of the sails of a little model cutter which the boys were sailing by the San Josef, they endeavoured to pull to the windward of that vessel to get a breeze for her. The tide at the time being ebbing very strongly, drifted them down in the course of the steamer, which was crossing the river; and all their endeavours to avoid the steamer proving fruitless, he hailed the steamer, calling out several times "stop her." They, however, continued their exertions; the ladies were screaming very much; until, at length, coming close to the steamer, he leaped on board and immediately rendered every assistance in his power to the rest of the party. He saw nothing of the deceased after the collision. He could not say positively, but he did not see any assistance rendered by the steamer's men. When he first called out "stop her" which he did, as he considered, sufficiently loud to be heard in the vessel, had the men been at their post, they were within 20 or 30 yards of the steamer, and when he sprang on board she was still moving, but whether at the same rate he could not undertake to say. - A woman called Kelly deposed that it was not till after she heard the shrieks of the ladies in the boat that the look-out man cried out "stop her." She recollected saying that the parties in the boat appeared to be paying more attention to the model than to their own lives. - Cudlip, the stoker, stated, in addition to his former evidence, that if the boat, when he first saw it, had been 40 instead of 30 feet distant from the steamer, he should not have considered it necessary to hail the engineer to stop her. He did not hear any cry from the boat or any other quarter to stop the vessel; had any such cry been made, Vincent, the look-out man, was in a position to hear it. The gunwale of the boat was not broken by its collision with the steamer, but he did it himself in extricating it from the brow of the steamer. - Thomas Bray, gunner of the San Josef, saw the boat drifting down towards the steamer, and when it was within two boats' length of her, hear heard cries and shrieking, and almost momentarily the boat and steamer came in contact, the guard-iron underneath the brow striking the deceased, who was standing in the boat, and she fell head foremost into the water. He saw the accident through the telescope. - This witness's statement was corroborated by Wm. Beer, who was on the poop of the San Josef at the same time. - William Allen, the engineer of the steam-bridge, stated that immediately directions were given by the fireman he stopped the engine, and should think she ran about 15 feet after she was stopped. The steamer, however quickly it was stopped, would run at the least 12 feet. - The Coroner then read over the evidence to the Jury, explaining the law of manslaughter, and pointing out how far it bore upon this case. The Jury shortly after returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time expressing their conviction of the necessity there existed for the strictest vigilance on the part of the men on board the steamer.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 August 1844
MODBURY - An Inquest was held at Modbury on the 5th of August, on the body of JOSHUA PUTT, aged 74, who died suddenly. Verdict accordingly.

SOUTH TAWTON - An Inquest was held at South Tawton, on the 9th of August, on the body of JAMES PINE, aged 6 years. Deceased it appears went to the Town Mills, and went up in the loft, where a trap-door was open, by some means he fell down through to the floor beneath, and received such injuries that he died shortly after. Verdict, Accidental Death.

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Melancholy Occurrence At Plympton. - On Sunday 4th July, MR CORK, a respectable yeoman residing at Woodford, Plympton St. Mary, died in consequence of taking salt-petre by mistake for Epsom salts. It appears that MR CORK went to Church in the forenoon of that day, and in the afternoon went round his estate (the usual custom with farmers) to look to the safety of his sheep and cattle. After returning he complained of indisposition, and being in the habit of taking salts, called for a dose, when unfortunately some saltpetre, kept in the same cupboard, was mixed by mistake and taken immediately by the deceased, who made an observation on its peculiar taste. Shortly after, violent illness ensued, and medical assistance was obtained, but he expired within six hours of talking the saltpetre. MR CORK was above 60 years of age, and was much and deservedly respected. An Inquest has been held on the body, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Friday, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES HAYNES, a cartman, in the employ of Messrs. Scott, brewers. From the evidence of several witnesses, it appears that deceased has for some months past, occasionally drank to excess, and at times manifested an unsound state of mind. On Friday morning he went to his work as usual, and left the brewery with the cart to deliver beer as directed; at about half-past ten in the forenoon he was at the Robin Hood public house, in New-street, where he drank some gin and water, and then requested a porter to go with him to deliver some beer. On leaving New-street he drove the horse and cart to the Hoe, immediately above the Public Bathing Place, where he left and went down over the rocks saying he was going to bathe his leg, (deceased had a diseased leg) but on coming to the water's edge he was observed to throw up his hands and plunge into the water. The party who accompanied him, a porter named Sargent, did not attempt to rescue deceased, but drove the horse and cart back to the brewery. Alarm was raised by some young gentlemen who were bathing near the spot, and the body was taken out of the water by Mr John Bowden, who on arriving at the spot immediately plunged in. It was conveyed to the Hospital, and every means tried to restore animation without success. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity, produced by excessive drinking."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 August 1844
KINGSBRIDGE - Inquest. - Mr W. A. Cockey, Deputy Coroner for the County, held an Inquest at Kingsbridge, on the 23rd instant, on the body of ELIZABETH POPPLESTONE, aged 79 years, who died suddenly the previous day, in a fit of apoplexy.

MODBURY - And on the 26th at Modbury, on the body of a poor man named GEORGE VOISEY, aged 69 years, who died suddenly from the rupture of a blood vessel of the heart. Verdict, in both cases, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 September 1844
On Monday last an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WM. H. STIDEFORD, the infant child of a seaman of that name, who was found dead by the side of its mother. It appeared that the parents had taken proper care of the child, and the Jury, therefore, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 October 1844
Painful Occurrence - Five Lives Lost. - A sad event, which has been attended with the loss of five lives, two men and three women, happened on Monday evening last at a place known as Hoe lake, situated midway between Kingsand and Redding Point, Mount Edgcumbe. The unfortunate persons were JAMES FOWLER, aged 36, cabinet-maker, and JANE FOWLER, (his wife), ALEXANDER KNOWLES, 29, shoe-maker, brother of JANE FOWLER, ELIZABETH MORGAN, 24, the wife of a mason, all living at 28 William-street, Plymouth, and ELIZABETH RYDER, 20, an unmarried domestic servant in a family residing in Clarence-street. It appears that on Monday afternoon the two men hired a pleasure boat at Richmond Walk, stating that they were going into the Sound; and having been joined by the females at some point unknown, it is believed they went alongside H.M.S. Queen, lying in the Sound, to see MORGAN'S brother, and from thence proceeded to Kingsand. They landed there about four o'clock, and after remaining at the Devonport Inn until nearly seven o'clock, they embarked in the boat with the intention of proceeding to Devonport. The men, it is stated, were slightly in liquor, and there was a good deal of water in the boat, owing probably to the surf which is always running on the beach having broken over its stern. It was very dark, the moon not having risen, but the weather was very calm. Soon after seven o'clock the inmates of the cottages at the western extremity of Mount Edgcumbe Park were startled by loud shrieks coming apparently from the direction of the water. A party were taking tea at one of the cottages at the time, and they were in doubt whether the cries really did proceed from persons in distress; but as they were repeated at intervals for four or five minutes, one of the party, Mr Parsons, plumber, of Plymouth, went out, and at the door he met a young woman named Collins, the daughter of the inmates of the cottage, coming to raise an alarm. This young woman, with a degree of self-possession truly admirable, led them to the waterside and descending the cliff, the whole party got out upon the rocks. The spot at which the affair occurred, we should here mention, is a small bay, about twenty feet across the mouth, formed by two ledges of rock jutting into the sea to the distance of about forty feet. Extreme darkness prevailed at this time, but the party attracted by sounds rising out of the water like the gurgling of water in the throats of drowning persons, scrambled out on the easternmost ledge of rock. Miss Collins immediately exclaimed "I see one" pointing to an object which appeared to her like the head and shawl f a woman and instantaneously added "there's another." The first object disappeared immediately it had been seen, and the second being nearest to the westernmost ledge of rocks, the party ran over there in the hope of being able to seize it. One of the party divested himself of part of his clothes with the intention of plunging into the water, but while doing so, he pointed out to Mr Parsons who was out on the rocks, than an object had risen immediately beneath his feet. Mr Parsons states that he heard the sound of a person apparently in the last agony close to him, but owing to the intense darkness and the reflection of the Breakwater lighthouse flashing across his eyes at the moment the object rose, he could not see it and it sunk, and all was hushed. The boat was next discovered bottom upward, drifting towards the beach, and while Miss Collins proceeded to Kingsand to obtain assistance, the party righted it but found nothing entangled in it except a man's hat. Two boats arrived in less than half an hour from Kingsand, the men in the first of which instantly discovered the body of a woman lying at the bottom in 5 or 6 feet of water, and fished it up with an oar. A boat was sent to Kingsand with the body, where two medical gentlemen who had been alarmed, were waiting to apply restoratives. Soon after the body of a man and then of a second woman were picked up, and conveyed to Cawsand. The two medical gentlemen, Dr Cook and Mr Gray, made great efforts to restore animation, but after persevering two hours, they pronounced life to be extinct. The body of the third woman was found about 11 o'clock by a coast-guard officer lying on its face on the rocks at half-tide and that of the second man was discovered soon after midnight lying in a little gully between two rocks near high-water mark. We cannot speak too highly of the conduct of all parties who acted on this melancholy event. The presence of mind and courage of the young woman, Mary Anne Collins:- The prompt attention and skill displayed by the medical gentlemen - the cheerful alacrity of the Kingsand men in rendering assistance, and the kindness of those who decently performed the last offices of the dead, are all admirable. It is conjectured that the boat struck on a rock, and the unhappy individuals rising up, overset it and precipitated themselves in the water. Had it not been dark, in all probability they might have saved themselves, as the accident occurred close to uncovered rocks adjoining the shore, and in water from five to six feet deep. It is supposed that, bewildered by darkness, and disabled by fright, they struggled until exhaustion, and then perished. An Inquest was held on the bodies of the deceased, before A. B. Bone, Esq., yesterday: it is not necessary to detail the voluminous evidence touching the event, collected patiently by the respected Coroner, for the foregoing is the substance of it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but by what means they came by their death there is no evidence to shew." FOWLER has left a family of three children, KNOWLES a wife and two children and MORGAN a husband and two children.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 October 1844
KINGSTEIGNTON - An Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, at Kingsteignton, on the body of SAMUEL LEAR, aged 50 years, who was found drowned in the Teign river the previous day, but how or by what means he came into the water there was no evidence to prove. - Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 October 1844
NEWTON ABBOT - An investigation touching the cause of death of a pauper named JOHN WILSON, a native of Glasgow, was held at Newton Union Workhouse, on Thursday the 3rd of October. It appears that the pauper on the Tuesday previous was allowed to depart from the Newton Union House, to walk towards Exeter, to endeavour to gain admittance into the Hospital there; for the benefit of a long standing attack of asthma. He walked in the first place to Teignmouth; he there found himself so very unwell as to ask for a lodging from the authorities of the place; that was afforded him, but upon the following morning inflammation of the throat occurred, when the district surgeon was sent for, who recommended immediate strict attention or removal to the Union House, some five miles from the town. The parish officers followed the latter direction but instead of acting a ready part, the poor man was allowed to remain in an open back street upon the step of a door (to which place he had walked, after his lodging had been closed upon him,) an hour or two intervened before assistance of any kind reached him, even without the attention we believe of a single person, till a lady of the neighbourhood passing by and learning the circumstances, as well as knowing the dangerous state of the poor fellow, had him carried to her own house, where restoratives were given, and the man, we believe, revived. After several hours had elapsed the parish officers did return to a charitable sense somewhat; not, however, till they had been frequently sent for, when contrary to the urgent appeal of the lady, who had so feelingly done her duty, and who had the opinion of the medical attendant of her family to back her, the poor man, in his almost dying state, was put into a fly to be taken to the Union House, at Newton; as may be expected, he did not survive the journey, for he died before he had been driven a mile. The lady, to complete her good work, then wrote to the Coroner, who summoned an Inquest for the following day, when the Jury returned the following verdict. - "Inflammation of the Lungs. The Jury cannot help expressing themselves not well satisfied how the medical man, Mr Stallock, could have given his certificate to remove the deceased from Teignmouth, when he appeared in a dying state." The case has also been represented to the Poor Law Commissioners in London.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 October 1844
PLYMOUTH - Inquests before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, of Plymouth. - On Wednesday last, on the body of WM. COLLINGS, aged 12 years, who was drowned in Sutton-Pool whilst passing over some boats. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - On Monday, on the body of JOHN THOMAS, late seaman belonging to H.M.S. Resistance, who, with seven other individuals, was drowned on sailing over the "Bridge" in the Sound. The particulars of which we gave in our last; the body of the deceased was washed on shore at the Brethren steps, under the Hoe. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 October 1844
PLYMOUTH - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of SARAH DOLE, who expired in a fit. Verdict accordingly.

Inquests before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner:- On Saturday last, on the body of JAMES HYNE, who drowned himself in the river Tavy, near Hill Bridge. - Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Same day on the bodies of JOHN CUMMINGS and THOMAS MAYNE, who belonged to H.M.S. Resistance, who were drowned in the late lamentable accident by the upsetting of a boat on the "Bridge". - Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

EGG BUCKLAND - On Monday at Egg Buckland, on the body of a child, the son of MR STIDDIFORD, who was burnt to death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

On Tuesday, at Southerton, on the body of JOHN VOYSEY, who was found dead by the side of his mother, in bed. Verdict, "Natural Death."

MILTON ABBOT - Same day at Milton Abbott, on the body of a lad called HENRY CHUBB, who was killed by falling from a horse. - Verdict "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 November 1844
Inquests before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner:-
BROADWOODWIDGER - On Monday last, at Broadwoodwidger, on the body of RICHARD PAGE, aged 15 years, the son of a farmer. The deceased had been playing with his sister, after partaking of a hearty supper, when he suddenly fell to the ground under the stroke of death. - Verdict, "Died of Apoplexy."

PETER TAVY - On the same day, at Petertavy, on the body of CHARLES REDDICLIFF, aged 4 years, who died in consequence of being burnt whilst temporarily left by his mother in a room with a fire. The little sufferer lingered in great pain for three days, when he died of the injuries he had sustained. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 20 November 1844
PLYMPTON ST MARY - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN BAKER EDMONDS, who died shortly after being admitted into the Plympton Union Workhouse. The deceased had been a farm servant, and was taken from that Workhouse into the service of Mr Hoskins, a farmer in the parish. He had complained of acute pains in the leg, from which he became an invalid, and was attended by a surgeon at his master's house, and it was considered that his suffering was the effect of rheumatism. It being found necessary, he was removed to the Union Workhouse, where he received medical treatment from Tuesday se'nnight till the following Thursday, when he expired. A post mortem examination of the body was made, when it was ascertained that he died from the effects of inflammation of the brain, produced by natural causes; the hip also was opened, and it was found that an internal abscess had formed. Verdict, "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 December 1844
EXETER - An Inquest before J. Warren, Esqr., was held at Exeter on Monday, on the male illegitimate child of MARY JACKMAN, which died under the following circumstances. The mother was servant to Mr Richards, of David's Hill. Her mistress, on Sunday evening, having rung the bell twice without causing her appearance, went into the back kitchen to see what had become of her. On approaching, she heard some one go hastily into the back kitchen, and following discovered her servant in the yard beyond bending over an empty wash-tub, in the act of placing in it living child. Mrs Richards brought the child in, and used every necessary care; but in a few minutes it died, to the mother's apparent concern. There were appearances which left no doubt that the infant was born at the kitchen fire-place, and it seems probable that the mother, startled on her mistress's approach, impelled by the momentary shame of her situation, had hastened away to hide it. Even the short exposure to the cold was in the opinion of the medical gentlemen, likely to have caused death; but though there were no marks of violence except a fracture of the jaw-bone, which was probably caused in the hasty delivery, they stated that the death of a new born infant not uncommonly occurred from causes quite independent of any ill-treatment after birth. The Jury found "That the illegitimate child of MARY JACKMAN was born alive, but that there was no evidence to prove the cause of its death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 January 1845
On Friday last, the body of WILLIAM EASTMAN, a Plymouth waterman, who, with his father, was drowned in Plymouth Sound during the late gales, was picked up by two Devonport watermen, and brought to the beach at Mutton-Cove. In accordance with a silly notion that it is illegal to land a body without the sanction of a Coroner, we understand that the body was kept below high-water mark, up to which the jurisdiction of the borough of Saltash extends, until notice had been given to the Mayor of that Borough; who, as ex officio Coroner, held an Inquest immediately afterwards on the body, gave the usual certificate, and charged the men not to leave the body until it was delivered up for burial. Owing, however, to some mistake, the cause of which is variously attributed to the Coroner and the watermen, the body remained on a hand-barrow, on the quay at Mutton-Cove, from Friday to Sunday afternoon, watched by two watermen, night and day. On the latter day the circumstance became known to Mr Arnold, one of the overseers of the parish of Stoke Damerel; and with creditable promptitude that gentleman had the body removed to the workhouse; and it has, we believe, since been interred by the authorities.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 January 1845
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBT. GOOD, a superannuated joiner from the Dock-yard. The deceased, in passing through Cornwall-street, was taken suddenly ill, and was taken into the King and Queen public-house; but before medical aid could be obtained he expired. Verdict, "Natural Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday evening, a boy named GEORGE STEPHENSON, one of the crew of H.M.S. Persian, fitting alongside the Vigo, hulk, in Hamoaze, stepped upon one of the hatchways on the main-deck of the hulk; and the hatch not having been properly secured, slipped from under his feet, and he was precipitated into the hold upon the ballast. The height of the fall was eleven feet, and the poor fellow received from it some severe internal injury, which caused his death shortly after. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday by Mr A. Bone, and adjourned until Friday to obtain further evidence.

On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by J. Edmunds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE EASTMAN, aged 60, waterman, who, with his son, was drowned in December last. Verdict, "Found Drowned." The body of the boy was picked up last week, as stated in our paper at the time.

PLYMOUTH - The body of MR THORN, of the Brunswick Inn, Barbican, Plymouth, who was drowned on Friday last in Deadman's Bay, by the upsetting of a boat in which he was conveying fish to the London steamer, was picked up on Thursday last. An Inquest was held on the body the following day; and a verdict of "Accidental Death" given.

On Thursday morning last, a man named JONES, the chief light-keeper at the Breakwater lighthouse, was drowned. Graham, another lightkeeper, saw him leave the lighthouse and walk towards the east end, but missed him in a few minutes, and supposing that he had been washed off by the sea, which occasionally broke over the breakwater, he hoisted a signal of distress. A boat from the Chatham immediately came to the spot, and the men commenced creeping for the body inside the breakwater, and after three hours found it. A Coroner's Jury has returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased has left a wife but no family.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 January 1845
PLYMOUTH - Inquests Before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner of Plymouth:- On Thursday last, on the body of MARIA STANBURY, the infant child of MR STANBURY, baker, Southside-street, who was found dead in bed that morning. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Same day, on the body of ANN SHORT, aged 74, whose death was occasioned by injuries she received in falling down stairs. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

On Monday, on the body of JOHN DOIDGE, 4 Ladywell-place; the deceased was 80 years of age, and expired somewhat suddenly. Verdict, "Natural Death."

Same day, on the body of G. ADAMS, who died after a few hours' illness. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 February 1845
PLYMOUTH - Inquests before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth:- On Wednesday last, on the body of SARAH CROCKER, aged 33, residing at 27 John-street, who expired suddenly. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

On Monday, on the body of W. HALLETT, 14 years of age, who died from the effects of burning, his apron having ignited whilst standing by the fireside. Verdict, "Accidental Death.".

On the same day, on the body of W. H. CREMER, an infant who was found dead by its mother's side in bed. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 February 1845
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday night last, a waterman named WILLIAM ABBOTT, aged 21, was drowned at Mutton-Cove. he had been drinking until a late hour, and it is supposed that he fell into the water while mooring the boat for the night. A Coroner's Inquest will be held on the body today, by A. B. Bone, Esq.

PLYMOUTH - On Wednesday last, a sailor's wife named JOHNSON, committed suicide by hanging herself in the Plymouth Prison, where she was confined for an assault and robbery of a girl. The policeman on duty, on visiting her cell at four o'clock on Wednesday morning, saw her standing as he supposed, against the wall underneath the window, but on examination, he discovered that she was hanging from the window bars by a handkerchief, and quite dead. The handkerchief was tied, not noosed, round her neck, and the wretched woman must have thrown herself off a bench, twisting her neck round while falling, and thus ensuring destruction. A Coroner's Jury has given a verdict of Temporary Insanity in the case.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 February 1845
EAST STONEHOUSE - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of W. LAMBELL, a retired timber-merchant. The deceased, on going to bed on the preceding night incautiously placed a piece of ginger in his mouth, of an inch in length for warmth, but in the night he was awakened from having swallowed the substance. A surgeon was immediately obtained, but he could not remove the obstruction, and deceased expired shortly afterwards. On a post mortem examination of the body, the ginger was found firmly fixed in the bronchus. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Sudden Death. - On Monday last, a waterman named THOS. HAMBLY, while proceeding in his boat to Barnpool, to H.M.S. Firebrand, with Mr Smith, the surgeon of that vessel, expired suddenly. An emission of blood from the nose and mouth taking place, the poor fellow instantly fell insensible into the bottom of his boat. Mr Smith at once took the management of the boat and pulling to Cremyl, used those restorative efforts that his skill dictated, though in vain. The deceased's son was in the boat at the time of this melancholy occurrence, and the event is the more deplorable, as the deceased has left a wife on the eve of confinement, and a family of six children, in a state of painful destitution. The Firebrand was under sailing orders at the time, and Mr Smith while giving evidence at the Coroner's Inquest, was nearly left behind. Fortunately the vessel was obliged to take a circuit round Drake's Island and hence Mr Smith was able to catch her by the shorter route over the "Bridge." An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Saturday morning last, MR AVERY, chief clerk in the Excise at Plymouth, terminated his existence in Coburg-street, by administering to himself a large dose of arsenic. The circumstances under which this rash act was committed, are peculiarly distressing, and though we may disappoint public curiosity by not chronicling them, for ourselves we must say that we think that the connections of the deceased have had their feelings too much harrowed by this awful calamity and distressing bereavement, to need the additional pang which a narration of all the information which is rife on this sad occurrence would occasion. The particulars of the case are simple and affecting, and are briefly these. The deceased being of a very sensitive and nervous temperament, has from many causes been much grieved of late, and has evinced much excitement and dejection of manner, but he exhibited no symptoms which would have led those around him to believe that he had a dangerous intention. On Friday night last, he retired to bed at an early hour; in the morning he complained of indisposition, and took his breakfast in bed. Shortly afterwards the deceased was taken suddenly worse, and he presented so ghastly an appearance that it was evident that the stroke of death was upon him. Immediately, Mr Andrews, surgeon, was sent for, and on his immediate attendance on deceased, he addressed him as follows, "Doctor, I am dying; if you knew all, you must know I am dying; if you will allow me, I will tell you all about it. They have driven me to distraction. you do not know what I have done. What will become of my poor wife? The deceased then sunk and died. From a discovery which was afterwards made, it was clearly shown that the deceased had poisoned himself, for the remains of the fatal drug were found in a paper under the bed. Papers were also found which furnished the most conclusive proof that the deceased had destroyed himself. These documents were addressed to his wife, and the contents were truly heart-rending, showing the impressions of a broken spirit and a heart overcharged with sorrow. The following document will best tell this sad tale:- "My dear, dear wife, - I have been a deceitful villain to you, and you have been one of the best wives to me. Oh, my CARRY, my dear life, pray for my poor soul. I have behaved a rogue to your dear sister. I crave earnestly of all of your forgiveness. Everything belonging to me is yours. If you like, give my watch to dear Priscilla, but keep the chain yourself; also give some of my brooches to dear Eliza, whom I have so cruelly treated. Oh, my blessed wife, forgive me, and pray for my distressed soul. You have threatened to leave me; the thought is horrible, I cannot endure it. I love you more than ever, my dear wife. My pencil-case and your spectacles are in my travelling desk, in the desk in the office. God bless and protect you and your sisters. - Your unhappy WILLIAM. - Oh my darling wife, forgive me for my cruel conduct. See my letter for you in the office on the stamps. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held on the body at the Guildhall, John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and by adjournment to last night to allow a post mortem examination. The contents of the stomach it was found were charged with a half-ounce of oxide of arsenic, which the deceased is supposed to have taken in his tea. The Jury, in a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was 43 years of age.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 March 1845
CADELEIGH - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, before J. Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the REV. WM. SALTER, rector of Cadleigh, resident at Exeter. The deceased, who was 70 years of age, had been lately in a desponding condition. On Saturday morning he went into the garden with his gun, which he kept loaded with small shot to shoot sparrows, and shortly after a report was heard and he was found quite dead, and the gun lying across his arm. There was a wound in the upper part of the palate, and through the head, out at the back of the skull, the crown of the hat being perforated by the charge. The muzzle of the gun had been evidently put into the mouth, and the unfortunate man had discharged it with the ram-rod. Verdict - Temporary Insanity.

BRADNINCH - A Baby Poisoned By Its Own Father. - The little town of Bradninch, nine miles from Exeter, has been much excited owing to the alleged discovery of the murder of a motherless infant, ten days old, by its father. - It appears that SAMUEL HAYDON is a husbandman, 30 years of age, and married about ten months since, a young woman aged 21. On the 9th of February she was delivered of a daughter. The mother survived only seven days, when she died, unquestionably, from natural causes. On the Wednesday following, Feb. 19, the wife's funeral took place. The deceased's eldest sister came over to attend the funeral. HAYDON, the husband, was ill of rheumatism, and confined to his bed. He is a member of a club, and the rule is that if a sick member left the house within the week, he would not be entitled to any pay. He, therefore, did not attend the funeral, but requested his sister-in-law to bring in the child, which could remain in bed with him whilst the family were gone to see the corpse borne to its final resting place. The sister, MRS SANDERS, brought the babe in, took it up to his bedside, and gave it the breast - she having an infant of her own, had undertaken, so far as her limited means would allow, to supply the place of a mother to it. After she had left, MRS YELLAND, a sister of HAYDON (the prisoner) entered the house and went up to her brother's room to fetch the child and take it to the fire. She accordingly received the child from him, he not having had it more than fifteen minutes. Two other women were below, they looked at the infant and seeing something the matter with its mouth, concluded that it had the thrust - as they had not seen it for some days before. In about three quarters of an hour, MRS SAUNDERS returned from the funeral. She took the child and was instantly alarmed at its altered appearance. She hastened to Mr Cleeve, surgeon, and he not being at home, convinced that the child was very ill, she hastened to the clergyman, the Rev. Sam. Jordan Lott, to have it baptized. He baptized it, but exclaimed immediately he saw it, "Why the child is poisoned." She left the clergyman the moment the baptism was concluded and hastened back to the surgeon's; he had not returned. She then consulted several mothers as to the state of the child; they all pronounced it very ill. She then departed to her own home, very much distressed at her inability to get medical advice, and retired to rest about 11 o'clock. She scarcely slept, having charge of this babe, and one of her own not very much older. About one in the morning the babe was moaning, and about an hour afterwards the moaning ceased, and her husband found it dead. - An Inquest was held last Saturday before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner. The father of the babe was present, under surveillance, but no questions were put to him. His sister, feeling herself to be in some measure implicated in suspicion, from the fact of her having brought the child down from the father, exclaimed before the Jury, "You know, SAM, the froth was coming out of the child's mouth when I took it out of bed." He replied, "e'es 'twas." The surgeon stated that the child had died from taking some corrosive poison. The constable, having searched the house the same day, deposed to the Jury that he had found a small bottle, secreted in a hole in the floor of the bedroom. This bottle he produced. It was labelled "Spirits of Hartshorn." - A post mortem examination of the body having been made, the Jury resumed its Enquiry on Thursday last. In the interim, the prisoner had made some important disclosures. On that morning the prisoner sent for Mr Matthews, who told the prisoner that whatever was said to him would be told to the Jury. HAYDON then began very abruptly to allude to the charge - he said he did not think it would hurt the child, he did not hide away the bottle till he was summoned to attend the Inquest. The bottle was in his pocket when he was at the Inquest; he had taken some himself and did not think it would hurt the child - he did not know what he was about, he was in such trouble. He begged Mr Matthews to speak to the Jury for him - and he hoped that the gentlemen would be merciful to him. Mr M. told him he must not look for mercy from men, but that he must look to God for mercy. He was then reading the New Testament, and he said he knew it - he had read over the book twice. On the Tuesday evening previous he had said to the constable while locking him up that he had been in a great deal of trouble, and he had not known what he was a doing of, and that he hoped they would forgive him. He said he had taken some of it himself, that it was a good thing for the rheumatic and that he gave the child about half a teaspoonful. The prisoner, after the witness had given his evidence, observed "that is exactly what I said to him." It was proved that the prisoner had sent for the hartshorn some days before his wife's death; and that after it had occurred he had expressed a wish that the "child was in heaven with its mother." Another witness deposed that the prisoner asked her when the question was enquired about "whether a man would be put into jail if any person didn't see any person give the child anything." She said, "I don't know, it is according how it is brought in." He said several times after his wife was dead, and before her death, "that it would be a good thing for me if it would please the Lord to take the child." - The Jury after a brief consultation, gave a verdict of Wilful Murder. - The conduct of the sister-in-law, MRS SANDERS, has excited general respect and admiration. She has five children of her own, under nine years of age. Her husband is a labourer, his sole wages is seven shillings a week, (with three loaves of bread from Halberton parish, during the last month,) and yet, notwithstanding that there were seven mouths to be fed, seven bodies to be clothed and housed out of this miserable pittance, she still contrived to discharge the duties of sisterly love and affection, and to make some sacrifices, both of rest and means, on behalf of the miserable, motherless, babe, so soon to be relieved from all its sufferings. Her appearance was neat and tidy, and we were informed that her narrow humble cot showed that her tidy spirit was not exhausted on her own person. JOHN SANDERS, her husband, is a simple hearted peasant. He almost cried in court.

SOUTH MOLTON - A distressing suicide occurred on the night after Southmolton Great Market. MR THOMAS SKINNER, a yeoman of South Aller, went home much depressed, having been slighted by his sweetheart, who had refused to see him when he called in Southmolton to see her. He retired early to bed, but about one in the morning was heard to leave the house. His brother followed him to a large quarry, where he found a boat floating on the water. The alarm was given and search made for the body; and on Monday morning it was drawn by grapnels from under forty feet of water. An Inquest was held, and the verdict was - "Found Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 March 1845
PLYMPTON ST MAURICE - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held by Mr J. Walter, Coroner for the Borough of Plympton Earle, on the body of NATHANIEL FALL, labourer, a single man, who was killed in a quarry near Plympton, by the falling in of a quantity of stones and rubbish: his death was almost instantaneous. Verdict - Accidental.

STOKE DAMEREL - Deliberate Suicide. - A shocking suicide was committed on Monday last, in Cumberland-square barracks, by a private of the 44th regiment, named EDWIN DAVIDSON, one of the servants of the sergeants' mess. DAVIDSON, it would appear from the evidence, had been drinking slightly during the day, but was perfectly capable of performing his duty; and had gone about four in the afternoon to his quarters, with the intention, it was understood, of cleaning his accoutrements. A comrade on going to the room found the door locked, and demanded admission; the deceased, after ascertaining that he belonged to the room, let him in, and a few minutes after left his quarters and proceeded to the sergeants' mess-kitchen. Shortly before he was seen by a fellow-servant, with whom he conversed very cheerfully for a moment; but the man states that he observed a wild expression about his eyes, arising, as he believed, from drinking. The deceased then entered the mess-kitchen, observing that he had left his own room because it was dusty, and went into a pantry opening out of the kitchen, as he said, to clean his arms. Soon after he called out to a fellow-servant who was at work in the kitchen - "Charley, I want you." "What for?" was the reply. "Oh, never mind," he added, "it is all right." Instantly the report of a musket was heard in the pantry; several men rushed to the door of the place; they found it locked. On breaking it open the unfortunate deceased was lying extended on the floor, quite dead, his face bespattered and the whole body immersed in a pool of blood, which poured out from a dreadful wound in the back of the head. He had taken the stocking off his right foot, fastened a string to the great toe, which communicated with the trigger of his musket and it is clear that he had by this contrivance discharged the contents into his mouth. The ball took an oblique direction, came out under the right ear and passed through the window, leaving on the edge of the broken glass a portion of flesh. The deceased was only twenty-two years of age; and was remarkable for his regular and steady conduct. No motive has been assigned for the commission of the dreadful act. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, and the above facts having been detailed, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. The Commander in Chief, the Hon. H. Murray and colonel Shelton, commandant of the 44th, were present during the Enquiry.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 April 1845
STOKE DAMEREL - Lamentable Suicide. - On Thursday evening last, MR JOHN BOWHAY, a retired ironmonger of Devonport, put an end to his existence, by hanging himself in an outhouse of his residence in Brunswick Terrace, Stoke. MR BOWHAY had laboured under depression of spirits for some weeks since, and on the evening of the fatal occurrence his manners appeared rather strange, though not sufficiently remarkable to lead to the supposition that his mind was thrown off its balance. Soon after dusk, MR BOWHAY went into the garden as he said, to feed his rabbits; and MRS BOWHAY becoming alarmed by his protracted absence went in search of him. MRS BOWHAY having opened the door of a small wash-house, put her hand in the dark on her husband's face; and light having been brought, was horror struck to find him suspended by the neck from a hook in the beam quite dead. The deceased was in very easy circumstances; and no cause can be assigned for the commission of the rash act. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Friday last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was given.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 April 1845
PLYMOUTH - Collision In The Channel. - On Wednesday morning last, the newly-built trawling sloop Ariel, Turner, belonging to Plymouth, was discovered about 12 ½ miles S.E. of the Eddystone light-house, abandoned, with her rigging, bulwarks, and bowsprit gone. She had evidently been run down in the night by some large vessel. On her deck a large anchor was found with one fluke stuck in the deck, and the other on the bow, and attached to the anchor was a heavy chain supposed to be 120 fathoms long, and by this mooring the sloop was riding securely. The anchor weighs 22cwt. 2qr. 8lbs., and the shackle 3qrs. 20lbs; and is supposed to be of North Country or American construction. The concussion must have been very severe as the sloop's shingle ballast was forced up against the deck. On Friday last, the body of a boy belonging to the vessel and the master's southwester were picked up by the Red Rover, trawler, and on Tuesday the body of the master was picked up by the Mazeppa, and very little hope is entertained of the safety of the rest of the crew. The larger ship has not been heard of; and it is considered probable that she has been totally lost from the collision, as so many days have elapsed without any intelligence being received from any part of the channel tending to throw a light on the occurrence. The fishermen who brought in the Ariel attempted to weigh the chain attached to the anchor, but were compelled to unshackle it after breaking a 4 ½ inch new warp in the attempt. The chain is about 13-8-inch, which in 40 fathoms of water would give a weight of 2 tons, and this might have been raised if nothing had been attached to it at the bottom. Moreover, although two trawling sloops were moored to the chain three days in blowing weather, it remained almost perpendicular to the last. Two pieces of the ship's trail-board were found on the deck of the trawler painted white and gilded and made of Baltic fir. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Saturday last, on the body of the boy, who was named JAMES SIMPSON ANDERSON. The Coroner recommended the Jury to return a verdict of "Found Drowned," thus leaving the matter open for further investigation. They had heard something about a collision having taken place, but no evidence to that effect had been brought before them; if, however, on further inquiry, it was proved that the collision was caused by the negligence or carelessness of any parties, those parties would be tried for Manslaughter. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 May 1845
CREDITON - Melancholy Suicide. - A young woman named PARTRIDGE, 178 years old, an apprentice to a straw bonnet-maker at Crediton, committed suicide last week by swallowing oxalic acid. She was found dead in her room, and the following letter, addressed to one of her sisters, was lying in a cupboard:- Long Barn, May 12, 1845. - My dearest MARY ANN, - Do not grieve to examine these few lines from me, your unworthy sister. But, rather pity me, and console the hearts of my dearest parents. Had I not these intentions this morning when my dear Father left? - yet did I not secretly keep them from him, and with a false tongue say 'I hope to see you in August?' what must I endure for my weakness? Do not blame me nor reflect; but I pray the Lord to keep you and al my dear brothers and sisters from all evil. Tread in the path that is just and right in the sight of the Lord, and he will be your Comforter. The cause of my misfortune is a sad broken heart, known to none but myself. I must, as misery is just at my hand, just say in a brief way, what I wish, that is you to console my dear parents, and be a comfort to them in their old age, should they require it, and you spared to do so. I have just to add, if it is possible, do come up to my funeral. The few pounds I have will come to bury my unworthy body, which I should wish to be buried at Hellins, as that place has been my home. I can scarcely express how kind Mrs Wellington has been to me, and I hoped to have shewn to her my gratefulness for it. I hope God will pardon me for my weakness, and also I further ask pardon of my dear parents and relations all; and with sorrowing heart I now remain, Your affectionate Sister, Good bye, God bless you all. NANCY PARTRIDGE. - The deceased had been very nervous since she had been assaulted and grossly insulted by James Lee (now undergoing his sentence in the county gaol for the offence), in the road, as she was returning home; and it is supposed that this preyed so much on her spirits as to induce her to commit the rash act.

PLYMOUTH - Yesterday a cartman called RICHARD PETERSON, was crushed to death in lifting a piece of timber which fell on him at the Railway works, Millbay. An Inquest was held on the deceased before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, Plymouth, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 June 1845
TOTNES - On Monday last an Inquest was held at Totnes, on the body of MR STRANGER, who had died almost suddenly the preceding day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Rupture of a Blood Vessel near the Heart."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 July 1845
WEST ANSTEY - Shocking Suicide. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at Slade Farm, West Anstey, before Mr Partridge, one of the County Coroners, on the body of ELIZABETH TAPP, a single woman, lately hiring as servant at the farm. On Saturday last, the deceased drank some corrosive sublimate, which her master kept in the house for washing sleep, and then went out in the field and lay down on the grass. She struggled and tore the grass from the ground; and kept vomiting very much. On being removed to her bed, she said trouble had made her do it. It appeared that she was pregnant, & that she had seen her sweet-heart walking with another woman. The Jury returned a verdict of - "We find that the deceased died from poison which she took herself;" this the Coroner translated into a verdict of Felo de se, and the corpse was therefore interred without burial rites at midnight.

PLYMOUTH - On Monday evening an Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of MR BENJAMIN WILLOUGHBY, hatter, Whimple-street. The deceased, who was nearly seventy years old, had been in failing health for some years, and on Saturday evening he expired suddenly. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr Andrews, surgeon. Verdict, "Died by Apoplexy."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 August 1845
EAST STONEHOUSE - Shocking Suicide. - A pensioner named YOUNG, aged 55, in the service of Mr Mayne, Silversmith, Stonehouse, committed suicide on his master's premises on Friday last. He had been for some time in Mr Mayne's employ, but for frequent acts of inebriety, received notice of discharge on Friday morning, and it is supposed that he had lost part of his pension money. In the afternoon he went out and drank to intoxication, and then returned: taking charge of his master's child, he went into the water closet, at the rear of the house. Shortly afterwards the man was found suspended by a rope - his life being perfectly extinct. The poor child, unconscious of the wicked deed, was quietly playing on the floor. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday; but it has been adjourned until Thursday to obtain further evidence.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 September 1845
PLYMOUTH - Suicide By Hanging. - On Friday, an Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, of Plymouth, on the body of JAMES WARN, which had been found suspended to the beam of a linhay in the Mill-hill Field, Four Fields, a few hours before. It appears that the occupant of the field, J. Wyngett, dairy-man, in passing near the linhay, perceived the door open, and went towards it, when his attention was attracted by his dog, which was barking at what he thought at first was a man standing in the corner, but which on approaching closer he found to be the deceased hanging by the neck in a kneeling position. Life had been extinct some hours. Deceased was a superannuated seaman of the R.N., and had been engaged by Mr Pethick, as a ship-keeper, on board a vessel lying at Sutton Pool, laden with hides. He slept on board on Wednesday night last; but came home about 8 o'clock the following morning, when his wife perceived that he was unusually depressed in spirits, to which he appears to have been subject on previous occasions. He took breakfast and left the house, and his wife did not see him again until informed of the melancholy occurrence. Other evidence having been given as to the occasional unsound state of his mind for some time past, a verdict accordingly was returned. The deceased was 68 years of age, had been married 40 years and had lived on the best of terms with his wife and family and friends.

DEAN PRIOR - The sequestered village of Dean Prior and its neighbourhood, have been thrown into a state of great excitement during the last week, in consequence of a report getting into circulation that a female, named HARDING, who died suddenly about three weeks since, had been poisoned. On Monday last an order was issued by J. Gribble, Esq., coroner, for the disinterment of the body, which took place on that day in the presence of Messrs. Hele and Lyle, Surgeons, of Ashburton, and Mr D. Philips, of Buckfastleigh. The Inquest was held at the Buller's Arms Inn, and after taking the evidences of several persons, it was adjourned for a few days in order that the contents of the stomach might be examined by the surgeons; but we are happy to state from the best sources of information, that there is no reason to suspect that the deceased has met her death by any unfair means. We believe the above unpleasant circumstance has originated from the husband of the deceased getting married three weeks after the funeral of his first wife, to a fair young damsel, who appears to have interchanged vows of love and constancy for two years past with a young man of the village, but probably having heard the old adage that "delays are dangerous," she left her first love without a moment's notice, and joined the widower in the bonds of holy matrimony, the ceremony having been performed at Dean church on Wednesday morning last.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 October 1845
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - A woman, named ELIZABETH RIGGS, aged 34, died in Cannon-street, on Monday morning last, from the effects of arsenic which she had taken on the previous Saturday evening. It appears that the unfortunate woman, who has resided for a period of about 15 years in the different houses of ill-fame in the neighbourhood of Cornwall-street, had lived in the capacity of servant with Mr Hearn, the landlord of a public-house in that street, for the last few months, but about a fortnight since she left his service without assigning any causes. On Saturday morning last she went to the Naval Hospital, at Stonehouse, to see an acquaintance, a patient in that establishment, and promised to return again on the Wednesday after. She then went to the "King and Queen," in Cornwall-street, where she had some drink, and from thence proceeded to the house of a Mrs Whitten, who resides in Cannon-street, to sleep. Before laying down she asked for a drink, which was given her in a tea-cup, and Mrs Whitten observed the deceased stirring the contents of the cup with her finger. Thinking that the deceased was about to take a dose of Epsom salts, as she suffered greatly from internal inflammation, Mrs Whitten remarked that "she should not have taken it until the next morning." In the morning, however, a paper was discovered on the floor of the apartment, with the word "Poison - Arsenic," written on it, and the deceased requested that a surgeon might be sent for. Mr Bennett, the parish surgeon, was called, and applied the usual remedies in such cases, but the deceased expired on Monday morning. She appeared perfectly sensible to the last, and not the slightest cause can be assigned for the rash act, nor has it been ascertained where the deceased obtained the poison. An Inquest will be held on the body by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, this day (Wednesday).

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 October 1845
STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Case. - Considerable sensation has been created in this borough during the last few days, by a report which had crept into circulation to the effect that an old man, named HOLMES, a pauper living in the wretched purlieus of Cornwall-street, had died not precisely by foul means, but through want and neglect so deplorable as to be criminal. A written statement of the circumstances attending, as it was alleged, the deceased of the man was forwarded to A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner of this district, and that gentleman very properly thought it his duty to issue an order for the exhumation of the body of the deceased, with a view to the investigation of the real causes of death. Accordingly, the body which had been deposited in Stoke Church-yard, was exhumed, a post mortem examination of it was made, and an Inquest held on the body on Monday and Tuesday, at the Military Hospital Inn. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was a very old man, residing in the top room of a house in Cornwall-street. On Friday, the 26th ult., a woman in a state of intoxication brought an overseers' order for medical attendance of HOLMES, to the residence of Mr J. Bennett, one of the parish surgeons. Mr Bennett was from home on professional business at the time, but having returned about two hours afterwards, he immediately visited the patient. He found HOLMES lying on a bed placed on the floor, suffering from an apoplectic seizure, speechless, helpless, very much emaciated, and dreadfully pale and evidently beyond hope of recovery. There was no one present, no furniture except a chair and table, the latter of which was turned up and placed across the foot of the wretched bed to protect the unfortunate man from the draught of the door, and the room was also destitute of food, drink and fire. Mr Bennett made enquiries to ascertain if the man had friends, and was told that he had a wife, but that she was from home. One of the inmates of the house, however, offered to go and fetch the wife, and in a few minutes afterwards returned with her - she was shockingly drunk. Mr Bennett upbraided the wretched creature for her culpable neglect; and apparently succeeded in awakening feelings of remorse, for she went down on her knees by the bed-side, spoke to the poor sufferer in tones of affection and manifested a desire to ameliorate his unhappy condition. Medicine and food were immediately supplied for the relief of HOLMES and Mr Bennett regularly visited him, but it would appear that the amendment of the wife was but transient, for the wretched husband was left alone, unwatched, unattended, and unable to help himself, from the Friday until the following Tuesday, the 30th when death terminated his miserable existence. The Jury, after a careful investigation, returned the following verdict, - "That the deceased died from Apoplexy, but whether his death was caused by the gross neglect of his wife, or by natural causes, they could not from the evidence determine."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 October 1845
DAWLISH - An Inquest was held at the Ship Inn, Cockwood, on Tuesday last, by J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, on view of the body of GEORGE LOVELL, aged 30 years. It appears that deceased was engaged on the South Devon Railway, and while taking earth from the bottom of an embankment, a large portion of the earth fell on him, and the poor sufferer was entirely buried. He was extricated as soon as possible, but life was gone - a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 October 1845
PLYMOUTH - Love And Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening last, by T. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner of Plymouth, on the body of JOHN LANG, a youth of 17, groom to Mr Whipple, surgeon. The poor fellow having been missed on the preceding evening, a search was made for him, and he was found hanging and quite dead, in his sleeping room, over the stable. On his bed was found a letter, as follows:- "Dear Sarah - These few short lines come to with my kind Love to you and I hope you will never marry no other. So farewell to you and all brothers an sisters all I have I give to Sarah Kellan at Mr Shepeard, Bourghton, Ermington, Devon (in the name of the Lord so do) Its nothing but mary Sarah's crossness that had mad me do this thing but I hope that the Lord will forgive me at the rising of the dead so wicked world forgive me. - Yours J. M. LANG." A church of England prayer book, with a leaf turned down at the 62nd Psalm was found also in the room. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 November 1845
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - On Thursday evening last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to Inquire into the circumstances under which MARY NETHERTON, wife of WILLIAM NETHERTON, ostler at the Post-office Inn, in Old Town-street, came by her death. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased who was naturally of a very cheerful disposition, had during the last few weeks been very low and desponding, and exhibited symptoms of insanity. On Friday morning she arose from her bed, lighted the kitchen fire, and was never seen alive afterwards. Her daughter, a little girl nine years of age, went to the wash-house a few minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, and alarmed by the dreadful spectacle which she cast her eyes upon, she screamed out, which brought to the spot a lodger, who observing a pool of blood immediately guessed the catastrophe, and ran to WILLIAM NETHERTON'S place of employment with the dreadful intelligence. The poor fellow on hastening home, found his wife quite dead, having cut her throat with a razor, and nearly severed the head from the trunk. She was lying on her side, with the razor under her head where it had dropped from her hand, as if death had been instantaneous. It was stated by the relations of the deceased that she had made several attempts to destroy herself before, and that on one occasion she tried to strangle herself with the strings of her night cap as she lay in bed. On the Sunday preceding she wandered away, it was feared with the intention of destroying herself, and her friends went in search of her in various directions, and gave information to the police; but a man brought her back in the evening from Commons, near Saltash, where she had a cousin residing. It appeared that the deceased lived very comfortably with her husband, and that her family had done everything in their power to protect her from her own violence. The Jury on the conclusion of the evidence, immediately returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was 49 years of age, and has left two children by a former marriage. It was currently reported that the reason of the deceased had been upset by the ravings of Messrs. Dealtry and Burgess, and we perceive that the Plymouth Herald has given currency to the story. It is but justice to those infatuated for infamous men, we know not which, to say that nothing of the kind was established at the Inquest. Indeed her son-in-law deposed that she had taken no account of their proceedings, but had made light of them.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 November 1845
DAWLISH - An Inquest was held here on Thursday last before Mr W. Cockey, Deputy Coroner of Ashburton, on view of the body of JOHN NARRAMORE, aged 53 years. From the evidence given, it appears a young man named Bussell rode a horse through the street on the previous Saturday evening about 7 o'clock, (the night being dark) at a fast rate, and knocked down the deceased, who received such injuries that he died a short time after. The Jury, after investigating the case, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Bussell, who was accordingly committed for the offence. It appears that Bussell after riding over the deceased, had not the humanity to stop and enquire if the poor man was injured. it is high time cases like the above should be stopped, as only a short time since, a fine little girl, at Teignmouth, was ridden over and killed, and in that case, as in the above, the rider passed heedlessly on, as if nothing had occurred. Both cases will be tried at the next assizes.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 November 1845
EAST STONEHOUSE - Infanticide At Stonehouse. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of the infant child of ANN HEARD, servant to a lady in Durnford-street, met on Thursday, when the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the wretched mother, and she will be committed to prison to take her trial as soon as she is well enough to be removed. The child, it will be recollected, was found under her bed with its throat cut, it is supposed with a pair of scissors, though the instrument has not been found.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 December 1845
On Wednesday evening last, MR SAMUEL GLANVILLE, of the Yealmpton Inn, Yealmpton,. was found lying dead in the road near Pomphlet Mill, about two miles from Plymouth, having fallen from his horse, it is supposed, in a fit of apoplexy. MR GLANVILLE passed through the Laira Bridge gate, from Plymouth, about seven o'clock, in his usual health, but a short time afterwards his horse returned over the bridge without a rider, and the gate-keeper suspecting some casualty, went up the road, and discovered the unfortunate man lying down, perfectly insensible. Life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body, at the Morley Arms, by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on Friday morning, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased, who was well-known and much respected, was the driver of the Defiance coach for many years. He was about 53 years of age, and has left a widow and several children to lament their loss.

PORTH CAWL - Early in the morning of Monday last a sloop, called the Olive Branch, of Plymouth, about 80 tons burthen, WILLIAM PROUT, master, came ashore on the rocks, near a farm house, called Houtchins, about half-a-mile to the westward of this port. She first struck on the sands, (being about half-tide) when the sea completely broke over her, and as the tide advanced, she was driven in upon the rocks. One of the crew, a young man, jumped from the bow-sprit on to the rocks, and escaped without any injury; before, however, any of the others could follow him, the vessel was drawn back by the powerful reflux of the tide, and began to break up. The young man, not knowing what to do, as it was quite dark, and the wind blowing a fearful gale from the S.W., proceeded from the rocks towards the land, and, finding a cart rut, traced it to the farm house, before mentioned; here he procured the assistance of two men, who, with a lanthorn, returned to the rocks, where they found the cabin boy, who had been washed ashore on a part of the bow of the vessel, but could discover no traces of the captain or mate. As soon as it was light, the full extent of the wreck was seen, the vessel having been literally broken in pieces. At low water, the bodies of the two ill-fated men were found among the rocks, a short distance to the eastward of the wreck; their names are WILLIAM PROUT, captain, WILLIAM SNOWDEN, mate, both living at or near Plymouth. The bodies are now deposited at the Knight's Arms Inn, Porth Cawl, to await the Coroner's Inquest. The vessel left Falmouth on Saturday last (the 29th.,) for Newport, in ballast. They made Lundy light, off which they split their squaresail, and proceeded up Channel, (course unknown) Wind S.W., blowing a very strong gale, under three-reefed mainsail and second jib. It would seem, however, that they had mistaken their course, as they supposed themselves to be above the Naas lights. How any of the crew were left to tell the hapless tale, appears almost a miracle, as the place where the vessel was driven ashore is covered with huge limestone rocks. The materials are being gathered from the wreck, and will await the disposal of the owner, (Mr Hart, of Plymouth). It is not known whether she was insured. The survivors, whose names are John Evans and William Turner, have been relieved by Lieut. Bradley, R.N., (Harbour Master) agent to the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society, and will be sent on by him to Cardiff or Newport, from whence they will be enabled to proceed direct to their home, Plymouth.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 December 1845
PLYMOUTH - Inquests in Plymouth. - On Monday, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM POLLARD, aged 74, a superannuated coal-meter, late of the Customs. As he was going up stairs he suddenly fell down and died. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

On the same day, on an old man, 74 years of age, named WILLIAM CROFT. The deceased, who resided in Cambridge-street, was found dead in his bed on Sunday morning. Verdict - same as above.

Yesterday, on the body of WILLIAM GLEN, mining agent, of William-street. He was taken out of Sutton Pool that morning by a barge master. Verdict - "Found Drowned."

The same day, on the body of an infant named LAVINIA SHORT, the daughter of a cabinet-maker, in Exeter-street. The child was found dead in her bed that morning. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 December 1845
Fatal Accident, - On Monday, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a middle-aged woman, named REBECCA ROSEDEAN. Late in the evening of the 23rd inst., she fell down an area in Ker-street. She was removed to the station-house, when it was found that she had sustained a severe cut upon her head, which was bleeding profusely. She was removed to the Workhouse, where she expired on the following Saturday. A verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Inquest in Plymouth. - On Friday, an Inquest was held on the remains of AGNES MALONY, a widow, aged 78, late a butt-woman at the Baptist Chapel. Her death, which was instantaneous, took place on Christmas day, and was occasioned by a fall down stairs. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 January 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Drowning. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Tamar Inn, Tamar Street, Morice Town, on the body of ROBERT BROWNING, a labourer employed in the Keyham Works. On Monday afternoon after leaving his employment, the deceased and another workman named Tucker, went about five o'clock on the Quay. They were standing on a platform looking at the crane employed to haul up stone and timber from boats and some observations passed between them on the dangerous construction of the crab or windlass attached to the machine. In order to examine it more closely, Tucker went round one side, and deceased on the other. Only a few seconds had elapsed, when Tucker heard the rattling of BROWNING'S spade on the stage, and turning saw his companion fall into the water. A line was thrown into the stream, boats were sent out, and every effort was made to save the unfortunate man, whose body was not found till two hours afterwards within a short distance of the place where he had fallen in. The deceased was 25 years old, his birthday being upon the 1st of January. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 January 1846
ALPHINGTON - Singular Death. - On Monday night a poor woman named SMITH, who was in the habit of sleeping in a linhay in a field on the Alphington-road, left the Round Tree Inn, in Exeter, and was seen going towards her usual resting place. On Tuesday morning she was found upon the gate of the field in the posture of getting over it, quite dead. Some thorns had been placed about the gate, which was paled, and in attempting to get over, one of the pailings hitched in her stays and held her, and in her struggles to get free her dress was pulled over her face and head, which caused death by strangulation. An Inquest was held in Alphington on Wednesday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

WASHFIELD - On the 8th instant, an Inquest was held on the body of ISAAC NEWTON, a butcher, who had been found dead in his dwelling, having forced a pocket knife to some depth into his throat. The key of the door was found in the middle of the deceased's apartment, and the knife with which the suicidal act had been committed, had been placed on the window-bench. Evidence was given of the insanity of the deceased and a verdict returned accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 January 1846
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - GRACE CANN, a servant to the Misses Winne of Oxford-street, Plymouth, died suddenly on Monday. An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, and a verdict of "Died by the visitation of God" returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Freemasons' Arms, John Street, Morice Town, on the body of MR ROBT. BIRD, timber merchant, of Morice Town, who was drowned on Wednesday. From the evidence it appeared that on the above day the deceased went over to Torpoint, to be present at a sale of timber. The sale took place about five o'clock, at Mrs Bromley's Ferry House Inn, and MR BIRD made several purchases, and paid the deposit money. About half-past seven he went on board the steam ferry-boat to return home. He entered the cabin and conversed with Mr Richards, one of the witnesses about the timber, which he had bought. Upon the conductor of the steam-bridge calling out "ease her," as the vessel approached the land, the deceased quitted the cabin, but instead of making for the right hand side, he turned on to the left, and was never seen alive afterwards. He was perfectly sober, but being very near-sighted, it was supposed that he had inadvertently walked into the water, and the night being very boisterous, nothing was heard to create alarm. His body was picked up at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of Thursday, by John Chadwick, and brought to land. It was found in about five feet depth of water, at the bottom of the ferry-boat canal, at Morice Town. In the course of the Enquiry, some of the Jurors expressed an opinion that the steam-bridge did not afford sufficient protection to guard against the recurrence of such a fatal catastrophe, and it was suggested that the brow should be railed in. Ultimately it was agreed that the Foreman and some members of the Jury, conversant with such matters, should on the morrow, inspect the steam ferry-boat, and report to the Coroner in what particulars the safety of the passengers might be better secured, and Mr Bone promised to use his influence with the proper authorities to induce them to attend to any recommendation which might emanate from the Jury. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 February 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - On Thursday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., in Marlborough Street, Devonport, on the body of an infant named GEORGE OLDFIELD, who fell into hot water, and died from the effects of the injury. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Mine Accident. - Yesterday, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at Tavistock, on the body of THOMAS MUNDAY. On the 31st ult., the deceased, who was a labourer in the Devonshire Great Consols Mine, was ascending the shaft, when he lost his hold, and fell a distance of 15 fathoms. He died in a few minutes afterwards. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 February 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday night, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Hospital Inn, on the body of MR MAY, of the Dockyard who expired on the same day in consequence of the injuries sustained by the accident which we related in our last. Verdict, "Accidental Death." He was an active and efficient officer, and much esteemed by the officers and men in the yard.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Poison. - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Gloucester Arms, Gloucester Street, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female child, named LOUISA SANDERS. The father of the deceased had placed a piece of bread and butter, impregnated with arsenic, on the roof of an outhouse to destroy mice. Falling accidentally into the yard, it was picked up by the deceased, who, eating it, died in consequence. Verdict - Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - On the 5th inst., an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of a little girl named ELLEN ROBERTS, who died in consequence of injuries sustained by the ignition of her clothes on the preceding day. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 February 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest Before A. B. Bone, Esq., - On Saturday, at the Ordnance Arms, Devonport, on the body of JANE GIBBS. From the evidence, it appeared that on Thursday week last, the deceased, in a state of intoxication, had fallen down in the street in a helpless state, and had been conveyed by P.C. Prowse to her home. Her son, a shipwright in the Dockyard, on returning from his work, locked her up for safety in her room. She afterwards broke open the door, but was secured and again confined. On that night some angry and abusive language was heard to issue from the room of the deceased, occupied only by her son and herself. On the Tuesday following, up to which time she kept her bed, she had two fits of apoplexy, from the effects of which she expired on the Thursday following. The Jury, feeling satisfied that the deceased had died, not from the blow which it was probable she received in an accidental fall, when in a state of inebriety, but from the effects of drink, returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 March 1846
LIFTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at Lifton, on the body of a child named MARY BUDGE, aged three years. The deceased having been left in a room alone, accidentally ignited her dress, and was so severely injured, that death was the result. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 March 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday afternoon, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Barnstaple Inn, Princess-street, Devonport, on the body of GEORGE NOSWORTHY, a young man, aged 19. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was an apprentice to Mr Swanson, a boot-closer, in Pembroke-street. On the afternoon of Friday, the 27th ult., the deceased was in his master's work-shop along with Thos. Quick, the foreman, John Swanson, his employer's son, and Thomas Nathaniel Bennett, a younger apprentice. Quick threw a pair of slippers to Swanson, and asked if he would have them. He replied, no; and said that he would have a pair out of the shop, as they were broken. The deceased then said he would take them, upon which John Swanson tore the vamp of the slippers across. NOSWORTHY thereon applied an opprobrious epithet to Swanson; and when the latter asked the reason of being so called, the reply was, because he had torn the slippers. Swanson struck the deceased upon the face, and a scuffle ensued between them, which resulted in both of them falling upon the floor. The foreman then attempted to part them, while the apprentice Bennett called to Mr Swanson to come into the room. Mrs Swanson came up stairs and seeing the deceased putting on his boots, asked where he was going to. He said into the court; when she told him not to leave. Soon afterwards they went down to tea. The lad Bennett, from whom the substance of the above was elicited, was strictly examined by the Coroner, and asked whether he had not suppressed some particulars, or whether he had not been instructed what to say. He protested that he had misrepresented nothing and spoke only the truth. MR NOSWORTHY, the father of the deceased, was present at the Enquiry, and at his request, the Coroner put to the witness several questions, the object of which was to show that Quick, the foreman, had held the deceased while John Swanson maltreated him. This was, however, denied. - Several witnesses were examined who spoke as to what the deceased had subsequently said relative to the affray, using such expressions as "I am murdered," and "oh the white-livered Jack," but the Coroner said that nothing had at present been elicited which he could receive as a dying declaration. - Mr James Bennett, surgeon, was summoned to attend the deceased on the 5th instant, at his father's house. The young man was suffering from symptoms of general fever. There was a swelling on the left temple which was discoloured. The deceased complained of pain and soreness in the right arm near the elbow. The deceased died on the 11th March. Witness made a post mortem examination of the body on Sunday, he dissected the muscle of the temple from its attachment to the skull, and underneath the lower fibres close to the bone, discovered a teaspoonful of matter. He opened the skull and examined the surface of the brain, the vessels of which were more congestive than usual. He removed the brain from the cavity of the skull and discovered on the surface of the brain about the size of a shilling a small quantity of pus. The brain was softer than natural. On examining the chest, the lungs presented a very congested appearance. The rest of the viscera were healthy. A blow would produce the mark on the temple. Thought that the deceased died from the effects of the injury described on the left temple. The immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs. There were tubercles on the left lungs, which must have been pre-existent for months. - Mr Laity, surgeon, attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the family of the deceased. - Previously to leaving the case in the hands of the Jury, the Coroner asked Mr Bennett if he would swear that the congestion of the lungs to which he (Mr B.) attributed the cause of death could not have resulted from natural causes. A reply in the negative was given. - The Coroner summed up the evidence, and the Jury, after some deliberation, recorded the following verdict:- " Died from congestion of the lungs, produced by inflammatory fever resulting from an injury on the left temple; but how such injury was occasioned, no sufficient evidence appeared to the Jurors." - [We are requested to state that Messrs. Swanson and Son, boot-makers of George-street, are in no way connected with the persons of the same name mentioned in the above report, as has been erroneously stated.]

PLYMOUTH - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., upon the body of a newly-born child, of which JANE ANN DANN, a housemaid in a gentleman's family, had been delivered early on that morning. It appeared that DANN slept with a fellow servant, and complaining of the spasms, had arisen soon after four and gone down stairs, where she remained till a quarter before five. Subsequently upon being taxed with having done something wrong, she opened her box in which lay the body of her infant. The surgeons examined, stated that the body exhibited no signs of violence, and he had every reason to believe that it was still-born. Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 March 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Barnstaple Inn, Princess-street, on the body of BENJAMIN JOHN MURCH, a child 15 months old. On the 7th inst., the child overturned a basin of hot water, which was inadvertently placed upon the kitchen table, and was so severely scalded that death was the result. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 April 1846
TIVERTON - We regret to announce the death of JAMES PARTRIDGE, Esq., one of the coroners for this county, who was drowned in the canal, near Tiverton, on Tuesday last. It appears that the unfortunate gentleman was observed in the water, near Tidcombe, the residence of the Rev. Wm. Rayer, about half-past four o'clock p.m., by a person named Hepper, who being unable to swim, did not attempt to extricate the deceased: he, however, gave the alarm, and Mr Wm. Rayer, the eldest son of the Rev. Gentleman, hurried immediately to the spot, and courageously plunged into the canal, from whence after some difficulty, he succeeded in taking the body, and it was as soon as possible conveyed to the rectory house, and every means that could possibly be used to restore animation were resorted to, but without effect, life being quite extinct. An Inquest was held on the remains on the following day, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, when it appeared from the evidence of the medical gentleman, who had attended MR PARTRIDGE for some years past (confirmed by other testimony) that he had recently been subject to occasional aberrations of mind, produced by severe illness, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned. Several gentlemen are in the field for his late office.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 April 1846
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last an Inquest was held at the above place, before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, on the body of a young man named TUCKER, who met his death under the following circumstances:- It appears that a labourer named Westaway was engaged in blasting a piece of rock situate close to one of the streets of the town, and having fired without giving notice, TUCKER, who was passing by at the moment, was struck on the head with a part of the rock, and expired a few hours after the injury. The Jury brought in a verdict of Manslaughter against Westaway.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 April 1846
PLYMOUTH - Alleged Case Of Manslaughter. Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday evening last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of REBECCA WYATT, wife of WILLIAM WYATT, landlord of a beer-shop in Lower lane, who, it was reported, had died from the ill-usage that she had received. A considerable degree of excitement has been manifested about the circumstance from the fact that the body had been interred upwards of three months, and was now exhumed from the burial ground in Westwall street, by direction of the Coroner. It appears that the deceased was taken ill, and was attended by Mr Giles, surgeon. She exhibited about her eye and mouth strong marks of violence, and complained of having been struck by her husband. She also said that a solder had struck her. In a few days she expired, and the surgeon gave the usual certificate, attributing her death to effusion on the chest and head, without specifying what was probably the primary cause. The body was, therefore, interred. The mother of the deceased, it is alleged, had since been much disturbed by dreams, and believing at length that the unfortunate woman had been murdered, she, together with some of her friends, made a representation of the circumstances, as far as she was in possession of a knowledge of them, to the Coroner, who promptly ordered an Enquiry to take place. The following witnesses were then called:- Elizabeth Rowe stated that she had known the deceased about three or four years; she remembered Sunday before Christmas day, she then lived in WYATT'S house. About nine o'clock in the morning she heard angry words between the deceased and her husband, which lasted for some time, when she saw him strike her with his fist; she had not then attempted to strike him, but she afterwards saw the deceased heave the ash kettle at him, and he then hove it again at her. This difference continued for some time; and WAYTT was getting the better of the deceased, when she ran to the wash-house and took up a piece of wood, which was used for stirring the clothes in the furnace, when boiling; witness did not see any more than; but in a minute the deceased came out of the wash-house, where she and her husband were; the said piece of wood was then in WYATT'S hand, and the deceased was bleeding from the mouth, and three of her teeth were knocked out, and her eye was very much bruised. Witness then went to WYATT, who was gone into the bar, and said to him, "MR WYATT, I think you have broken your wife's jaw." He said, "if I have, I will send for Dr Giles." He did not deny having struck her, but said she had attempted to strike him first. She did not see deceased again until the following Monday, when she found her in bed in a most awful condition, her left eye was still swollen and she could scarcely open her mouth. Witness saw her down stairs on Tuesday morning, the 23rd, but she again took to her bed on Saturday, where she remained until her death, which took place on the 1st of January. On the Sunday after Christmas day, the husband of the deceased said she had been struck by a soldier whilst putting him out of doors, and that the blow was about the pit of the stomach. The stick now produced by Mr Harris, the constable, is the same she had seen in WILLIAM WYATT'S hand and previously in the hands of the deceased. - Charles Giles, surgeon, examined, said, I have been the family surgeon to the deceased seven years: I was called to attend her on Sunday the 28th December, about one o'clock. I found her in bed. She had then a black eye and a great swelling on the mouth. I found her very ill, complaining of pain in her head and stomach. She complained of blows received by her husband, and of having been struck by a soldier. She died 1st January. I gave the usual certificate of her death, which was to the effect that she died of effusion on the chest and head. Effusion would rise from many causes, one of which is violence. I do not think the blow of the stick on the mouth would have produced effusion after a lapse of so long a time. - The Foreman here asked the witness whether he did not think it his duty, as a professional man, in a case of so serious a nature as this, to make known the circumstances of the case, in order than an Enquiry might be instituted as to the cause of death? - Mr Giles: I left it with the family of the deceased whose duty I considered it was, if they were not satisfied, to cause an Enquiry to be made. - Several other questions were then put to Mr Giles by various Jurymen why he had not caused an Enquiry to be instituted, and as they appeared dissatisfied with his evidence, the Inquest was adjourned until the following day. - On Wednesday evening the adjourned Inquest took place according to appointment, when Mr Giles was again called up to give his evidence. Charles Giles, sworn: - I was with Mr Freeman, surgeon, this morning at about 8 o'clock, at the request of the Coroner and Jury, in the burial ground of St. Andrew's, at a post mortem examination of the body of deceased. Mr Freeman had his assistant there, and the latter, in my presence, made the examination. The chest was the first part examined; the left side was healthy, but the right lung was very much congested, with a good deal of extravasated blood in the cavity - about a pint or more I should think. The next part examined was the head; the left eye had been bruised externally, not internally, and there was a little effusion of the lining membrane of the scalp behind; the brain was in a very decomposed state; there was no apparent effusion on the brain; the lips appeared to have been bruised, and two or three teeth loosened; the heart was healthy. In his opinion deceased died from great excitement caused by extravasation of blood from the diseased lung, and not from the effects of any blow. - Richard Freeman, sworn:- I attended, in company with Mr George Giles, for the purpose of making a post mortem examination of deceased, in the dead house of St. Andrew's church-yard; the result of my examination was as follows:- on examining the body externally there were evident marks of maltreatment about the face and throat; I then proceeded to examine the chest and found the heart in a natural state, and also the left lung; there was no effusion on the chest, but a quantity of extravasated blood in the right cavity; the right lung was greatly accatised and congested; there was no rupture that I could detect, and the rest of the chest appeared sound; I subsequently examined the head, but from the decomposed state of the brain it is impossible to give any opinion: there was no evidence of effusion on the brain, and no fracture of the skull of any part. I next examined the jaw-bone which had been severely bruised, and several of the teeth had been forced from their sockets. I subsequently examined the stomach, but it was in such a decomposed state that it separated immediately we handled it; I cannot from the decomposed state of the body, state the cause of death, or whether the extravasated blood on the chest was the result of a blow, or blows, or of disease. - The Coroner: As a medical man, had you been attending this woman, and perceiving the state of her face and mouth, and finding her teeth loose, what would have been your duty, do you consider? - Witness: I should, most certainly, have considered it my duty to take steps for the purpose of instituting a judicial enquiry. - The Witness was subjected to a searching cross examination by Mr Lavers, who attended professionally for WILLIAM WYATT, the husband of the deceased as to whether the extravasation of blood might not have proceeded from disease and not from a blow. - Mr Freeman replied that it was not usual, as resulting from disease, but that from the decomposed state of the body he could not say what was the cause of the death. If he had been called in within a week after death, the post mortem examination would have been much more satisfactory. - Mr Lavers then applied to have two witnesses examined, who could prove that the deceased died from the blows received from a soldier, but subsequently declined calling them. The Coroner observed that the Jury were in full possession of all such facts as they deemed of importance in the case. - The Court was then cleared, and after more than two hours' deliberation, a verdict was returned of "Manslaughter Against WILLIAM WYATT," the Jury at the same time expressing their disapprobation of the conduct of Mr Giles, and his remissness in not having communicated the manner in which the deceased died to the proper authorities.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on the 11th instant, and by adjournment on the 14th, on the body of WILLIAM HARRIS, late a seaman of H.M.S. Favourite, who died from the effects of an accidental fall from the fore-top-mast head of that ship. He was about to remove the pennant, when by some means he accidentally slipped and fell from the mast to the deck. He died on the 11th instant.

EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held on the 14th instant, at East Stonehouse, on the body of a man named MURPHY, late a seaman of H.M.S. Belleisle," who, in attempting to get between the bars of the capstan and the bulkhead, while the capstan was at work, became jammed, and was struck by one of the bars of the capstan so severely as to occasion his death in about half an hour. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Stoke. - On Monday afternoon last, a young man, named PAYNE, engaged in the erection of the new Royal Female Orphan Asylum, at Stoke, fell from the top scaffold of the building and received such severe injury that death almost immediately ensued. An Inquest was held on the body by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

BRIDESTOWE - An Inquest was held on the 13th instant, at New Quay, on the body of WILLIAM SIRCOMBE, who was accidentally drowned in the Tamar. The deceased (a blacksmith, of Bridestow,) with his journeyman, had gone on Good Friday last to see Wheal Maria Mine. They afterwards went to Calstock, where they dined, and having become intoxicated they left that place on their way home about 9 o'clock; they missed their route and wandered into the river, mistaking the proper landing place, and the deceased sunk in the stream and was drowned. His companion made an alarm, when persons came to the spot; and having crept for the deceased some time he was picked up dead, about 40 yards below the landing place, about half-an-hour afterwards. Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 April 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Rose and Crown, Pembroke-street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD MUNDELL, who met his death in the following manner:- It seems that a builder named Harris had erected some scaffolding at the front of a house in Water-lane, when part of it fell upon the deceased as he was passing on Monday afternoon, and it fractured his skull. He died in the course of the evening from the injuries that he had received. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of one shilling upon the scaffolding.

STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday evening last, at half-past 7 o'clock, an Inquest was held at the Mutton Cove Inn, on the body of THOMAS WILSON, late a seaman on board H.M. naval transport Adventure, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, when the following evidence was given. John Stevens, a seaman on board of the Adventure stated, that he and some others of the crew came ashore on the Wednesday evening and stopped until 9 o'clock at the Royal Exchange public-house in Pembroke Street. About that time they left and came down to Mutton-cove quay, when, not finding the boat's crew there who were to take them back to the ship, they returned to the Mutton-cove Inn, where they had some beer. here they waited about for twenty minutes, during which time some of the boat's crew came into the house, and they all returned to the quay except the deceased. They stopped there for about 10 minutes, during which time the deceased came to the quay, accompanied by another person whom witness did not know, deceased passed on and went towards the steps of the landing-place, when suddenly he heard someone cry out that a man had fallen from the quay. Witness ran down to the bottom of the steps and saw the deceased lying on his face on the platform at the bottom of the steps. He and his shipmates carried him up to the quay, and afterwards into the Mutton Cove Inn. He was living when brought into the house, but senseless and bleeding from the nose, mouth and ears. There was a large gash underneath the jaw bone, and his face was very much scratched. His eye was also closed and very much swollen. As soon as deceased was brought into the house he was laid on a table, but he expired twenty minutes after. Mr Swain, surgeon, was sent for, who examined him and pronounced him dead. The last time witness saw the deceased was on board the ship about half-past five o'clock. The deceased was 47 or 48 years of age on the 11th instant. He could not tell his general habits as he had not been a long time on board the ship. Charles Adams said that he came ashore with the deceased about twenty minutes to eight on the same evening, at which time he was quite sober. They went into the Mutton-cove Inn where they had a pot of beer among five. Witness left the public-house in company with another man, and went down the steps to get the boat off as it was low water. Whilst he was thus employed, he saw the deceased fall from the top of the quay down on the platform close by where he was. No one was near the deceased when he fell, he was certain that he fell over the quay by accident. The height from the platform was 13 feet. The Coroner questioned both the witnesses very closely whether the deceased was not in liquor, but they persisted in saying that he was quite sober at the time. The landlady of the public-house also said that he was quite sober when he went out. The Jury brought in a verdict of Accidental Death; but several of them expressed their opinion that it was a very dangerous place, and that a similar accident might very easily happen to anyone else. The Coroner said, that if the Jury sent him a letter to remonstrate about the condition of the landing place, he would make it known in the proper quarter, and have it looked into. It seems to be the general opinion that there ought to be some protection, if not a wall, at least a few posts with a chain to prevent similar accidents.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 May 1846
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the Hospital Inn, East Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of ROBERT BIGNALL, Assistant Clerk, who died from the effects of an accidental fall on board H.M.S. Belleisle. George Rowe - I am a Master's Assistant on board the Belleisle, now in Hamoaze. The deceased, R. M. BIGNALL, was a Clerk's Assistant on board of the above ship and had been there about a fortnight, it was his first entry into the service, I believe. About half-past six o'clock on Monday evening, I and the deceased left the hulk Vigo, lying alongside the ship. We went down on the main deck of the Belleisle to look at the ship, I came up by the port ladder to the upper deck, and the deceased came up after me. Whilst crossing over on the prow, I heard a fall, and immediately returned, when I saw the deceased lying on the tanks in the hold. I immediately gave an alarm, and two of the sentries ran down into the hold and assisted to bring him up, at which time he was insensible. Walter Wilcocks:- I am a marine, and was on duty on the night in question on board the Vigo hulk. I saw the deceased slip while crossing the hatchway, and fall down through it into the hold. I went on board and saw him lying on his face and hands, he was taken up and laid in a spare cabin of the hulk. - G. D. Maclaren:- I am surgeon of the Belleisle, and saw the deceased after the accident, when he was on board the Vigo, hulk. I found him in a state of insensibility, bleeding a little from the mouth. The insensibility arose from severe injury to the brain, which might be occasioned by a fall. I had him conveyed into a cabin in the hulk, where he was laid down. I dressed a wound on the back part of the head, but I saw no other external injury. I accompanied the deceased, who remained in a state of perfect insensibility to the Naval Hospital, where he died. I am of opinion that the deceased died from an injury of the brain, occasioned by a fall. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday evening an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Queen's Head, Duke-street, on the body of a boy named THOMAS ROBERTS, who was killed by having been accidentally thrown from a cart on which he had been riding. Theodore Parker, stated that on Monday afternoon, about one or two o'clock, he was walking down Stonehouse Hill, when he heard a voice behind him calling out "Whoo, whoo," as if to stop a horse. On looking round, he saw a horse coming down the hill, apparently rather wild, attached to a cart laden with gates. As soon as it had got to the corner turning off to Richmond Walk, witness jumped off the footpath to endeavour, if possible, to stop the progress of the horse, but did not succeed, after proceeding some way further, it dashed the cart against a stone in the gutter, which turned completely over. The deceased, who was on the top of the gates in the cart with the driver, was thrown out on the curb stone, and died upon the spot. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of one shilling.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 May 1846
SOUTH BRENT - On Thursday, an Inquest was held at this place, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a lad named JOSEPH FULL, who met his death from fighting with another boy, Joseph Hutchings, on the previous Sunday, in a hutfield near the Marley Tunnel. The prime instigators were two "navvies" named Charles Purnell and Robert Parsons, who took the boys into what is called a "tommy-shop," and gave them beer to drink. Even when they saw that the boy FULL was the weakest of the two, and was nearly dead, they brutally insisted on is continuing the contest, and defied the bye-standers to interfere. At length, he was taken up and carried into one of the huts, and only survived a few minutes! The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Hutchings, Purnell and Parsons - all three of whom have absconded. The Coroner immediately issued his warrant for their apprehension.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 May 1946
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest At Morice Town. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the Gloucester Arms, Gloucester Street, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of ELIZABETH HANCOCK, wife of RICHARD HANCOCK, a police constable in the Dock Yard, who died on the 20th instant. - Mr Cole, surgeon, stated that he first attended the deceased on April 16th when he found her labouring under haemorrhage or great loss of blood. The deceased was very much exhausted, her pulse was very low and her person very much emaciated. She complained of weakness and of having lost much blood, and said that she had been in this state for some days, but had not kept her bed. His impression was that she had miscarried, and he mentioned it to the deceased, who replied that she was not certain about that. She complained mostly of her great weakness, but not of any pain at that time. He thought that when the haemorrhage had ceased, which was the case in one or two days according to the statement of the deceased, that she would get about. A few days afterwards the deceased complained of a pain in her limbs, which appeared to him to be rheumatic pains, and in about a week her right arm became completely powerless, from the severity of the rheumatism. She complained also of a pain in her leg, but he could not well speak about this as she was too weak to turn herself. Witness saw her up to the time of her death, which took place on Wednesday last. About a week or ten days prior to her death, deceased complained of an excruciating pain in her back. This pain continued, which she described as being similar to that which she felt in her limbs. As well as witness could make out from her account, it proceeded from the small of the back but she did not describe it more particularly. Witness examined her back, the second day after her complaint, when he discovered a livid mark darker in the centre, on the os sacrum. This spot was as large as the palm of his hand, and of a circular form; he should consider it to have been about 2 ½ inches in diameter, but the skin was entire. On examining the place, there was no pain in the centre, but the surface of the edges were rather tender, the parts within the rim were dead and he considered it to be mortification. He told the woman who was present in the room that the deceased ought to have a feather bed placed under her, and some soft chamois leather placed between, to relieve her sufferings. He applied no remedies as he saw they were useless, but he advised the deceased to lie on her side, this she was unable to do on account of the prostration, arising from the loss of blood. Nourishing articles of sustenance were ordered by him shortly before her death. When mortification was a constitutional symptom it was almost generally fatal, but where it proceeded from violence or internal injury, the constitution might resist its progress and sloughing might take place. In this case the individual afflicted might recover with the loss of the part. In this instance it resulted from the pressure of the body on the mattress combined with constitutional debility. There was another sore or ulcer upon the hip about a third of an inch in diameter, and also a mark of mortification upon the cap of the knee, about an inch in diameter, which was first observed a few hours previously to her death. This latter he attributed to the loss of vitality in the system. It was evident from the present decomposed state of the body that it must have been in a putrid state before her death. Witness prescribed medicine, but it was frequently not sent for, or otherwise not taken, the deceased placed great reliance on a liniment which she rubbed on the parts affected, but he did not attribute any harm to its use; there was camphor in it. He had no hopes of the recovery of the deceased from the first time of attending upon her on account of her extreme debility, arising from loss of blood. In his opinion the deceased died from the effects of mortification, which showed itself first on the os sacrum, this latter was the result of pressure combined with the enfeebled state of her body, she might have died from the effects of acute rheumatism or from the debility proceeding from the haemorrhage, apart from the mortification, either was sufficient to have caused her death. Several witnesses deposed to the ill health of the deceased and that she had been furnished with proper necessaries, as well as all the attention that could be paid to her by her husband, who was compelled to be absent two nights out of three on duty, at the Dock Yard. At these times she, the deceased, had nobody with her of a night, but this was at her own desire. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 June 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - On Monday an Inquest was held at the St. Aubyn Arms, Navy Row, before A. B. Bone, Esq., upon the body of WILLIAM SAMBELLS, who was killed on Saturday the 30th ult., at the New Works, Morice-Town, in the following manner:- The deceased was employed on the works as a labourer, when a horse and waggon in the tram line went over him, the deceased having previously stumbled in endeavouring to get out of the horse's way. Surgical assistance was produced, but he died almost immediately from the injuries received. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BRIXTON - On the afternoon of the same day, an Inquest was also held on the body of a boy about 15 years of age, named JOHN GOSS, in the parish of Brixton, who hung himself with his braces, at the bar of a gate. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was a farm-servant to Mr John Harvey, a farmer of Sherford, in the parish of Brixton. There was nothing particularly remarkable in his conduct prior to the rash act; and no reason could be assigned for his having done so. Charles Symonds, a labourer, in the employ of the same party, stated that the deceased was employed in a field with him on Saturday last; when they left off work, deceased asked witness what o'clock it was, and then went away as he said to a place called Gore, and witness heard nothing further of the deceased until his death. - Richard Rogers, of Brixton, labourer, stated that on Saturday night, about 9 o'clock, he saw the deceased hanging at Kingshill Gate; he procured assistance and examined the deceased, who was hanging by his braces, quite dead. WILLIAM GOSS, the father of the boy said that the deceased was servant with Mr Harvey; he was a sober lad, and he could not account for his rash act. He appeared very comfortable and happy, and witness knew of nothing likely to have affected his spirits. One or two other persons were also examined, but their evidence elicited nothing of any material interest to the Inquiry. The Jury returned a verdict of 'Felo-de'se'.

PLYMOUTH - On Tuesday afternoon, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of WILLIAM B. PROBERT, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was found dead, hanging to his bedstead, between eight and nine o'clock on Monday morning. No cause could be assigned except the fact that the deceased had been lately pressed about money matters, and was in a low desponding state of mind for some time past. The deceased was about forty-five years of age, and was a painter and glazier, carrying on business on his own account at 28 Russel Street. He has left a widow and six children to lament his loss, the eldest of whom is about seventeen years of age, and the youngest nine weeks. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Sudden Death - On Monday week a navigator, named ALEXANDER BOWNDAY, whilst working on the railway about half a mile from Ridgeway, suddenly dropped on the ground, and was found to be a corpse. An Inquest was held on his body the same day, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

EXETER - Melancholy Catastrophe. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Paper Makers' Arms, in Exe-lane, Exeter, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM PERRY, a young man under the age of 21 years. On Wednesday the deceased went from his master's house to the Head Weir, for the purpose of bathing. On reaching the bathing-place, he noticed a boy in the water, who had got out of his depth and was evidently making his last struggle for life; he immediately walked into the river, and succeeded in extricating the lad from his perilous position and enabled him to get to land. The exertion, however, had thrown him off his equilibrium, and his feet failing, he fell into a hole excavated in the bed of the river for the purpose of obtaining gravel; not being able to swim, he lost his presence of mind, and after ineffectual attempts to save himself, finally sunk; before assistance could be rendered, life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Disastrous Accident On Board H.M.S. "Caledonia." - Three Persons Killed. - On Tuesday evening, an Inquest was held at the Hospital Inn, adjoining the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the bodies of the three individuals who lost their lives on board H.M.S. the "Caledonia," on Sunday last, by the fall of the top gallant mast while it was in the act of being lowered. Their names were CHARLES PHILIP LAMB, ordinary seaman, acting as assistant clerk; WILLIAM SLANEY, marine; and THOMAS HERBERT, rated as a second-class boy. - Herbert John Jones, first lieutenant on board H.M.S. "Caledonia" stated that he was on the upper deck at the time of the accident. The mast which had been ordered to be lowered fell point blank upon the deck, and struck several persons, among whom were the deceased. - John Callaghan stated that he was a seaman on board H.M.S. "Caledonia," and was on duty in the main top on Sunday last. At sunset an order was given to send down the main top gallant mast: witness was employed for the purpose of securing it, and did so as he supposed effectually, but by some means the rope used for this purpose slipped off, and consequently the mast fell upon the deck. - John Johnstone said that he was captain of the main top on board the "Caledonia", and had been doing duty as such for nearly twelve months. He (witness) ordered Callaghan to go to the mast and see that the top gallant was all clear for coming down. As it was not lowered quick enough witness went to the cross trees to see what delayed them from lowering, and then gave the necessary orders for securing the top gallant mast in its descent. At this time it was lowered very quick so that Callaghan had only time to take one half hitch after the clove hitch, when notice was given that the lizard was rendering, that is, slipping up, by another seaman named Fox; but it was too late to stop the mast from coming down. - Wm. George Maude, deputy lieutenant, said that no blame was attributable to anybody on deck; it was purely an accident. - Samuel Skarret, surgeon on board H.M.S. "Caledonia," stated that LAMB had sustained a severe fracture of the skull, SLANEY had his ribs broken in, and HERBERT also died from a fracture of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 June 1846
PLYMOUTH - Death From Bathing. - On Monday an Inquest was held at Plymouth, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN BARTLETT, aged 23, son of MR JAMES BARTLETT, bookseller, of that town, who was drowned under the Hose on the previous day. It appeared that the deceased went to bathe in the morning about 9 o'clock, and it is supposed that while in the water he was taken with a fit, to which infirmity he was subject, which caused him to sink. Unhappily, no means were at hand to save him. Drags were procured at the cottage on the Hoe for the purpose of drawing out his lifeless body, but without success. Shortly after a man named Shepherd dived, and brought it up by the hair of the head. Verdict - "Accidental Death by Drowning."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 June 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday morning last, at the St. Aubyn Arms, Morice Town, on the body of a lad named PETERS, who met his death on the previous afternoon whilst bathing in Keyham Lake, adjoining Mr Elliott's farm. The boy, it appears, when in the water, accidentally slipped into a pit where the water was about nine feet deep, and being unable to swim, immediately sank. There were two other boys in the water at the time but who, from their inability to swim, were unable to render any assistance. The body was not taken out of the water until an hour after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Great credit is due to the Jury for their humane conduct, who not only gave to the mother of deceased the small sum allowed them for their attendance, but likewise made a subscription and the sum collected in the Inquest room amounted to about 23s.

EXETER - Dreadful Accident. - On Monday week an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the George and Dragon Inn, Exeter, on the body of MR R. GOULD, an elderly gentleman, residing in Albion Place who died on Saturday, from injuries received by a fall from the top of the verandah in front of his house on the Monday previous. The deceased had reached the top of the verandah by means of a ladder, for the purpose of cleaning it; and when standing there, lost his footing, and fell to the ground. He was taken up insensible, blood issuing from his mouth, nose and ears and conveyed into the house, where he was examined by a surgeon, who ascertained that the deceased had suffered concussion of the brain, and that his arms as well as several of his ribs were broken. The deceased had been subject to fainting fits from a disorder of the heart. Mr Arscott who attended him till his death, attributed the accident to the occurrence of one of those fits, whilst the deceased was upon the verandah. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 July 1846
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Exe Lane, Exeter, on the body of an old woman named LETITIA WILLIAMS, who drowned herself in the Mill Leat opposite Bodley's Foundry, on the previous evening. The deceased had been for sixteen years midwife to the Lying-in Charity, but last Good Friday, in consequence of some breach of duty, she was requested to resign, and she had been in a very desponding state ever since. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 July 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Important Coroner's inquest. - Within the last few days, considerable excitement has been caused at Morice Town by the death of a woman named ELIZABETH MONRO, the wife of a superannuated shipwright in the Dock-yard. The deceased, who was 68 years of age, had been suffering from severe illness for ten days prior to her death, and the assistance of Dr Budd and Mr May, surgeon, had been obtained. Before, however, these gentlemen were sent for, she had been under the treatment of Mr Row, druggist, of William-street. On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the Tamar Inn, Tamar Street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, Mr Joll Foreman, when the following evidence was adduced:- Mary Ann Hillier being sworn, stated that she knew the deceased, who lived with her in the same house in Garden-street. About a fortnight since she complained of severe illness. Mr Row, druggist was called in, and sent some pills and a draught. Both were administered by witness to the deceased. The next day she laboured under great sickness and pain in the stomach. Mr Row visited her daily until Sunday week last, when Dr Budd was sent for. During the time Dr Budd was at the house of deceased, he requested that Mr May should be called in. Messrs. Dansey and Swain also attended. - ELIZABETH MUNRO was then sworn:- She was the daughter of deceased and came home from London on Monday fortnight last. She found her mother very unwell and recommended her to have Dr Budd. The deceased expired on Tuesday week. Mr Row was sent for, and was at the house every day after she came home. The last time he came to see her mother, witness followed him to the door, and on her enquiring of him his opinion as to the state of the deceased, he said "I assure you there is not the least danger. I would venture my life on her recovery if you pay proper attention to the medicine and other things which I shall prescribe." Her mother was constantly vomiting, at intervals of about five minutes, bringing half a cup full of matter each time, of a very foetid and nauseous character. On Sunday, after Mr Row made the above observation, Dr Budd came and three other medical gentlemen were sent for by him. They each examined the deceased as to her complaint and its duration and gave it as their opinion that she was in a very dangerous state. An operation was performed on Sunday evening by those gentlemen, at which she was not present. A linseed and mustard poultice had been applied by Mr Row to the stomach of the deceased. - Dr Budd was then called and sworn, but did not give evidence, because he thought it would be insufficient of itself, as the illness was more a surgical question than the business of a physician; and the Coroner not having the power to summon but one medical gentleman without it was demanded by the Jury, Mr May was substituted for Dr Budd. - Mr Joseph May, surgeon, said, on Sunday afternoon last Dr Budd requested his attendance at No. 18, Garden street, where he found that gentleman sitting at the bedside of the deceased. He found the deceased very weak, her pulse quick and small, and suffering from great pain in the stomach with repeated vomiting. He suspected the existence of hernia, and found the uppermost part of the right thigh was swollen to the size of an ordinary lemon. Upon the advice of Dr Budd, and two surgeons, an operation was performed on the deceased. Upon dividing the skin on the upper part of the thigh, on the right side, immediately over the tumour, he found the sack of the hernia of a dirty chocolate colour, and on making an examination it burst, and gave vent to some dirty pus of a disagreeable odour. The portion of the gut that was strangulated then presented itself to view. It was black and mortified. After the operation she no longer vomited, nor did she suffer from pain of the stomach, but continued gradually to sink, on account of the operation being too long delayed. He attended upon her from that time until her death. The deceased had died from hernia having been strangulated for several days before an operation was performed. In his opinion the death had been occasioned by the delay of the operation. With proper care and attention from a surgeon, such a disease ought to be detected. He solemnly declared his opinion to be that the non-discovery of the existence of the hernia in this case was proof of gross ignorance. Medical men never trust to medicinal means to reduce hernia. He thought it highly desirable that he should have his opinion corroborated. - The room was then cleared by order of the Coroner, who had, as he stated, some suggestions to make to the Jury. On our re-entering the room, we found that it had been determined to take the evidence of another surgeon, in addition of Mr May, and accordingly Mr Paul Swain was then sworn: - He stated that he had heard the testimony of Mr May, and believed that he could corroborate it in every respect; adding, moreover, that feeling himself competent to give an opinion on the complaint of which the deceased had died, he believed it to be the duty of every medical man to inquire for himself, and that, of however ordinary a nature the talents of a person so engaged might be, he should deem it impossible for them to fail in detecting the existence of the disease, from the symptoms which presented themselves in the case more immediately under consideration, and (continued Mr S.) a student, with but a few months' experience, could not have, in his belief, heard the various complaints of the deceased without seeing immediately that she was suffering from hernia. - The Coroner summed up at some length, pointing out to the Jury those points of the law which bore more particularly on the subject. He deprecated that custom, which he believed was prevalent in the present day, of calling in inexperienced, unqualified and illegal persons to attend the sick, and pointed out the danger of so doing, and the penalties which apothecaries and druggists placed themselves under by pretending to perform those offices which were the duty of physicians and surgeons only. - The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict that MRS MUNRO "Died from Strangulated Hernia," produced by natural causes.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 July 1846
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, Plymouth before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner on the body of RICHARD HEATH, who unfortunately fell overboard from a trawler, whilst engaged in his occupation, about three miles to the southward of the Breakwater. A verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - On Thursday morning last, MR J. R. BEER, watchmaker, Plymouth, was found lying dead in his bedroom. An Inquest was held on the body the same evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., when his unfortunate widow, who was very much distressed, stated that the deceased had been insolvent two years since, and that he had lately pledged a number of watches which had been left to be repaired, and for the recovery of which he had told her he expected to be summoned. He had spoken to her the previous week about the suicide of Mr Haydon, and for some days he had appeared very much agitated and desponding. The deceased had been a member of the Temperance Society for six years; occasionally his family had suffered great privations, and almost wanted the necessaries of life. The deceased left home about half-past 9 the evening before, but returned soon after. She retired to rest about 1 o'clock, and he remained up reading, as he frequently had done. He came upstairs soon after and was very much agitated, but this was not unusual, and did not alarm her; he asked her forgiveness for the misery he had caused her, and looking at the children's bed, said "poor creatures;" he then kissed the little girl. When she found him lying on the bed in the morning, she gave an alarm and Isaiah Williams came to her assistance. Mr Williams stated that when he entered the room he found the deceased lying on the bed, without his coat, he felt his pulse which was beating very faintly, and he immediately sent for a surgeon. He found a letter on the table with a list of names and some pawn tickets. The following is a copy of the letter:- July 9th, 1846. My Dear Wife, - I write this, hoping it may afford some degree of relief to your mind in your great trouble. I am excessively weighed down by the thought of my neglect of business, because it has brought you and your dear children into such distressing circumstances, and myself into that state which shuts out all hope or prospect of my retrieving them. You know what my thoughts and feelings have been on that point, therefore I will say no more about it; but from a thorough conviction that you and the dear children will have more done for you when I am removed out of the way, than you would if I remained, I have determined on proving how strongly I desire your welfare, beyond what it is left in my power to bestow on you by my utmost exertions under such unfavourable circumstances and afflictions as I feel myself brought into, by laying down my life for you - see the 13th verse of the 5th cap. of St John's Gospel. - Now it wants a few minutes of being 4 o'clock. Farewell! Farewell! - The list contained the names of the parties whose watches had been pledged, and also the name of the pawnbroker, with the sum advanced upon each. There were also two newspapers with certain sentences marked, in one of them were the following from the late Mr Haydon's diary. - "My Hyman here observed that throughout the diary he found frequent complaints of the loss of time deceased suffered from continual interruption, owing to his embarrassments. Appending to one of these complaints was the following remark: 'I am more and more convinced by experience that the loss of a day to an artist is a great injury to any work on which he may be engaged.' - "June 18. Sat from two to five o'clock staring at my picture like an idiot - my brain pressed down by anxiety and the anxious looks of my family, whom I have been compelled to inform of my condition. We have raised money on all our silver to keep us out of want in case of accident. 'June 22. God forgive me. "Amen. "Finis. "B. R. Haydon. "Stretch me no longer on this rough world. - Lear." - And in the other the following extract was marked:- "And to treat those who from ignorance or overmastering irregular impulses, lapse from virtue as erring brethren - who are to be reclaimed, not as wild beasts who are to be hunted down." - After each paragraph he had made the addition of the initials "N.B." and at the close the word "Amen," with the date "July 8th." - Mr Andrews, surgeon, said a post mortem examination of the body had taken place, and it appeared that deceased had died from the effects of Prussic Acid. A bottle which had contained that deadly poison was found in a drawer in his room. The Jury after a short consultation returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased has left a family of four children.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 July 1846
- Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy about 13 years of age, named JOHN WILTON, who was unfortunately killed at Horrabridge woollen manufactory, owing to becoming entangled in the machinery. The shaft was thrown out of gear the instant the circumstance was discovered, but it was too late to save his life. He had only been employed about a month, and wore an apron, which it is supposed first caught the wheel. The poor boy's father was present at the Inquest, and expressed his opinion that no blame was attributable to any person. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was of course returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 August 1846
TAMERTON FOLIOT - On the evening of Tuesday week as some labourers in the employ of Sir R. Lopez, Bart. were fishing in the river Tavy, one of the party, named THOMAS HALFYARD, while attempting to get across Rock Pool - a deep portion of the river just opposite Maristow House, - suddenly sank, and although assistance was immediately on the spot he was unfortunately drowned, as he never rose after his first submersion in the water; it is supposed the weight of his boots and clothes kept him down. Drags were instantly procured, and his body was discovered and brought to the shore in about an hour after the accident, and every means were used to resuscitate him, but without effect. An Inquest was held on his remains on the following day, and a verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 September 1846
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - On Friday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of a young man, named THOMAS BINMORE. It appears that the deceased, who is about 18 years of age, was engaged at the works now proceeding at Keyham, and that on Thursday last he was run over by a waggon heavily laden with mud. His leg was completely shattered, and he was otherwise so seriously injured that he was conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, and after lingering for about three hours in extreme anguish, he was relieved by death from his sufferings. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

MARY TAVY - Singular And Fatal Accident. - An accident of a very peculiar nature, which was, unhappily, attended with fatal results, occurred at Marytavy Mill, on Saturday afternoon. It appears that a young man of the name of DANIEL JOHN HARTOP, who was the brother-in-law of Mr Charles Hoyles, the miller at that place, went about one o'clock in the afternoon into the courtlage connected with the mill, for the purpose of changing the harness of some horses. The mill is situated very near to the South Wheal Friendship mine, at which some parties were pursuing their operations, entirely unconscious of the dreadful results which were shortly to occur. In the progress of their operations it became necessary to fire a hole, when, unfortunately a large and heavy stone was blown up from the mine, and, being thrown over the courtlage, it struck the unhappy man a blow upon the head, which occasioned almost instantaneous death. An Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on Monday, when a verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned.

ASHBURTON - Frightful And Fatal Accident At Ashburton. - On Saturday night, an alarming accident occurred at the Marley Tunnel, on the South Devon Railway. It appears that about ten o'clock in the night several workmen were engaged in removing the centre and uprights that had been used in erecting the arch over the tunnel, as all the masonry was considered perfectly safe. Unfortunately, however, about fifty yards of the arch fell in, and buried four men, while others received injuries. Several hours elapsed before the bodies could be extricated, and the poor fellows were literally cut to pieces by the heavy mass which fell on them. Every assistance was afforded them which humanity could devise, but we regret to state that all was fruitless, as all four died after lingering in the most agonising suffering for a few hours. An Inquest was held on the bodies on Monday, when a verdict in accordance with the painful circumstances was returned. The names of the unfortunate sufferers are BIGWOOD, PARNELL, POLHILL, and SETCHER.

BARNSTAPLE - Distressing Suicide. - Barnstaple, Aug 30. During the whole of this week an investigation has been in progress here relative to the death of MR J. H. KNOX, who for many years held the joint offices of secretary and house-surgeon to the North Devon Infirmary, and who, it now appears, committed suicide owing to some irregularities in his accounts, which it was his duty to have represented at the annual meeting of the governors of the institution. The circumstance having been communicated to Mr A. Drake, the Borough Coroner, a Jury was impanelled, who, after the examination of several witnesses, returned the following verdict:- That the deceased came to his death by means of prussic acid administered by himself, but in what state of mind he was at the time of his committing the act, there was not sufficient evidence to enable them to determine."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Remarkable Case Of Drowning. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Seven Stars Inn, St. Thomas, Exeter, before E. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN TOTHILL, a middle-aged man who had resided at Starcross, and whose death had been discovered under the following extraordinary circumstances. On Wednesday a man was using the path across the South Devon Railway near the Spring Gardens, contiguous to the Exeter Canal, when, at a place called the Warren Dykes he saw the body of a man who had fallen into a ditch of water about six feet wide and knee deep, and in this position had been drowned. It is supposed that he missed the train, and set out to walk home; but it being dark, the way being imperfectly known to him and he being a little intoxicated, he fell into the ditch, from which he was unable to extricate himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 September 1846
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Friday last, on the body of HELEN TUCKERMAN, wife of GEORGE TUCKERMAN, Higher Batter Street, who died suddenly on the 10th inst., aged about 24 years. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

TORRINGTON - Suicide. - MR GEORGE STONEMAN, tanner, of Torrington, was found drowned on Monday week, near Rothery Bridge, in the vicinity of Torrington. Deceased, who appeared in his usual health on the previous day, attended the Baptist Chapel three times. In the evening he complained of being unwell and walked out, but not returning as soon as was expected, inquiry was made about him, but he was not found until the following morning, at the place before mentioned. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Monday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." It is generally supposed that the unfortunate man committed suicide, but what led him to commit the rash act remains an inexplicable mystery.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 September 1846
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - The family of Captain Thomas, R.N., of Plymouth, were yesterday thrown into a state of the greatest consternation, by the sudden death of MATTHEW FOEL, Esq., of Jersey, who was on a visit. The deceased gentleman, who was about forty-four years of age, was Adjutant of the 5th Jersey Militia. For several days he has been on a visit to his friend Capt. Thomas, of Alfred Place, Plymouth. He retired to rest on Monday night at his usual hour, and in perfect health and spirits, but yesterday (Tuesday) morning, he was found dead in his bed, having expired under a sudden fit of sanguineous apoplexy. An Inquest was held upon his remains yesterday, when a verdict in accordance was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Frightful Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, Plymouth, upon the body of a young man, of the name of JOHN DEACON, whose death was occasioned by his falling into a boiling cauldron of oil. It appears that the unfortunate man, who was only 22 years of age, was employed at the Stucco Works, at Plymouth, and that having occasion, on Monday afternoon, to attend to the boiling of some oil, he ascended the steps conducting to the mouth of the cauldron, which is very large, and stands at some height above the level of the ground. While in this situation, it is supposed that he either over-balanced himself, or had a fit, for he was found about an hour afterwards in the cauldron, his head and body being submerged in the boiling oil, while his legs and thighs were hanging over the vessel. As soon as the deplorable circumstance was discovered, assistance was afforded, but in taking him out it was found that he was not only quite dead, but frightfully disfigured. It appeared at the Inquest that some time back he was subject to fits; but without any further evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BURRINGTON - Two Infants Suffocated. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the bodies of two infants, twin sisters, about 14 weeks old, the children of a blacksmith of Burrington, named JAMES HARRIS. It appeared that the children were put to bed in their usual state of health on the previous evening, and that at four o'clock the husband got up for the purpose of going to his work. At six o'clock the grandmother who resides in the same house was disturbed by the screams of her daughter, and on proceeding to her room she exclaimed "the dear children are either dead or dying." A hot bath was immediately applied but without effect. Mr Tidbold, surgeon, was called in, and gave it as his opinion, after the examination, that death was occasioned by suffocation, an opinion in which the Jury concurred.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 September 1846
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - On Friday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmunds, Esq., on the body of JOHN EDWARDS, who kept the Black Horse beer shop in Howe St., and who had been failing in health for some time. It appears that he retired to bed not perceptibly worse than usual on Thursday night and was found dead on the following morning. Verdict, "Natural Death."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Wednesday evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., upon the remains of GEORGE HENRY RICHARDS, a seaman on board the schooner Exmouth, lying in Catwater, who, on going aloft about one o'clock on that day for the purpose of scraping the fore-topmast, fell from the fore-topsail yard, thereby occasioning a fracture of the skull. He was immediately removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered for about two hours and expired. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday week an Inquest was held at the Black Dog Inn, North-Street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, on the body of THOMAS JONES, a sawyer, formerly of Plymouth and a Chelsea Pensioner, who n Friday morning had been found dead in his bed at the said in. Deceased and his wife came to Exeter early in August, and lived in a small house on the Haven Banks. He was an in-patient of the Devon and Exeter Hospital from the 7th to the 14th of August, having a disease of the bladder and kidney; and was made an out-patient from that time at his own request, though contrary to the advice of Mr Harris, the surgeon who attended him. His subsequent visits to the hospital were very irregular, notwithstanding the disease continued to be of a very grave character. He took a bed at the Black Dog Inn on Thursday night, and not rising the next day, the landlord went to the room and found he had been dead some hours. In his pocket was a bottle of brandy and some cider was on the table, - most pernicious liquids in his diseased state. Mr Harris considered the disease not of a nature to account for sudden death, and the Inquest was adjourned to allow an examination of the body. On Monday morning the Jury re-assembled. Mr Harris stated that he found a stone about the size of a peach-stone in the centre of deceased's kidney, which had produced an abscess; those parts were much diseased; air was found in the blood taken from the cavity of the heart and the vessels of the brain were much congested but not ruptured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes." - The stone produced by Mr Harris was very remarkable, on account of its size; and on being cut in two, showed the successive layers which had formed round the minute secretion.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 October 1846
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of an old man named JOHN SYDENHAM, aged 75, who fell down dead in Tavistock St., in the morning. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

OTTERY ST. MARY - Double Suicide. - Considerable sensation has been created in the vicinity of St. Mary Ottery by a dreadful occurrence, by which the deaths of two unfortunate factory girls were occasioned. On Friday week the deceased females, MARY ANN OLDRIDGE and JANE SMITH, were visited by a man of indifferent character, from whom OLDRIDGE contrived to possess herself of half-a-crown to get some liquor with, and never returned, the other deceased following her. The man subsequently meeting with them, threatened to expose them to their employer, Mr Newberry, the silk factor, in Exeter, if they did not immediately return him his half-crown. not having sufficient to make up the required sum, the threat appeared to operate so powerfully upon their minds, that they went to the neighbouring chemist and purchased 3d. worth of arsenic, with which they resolved to destroy themselves. They then returned to work at the factory, and on leaving at night went to a public-house kept by a person named Taylor, where they mixed the poison in some cider and drank it. OLDRIDGE died in dreadful agony on Wednesday, and SMITH in twenty four hours after. An Inquest was held on Friday, on the bodies of the unfortunate women, before Mr Aberdein, the coroner, at the Red Lion Inn, Ottery, when the Jury after several hours' deliberation, returned a verdict of Felo De Se. Both bodies were interred late on Friday night in the parish churchyard.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 October 1846
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, by John Edmonds, Esq., on the body of SARAH DODGE, aged 26 years, a servant at the Market House Inn - who died suddenly of an apoplectic fit on the night preceding, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

PLYMOUTH - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of an old man, named RICHARD DAWE. It appears that though 72 years of age, he still continues working as a bricklayer, but on Friday he received such severe injuries owing to the falling off a wall in Mount-street, as terminated in his death on Sunday, in the South Devon Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 November 1846
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday, by J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of a man named EDWARD JAMES, who was taken ill only on the previous night. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suspicious Circumstance. - Some painful interest has been excited in the neighbourhood by the drowning of a young female of loose character, under circumstances which involve considerable ground for suspicion. The unfortunate girl, whose name was HONORA SCARROLL, after drinking at the King and Queen Public house at North Corner, on the night of the 21st ult., entered the boat belonging to John Davey, a waterman, about 11 o'clock, for the avowed purpose of going to the Stromboli's hulk, lying in Hamoaze. It was reported in a short time afterwards that she had fallen overboard from the hulk, and nothing was discovered of the body until Tuesday,, (yesterday) week, when about 12 o'clock in the day, a waterman of the name of Lundy, after dragging some time, picked it up between the Fly and Lively hulk, at the bottom of Hamoaze. Her face was greatly disfigured, one of her eyes was deficient, and there was a mark of violence upon one side of her head. Upon inquiry it turned out that a short time before she entered the boat she had been in company with a sailor and became very much intoxicated, and in a conversation which she had with a woman of the name of Tozer, she expressed her intention of going to the Stromboli. To a woman of the name of Collins she expressed a similar determination, adding that the purpose of her visit was to see a young man to whom she had a particular fancy. On taking her seat in the boat she gave Davey a handkerchief to keep as security for his fare, and the boat was then launched by the assistance of a man named Bennett. On the return of the boat Davey told a constable of the name of Allen, that the woman was drowned. On Wednesday an Inquest was held upon the body before Mr A. B. Bone, the coroner, at the King William the Fourth, in Cornwall-street. After hearing a portion of the evidence, Mr Bone directed that Davey should be called in, upon which he told him that information had reached him that he had given several contradictory accounts with reference to the unfortunate deceased, and had upon one occasion stated that she was all right upon the ship. Upon this Davey said "I will take my solemn oath that I put the woman on board that ship. One man came down the accommodation ladder, and she would not go on board with him. She said she would not go on board the ship unless "Bill" would take her on board. "Bill" then came down the ladder in company with the other man, and both of them helped her on board. I will swear that I saw that woman go up two or three steps, and then I pushed off. She told me not to part with the handkerchief, as she would redeem it when she came on shore again. As I was leaving the ship, I heard a splash in the water, but did not see anything afterwards. I reported the circumstance to Allen when I came on shore. Word was passed to me from the ship that the woman was overboard, and those on board immediately left the gangway, and made no effort to save her. I looked about for her, but could not find her, and as it was blowing hard, I was obliged to make for the shore. I never saw her afterwards, and what I have stated is true. I will take my oath of it as God is my Saviour." - The evidence of William Allen, the constable, was next taken; he said I never saw the deceased but once and that was on the day of her death, at the "India Arms." On the night when she was missed, about twenty-five minutes to twelve, I was coming down Cornwall-street alone. I met a man by the name of Davey. He said to me "Am I drunk or sober?" I replied, "I don't consider you are drunk; why do you ask that question." He said, "I've been alongside the Stromboli's hulk with a woman. Two men came down and took her up the side, and one of them gave me sixpence. I saw her go three parts of the way up the accommodation ladder, when I let go the boat to come on shore. The sentry immediately sung out, and said the woman was overboard, and called me to pick her up. I asked where she was, and the sentry said 'there she is - don't you see her.' I replied that I did not, and pulled the boat alongside the gangway, and remained there ten minutes. No one said anything further to me, nor I to them, and I came on shore." I asked Davey whether he saw the woman fall overboard? He told me that he did not, nor did he hear the woman fall in the water. I then said the woman might be on board the ship now, for what he knew, to which he replied that it was very probable. I then left him and went home. The following day I saw him again, and asked him whether he recollected the conversation of the previous evening, and I again asked him whether there was any truth in his assertion. He said "No; she is on board, all right." In consequence of further information, I went to the Stromboli's hulk, on the Friday following, where I saw some of the officers, and told them I had heard that a woman had been drowned alongside the ship. The officers said nothing of the kind had occurred. I desired one of them to call the sentinel and quartermaster, who were on duty on the evening when the deceased was drowned, and they complied with my request. I asked them whether they were on duty that night, and they told me they were from eight to twelve, and during that time had never left the deck. I then asked him whether a waterman had brought a woman on board that night. They said no woman had been brought alongside for the night, but two watermen had been hailed by them. They were in a boat. They asked the sentinel and quartermaster whether a waterman had brought a woman to the ship that night, and they told them that nothing of the kind had occurred. The watermen immediately left the ship and pulled for the shore. A sergeant of marines told me that he was on North Corner beach on the day after the woman had been missed, when Davey said to him "I was alongside your ship last night, with a woman; she was thundering drunk, and I was not much better. I could not get any assistance; she fell overboard between the ship and the boat, and went down like a stone." Those were the words the sergeant uttered to me. I know nothing further of the circumstance. - The testimony of the medical examiner was next given, he expressed it as his opinion that the deceased did not die from drowning in consequence of the flaccid state of the lungs. As the Stromboli is at present on the coast of Ireland, the Inquiry was adjourned and in all probability an order for her immediate return will be issued by the Admiralty.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 November 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - The Adjourned Inquest on HONORA SCARROLL. The adjourned Inquest on this unfortunate woman was held at Down's Three Tuns Inn, Catherine-street, on Friday last, but in consequence of the Stromboli not yet having arrived at this port, it was adjourned until that day fortnight, Mr Bone at the same time, intimating his intention of communicating with the authorities on the subject during the interim.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 December 1846
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at the 'Packet Hotel' on Wednesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of WILLIAM WRIGHT, of Plymouth, mate on board the schooner Hero, lying at this port. Deceased was about to make fast the stern chain of his vessel on the preceding Monday night, and on getting into a boat which was lying under the stern, he fell with one leg in the boat and the other in the water; he went to bed and did not get up in the morning, but was supplied with coffee in his berth, and remained till towards noon, when one of the seamen went to see him and found him in great pain, and he soon after died. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was called in, but his help was unavailing. At the direction of the Coroner, the surgeon made a post mortem examination of the body, which discovered the cause of death to have been congestion of the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

EXETER - On Monday an Inquest was held before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on the body of JAMES WILCOCKS, a poor labourer of Bishopsteignton who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital early on the morning of the previous Thursday, from ulceration caused by strangulated hernia. From the evidence: it appeared that the deceased was at his usual work on Wednesday the 25th ultimo. On Thursday the 26th ult he complained of illness and did not get up. He was taken with vomiting which continued without intermission until the middle of the following Wednesday when it abated. the substance vomited was stercoraceous. On Friday the 27th as deceased continued ill, the woman at whose house he lodged went by his desire to Mr Knill, the relieving officer of Bishopsteignton, who sent her to Mr Lamacraft the assistant overseer, giving her at the same time 2s. 6d. as relief, expressing his opinion that it was a case of influenza. On Monday he called again and this time he wrote a note to Mr Gillard of Newton, the medical officer of the union, desiring him to attend to the case as soon as convenient. Mr Gillard did not make his appearance and on Tuesday Mr R. Cartwright, of Teignmouth, who was visiting in the parish, was desired to see the deceased, and on examining him he found it was a case of rupture. A note was sent to Mr Gillard again, but he did not make his appearance until late on Wednesday when he directed deceased to be immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital which was forthwith done, every care being taken in removing him, and the butler of Mr and Lady Frances Stephens, of Bishopsteignton, accompanying him to Exeter. After his arrival at the Hospital an operation was performed by John Edye, Esq., with great skill in the presence of John Harris, Esq., and other medical gentlemen connected with the hospital, but without saving the life of the patient who expired a few hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Natural Causes, but added to it an impression of their unanimous opinion that the conduct of Mr Gillard was deserving of severe censure, at the same time stating their approbation of the pains taken by the Rev. John Comyns, vicar of Bishopsteignton, to cause an investigation of the case, and of the kindness of Lady Frances Stephens, and Miss Taylor of Bishopsteignton towards the deceased.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 December 1846
STOKE DAMEREL - Complicated & Strange Affair. The Adjourned Inquest on HONORA SCARROLL. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of a woman named HONORA SCARROLL, who, it is supposed, met her death in an improper manner, was held on Friday last, at Downs' Three Tuns Inn, Catherine-street, Devonport. It will be recollected that at the time of the occurrence we detailed the event as related by the waterman Davey, but as the presence of the crew of the Stromboli, steamer, was necessary, in order either to disprove or qualify his statement, the meetings of the Jury have been from time to time put off in consequence of the non-arrival of that vessel until Friday last. On that day the Jury met at 10 o'clock, when Mr Bone (Coroner) read over part of the evidence which had been given on former occasions, of which we think a short narrative will suffice, as it was given by us in full at the time of the first meeting of the Jury. It was stated at that time by the waterman Davey, that on Friday night, the 20th October, he was standing in Cornwall-street, waiting to be employed by any person wishing to go afloat, when the woman HONORA SCARROLL, who was one of those unfortunate characters who are to be found too plentifully in this town, presented herself, saying she wished to go on board the Stromboli's hulk (the Lively), living in Hamoaze. He went down to the beach with her, and found that his boat had got aground, but with the assistance of a man named Bennett, he succeeded in launching her. The woman then got into the boat, but previous to starting from the shore, she gave Davey a pocket-handkerchief to keep as a security for his fare, as she had no money. They then went alongside the Lively, when the woman asked for a man named "Bill" or "Bale." A man presented himself at the gangway, but she said "no, I shan't go on board with you, I want Bill." Another man then came down the side, who gave Davey 6d., and the woman got out of the boat, and put her foot on the ladder to go up, and after proceeding two or three steps Davey pushed off. He had scarcely let go the ship when he heard a plunge, and the sentry sang out "the woman's overboard, pull a-head and pick her up." Davey did not see her, and after looking about for awhile, and no one speaking to him, he pulled ashore, and related the affair to Constable Allen, whom he met in Cornwall-street. This was his story at that time. - Mr Tripe, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body after its recovery (eight days after the night on which the woman fell into the water), stated that she had not died from drowning, but from a very severe blow on the head. As this was all that could be done in the matter in consequence of the Stromboli having sailed, an application was made to the Admiralty for her return, which took place last week. - On Friday last, after the opening the Court, Mr Bilow, one of the officers of the Stromboli, said he attended there for his brother officers, who would be most happy to render the Coroner and Jury all the assistance in their power in the furtherance of the Enquiry. - John Lampier was then called and sworn. He said:- I am acting quartermaster of the Stromboli, steamer, but have the rate of ropemaker. I recollect being on board the Stromboli's hulk, the Lively, on Tuesday, the 20th of October, in Hamoaze. It was my duty to be on the quarter-deck from 8 to 12 o'clock that night. I do not know the waterman Davey. At 9 o'clock that night the gunner and his wife came on board; and at 11 o'clock Lieut. Clarke, of the Stromboli, also came on board. Shortly after that I saw a waterman's boat between a buoy which is off the Gunwharf, and the hulk. The buoy is about 20 fathoms off from the hulk. There were two men in the boat. It was a very dark night and the wind was blowing hard from the west. The boat was about 20 yards off. I did not see anybody else in the boat but the two men, who were pulling. The head of the boat was up the harbour, and her side towards the hulk. The sentry hailed the boat, and asked what boat it was. The answer, which was given in a man's voice, was "have you see a waterman's boat alongside with a woman in it?" The sentry said "no," and the men in the boat pulled ashore directly. The boat stopped on being hailed by the sentry, and continued in the same position until the sentry had answered the question which he was asked. I did not see any other boat near the hulk during the night. At 12 o'clock I was relieved by Grove, the quarter-master; the sentry was also relieved at that time, and he had been on duty all the watch with me. I should think from the tone of the man's voice who answered the sentry that he was sober. I could perfectly see that they had blue jackets and trousers on, but neither of them stood up in the boat. - By a Juror: - Was the port on the main deck, close to the gang-way, open or shut? Witness: I do not know. Juror: If any boat came alongside in such weather, must you have seen her? - Witness: I must. Juror: What men came on deck during the watch? - Witness: I do not know. - In answer to the Coroner and the Jury, he then said:- I do not know any seaman or marine on board who passes by the name of "Bill." There were no marines on deck at 11 o'clock that night. During the watch if any person had come to the ship's side, I must have seen them. I do not think it possible, even on such a night as that, for any person to have been put on board if the port was open. If a marine or any other person had said that a woman was overboard, I should have heard it. I never heard anything about this occurrence until the next morning, when, on being asked if I had heard anything about a woman being drowned, I said no. - William Grove sworn:- I am quarter-master of H.M. steamer Stromboli. I went on the deck of the Lively at 12 o'clock on the night of Tuesday, the 12th of October, to relieve the watch, and remained there until 4 o'clock the following morning. There was nothing hailed the ship, nor did I see any boat near the ship. The weather was very severe, and the wind blew so hard that our own boats got adrift from their first mooring alongside, and wee compelled to be moored afresh. I relieved the acting quarter-master Lampier, and the sentry Jeffs, who said that nothing particular had occurred during their watch. - By a Juror: Was there any port open on that side of the ship facing the shore? - Witness: The bow port, as well as I can recollect, was open. - By a Juror: Do you not think that a boat could come alongside and you not hear it? - Witness: I do not. - Thomas Jeffs was then sworn, and stated:- I am a private of marines, and am serving on board H.M. steamer Stromboli. I remember about 7 weeks ago, being on board the Lively, then lying in the harbour of Hamoaze. I had the first watch on the night of Tuesday, the 20th October. About half-past ten o'clock I hailed a boat, in which was Lieut. Clarke. About half-past 11 I saw a boat with two men in her between the buoy and the hulk, at a distance of 30 yards from the ship, I hailed her and said, "boat a-hoy," the answer was, "has there been a boat alongside with a woman in her?" I said "no," and the boat immediately left for the shore. When I first saw the boat coming it was in the direction of North Corner, towards the stern of the hulk, and the men in her were not pulling fast, but the usual stroke. They did not come near the ship after I hailed them. - Davey was here asked a question by Mr Bone, which having answered, Mr Bone asked Jeffs if he thought that Davey's voice and the one he heard in the boat answer him were the same? Jeffs said I do not know. - By a Juror: I know a man named Bale, a marine artillery-man, but I do not think he was on board that night. - By Mr Bone: A boat came alongside the hulk at 12 o'clock, in which was Mr Evans, clerk's assistant. Lampier was on deck at the time. I was standing at the side of the gangway when Mr Evans came on board. It was a very dark night. I think that the men in the boat had coats on, but I could not see them clearly. I could distinguish plainly that there were two men in the boat. - Wm. Taylor sworn:- I am master-at-arms of the Stromboli. It is my duty to be on watch through the ship generally from 7 in the morning until 12 o'clock in the night. At 11 o'clock I was on the upper deck, and heard the sentry hail a boat, which I saw at a distance of about 100 yards in shore, or it might have been more. - Davey was here asked a question by Mr Bone when he once more repeated his previous statement, as to the cause of the woman's death. - The examination of Taylor was then resumed, and he detailed the conversation which took place between the sentry and the men in the boat. In answer to questions from the Coroner and the Jury, he said:- I do not know the man Davey, but I think I have seen him on board the hulk before. No one could come through the port adjoining the entrance ladder that night, because it was shut. It was not likely that a woman coming on board in such weather would be turned ashore again. The sentry must, in the execution of his duty, have made me acquainted with such a transaction as a woman coming alongside, at so late an hour, if it had taken place. If any boat had come alongside I should have known it, and nothing like Davey has stated could have occurred without my knowledge. - William Allen, the constable, then gave his evidence, which was merely a repetition of the facts deposed by him on the first meeting of the Jury, and which we published at that time. - James Hughes was next sworn, and stated that he was a private in the marines, doing duty on board the Stromboli. He said:- I remember that on a night, about seven weeks since, the launch getting adrift. I relieved private Jeffs on that night, and was on duty from 12 o'clock in the night till 4 o'clock in the morning, and during that period there was no boat came near the ship. When I relieved Jeffs he did not say anything had happened. - John Goss, sergeant of marines, was then sworn, and said:- I know the man John Davey, but do not recollect ever having seen him on board the Lively. On the morning after the reported death of the woman I saw Davey on the beach at North Corner. He came where I was standing, and said "Sergeant Goss, I don't think you will be able to get on board," to which I said "I am afraid not." He then said "I expect there will be a bother about this affair which took place alongside your ship last night," and I then inquired what that was. He said "last night, somewhere about 10 or 11 o'clock, I took a woman off alongside the hulk, and the woman stepped from the boat to the side of the ship, and I believe fell overboard." I said it is strange that you did not call out for someone. He said he did, he called the quarter-master and sentry, but no one answered. The woman, he said, went down directly, and he could not save her; she was very drunk, and he was not very sober. - John Richards, stoker, who had been sent for at the request of one of the Jury, for the purpose of inquiring into a statement alleged to have been made by him at a house in Cornwall-street, to the effect that he had seen the woman "fall into the water, and go down like a shot," was then sworn, but said that the report was altogether unfounded, because he was sick in his hammock at the time of the affair, and, therefore, if it had occurred he could not have seen it. - John Bale sworn, and said:- I am a gunner of the marine-artillery on board the Stromboli. I knew the woman who it is reported has been drowned, and who it is said was called HONORA SCARROLL. I was on board the Lively on the night before the transaction, when she went ashore. When I came from the Dock-yard on that day, she was sitting down with a needle and thread in her hand sewing, and having broken out a brace button I asked her to mend it, which she did. A conversation here ensued between the deceased and myself, but no agreement was made for her to come on board to me. I did not go on the gang-way after ten o'clock on the night of Tuesday. I went on the upper deck after the lights were made out, because I had been asleep in the fore cock-pit with a woman, and the lieutenant and the boatswain of the hulk came down and routed me out, because it was contrary to the rules of the service. I remained probably on deck 10 minutes or a quarter of an hour. There was no boat hailed whilst I was on deck. I saw the sentry on deck, but I do not know who he was. I did not expect the woman SCARROLL on board to me, because I had another girl on board at the time. I do not believe that ever she came alongside the ship that night, or inquired for me; if she had come I should have been called, as the sentries all know each other, and pass the word if anyone came and inquired for them. I do not know whether the woman SCARROLL knew there was a woman on board with me at that time. - John Pomeroy was next sworn, and stated the following:- I am painter of the Stromboli, and was on shore on the night that HONORA SCARROLL was drowned. I slept at the Globe, and was not out on the beach after 7 o'clock. I heard "murder" cried whilst I was in bed; it was about half-past 11 or 12. The Globe is close to the beach at North Corner, The cry was in a woman's voice and the sound appeared to me to come from the water. I know Davey. On hearing the cry I got out of bed, and opened the window and looked on the water, (the window faces the river), and whilst I was so engaged I heard the cry of "murder" repeated twice, very plainly; it was very clear the first time I heard it after opening the window, but the last time I heard it, it was faint. It seemed to come from about half-way between the Lively and the shore. It was blowing and raining at the time, and I could not see anything on the surface of the water, because it was so dark. There were two or three men on the beach, but I did not hear them talking; they were walking up and down. The first and second cries might have been a minute from each other; the third was quick after the second. - Davey was then asked by the Coroner if the woman sung out "murder," but he said there was not a word said by her. - Examination of Pomeroy resumed:- I thought first it was the cry of men fighting, but after lifting the window, I was sure it came from the water. There was a girl sleeping with me at the time, and she also heard the cries, and we mentioned it to the landlady in the morning when we came downstairs, before I heard a word about a woman being drowned. - Davey said that the two men, named Taylor and Hodge, who were working the same night, had told him that they had been to the Lively to inquire if the sentry had seen a boat. - Mr Bone said he understood the men denied ever having told him any such thing, but he would send an officer for them. - Henry Goodman Driscoll, waterman, was then called, and said:- I recollect creeping for the body of this poor woman, meaning SCARROLL, near the Lively on the Saturday after the woman was drowned, and while so engaged one of the marine-artillerymen said to the other man who was in the boat with me "it's of no use creeping there, the woman is further over here," pointing to the direction in which the woman was found, but he could not recollect the man's features. Bale was pointed out to him, but he said he could not tell if that was the man who spoke to them. - Joseph Bennett, waterman, on being sworn, said:- I saw Davey on the head of North Corner steps on the Tuesday night, at a quarter to 11, and helped to launch his boat with him, to take a woman off to the Lively, and saw the woman give Davey a handkerchief. I did not see Davey come ashore. I was up Cornwall Street talking to Wm. Allen, constable, when Davey came up. (This was denied by Allen, who swore most positively to Bennett's coming up behind Davey at the time when the first conversation on the subject took place between Davey and himself). Bennett then said I have forgotten altogether now what Davey said to Allen. - The Coroner: I do not know if you are aware of what the meaning of that oath is which you have just taken, nor do I believe that you think yourself it is reasonable for us as a Jury to credit you when you say that you have forgotten all about a subject like this, which has occupied the attention of so many, in fact of all, the people in that quarter of the town. - Bennett again said he had forgotten it altogether. - The Coroner:- Whether you have any regard for that book which you have just taken in your hand, it is impossible for me to say, or what your moral character or belief may be, would be equally difficult, but this I tell you, that the laws of this land punish, and that very severely, the crime of perjury. I tell you this because you might not be aware of it. Mr Bone then read part of his previous evidence over to him, in which he detailed a conversation which he said had taken place between Davey and himself; after which he said to Bennett, you are liable, I think, to be indicted for perjury, and if those persons who heard you say this, (referring to that portion of his former evidence which he had read) were to come forward and swear to it, you would be subject, on conviction, to very heavy consequences. It is not in the nature of things that you should forget such a subject, nor do I believe that you have done so. I do not ask you if you recollect the words, I only ask you if you know the subject. You must consider the Jury and myself the most arrant fools in existence to suppose that we shall believe you when you say you have forgotten all about it. I am sure you would not so far insult our understandings, even in your own mind, as to think we should credit what you have now said. I stopped short the last time I took down your evidence because I thought it was devoid of truth, and the manner in which you have come forward today has confirmed me in that belief. You gave on the other time of your appearance an account of all that the woman had said to Davey, and now you come and tell us that you have forgotten it all. I tell you again I do not believe you. - Mr Bone was interrupted several times by Bennett, who continued to say that he had forgotten all about it. - A Juror observed that it was a great pity such men were allowed to go unpunished, and that they were not treated in a different manner. - Wm. Farrall, alias Hodge, stated that he was at work at North Corner on the night in question, that he went to the quay with an officer of the Queen, but found that his boat was gone, but Davey's was there, hard and dry, as the tide had gone out and left her. With the assistance of his mate and the officer, he succeeded in launching the boat, and then took the officer to the Queen, and on their way back they called to the Lively, and on being hailed by the sentry, he asked him if "he had seen a boat pass by." He did not ask if a boat with a woman in it had been there. - Bryant, the Police Inspector, said Hodge told him he had never been near the Lively on that night, to which Hodge answered that he told Bryant he had not been there with any person. - The Coroner then said to Davey:- I ask you if there is any further statement you wish to make. The surgeon has stated that the woman did not die from drowning. You were the last person seen in her company, and you have related a story, which has been denied by several credible persons. I wonder that you seem so much annoyed at my saying that you were drunk; you have been seen by many persons to have been intoxicated, and the woman has also been proved to have been in that state on the night of her death. I mention this to you to show you the position in which you stand. It is not probable that SCARROLL had any large sum of money about her. She has been shown to be a person in different circumstances, and a very small sum which was seen in her possession by a person who was almost last in her company was found on her dead body. Anything further you may have to say I will take down, although you are not obliged to say anything. You have heard what has been said before, that you were both intoxicated, and there is a probability, that she may have fallen overboard when she was with you. I now ask you again if you have anything more to say? Do you persist in this statement which has been disproved by so many persons? - Davey: - I am confident of what has been stated, and that the woman was taken alongside the ship by me. - The Court was then cleared, and remained so for half-an-hour, and on our re-admission the marine Bale was again sworn, and subjected to a strict inquiry, but nothing further of importance was elicited; in fact, he gave his evidence throughout in a most creditable manner. - The Inquest was then adjourned to Tuesday, in order that Bryant might try to get some additional evidence from the policeman or sentries on duty that night relevant to the cries of "murder" deposed to by Pomeroy. Davey, in the meantime, being detained a prisoner. - Tuesday. - This morning the Jury again assembled at the appointed hour, and proceeded at once to hear the evidence which had been procured since their last meeting. The first witness called was George Bigg, a private in the 14th Regt., who on being sworn, deposed the following:- I recollect Tuesday, the 20th of October. I was on duty on the evening of that day, from 10 to 12 o'clock. I was sentry on the Gun-wharf guard, being stationed at the post on the wharf adjoining the north canal or basin, and close to the water-side. I did not hear any noise during that time, nor any cries of "murder." There was a boat with one man in it passed me about 11 o'clock. The man appeared to be asleep. He was not rowing, but had his hands on the paddles, and his head bent down on his hands. The boat was close to the outside of the wharf on which I was standing, and was drifting gently onwards in a direction towards Saltash, her bows pointing there. I did not speak t the man, nor did I see any other boat whilst I was on duty. There was a ship lying directly off from where I was standing, but I do not know what she is called. There was light enough for me to see the vessel. I did not observe anything going on board. I was in the sentry-box about half an hour when I went on duty, as it rained very hard at that time. - By the Jury:- I did not hear from any of the sentries on my return to the guard-house when relieved that they had heard any cries of "murder," or anything else particular. - Mr Tripe again made some remarks respecting the manner in which the deceased might have received the wound in the head. - Davey was then asked by the Coroner, at the request of one of the Jury, which side of the hulk he put the woman? - Davey said that he put her the port side, and that he was not hailed by the sentry until he was close alongside. He also stated in reply to a question put to him, that he did not hear any cries of "murder," nor anything like it, on his passage to or from the hulk. - John O'[Sullivan, sergeant of the 14th Regiment, examined:- I recollect being in the Gun-wharf on Tuesday, the 20th October. I was corporal of the guard, and put the sentries on their posts at 10 o'clock. I did not hear or see anything particular on the water that night. I heard no cry of "murder," nor was any such report made by either of the sentries of their hearing such cries, as it would have been their duty to do had it come under their notice. - William Taylor was then sworn, but his evidence was only a corroboration of that of Ferrall (which is given at length in our report of Friday's proceedings,) in that part of the latter's testimony which relates to their taking the officer on board the Queen, and visiting the Lively on their return to inquire for the boat they had lost. He stated in addition to the testimony of Ferrall, that he was standing in Cornwall-street after he came ashore that night, when Davey came up and related the circumstances attending the drowning of the woman in a similar manner to that in which he had related it to Allen. The witness did not know that Davey had quarrelled with SCARROLL, or with Susan Bartlett (the woman with whom Davey lives). - Mary McGee, alias Pomeroy, was next called, and gave an account of her hearing the cries of "murder," whilst in bed, as related by the man Pomeroy, the painter of the Stromboli. This woman, it may be stated, is the person who slept with Pomeroy on that night, and who passed for his wife. - Susan Bartlett was then sworn, and stated that she was coming out of the King and Queen public house, in Cornwall Street, on the night of Tuesday, the 20th of October, when she saw Davey and SCARROLL going down that street towards the beach. She went part of the way with them, and then wished SCARROLL, who was very drunk, "good night," and went home. Davey came home, she said, about 2 o'clock in the morning. - Richard Burrows was called to substantiate the evidence of Driscoll, which he did, but could not recognise in either of the men of the Stromboli, the person with whom that conversation was alleged to have taken place. - The Court was then cleared for the Jury to consider their verdict, and remained so for about an hour, after which they returned a verdict that "HONORA SCARROLL died from an external wound in the head, but how she received it there was no evidence to determine." Davey was then feelingly addressed by the Coroner and discharged.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 January 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - Child Burned to Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Union Inn, William Street, Newpassage, on the body of a little girl, between 6 and 7 years of age, daughter of a woman named YOULTON, who met her death on the previous day by her clothes taking fire. It appears that during the temporary absence of her mother, the child who was lightly clad, approached the fire, when its clothes ignited. On the mother's return she found her infant enveloped in flames. Having extinguished the fire Mr Barlow, surgeon, was instantly called, and very promptly attended; but, the poor child survived the accident but an hour. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 February 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - Accident At The New Government Works At Morice Town. - On Friday last a man named GOODMAN, whose duty it was to attend to the trucks used in conveying materials from one part of the works to another, by some accident got between two or these vehicles and was so seriously bruised that he died from the injuries on the following morning.

On the same day, whilst engaged in connection with the lifting of a large stone, a mason's labour named DEACON, was so crushed by the fall of the stone that he died shortly after. Inquests were held on the bodies on Saturday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Royal Naval Hospital, when "Verdicts of Accidental Death" were returned in both cases.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, on the body of MARY ANN WEDLOCK, a young woman of about 24 years of age, who was found dead in Castle-street, that morning. It appears that this unfortunate young woman, who had not arrived in Plymouth from the country more than about four months, was on Friday in company, drinking in one of the public-houses of Castle-street, with a marine and others late in the evening. She was taken to bed, being too much intoxicated to go herself, and in the morning was found dead beside her bedfellow. After a patient Inquiry, the Jury returned a verdict of - "Died through Excessive Drinking." This melancholy instance will, it is hoped, operate to deter others from indulging in similar excesses.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 February 1847
PLYMOUTH - On Tuesday morning, as one of the Plymouth Police was walking through Bedford Street, at about half past 6 o'clock, he saw a young man named FOOK, the son of MR FOOK, Tailor, of Saltash Street, lying on the footway. He took him up, and carried him to the Police station, at the Guildhall, and immediately sent for Mr B. Hull, surgeon, but before that gentleman had arrived, the "vital spark" had fled. It is said that he left home for the purpose of attending a prayer meeting at Stonehouse, but fell down on his way, and was picked up by the Policeman. An Inquest was held on the body before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the same day, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. The deceased was a fine youth aged about 17 years.

ASHBURTON - An Inquest was held at Colehouse Lodge, near this town, on Sunday week, before J. Gribble, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM ROWE, who was found dead in Stover Plantations. Deceased being troubled with short breathing, it is supposed he fell down and no one being near to assist the unfortunate man, he lay on the ground until he expired. He was found in the morning a lifeless corpse. Verdict in accordance with the above.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 February 1847
PLYMOUTH - Plymouth Guildhall. - MARY DOGHERTY was brought up charged with concealing the birth of a male child born on the 30th of December. Evidence was taken on the charge, but the Bench being of opinion that it was insufficient to maintain, it dismissed the woman with a caution. [An Inquest had previously been held on the body of the child, at which a verdict of still-born had been found.]

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - On Monday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Prussian Eagle Inn, St. James St., on the body of RICHARD NEWELL, who died on Friday last, from an injury received in the chest, a short time since, in H.M. Dockyard, by falling over a quantity of loose stones. After a full investigation of all the circumstances attending the fatal catastrophe, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 February 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, on Friday, on the body of a child named ROBERT WILLCOCKS, whose parents reside in Princess-street. It appeared from the evidence of the mother that she had administered to the poor little fellow a table spoon full of rum, as a remedy for a cold, and then put him to bed. On the next morning she found him apparently dying, when Mr L. P. Tripe, surgeon, was called in, but was too late to render any effective assistance. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr Tripe and other witnesses, returned a verdict that the child died from the effects of an overdose of rum administered by its mother for the relief of a cold.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, on the body of SENATER MALLARDINE, a fisherman lately belonging to the St Mary, a French boat, from Fecamp. It appeared that the unfortunate man fell over the Pier head early on the morning of the 26th ult., though his body was not discovered till the 17th February. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 March 1847
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Plymouth Coroner, on view of the body of SOLOMON PHILLIPS, a member of the Jewish persuasion, and an itinerant dealer, who travelled with various goods, and was found dead on the preceding day at his lodgings, at the Bunch of Grapes public-house. Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

STOKE DAMEREL - Another Accident. - On Friday last a melancholy accident occurred at the Newpassage Works, whereby a poor man named THOMAS MOYSEY met his death in a shocking manner. It appears that in the excavations for the steam basin the rubbish has to be drawn up in waggons by machinery, a height of forty feet, to the rails laid on the piles above, whence it is conveyed to the place of its deposit. On the above day the unfortunate individual was at work under where the waggon was ascending, when the machinery breaking, the carriage was precipitated to the bottom, falling on the poor fellow, and almost crushing every bone in his body. He was conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, where he lingered until early next morning, when death relieved him from his torture. An Inquest was held on the body, at the Naval Hospital Inn, at which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 March 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - Child Burnt To Death. - On Saturday morning last, a little boy, four years old, son of JANE NEWBERRY, residing in Prospect Row, Devonport, met his death by his clothes taking fire. His mother, it appears, is a vendor of fish, and on the day above named she locked him in her room in bed; but the child getting out of bed, took a box of lucifer matches to play with, one of which becoming ignited, occasioned the dreadful accident. An Inquest was held at Besley's Castle and Keys Inn, by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 March 1947
STOKE DAMEREL - Accident On The Keyham Works. - On Monday a man named Rashdall received several severe injuries by falling from the boundary wall, a height of 40 feet. - On the same day a poor fellow named MEDDOWS met his death in the following manner. A large stone was being lifted by a crane to a certain spot, when the chain slipped and the stone was precipitated to the ground, and falling on the man MEDDOWS, killed him on the spot. An Inquest was held the same evening, and a verdict in accordance returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident In The Dockyard. - An Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS ELLIOTT, late a smith in the employ of Mr J. E. Mare, iron-founder of Plymouth, who met his death under the following circumstances. He was on Wednesday engaged in the dockyard fixing some iron work, on the first floor of the building constituting the chain cable store, near the Camber, at an elevation of about 17 feet, when some portion of the scaffolding on which he was standing gave way, and he was precipitated to the ground. In all probability death would not have ensued but for one of the girders falling at the same time, and which, after glancing from the place where it first struck, fell across the poor fellow's body, causing instantaneous death. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 March 1847
EXETER - Death By Drowning. - A melancholy case of this kind occurred in Exeter on Tuesday. MISS ELIZ. ISHERWOOD, about 17 years of age, who it is understood has no parents living, but is in the care of an aunt, was placed from Bath, her previous place of residence, with the Misses Langsford, milliners, 235 High-street, to be instructed in the business. No cause is assigned for such conduct, but on Tuesday she left the Misses Langsford's house, was seen in her course towards the river, and it is said afterwards seen walking in the fields between head Wear and the Railway Stations, and in a short time the body was discovered and taken from the water, but the unfortunate young woman was dead. The body was taken to Cridge's Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-street, and an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at 5 the following day. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 May 1847
PLYMPTON - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the Guildhall Plympton, before Deeble Boger, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of BENJAMIN DREWE, aged 82, who was found dead in his bed on Sunday morning last, having destroyed himself by cutting his throat with a razor. - Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 May 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - Supposed Case Of Suicide From Drowning. - On Monday night last an Inquest was held at the Masonic Inn, Navy Row, by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, to Inquire into circumstances connected with the death of a woman MARY VEAR, aged 59, who resided in Navy Row, and who on the Saturday morning previous was found drowned in the Devonport Leat, near Mr Knowling's farm, at the back of Navy Row, near where the stream passes under the road leading from the Blockhouse to Keyham Bridge, called Magazine Lane. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had for about three months past been labouring, at times, under a slight mental derangement, and had on more than one occasion said she would destroy herself; but her manner within a few days previous to her death seemed to indicate an improvement in her mind. On Friday last she appeared quiet, calm and collected, and seemed much more comfortable than she had been for some time; and her husband, apprehending nothing to be amiss, retired to bed on that night a few minutes before her, leaving her with her daughter in the sitting room; but finding she did not come to him within a very short time, he came down from his bedroom after her, when he discovered to his utter astonishment, that she had left the room with the intention of proceeding to bed, and that she had slipped out of the house unnoticed. Of course an immediate and minute search was made for her, but nothing was seen or heard of her until the following morning, when Mr Giles, in the employ of the Devonport Water Company, discovered her body in the leat, in about 20 inches of water. The Jury, in the absence of direct evidence as to how the body came there, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - Charge Of Poisoning. - The inhabitants of Devonport were thrown into a state of great excitement on the afternoon of Thursday last, by the extensive circulation of a report that the crime of wholesale poisoning had been perpetrated at a beershop in Pembroke Street, in that town, called the Victory of China, which is kept by a person named Ackland. The report, we are sorry to say, had but too good a foundation, as will appear by the evidence below, from which it will be seen that one human being has been hurried to a premature grave, and that two others have very narrowly escaped the same fate. The person who has thus so unexpectedly been launched into eternity was named HENRY HUMPHREY GILBERT, late a Clerk-in-Charge on board H.M.S. Caledonia. - Suspicion rested on a person named Joseph Pedlar, a sick-bay-man on board H.M.S. Queen, at this port, in consequence of his having been drinking at the above house in company with the parties referred to, on the morning in question, but had left immediately the occurrence became known. Information was therefore given to the police without delay, and the prisoner was apprehended on the evening of the same day in Queen Street, by four watermen, who brought him to the Station House, where he was identified. - Next morning (Friday) the Coroner for the district, A. B. Bone, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Bamber, R.N., was the Foreman, assembled at the Queen's Head, Duke Street, for the purpose of investigating the particulars relating to this melancholy affair, the prisoner being present, in custody. The Inquest, after the swearing in of the Jury, was adjourned to the Workhouse, where the body was inspected and the case gone into. - Mr J. Beer, solicitor, of Devonport, attended to watch the proceedings for the prisoner. So much interest was excited, that a passage was with difficulty procured through the vast number of persons that had assembled around the Workhouse, Duke Street, during the hearing of the case. - Inquest On The Body. - Eliza Card, being sworn, deposed: I am a single woman, living at the Victory of China beer-shop, Pembroke Street. I did not know HENRY HUMPHREY GILBERT, the deceased, before Wednesday last. On that day I saw him at the Victory of China, in the tap-room. He was in company with a girl now outside the door, called, I believe, Ellen McMean. The girl lives in the house. Deceased was drinking a pint of beer; the girl was sitting with him by his side. After drinking the beer they retired to bed. They had been gone to bed three quarters of an hour when the prisoner, Joseph Pedlar, came into the room, asked for a bed for himself, and shortly after retired. I slept alone in the same room as the deceased. On the following morning, about half-past 11 o'clock, on coming into the tap room, I saw prisoner and deceased, the latter of whom the girl was with. The deceased and girl were sitting side by side; I was sitting by the fire. The deceased said: "Beat up the tambourine". He requested me to get a barber to shave him, which I did, and he was shaved. Prisoner had a pint of porter, and the deceased also had a pint of porter. There was a girl sitting by prisoner. The girl went out at the back-door, and remained out about two minutes; and directly she was gone outside, the prisoner put his fingers in his waistcoat pocket, pulled out something white, like powder, and put it into the glass of porter, and stirred it with the stem of the pipe he had been smoking. The glass of porter had been poured out just as the girl went out. On the girl's return, the prisoner asked her to drink; she took the glass, and I said: "Don't you drink, as he has put some white powder stuff into the glass." She put it to her mouth, and spat it out, and flung the remainder under the grate. I then saw white stuff at the bottom of the glass. When I said he put something in the glass, he said I was a b...... liar. I then went away up stairs for 5 minutes: on returning deceased was in the Tap-room, and also the girl. After the girl had thrown away the glass of porter, the prisoner called for another pint of porter, and had it brought to him. He poured out some more porter in the same glass. He took it over to the other side of the room to where the deceased was, and asked the deceased to drink; deceased took the glass and drank the whole of the liquor out of it. I then saw something white in the bottom of the glass. I am quite sure I saw something white in the bottom of the glass. I am quite sure it was the same glass that I saw the prisoner put the white powder in. The glass was never removed from the room. When deceased had drank, he returned the glass to prisoner, who then took it back to the table where he had been sitting before. The deceased still continued to sit where he was, and in about two minutes he said "you can't think how sick and sleepy I feel." He laid his head on the table, and remained about two minutes, and then fell down on the floor between the seat and the table. He appeared as if he had a fit and he apparently could not speak. His eyes were opened and fixed. I went over and tried to lift him up. He appeared to be swollen. I and others unbuttoned his clothes. The prisoner had not left the room before deceased first fell to the ground; and as there was something coming from his mouth, the prisoner said: "take him over a handkerchief, he is sick." Then the landlady said, "you must have been putting something in the beer;" and the prisoner said, "no, I have not put anything in it." When the prisoner said take over a handkerchief, he seemed quite calm, not frightened at all. The landlady repeated, "surely you must have been putting something into the beer." The prisoner then seemed alarmed, and said again that he had not put anything in it. The prisoner then walked out of the room. I then saw no more of prisoner until I saw him at the Town Hall. The deceased was then taken into another room, laid on a table and the doctor was sent for. He was senseless and froth came out of his mouth. He made a noise in drawing his breath, three or four times. The surgeons and the policeman came shortly after. (The surgeons were Messrs. C. Tripe, Little and Laity). They examined the deceased, and attended to him. I left the room when the doctors came. He was taken about half-past 11 or 12; but I cannot say exactly how long after that he died. The girl who had been sitting in the tap-room by deceased was not the girl that slept with him. The girl who slept with the deceased was the girl to whom the prisoner gave the glass of porter. I did not know either the prisoner or the deceased; had never seen either of them before. - By the Jury: When the prisoner asked the girl to drink, the deceased was in the other room, - the parlour. - By Mr Beer: Do not know the barber's name. I was not long absent. - By the Jury: Prisoner and deceased were both sober. - By Mr Beer: When prisoner put powder into the glass deceased, two girls and myself were present. - By the Jury: Did not see prisoner drink out of the glass after he gave it to deceased. He drank from the pint. - By Mr Beer: The deceased drank glasses of porter from both pints. It was a small glass. The prisoner brought over all the glasses to the deceased. The prisoner drank out of the pint, and the deceased out of the glass. - Inspector Cook, of the Devonport Police, was next sworn, and said: Last evening, shortly after 6 o'clock, I was on duty at the station house, when the prisoner now present was brought there by four watermen. They said "here is the man;" and I went over to prisoner and charged him with giving some powder to a gentleman, which had caused his death. He said "it is a serious charge," and appeared quite dejected and looked very wild. I said "I must search you." He was unwilling to be searched, but as I pressed him to let me do so, he took off his frock. I searched the waistcoat, but found nothing particular there. On searching the watch pocket I saw something white, a powder, and I then requested him to let me have the pocket; he consented. I then cut the pocket off, and wrapped it up in paper. I afterwards saw other parts of the pocket, and part of the trousers cut off by Mr J. Little, surgeon. I handed over the whole of this to Mr Tripe, surgeon. - Mr Tripe here produced the pocket and it was identified by Inspector Cook. - Mr Beer asked if Mr Tripe was prepared to say what the powder was. - Mr Tripe said he had subjected it to some tests, and was prepared to say that it was some preparation of morphia. - C. Tripe, Esq., Surgeon, was then sworn:- I was passing through Pembroke-street, yesterday, about one o'clock, or shortly before, when I was called and went into a beershop called the Victory of China. My attention was first called to a woman with her head on her knees, who was moaning and complained of sickness and pains in her abdomen. It was then stated to me that a man in the adjourning room was dying, and I therefore went into the next room, where I saw the deceased on his back, in a state of dreadful convulsion. His countenance was turgid and red; his eyes were protruded and fixed, and he was frothing at the mouth. The carotid arteries were beating violently and he was breathing hard and slow. I immediately divided a temporal artery, which bled freely and his condition appeared to improve; but all the symptoms continued. I sent the Policeman for other medical assistance, and shortly afterwards Mr Little and Mr Laity arrived. It must have been half-an-hour after I came before Mr Little and Mr Laity arrived. A stomach pump was then procured, and the stomach cleared of its contents. there was an ejection from the stomach of spirits of turpentine. We very soon lost the ground we appeared to have gained by bleeding, and there was no hope of recovery; but willing to leave no effort untried, we directed the application of mustard poultices to the calves of the legs. The contents of the stomach were placed in bottles and preserved. By this time it was three o'clock, and I then left deceased in charge of Mr Laity and Mr Little. The deceased then appeared to be dying. I saw nothing more; but about 6 o'clock in the evening, I received from Cook, the Police officer, the pocket and piece of cloth now produced by me. I have examined and tested the substance which was in the pocket. I applied to it nitric acid and on dissolving, effervescence was produced, and the colour changed from white to a brownish red, and then to a bright red, and after some time to yellow. These are admitted tests of the presence of muriate or acetate of morphia, and I therefore believe that the substance is muriate of morphia, or acetated morphia. The whole appearance of the case would lead me to believe morphia to be the substance administered. There is authority for saying that half-a-grain of acetate of morphia might destroy life; in that instance the patient was a lady in an ill state of health. I should think that five or six grains of the muriate of morphia might be taken up at a pinch between the finger and thumb and am quite satisfied that three or four grains would probably destroy life. I think that three or four hours would be the length of time required for three or four grains of muriate of morphia to produce death. - By Mr Beer: I do not say this powder is not mixed with other foreign substances. I think it the muriate of morphia as sold in druggists shops. - Examination in chief continued:- I have this day been in company with Mr Laity and Mr Little, and have made a post mortem examination of the body. The surface of the body was very livid. On removing the scalp from the cranium, a considerable effusion of dark coloured blood poured from every part. On moving the skull cap, the same thing occurred with the dura mater. On the removal of the dura mater, all the vessels on the surface of the brain were found distended with dark-coloured blood, and on slicing the brain, blood oozed out. The vessels throughout the brain and sinuses were distended in the same way. There was also some serum that ran out from the lateral ventricles. The lower part of the lungs were considerably congested. The heart was small, flaccid, and empty; the liver large and adhering to the viscera. Throughout the intestines there were highly inflamed patches. The stomach contained 2 or 3 ounces of fluid matter. The mucous coat was covered with striated vessels. The bladder was distended with urine. From the symptoms of deceased, the morbid condition of body, and the examination I have made of the substance contained in the pocket, I am of opinion that deceased died from the effects of one of the salts of morphia: acetate and muriate of morphia are salts of morphia. - By Mr Beer: I think from the appearance of the liver, that deceased was addicted to drink. Should not look for blood in the state it was, had death been the result of apoplexy. There are many reasons why I should not think that he died from disease. If I had found these appearances without any previous knowledge of the case, my mind would not necessarily lead to the conclusion that the person had been poisoned; but should certainly not have expected to have seen the coat of the stomach as it was found in this case. The patches on the surface of the intestinal canal might result from habits of intoxication. Muriate of morphia is administered instead of opium, as medicine. - By the Coroner: Found from 2 to 3 ounces of fluid matter in the stomach, which is in my possession, as is also the stomach. - Simon Saltyman: Having been sworn, deposed:- On yesterday afternoon, between four and half-past four, I saw prisoner in my shop in Boot lane. He offered to sell me his frock, and on my refusing, he offered to sell his jacket. He appeared quite dejected. I thought he came out of the way of police. Knowing of the accident, I asked if I had not seen him at the Victory of China, and he said "yes; I had some beer therein." I said why did you put powder into beer there? He said that "the b.... girls had served him out, and he had now served them out." He told me he was a sick-bay-man on board H.M.S. Queen; some customers came in, and he left the shop. Shortly after I saw the watermen bring him by on their way to the police station. The Inquest was then adjourned to seven o'clock. - The Adjourned Inquest. - Shortly after seven o'clock the Coroner and Jury again assembled, when the following witness was called:- Ellen McMean:- I live at the Victory of China beershop. I know the prisoner. I first saw him yesterday morning in the tap room of the Victory of China, about 8 o'clock. I was not there all the time steady, but I went in and out in the course of the morning. Prisoner had some porter. He poured out some into a glass, and was in the act of doing so when I came in, on one of those occasions of which I speak. Deceased was then sitting in another part of the taproom, opposite the prisoner. A young woman was sitting by his side. I do not know her by any other name than Catherine. There was no girl sitting with prisoner. Eliza Card was sitting by herself. After prisoner poured out the glass of porter, he said to me "Drink," and then handed the glass to me, which I took. Eliza Card then said to me: "Don't drink, for he has put something white in the glass, and you will be poisoned." I then spat out what I had in my mouth, and threw the remainder into the ashes. There was a particular tang with the porter - different from that which it usually has. After I had thrown away the liquor, I put the glass on the table, when I observed something white around different parts of the glass, inside as well as out. I afterwards saw a glass of porter in the deceased's hand, about 10 minutes after I had drank. I did not see him drink it. Soon after this I heard deceased say he felt very funny, and he had just drank a glass of porter with the prisoner; and in about two minutes after he appeared very drowsy. After that he went to sleep where he was sitting and then almost immediately fell on the floor, as we had not strength enough to hold him up. The landlady came in while the deceased was on the floor; and when she saw the girl was ill (who had been upstairs and come down again), and the man lying on the floor she said to prisoner: "You must have put something in the porter." Prisoner said he had not, and that he had been drinking out of the same glass himself. Before we had power to speak any more, prisoner left the tap room, going towards the door leading to the parlour, but I did not see which road he took; neither did I see him again until I saw him at the Town Hall. Deceased and prisoner were quite sober. I slept with the deceased the night before. I never saw the prisoner before yesterday morning. He did not complain of my having been with the deceased. He asked me if I had, and I said yes. - By the Jury: - The deceased was in the room when I threw the porter under the grate, but I do not think he saw it, as his right shoulder was towards the grate at the time. He might have heard the remark that was made. I could not swear that the glass the deceased drank out of was the one that the prisoner offered me, though I only saw one on the table. The deceased had a pint and glass. I did not see the prisoner drink out of the glass after I threw away the porter; he drank out of the pint. I did not see the deceased leave the room to be shaved. - By Mr Beer: The prisoner came down about 9 o'clock. It was about an hour after I came down that prisoner asked me to drink. He had two pints before that. Deceased had 7 pints of porter while I was there, but I cannot say what more he had. I sat by him part of the time. I saw him receive 7 pints, but I was away out of the room several times, and he had porter during my absence. He drank but little himself, - he gave away most of it. There was no man present but the prisoner and deceased, up to the time of the occurrence. It was about half-past eleven I heard the deceased say he was ill. I never saw the prisoner before yesterday morning, nor the deceased before the evening before. There appeared to be no acquaintance between the prisoner and the deceased. I asked the prisoner if he knew the deceased. He said no - he had never seen him before in his life. I spoke quite loud enough for any person in the room to hear. -- Mr Beer said he should be glad to ask Mr Tripe another question on the part of the prisoner and Mr Tripe having been sworn, he was asked if there was not a quantity of lymph on the brain. - Mr Tripe:- There was an exceedingly slight appearance of lymph, but so slight, that it would involve consideration as to whether it was not an extravasation of serum under the pia mater. My attention was not drawn to the appearance of an operation having been performed on the lids of the eyes, nor to a portion of them having been removed. Operations of this kind are not unusual. A disease of the eyelid itself, or causes which would produce a diseased action of the eyelid, would render such an operation necessary. Many diseases may occasion a dropping of the eyelid from relaxation, independently of the cause suggested. - Mr Beer here requested Mr Tripe to examine the body of deceased again, in order that his attention might be directed as to whether an operation had not been performed on the eyelids, to which Mr Tripe assented. - Mr Beer:- I understand as a general principle, that paralysis may be the consequence of dissolute living. - Mr Tripe: Any excitement of the brain would, in my opinion, produce paralysis. - Mr Beer: Then the dropping of the eyelid through paralysis, I understand, it not an unfrequent result of the same irregularity. - Mr Tripe then withdrew to again inspect the body according to Mr Beer's suggestion. - Mr William John Grogan, Assistant Surgeon of H.M.S. Queen, was then sworn. He said: I know prisoner. He calls himself Joseph pedlar. I have known him a few weeks. He was sick-berth attendant on board the Queen. The medicines for daily use of the ship are kept on shelves in the sick bay. Medicines are always kept in the dispensary and others in a chest outside the dispensary door in the cock-pit. Since the 15th of April, we have been in the Bellona hulk, where there is no medicine chest. Prisoner has had access to all the medicines. Since prisoner has been so employed in the ship and hulk, there has been muriate of morphia in the sick bay, to which prisoner had access, but I never missed any. Prisoner has seen me use the solution of morphia, also the powder, but he has never used the powder himself. He may have poured out some solution, under my direction, I never saw morphia in his possession. The powder is kept in a little bottle on a shelf. Somewhere about a fortnight or 3 weeks ago, he was reported for being drunk. Next morning I was speaking to him of being drunk, when he said he was not drunk, but that he had taken two drachms of the solution of morphia, which had made in the state in which he had been seen. The bottle containing the morphia was an ounce bottle. The strength of the morphia was about one-third of a grain to a drachm. I d---ed him ever to take any again or administer any or without the sanction of a medical man. - By Mr Beer: Prisoner knew nothing about medicine or its use. - By the Jury: He did not say, that I recollect, why he took it. - By Mr Beer: Morphia, and all preparations of opium, are commonly used in the navy in cases of delirium tremens; but since prisoner has been in the ship we have had no such a case. I may at the time have remonstrated with the prisoner for taking a double dose. I cannot state the exact words I used; but I spoke sharply to him for doing what he had no business to do. Two drachms would be a double dose. - Mr Tripe, stated that he had examined the eyelids, but there was nothing in their appearance to induce him to believe that an operation for ptosis had been performed. There was a cicatrice observable over the eye, which might have been caused by the puncture of a lancet, but the lid did not exhibit any signs of paralysis. matter sometimes forms - suppuration - which is not altogether unlikely in both eyes. - Kitty Husband, a girl living in Morice Street, was next called, whose statement was a corroboration of some of the former evidence, with the exception that she did not see the powder put into the glass. She saw prisoner take it from his pocket, but did not see what he did with it; nor did she see powder about the glass after the porter was drank. But there was a variation in her evidence from that given by Card, who stated that deceased was in the room at the time prisoner called her a liar. Husband strongly asserted that deceased was in the bar being shaved at the time. The girl Card was therefore recalled, and stated that the prisoner called her a liar on two separate occasions. Thus the apparent mis-statements were explained to the satisfaction of the Coroner and Jury. - Mr Coombs, Master-at-Arms, of H.M.S. Queen, stated that the conduct of the prisoner on one or two occasions had been strange and obstreperous. At one time he ill-treated a man who was very ill in the sick bay. He was taken on deck, and whilst there he was so outrageous that he was with difficulty prevented from jumping overboard; and at another time he was brought upon a charge of drunkenness, when he offered as an excuse that he was not drunk, but that he had taken some drugs, which had made him as he was seen, apparently drunk. - Keziah Cook, living at the Victory of China beer-shop, sworn:- I slept on Wednesday night in the same room with the deceased. On Thursday morning I went down into the tap-room between 7 and 8. Eliza Card, Ellen McMean and Kitty Husband were there, also deceased. About an hour after I came down, prisoner offered me the glass of porter, which I drank; and about half an hour after he asked me to take another - the same persons were in the room. I took the glass and drank the porter. It tasted very well when I first began to drink, but when I came to the last it was very bitter, hot in the mouth, and nasty. I said to prisoner: "You have put something in the beer - you have played the rogue with me." He smiled, but said nothing. Eliza Card said, "Yes he has; I saw him put something into the beer." I did not hear him say anything, but he laughed. Before he gave me the second glass of beer, he said "Do you see that officer?" meaning the deceased. Deceased was the only man in the room besides the prisoner. He said: "I'll have a lark with him, directly; I'll set him to sleep." About 10 minutes after drinking the beer, I felt very sick and giddy; I could not stand - I was obliged to take hold of the table to prevent my falling. After he gave me the first glass of porter, and before I had the second, we had a conversation, in the course of which he said he had no money. About half an hour elapsed between my drinking the glasses of porter. About half an hour after drinking the second glass, I was very sick, and brought off a good deal from my stomach. After that I felt myself better, but I swelled a little. I had a pain in my stomach before vomiting. I generally get some porter every day: and I am sure three glasses of porter would not make me sick, and I should be able to do my work after. I felt last night an itching of the skin. Great bunches of pimples, a sort of rash came out about my face and back; and there was a mist before my eyes. - The Coroner: Are these symptoms of morphia, Mr Tripe?: - Mr Tripe: Yes, sir. - Mr Beer: The pain in the stomach, Mr Tripe? - Mr Tripe: It is not an ordinary symptom, - the itching of the skin is. - Mr Beer (to witness): Did you not take the second glass of porter without being asked? - did you not lean over his shoulder and take it? - Witness: No, sir, He poured it out, and asked me to drink. - Mr Beer: What became of the remainder of the porter after you had the second glass? - Witness: I do not know. - By the Coroner: I did not hear prisoner say he had any ill will towards the deceased. I only heard him say he would have a lark with him. - By the Jury: After I had drank the beer, and when I charged prisoner with playing the rogue with me, deceased was in the room; but the girl beside him was playing the hurdy-gurdy. - By Mr Bone: Prisoner expressed no displeasure with me when I refused to go upstairs with him, because he had no money, but asked me to come on board the Queen to him on Sunday. I refused, saying I should not come until after Whitsuntide. Prisoner said "Well, when you come, you will know who to ask for." - Mr Beer: Did prisoner seem as if he had been drinking? - Witness: No, he was quite sober. - Inspector Cook here added to his depositions - that he was present when the decease expired, about half-past three in the afternoon. - The Coroner then said that he could not proceed any further with the case that night, as it was requisite that the contents of the stomach, and also the powder, should be analysed by a chemist, whose business it was rather than that of a surgeon; and for this purpose he would postpone the further investigation of the case until Thursday next (tomorrow), at one o'clock when the Jury will again assemble at the Board-room of the Workhouse. - The Inquiry was not adjourned until near 11 o'clock, and the room throughout the sitting was densely crowded. [It is understood that Mr R. Oxland, of Plymouth, practical Chemist is to make the analysis required by the Coroner and Jury.]

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 May 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - The Case Of Poisoning, In The District Of St. Stephens, Devonport. - The Coroner and Jury re-assembled at the Workhouse, on Thursday, by adjournment from the previous Friday, to further investigate the particulars touching the death of the unfortunate young man GILBERT. The Inquest, as our readers are aware, was adjourned for the purpose of allowing time for the analysation of the contents pumped from the stomach of the deceased man GILBERT, the stomach itself, and also the white powder found in the pocket of the prisoner Pedlar. The Jury having answered to their names, the Coroner called.... Mr Robert Oxland, analytical chemist, of Plymouth, who said: On Saturday last, the 8th instant, I received from Mr Tripe, surgeon, of Devonport, a black bottle, sealed with red sealing wax, and a stone ginger beer bottle, also sealed with red sealing wax. These vessels contained a liquid, which Mr Tripe informed me had been pumped from a stomach. I also received from Mr Tripe a white paper parcel, tied and sealed with red wax, containing a moulder white glass bottle - s sort of pepper bottle; likewise another paper parcel, tied and sealed as the other parcel, enclosing a piece of bladder, in which was another bladder, securely tied, containing a stomach. I also received another paper parcel from Mr Tripe, containing a pocket, marked with a capital letter C., a piece of white calico, which appeared to have been cut from the top of the pocket, and a piece of blue cloth, which also appeared to have been cut from the upper part of the pocket. The pocket contained a white powder. I commenced the examination of those matters with an analysis of the contents of the pocket. I turned the pocket inside out, and carefully removed as much of the white powder as I could. I found that it weighed 2 ½ grains, or nearly so. I proceeded to test it. I dissolved a portion of it in water, and applied nitric acid to it. I obtained a rich brownish red colour, which, on the addition of a further quantity of acid, passed into a yellow. Another portion of the powder dissolved in water I treated with per=chloride of iron, and obtained a dull dark blue colour. I also applied to another portion of the powder dissolved in water a solution of iodic acid, obtaining a brownish colour, and on applying to this liquor a solution of starch it turned to a blueish colour. The blue colour produced by per-chloride of iron, on the application of nitric acid, turned yellow. Another portion of the white powder I placed on platina foil. On the application of a low heat, the powder fused with a slight decrepitation into a reddish brown mass, which, on the further application of heat, took fire, and burned with a resinous flame. The continued application of heat dissipated the whole, by the conversion of the charcoal into carbonic acid. Another portion of the white powder dissolved in water I tested with nitric of silver, obtaining a white precipitate, insoluble in nitric acid. This last test indicated the presence of muriatic acid; the former test proved the presence of morphine. I thence infer that the white powder I have identified proved to be muriate of morphine. In order to obviate any doubt, I took a portion of muriate of morphine, and treated it in precisely the same manner with the various tests before mentioned, and obtained precisely similar results, comparing them as produced. I also examined the contents of the moulded white glass bottle. I evaporated this at a gentle heat, nearly to dryness, treated it with a small quantity of water, filtered it, and applied the tests as before, but without obtaining any indications of the muriate of morphine. The stomach I also examined. I digested it in water for about 24 hours, filtered the liquor thus obtained, evaporated it down to less than half a fluid ounce, and applied the tests in the same manner as before, but without obtaining any indications of the presence of muriate of morphine. There were in the stomach some portions of partly digested food, appearing to be meat of some sort, and whole peas, without their skins - very few, not more than three or four. I also examined the contents of the black bottle, and ginger beer bottle. I filtered the liquid, and evaporated it at a low heat slowly, until reduced to about half a fluid ounce, or less. I then subjected it to the following tests. On the addition of nitric acid to a portion of this filtered solution, I obtained a reddish brown colour, which, on the further addition of nitric acid, passed into a yellow. As the colour of the liquid obtained by the previous filtration was rather high, I filtered it through animal charcoal, and obtained a nearly colourless liquid. On the application of per=chloride of iron, I obtained a blue colour, which on the addition of nitric acid, was destroyed, the brownish red colour being produced, which, on the further addition of nitric acid passed into a yellow. To another portion of the filtered water I added iodic acid and solution of starch; and after a short time a blue colour was produced. From the results obtained by the application of those tests, I consider the presence of the muriate of morphine in the liquid contained in the bottles to be proved. I examined the piece of cloth which appeared to come from the top of the pocket, with a microscope and the appearance of white powder adhering to its surface was similar to the white powder contained in the pocket. - The Coroner: Did Mr Tripe at the time he delivered to you those matters which you have examined, inform you what it was suspected the deceased died of? - Witness: I had heard that a man had died of what was considered muriate of morphine. - Mr Beer: Therefore, I suppose your application was particularly directed to the search for muriate of morphine? - Witness: Yes. - The Coroner: On receiving the aforesaid matters, did you know that they were supposed to contained morphine? -= A: Yes, Sir. - Mr Beer: Is nitric acid considered the best test for discovering morphine? - A: It is not fair to say any is best, because one test alone cannot be relied on. - Q.: From which of these tests do you come to the conclusion that there was morphine in the solution contained in the bottles? - A.: Not from one alone, but from the whole. I omitted to mention that I also applied to the contents of the black and ginger beer bottles nitrate of silver, and obtained a white precipitate, insoluble in nitric acid - an indication of the presence of muriatic acid. Q.: Then I conceive you would not rely on the test of the iodic acid? - A.: Not alone. Q.: Nor on nitric acid alone? Witness: No. - The Coroner: On any of these tests alone? - Witness: No. - By the Jury: Was their sufficient muriate of morphine found to destroy life. A.: I cannot undertake to say, because the quantity found was small, but the presence of a small quantity in the stomach indicates that there has been a larger. - By the Coroner: The muriate of morphine is a very virulent poison. Half a grain has been known to destroy life, but in that instance the patient was a female in ill health. Q.: Do you think two grains would be sufficient to destroy life? - A.: The retention of life is an exception after taking that quantity. - Mr Beer: Has not muriate of morphine been known to be administered in a larger quantity, of from three to four grains, without producing fatal effects? - A.: Yes. But I can say that half a grain has been known to be fatal, and as much as 9 oz. of laudanum has been administered in twenty four hours without fatal effects. - The Coroner: Is that case the rule or the exception? - A.: The exception. - Mr Beer: Have you ever analysed porter? - A.: No. Q.: Have you not heard porter contains opium? - A.: It has been said that porter contains opium, but it has never been proved, that I am aware of. - The Coroner: (to Eliza Card), Was there any thing peculiar in the taste of the porter previous to the 6th of May? - A.: No, sir. Q.: Had the deceased any meat to eat on the morning of his death? - A.: He did not eat any meat or bread. - C. Tripe, Esq., (sworn) - On Saturday, the 8th, I received from Henry Bryant two bottles - a black and a ginger beer bottle, which on the same day I delivered to Mr Oxland, chemist. I at the same time delivered to him a piece of white linen or calico, in the form of a pocket, containing some white powder; and a piece of blue woollen cloth, which appeared to have been attached to the pocket. The woollen part also appeared impregnated with a white powder similar in appearance to the white powder contained in the pocket. I also delivered the stomach, which I removed from the body of the deceased, and also some fluid contents which I found in the stomach, and which I placed in the bottle. - Henry Bryant, Inspector of Devonport Police, deposed to having delivered to Mr C. Tripe the two bottles in question, which he received from Mr Laity, surgeon. - Mr R. J. Laity, Surgeon, said: On Thursday, 6th inst., I delivered two bottles - a black and ginger beer bottle - to Henry Bryant, containing the contents pumped from the stomach of the deceased. The stomach pump was used on the deceased by Mr Little and myself. The contents of the stomach were not out of my sight until after I had placed the same in the said bottles. I sealed the bottles and stamped them. I did not examine the stomach pump previous to using it. It belongs to and was in the use of Mr John Little. It was put into use immediately on being brought. - The Coroner here questioned Mr Oxland as to the probability, if the pump had lately been used for morphia, of any portion of it having been secreted in it previous to its being used for the stomach of the deceased. - Mr Oxland said there was a possibility, but no probability; as if there had any morphia remained in the pump, he should say, from the appearance of the contents of the stomach, it could not have been above the 1000th part of a grain. - Simon Saligman was recalled and interrogated as to his being positive that the prisoner said, on being questioned by him concerning the putting of the powder into the porter, " that the girls had served him out, and he had now served them out." He repeated his former statement, adding that the Superintendent of Police and Inspector Cook came to his house in search of prisoner, but that he did not mention the conversation to them at the time, thinking it of no use. - Mrs Ackland, wife of the landlord of the Victory of China, beershop, was next sworn. She said:- I never heard any angry words between the deceased and prisoner. I heard deceased say the day previous to his death that he did not like beer. We never keep laudanum in the house, nor do I know what morphine is, or keep it in the house. We never put carbonate of soda into the porter for the purpose of making it rise. On the morning of the day on which deceased died I heard him refuse beer, saying it would make him ill. [The remaining portion of her evidence was a corroboration of the statements of previous witnesses.] - Eliza Card recalled - The prisoner and deceased tossed for a pint of beer, not more than half an hour before the latter's death. They drank it together. - Mr Beer: Did you say the prisoner drank out of the pint the whole of the time? - Witness: Yes, Sir. - Mr Beer: Are you certain the prisoner did not drink out of the glass as well as the deceased? - Witness: I never saw him drink out of the glass. - By the Jury: About what time was it that deceased drank the porter that made him ill? - Witness: About half past 10. - The Coroner: How are you sure of that? - Witness: Because I went into the bar and looked at the clock. - The Coroner: How long after deceased had swallowed the porter was it before Mr Tripe came to the house? - Witness: About three quarters of an hour. - This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner said that if Mr Beer had any observations to offer on behalf of the prisoner he was then at liberty to do so. - Mr Beer said he would avail himself of the opportunity of offering a few general observations on the whole case, rather than direct particular attention to the evidence that had been adduced, which would no doubt be done by the Coroner in his summing up of the case to the Jury. They had first to consider what was the cause of the death, and he submitted with confidence there was no sufficient evidence before the Jury to say by what means deceased came to his death. He was supported in this view by the evidence of Mr Tripe, the only surgeon who had been examined, as to that part of the case. It was very clear from Mr Tripe's evidence as to the appearances upon the post mortem examination, - that they were such appearances as might have been presented if the person had died from apoplexy arising from natural causes. He had been well advised previously to the post mortem examination, that the appearances of a person dying from the effects of such a poison as the deceased was said to have taken, and those of a person dying from natural causes, were almost identically the same. He had, therefore, been perfectly prepared for the answer Mr Tripe had given; and he would invite their attention to it, as it seemed to him that a great deal in this case rested upon that answer. It appeared that the man had been leading a very dissolute life, - that he was labouring under a very dangerous disease, - that he was a very unhealthy person, - and that, associated with the appearances the body had presented in connection with the life he had led, there was almost sufficient to account for his death from natural causes, but for extrinsic circumstances to which he would by and bye allude. But he asked them to remember the starting point, - that all the appearances upon the post mortem examination might have existed when a party had died from apoplexy; and the next thing was, that the way in which the deceased had been living, rendered death by apoplexy a very natural result - it was exceedingly probable that apoplexy, by a rupture of one of the vessels of the brain, might have been produced. He would here take the liberty of saying, it was to be regretted there was no evidence that on the post mortem examination there had been a search for the rupture of a vessel, which was the ordinary case in apoplexy; but both the appearance of the brain and other parts of the body were adduced merely to show that the deceased had died from poison. He submitted that there was no evidence to show that the deceased had died from any but natural causes - the manner of life of the deceased presenting a predisposition to apoplexy. He reminded the Jury, that although Mr Oxland had stated there was muriate of morphine contained in the contents of the stomach which had been tested by him, he had not said there was sufficient to produce death. If Mr Oxland could have said that there was muriate of morphine found in sufficient quantity in the stomach to occasion death, as could be said in regard to arsenic, or any other mineral poison, then the hypothesis he had framed upon the evidence of Mr Tripe - that the man's death had been caused by apoplexy, produced by natural causes - would have been incorrect. Mr Beer illustrated this view of the case by some further remarks, and then proceeded to direct the attention of the Jury to another view of the case, namely: if it was admitted that the man died by poison, whether it had been administered by Pedlar; and referred to the evidence given by the last witness, which, if they could believe, went to prove that the prisoner had administered a deadly poison indiscriminately - and that, under the peculiar circumstances of the condition of the deceased, with him the effects were fatal. At all events, there was an end of malice, for the parties were strangers to each other, and dealt as friends down to the last period. If the Jury were satisfied that the deceased had died from the effects of the muriate of morphine, and that the prisoner was the party who administered it, then they must enquire as to what motive it was under which he had acted. - The Coroner suggested that that portion of the evidence relative to the prisoner saying he would have a lark with deceased, appeared to supply a motive. - Mr Beer resumed, and proceeded to state that there was not a particle of evidence to show that the prisoner had been actuated by malice; and the evidence as to wickedness, which had been referred to by the Coroner, he submitted that it was such, from the circumstances and character of the parties giving it, as ought to be received with considerable caution. He submitted to the Jury this one consideration: if the prisoner had acted through wickedness fully knowing that he had administered a portion of the drug - the virulent poison - the girl, was it likely that he should have said to her what had been stated? He believed the Jury would see that the statement of the prisoner was quite correct when charged with putting the powder in the porter, viz., "How can that be, for I have been drinking out of the same glass myself." If it was the desire of the prisoner to administer the poison, it would appear that it was to the girl, and not the deceased. There was no evidence of such intent, however, towards either party. They were all strangers to each other. Mr Beer directed attention to the evidence of the surgeon of the ship, as to what had occurred with respect to the prisoner's use of morphia on board. That was the third point. The prisoner might not have intended any injury to the party taking the drug. He only knew the result as far as his own personal experience went. There had been no indications in his own case that the drug would produce death. He would not have carried it openly about with him, if that had been his thought or intent. One could understand a dose of opium producing sensations of an agreeable kind. It was well known that it was frequently taken for the excitement which it caused; and was it not exceedingly likely, that knowing only what had been the result in his own case, the drug had been administered without the slightest intention of doing any injury, or the slightest idea that it could have that effect? If the substance had been laudanum or arsenic, this position could not for a moment be contended for. But this muriate of morphine was a thing about which people in general knew nothing. It was, he understood, a substance not long known to the chemist himself. The man had taken some himself, - it did not produce death, - it did not produce any feelings likely to create a belief that its effects could be fatal as far as himself was concerned; and thus had he been led to believe it could not in the case of another. Had the deceased been a healthy man, the result might have been altogether different. In conclusion, Mr Beer recapitulated the several points to which he had directed the attention of the Jury. - The Coroner then very ably and clearly addressed the Jury, saying:- The first and most material question for your consideration is, what has been the immediate cause of the death of deceased. On this point you have had very strong and clear evidence indeed, not only from Mr Tripe, but from Mr Oxland; and on that evidence it is for you to consider whether it is not made out, beyond any reasonable question, that the cause of the death of the deceased was muriate of morphine. Mr Tripe stated his opinion, as a medical man, that deceased died from the effects of muriate of morphine. Mr Oxland has examined the liquor which it has been proved came from the stomach of the deceased, and he says that the liquor contained muriate of morphine beyond all question. Muriate of morphine was also found on the person of the prisoner; and it has been shown to have been on his person at the time the transaction relating to the death of the deceased took place; therefore it will be for you to consider whether or not the cause of death did not arise from the muriate of morphine. You must then inquire, how came muriate of morphine into the stomach of the deceased. You have had evidence that Pedlar and deceased were in this beershop together; and you have also had evidence that Pedlar put his finger and thumb into his pocket and that he dropped some powder into a glass or porter, and then gave it to a girl to drink, who immediately after became ill, and very soon evinced symptoms of having taken muriate of morphine. You have also heard that into this same glass was put a quantity of porter by the prisoner, which he carried to deceased, who drank it, and immediately exhibited symptoms of poison, and shortly after died. It will be for you to consider what was put into the glass by the man Pedlar, - whether it was not muriate of morphine - and whether the administration of it to the deceased was not the cause of his death. With respect to the motive with which it was administered, Pedlar himself appears to have supplied the motive, for it had been sworn that he said he would have a lark with the deceased individual, and that he would put him to sleep; and the question is whether any possible doubt existed as to the person who administered it, and what intention there was in its administration. The principal point to which I expected the advocate would have drawn your attention was as to whether there was any evidence in support of malice, which would make out the most serious offence; or whether this is, on the contrary, only a case of manslaughter. If you should believe that the deceased died from the effects of the muriate of morphine, and that it was administered to him by Pedlar, the next question is, did he administer it with any malicious intention, or for the purpose of having a lark (as he himself expressed it) or did he administer it without knowing and without believing that it would have any prejudicial effect. If a man should use an instrument against another, or administer anything with an intention of causing grievous bodily injury, he is guilty of murder. But if he use such instrument or administer the same thing, with an idle motive, conceiving that the effect it would produce would not be prejudicial to the health of the person to whom it was administered, though at the same time it put the life of the individual in jeopardy, he would, by the law, be guilty of manslaughter. But if you should believe that this man did not know what he was dealing with a dangerous thing, and that he did not know the dangerous consequences which would arise, then it will be for you to return a verdict of accidental death. With regard to Pedlar being aware of the noxious quality of the drug, you must consider that he was sick bay attendant, and, as you have heard by evidence, he had taken the powder before, which had produced certain effects; and he had also been warned concerning it by the medical man - [Mr Beer: - That was the solution of morphia.] - So it was; but here was a sick-bay attendant, who had something to do with medicines and had tried a medicine himself of a similar character to the one referred to. In the first place, then, have you any doubt as to the death of the deceased being caused by the muriate of morphine, and as to Pedlar's administering it? - If not, then the question for your consideration will be the motives which induced him to administer it. If you are clearly of opinion that he was ignorant of the injurious nature of the drug, then it must be a question of whether this is or not a case of accidental death. If you believe there was any feeling of irritation; if prisoner had any ill will towards deceased, and if he intended to exercise that ill will, and that he administered the morphine for the purpose of producing grievous bodily injury, then he has been guilty of murder. But if you believe it was a mere idle wanton, wicked act, and that prisoner knew the stupefying effects it would produce, then the question arises: is not this a case of manslaughter? A man has no right to put the lives of his fellow creatures in jeopardy by an act of negligence or carelessness; and if you believe that Pedlar has been guilty of any act of wantonness by which he has caused the death of the deceased, the crime then amounts to manslaughter, and it will be your duty to return a verdict to that effect. After the Coroner had gone through the evidence, remarking on it as he proceeded, the Court was cleared for the consultation of the Jury, who, after about 10 minutes' deliberation returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Joseph Pedlar, for having administered to the deceased a quantity of the muriate of morphine. - The Foreman of the Jury remarked that before separating, the Jury were desirous of expressing their strongest disapprobation of the manner in which the "Victory of China," and houses of a similar character, are conducted. They desired that the coroner would communicate their sentiments to the Magistrates. - The Coroner said his opinion was the same as that of the Jury, that the conduct of the person who kept the house was deserving the severest censure; but he regretted that his official duties in this case ended with the reception of their verdict. - Mr Tripe said that he wished it to be understood that the responsibility of the conduct of the landlord of the Victory of China, or any other house, did not rest on the Magistrates of this borough, unless the parties were brought before them. The Watch Committee were the persons to whom a representation should be made; and he knew if they were applied to they would interfere. - The Coroner expressed himself desirous that the views of the Jury should be made known; and he believed this would be the case, through the press, seeing its representatives present. Anything might be done by the Jury themselves, but in his official capacity as Coroner he could not entertain the subject, it having nothing to do with the Inquest. - The prisoner Pedlar was then committed on the Coroner's warrant, to take his trial at the next Devon Assizes, and the witnesses having entered into recognisances to appear against him, the Jury departed.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 May 1847
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Friday morning, as MR RICHARD VERRAN, master of a merchant vessel, was walking through Princess Square, he dropped down and expired almost instantaneously. An Inquest was held on the body before J. Edmonds, Esq., the same evening.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 June 1847
TAVISTOCK - Suicide. -On Thursday last, the domestics of the house of E. FERNIE, Esq., Abbey Bridge, who with his lady is in Germany, were greatly alarmed on finding MRS MARGARET DUNLOP, the mother of MRS FERNIE, in the water closet, quite dead, who had cut her throat with a razor. According to the evidence given before the Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., and a respectable Jury, it appeared that the deceased had, for a considerable time prior to having committed the fearful act, been labouring under aberration of mind. Verdict, "Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 July 1847
CORNWOOD - An Inquest was held at Cornwood before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a double Jury, on Saturday last, on a young woman, aged 17 years, named MARY SANDOVER, the daughter of MR JOHN SANDOVER, a blacksmith, and farmer of Cornwood, near Ivy Bridge. It appeared that on the previous day the deceased and some of the family were engaged to go to the house of a relative in the parish to a sheep-shearing feast - the deceased wished to wear her best gown, which her mother refused to allow. This produced much mortification and displeasure on the part of the girl, who cried and said she would not work hard and not be allowed to do as she pleased, and presently afterwards quitted the house. About two hours subsequent she was found suspended by the neck by a rope to the beam of her father's shippen, near the house, dead. It was deposed by one of the witnesses, that about a fortnight ago the deceased appeared absent and strange, and she said she was very nervous, and could not tell what ailed her; and other witnesses declared that she had for some weeks appeared low spirited and absent. The deceased's bodily health was generally good, and she was usually cheerful and was a well conducted and good tempered girl. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, among other remarks, stated that all persons were considered responsible for their conduct, until evidence was adduced to the contrary - that mere despondency and depression of spirits were not to be confounded with insanity; and that if they believed the deceased to have rashly and inconsiderately destroyed herself under the influence of an impulsive feeling of mere mortification and disappointment, arising from her being prevented from indulging her wish to wear a particular dress, or from any other circumstance of this kind, they would find a verdict of felo de se; that some persons conceived the act of suicide, in itself, denoted insanity, but that the law did not recognise such an opinion; they would, therefore, consider all the circumstances of the case and the evidence, and if they considered any insanity to be proved, they would return a verdict accordingly; but if they thought such proof had not been adduced, their verdict should be felo de se. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport, on Monday, before Mr Bone, and a respectable Jury, upon the body of MARY ANN CHESIL, daughter of JAMES CHESIL, scavenger. It appears that on Saturday she went to the well to draw some water, and after having drawn it she was fastening the crock with which she had dipped the water to the rail, over the well, when she fell in. She was seen by a woman named Elizabeth Lavers, who directly she saw the catastrophe, ran down stairs and tried with a boat hook to catch her clothes, but could not; but a man who shortly after came, fastened a stick to the boat hook, and succeeded in dragging her up. She was quite dead; prompt assistance was obtained, but to no purpose. The deceased was about 10 years of age. Verdict "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by J. Edmonds, Esq., at Prince Rock, on the body of a child aged 7 years, named JOHN GOARD, who on the preceding day, whilst riding in one of the Dartmoor Railway stone waggons of which his father was the driver, gave the shaft horse a bow with the whip, his father being at the moment employed shifting the points a few yards off; the animal sprang forward and with the jerk, the poor little fellow was thrown from the front of the vehicle on the railway, and the fore wheel went over his body. He was immediately taken up by a man who was working close to the spot, and placed in the arms of his distressed father, when he merely uttered "Oh my!" and died instantly. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 August 1847
STOKE DAMEREL - Infanticide, and Verdict of Wilful Murder Against the Mother. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Laira Inn, Laura Green, before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Commodore Brucks, of H.E.I.C.S., was chairman, upon the body of a new born male infant, who came to its death under the following circumstances:- Mrs Ann Chesterfield deposed that she had resided at Laira during the past twelve months, and that she had a servant in her employ named ELIZABETH LAKEMAN, who had been living with her for the space of five months. About a month ago LAKEMAN appeared to be with child, but being questioned on the subject she gave no reply. On Saturday, however, she expressed a wish to go home, but witness refused to allow her to do so, as she intended to go out herself on the following day. On Saturday night she retired to bed between nine and ten o'clock; she then looked well and was cheerful, but she soon after came down stairs, and complaining that she was in pain, went towards the privy. She afterwards undressed and went to bed, but five or ten minutes afterwards she came down again; she only had on her night dress and an under petticoat over her shoulders. She went a second time into the court, where she remained about five or ten minutes - it might be ten; she came in again crying. Witness asked her what was the matter, more than once, but she made no reply. She went up stairs, and witness following her, said "ELIZABETH, what have you been doing?" She replied that she was taken unwell. One of her hands was covered with blood, and part of the sleeve of her dress was stained with blood. As she got into bed witness again said, "ELIZABETH what have you been doing?" to which she replied, "I cannot tell you Mistress - I cannot tell you," and began to cry. Witness then went to the privy; she saw no blood about the place, but looking down the privy she saw a new born child in the soil. She could see its face above the surface of the soil. She heard the child cry and she then called Mrs Jones and showed it to her, and sent for Mr Eccles, who came in about three quarters of an hour after - the child was permitted to remain there until Mr Eccles arrived. After speaking to Mrs Jones she went up to ELIZABETH, and said to her, "You have done a bad deed," when she burst into tears, but did not make any answer. She afterwards said, "I know I have done wrong. I ought to have told you of it." The child lived until three o'clock on Tuesday morning; it ate heartily of gruel at 11 o'clock. - By the Jury: At the time prisoner went out into the courtlage the blood was not on her hand or sleeve - she had told witness that she had had a child before, which she had seen; and it was about six years old. Witness found some clothes prepared in her box, and as soon as the child was washed &c., it was dressed. The child died on Sunday. On Saturday, up to the time of going to bed, LAKEMAN did her work cheerfully, singing songs. She was 23 years of age. - Mr J. H. Eccles, surgeon, and the woman Jones, who had been engaged by Mrs Chesterfield to attend to a sick child, were the only other witnesses examined. The evidence of the latter was merely corroborative of that given by the first witness. Mr Eccles deposed as to the state in which he found the child, on removing it from the place where it had been deposited, and ascribed its death to the exposure it had undergone. - After consulting for some time, the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against ELIZABETH LAKEMAN, accompanying their verdict with the following remarks:- "In finding the above verdict, the Jury feel bound to state their conviction, from the evidence before them, that had the child been removed from the privy when it was first discovered, instead of being left for two hours, it would now have been living; and the Jury feel it their duty to remark upon the gross neglect exhibited by the parties who had that knowledge." An order was immediately made out for the committal of the prisoner.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 September 1847
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - A melancholy suicide was committed on Wednesday last, by a man named PHILIP BRASSCOMBE, who was employed as overseer by Mr C. Tanner, tanners, Portland Square. The deceased was about 35 years of age, was found on Wednesday hanging in a stable. The deed had evidently been premeditated, for a ladder had been dragged from underneath to the loft above where the corn for the horses is kept, and placed right across the opening in the flooring through which persons ascend. He had then procured a small rope, tied it to one of the steps in the ladder, let himself down through the hole, and there was suspended, until the groom going through the passage found him and cut him down. His coat was found at side of the hatch, along with his hat, in which his neckerchief was placed, thus having apparently taken every precaution to ensure the completion of the awful deed. He left his lodgings in Tavistock-road at six o'clock that morning, and went to the tanyard, not being seen until 12 o'clock, when he was found by the groom hanging as described. His manner for some time past had appeared exceedingly strange, and had been remarked that morning. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth, and by adjournment on Thursday, when the above facts having been deposed to, the Coroner summed up the evidence, and the Jury remained a long time in consultation, but were finally discharged without being able to agree upon a verdict. We believe that eleven of them very properly considered that quite sufficient evidence had been adduced to justify a verdict of Temporary Insanity, but the remaining three entertained a very different opinion, and the result is, that a new Jury has to be impanelled. On Friday evening accordingly a new Jury was sworn, and the whole of the witnesses having been again called, and their evidence taken, the both juries retired to consider their verdict, and about eleven o'clock returned an unanimous verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

STOKE FLEMING - Fatal And Shocking Accident. - MR EDWARD DINGLE, of Woodbury, in the parish of Stokefleming, having lately built a house for an inn, near Dartmouth,, and let it to Mr Heath, of Bugford, attended with Mr Heath at the sessions at Morley, on Monday, the 6th instant, to procure a licence for it. They rode together in MR DINGLE'S gig, drawn by Mr Heath's horse. On their return they called at the public house at Hemberpost, Mr Heath getting out of the gig, but MR DINGLE not quitting it. MR DINGLE drove off alone, and Mr Heath followed on foot, expecting soon to overtake him. However, after going some distance and not perceiving the gig, he became alarmed and seeing some persons before him, called to know if they had seen a gig. Among these persons were MR DINGLE'S daughter and niece, Miss Kerswell, and on this inquiry the truth flashed across the mind of MISS DINGLE, and she replied in agony, "My father is dead." It is supposed that MR DINGLE fell asleep in leaving the Hember-post, and the horse, instead of proceeding towards Woodbury, turned into a lane leading to Bugford, where it belonged, and attempting to pass over a narrow bridge, only adapted to foot passengers or saddle horses, the gig was overturned. MR DINGLE'S head came in contact with a stone and his skull was fractured. One of the shafts being broken the horse ran away, leaving the gig where it fell. MISS DINGLE and Miss Kerswell were returning from Blackauton, and passed the spot just after the accident happened. They saw the gig and a man lying against the hedge, but, not knowing who it was, were hastening to procure assistance when encountered by Mr Heath. Their feelings may be conceived. An Inquest was held on the body the following day, when the verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. MR DINGLE was 65 years of age. He was buried at Stokefleming on Friday last.

STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, the Barnstaple Inn, Princess Street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a respectable Jury on the body of JOHN MOORE, an excavator at the New Works at Morice Town. The Coroner having sworn the Jury, made a few remarks on the frequency of accidents upon the works and his pain and regret at their many fatal results; and pointed out that it was the duty of the Jury to discover if the death of the deceased proceeded from pure accident or from neglect. The Jury then viewed the body, after which the witnesses were called. James Tucker deposed that he was on the works with JOHN MOORE and others on Wednesday, at ten o'clock in the morning; they were at work in the north dock on a shelf 17 feet from the surface of the ground, and 5 feet above the bottom of the gullet where the bores for explosion of rock were made. the man who set fire to the charges gave the signal word "fire," when all the men moved off, he and the deceased going about 50 yards away and standing for shelter behind the rock they had been excavating upon. About ten minutes elapsed between the alarm and the explosion, when a piece of stone 2lbs. 10oz. in weight fell from a height of 40 feet, to which it had been thrown, upon the head of the deceased, who immediately fell down, and without speaking died from the fracture of his skull. He (the witness) was sure it was not the result of negligence nor in caution. Two other navigators who were then examined agreed in this opinion. Thomas Tozer, on being sworn, said he had set fire to the charge, the explosion of which had caused the death of JOHN MOORE. Previous to lighting the charge he gave the alarm, and between the lighting and the explosion, there was sufficient time for all near to find shelter. In answer to a question, he said there were many docks or excavations in either of which explosions might take place, or in several at the same time, and the stones from one dock do sometimes fall among the men of another, thus placing them in some danger, especially as the only intimation the workmen in one dock could have of a "fire" in a contiguous one must be conveyed by those who happened to be between the two places, and could pass the alarm. He thought there ought to be a watchman for every dock to give proper notice of explosions. The Jury, after considering the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but conveyed through Mr Bone a suggestion to Mr Hillis, the overseer of the works, that there should be a signal made before explosions, such as the ringing of a bell, and to prevent the men mistaking whence the sound came, a flag should e hoisted at the same time. Mr Hillis, thanking the Jury for the hint, promised it should be attended to on Saturday. The deceased was a young man of 25 years of age, and has left a wife and one child. His wife is very ill from the fright.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 October 1847
KINGSTEIGNTON - An accident of an awful and fatal nature occurred in this parish on Thursday last to MR SAMUEL WHITEWAY, of the firm of Whiteway, Watts and Co., bankers of the Newton Bank. By the evidence given at the Inquest held on the following day before Mr W. A. Cockey, Deputy Coroner of Ashburton, and a respectable Jury, it appeared that the deceased, with Mr William Watts and Mr Whidborne, was shooting in the Preston Woods, on Thursday afternoon, and that the deceased after firing two or three shots from the right barrel of his gun, in re-loading it, the left barrel which he had not discharged during the day, by some means went off, and the contents entered his left cheek and lodged in the unfortunate gentleman's head, causing instantaneous death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was highly respected and only 37 years of age.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 October 1847
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Yesterday week, MR HENRY HALLIDAY, master of the trawling sloop, Collingwood, of this Port - while at sea on board his vessel, about seven miles inside the Eddystone, was suddenly taken ill and in a few minutes expired. The sloop was immediately taken into the Port, and the body landed on the following day. An Inquest was held on the remains by J. Edmonds, Esq., at the Guildhall and the above particulars having been deposed to, a verdict was returned of Died by the Visitation of God. The deceased who was about 30 years of age, was a respectable man in his sphere of life - and his very sudden death, affording as it does, a striking proof of the uncertainty of human life, has thrown a gloom over those engaged in the Fishery of the Port.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 December 1847
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon as a man named GILBERT, about 70 years of age was looking at the workmen pulling down the houses in King Street, Plymouth, for the purpose of building the arch forming the viaduct of the South Devon Railway, suddenly a portion of the side wall of the house, in which deceased had formerly resided, fell upon him, and the unfortunate man immediately expired. He was immediately taken to his residence to await Coroner's Inquest.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 December 1847
YELVERTON - Yesterday a Coroner's Inquest was held, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at Yelverton, upon the remains of CAPTAIN HAMBLY, of Maristowe Cottage, who on Sunday evening was thrown out of his carriage, while passing near Roborough Down, and was unfortunately killed, the verdict "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 January 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Monday, before Mr Bone, Coroner, at the Queen's Head, Duke street, on the body of a child named HENRY EVENS, who met with his death while playing with the fire, the deceased was only three years and a half old. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 January 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday morning at the Cross Keys, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, upon the remains of a labourer named FRANCIS HOOPER, lately living in Church-street, whose death appears to have been remotely occasioned by blows received on the Monday succeeding Christmas day, while in the midst of a drunken brawl, which too often occur in public-houses during the holiday time. The deceased died on Saturday morning. It appeared from the evidence of Mr R. J. Laity, the surgeon who attended him, that when he first saw the deceased his eye was much marked and his fore-arm swollen and causing much pain; he attended him until Friday night when erysipelas was quite apparent. On Saturday the deceased having died, he made a post mortem examination, and found the viscera generally very healthy, the lungs and heart were in the same natural condition, but there was strong adhesiveness between the plura and the ribs. The skull was not fractured but presented evidence of strong inflammation, which might have been occasioned by the erysipelas of the arm, which was in a mortified state. During the last two days of his life the typhoid symptoms had been developed. Blows or punctures might cause erysipelas, and in the opinion of the witness a bruise on the arm had brought on the erysipelas which had terminated the life of the deceased. - Thomas Hocker, driver of a post chaise, was next examined; he was in the tap room of the Cross Keys, on Monday, 27th December last, about 8 or 9 o'clock the deceased and another man named Andrew Paine came in, he saw the deceased and another man called Joseph Thomas talking, as he thought, angrily; did not hear what they were saying, but in a short time saw the deceased, who was not sober, place a young man named Gould to guard the door, and immediately take off his upper clothing to his shirt, and walk over to Joseph Thomas who was sitting, and commenced fighting with him; they fought about four rounds, the deceased was so drunk he could not stand against any man, and was knocked down almost directly he rose. Mr Pearn was in the room at the beginning of the fight, and said he would have no fighting there, but he was called away; there were near twenty men in the room. The witness fearing the deceased would be killed, went out in search of a constable, but could not get one, on returning, the fray had ended; the shirt of deceased was in rags; he took him home after putting on his clothes; the eye of the deceased was cut in the first round. - ELIZABETH HOOPER, wife of the deceased disposed he came home tipsy on Monday, after Christmas day, about 11 o'clock. He did not complain of pain until Thursday, when she applied a poultice to his arm which was red, and swollen badly, on Sunday she called a surgeon, the skin was knocked off his arm; he was always very healthy before this occurred, he had a black eye when he came home. - Andrew Paine, a labouring man, aged 25, was, on the Monday in question, in company with the deceased, he set out with him at 8 o'clock in the morning to keep a holiday, they went into the Cross Keys and drank a quantity of beer, from thence they walked to Devonport, and there again took some liquor; after that they went to Plymouth, and they being thirsty they took a quart or two more. From Plymouth they sauntered on to Mile-house, where at the time they again partook of their favourite beverage, in this inn the witness took the office of waiter, and although he saw a quarrel between his companion and a man, he did not know the cause of it, but Thomas and the deceased were parted, then the latter shortly after accompanied him (witness- to Stoke, the time being about 8 o'clock in the evening. - Henry Jago, in his evidence, in addition to a portion of the above, said he heard an altercation between the deceased and Thomas about an old grievance between them. Thomas said stand up and I'll show you what I'll do with you." HOOPER (the deceased) stood up, and was seized by the collar by Thomas, and he "struck a toe" at him and threw him over two chairs; witness interfered, and the matter seemed arranged amicably, and witness left the room afterwards they scuffled again, but witness knew nothing more of them after they left the Mile-house Inn. - John Couch, a labourer, was examined. He had throughout the day been in company with Joseph Thomas, but contrary to deceased and his friend, they had taken a walk in the country, and in the evening, after having taken several quarts of cider, "just enough to make them feel it," they dropped into the Milehouse Inn, there the witness sat near Thomas and HOOPER, the latter of whom began aggravating Thomas by reference to some old grievance between them. He at length saw a scuffle take place between the two, when both fell on some chairs. HOOPER was the least sober. The landlord came in and raised HOOPER and he (witness) took away Thomas into another room, and left the inn about 9 o'clock for their homes; when they came into Tavistock-street, they, with two friends, went into the Cross Keys to take a parting pot, when they were seated, they saw HOOPER sitting near them, who said, "Here is the ------ I wish to fight," but one of the four the witness was with offered HOOPER their pot of beer. HOOPER took it and drank, and then went over to Thomas and shook his hand, and then returned to his seat as if it was made up; but not long after witness saw he was stripped, and swearing he "would have it out." Thomas said he thought they had shaken hands, and with that the deceased walked to Thomas and struck him in the mouth, when they closed and both fell, they were helped up. Witness remained sitting, and only saw two blows struck, the first above mentioned, and which fell on HOOPER'S face. They dragged one another about a little after that and then parted; Thomas and witness quitted the room, leaving HOOPER naked to the waist. - James Davis, a coachman, was next examined. He had heard HOOPER challenge Thomas to fight; HOOPER was tipsy, but he (witness) tried to induce Thomas to go away, but he would not. - Samuel Cox was present, saw HOOPER with a black eye and blood over his mouth, but could not say which had the best of the scuffle. - The examination which lasted from 10 o'clock to ½ past four, was adjourned till yesterday, at 5 o'clock in the evening. - Joseph Thomas, had been detained under a warrant, and as the nature of the evidence demanded that he should be further kept in custody, he was taken charge of by the police officer's present. - Last evening the Inquest was resumed, when after the examination of several other witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Joseph Thomas, expressing at the same time their belief that great provocation had been given by the deceased.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 February 1848
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Effects Of Intemperance. - An old man named PASSMORE, a porter residing in Plymouth, died last week from the effects of being run over whilst in a state of intoxication, by the Era omnibus on Stonehouse Hill. An Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 February 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Suicide. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, at Weakley's Hotel, Fore-street, upon the body of ROBT. WEAKLEY who was on Sunday morning found dead in his bedroom, being suspended from the post of his bed. - The first witness examined was MISS EMMA WEAKLEY, granddaughter of the deceased, from whose evidence it appeared that on Sunday morning about 10 o'clock she went upstairs to her grandfather's room and opened the door expecting to find him in bed, she went to the bedside and discovered him hanging from the bedpost, she immediately ran out of the room and gave the alarm. Her grandfather had been attended by Mr Crossing and had taken some tea at half-past seven on Sunday morning, which had been carried to him by the bar-maid, who was the next witness called. - Mary Cowlyn said: I am bar maid of WEAKLEY'S Hotel. I have been so for 7 months, I went to the chamber of the deceased yesterday morning about half past seven. I took him as is customary a cup of tea. He said he was very poorly. He asked how MISS WEAKLEY was, and said "poor soul I am sorry for her," on hearing she was poorly. The door was not fastened. He told me to bring his clean linen when he should ring the bell. I quitted the room and heard no more of him until MISS EMMA WEAKLEY came down stairs shrieking and crying. She ran into the bar to Miss Collings and I went to the kitchen. I have seen the deceased every day for several months, I have noticed something strange in his manner and demeanour. He would walk about looking melancholy and talking to himself. It did occur to me before this happened that he could not be in his right senses. He usually got up to breakfast about 8 o'clock. His health has been ill for a long time. - Martha Dench was next examined. She said: I am housemaid in this Hotel. I saw the deceased alive last on Saturday night about 8 o'clock. He appeared to me more cheerful than usual. I did not see him in bed MISS WEAKLEY saw him after me about eleven o'clock. I never noticed anything in his bearing except that he was low spirited and he always went about looking into the rooms, more so lately than formerly, I think. He used to talk much to himself, I never knew what about. - John Rogers, waiter, was then examined: I have been in the hotel about 9 or 10 years, on Sunday morning a little before ten I was induced by an alarm to go to the room of the deceased, whom I found suspended by a cord to the bedpost and almost hidden by the furniture. The cord was fastened in a running knot or noose. I left and obtained assistance and he was cut down. The body was warm but perfectly dead, the feet of the deceased as he was suspended were within 4 inches of the ground, and a cushion of 6 inches in height was close to him. He had on only a shirt and flannel waistcoat. His health was for 15 months past been very bad, during that time I have observed him lost, not knowing what he was doing, and he has said so much of himself to me on Thursday or Friday last. He suffered from pains in his head of which he complained often. I have seen him tear his head most violently. These 8 or 10 days past he has been wandering and not at all himself - giving contrary orders, &c. - Edward Sole, solicitor, deposed: I have known the deceased 30 years, seen him frequently during the last twelve months. His health during this time has been ill, he has been failing in body and also in mind, I met him in a business transaction in July in which he showed considerable confusion and want of what had been his ordinary power of mind. He could not arrange his ideas. I saw him in November when I found him much depressed in mind and very restless - decidedly not himself, being in a confused, incoherent state and seemingly full of trouble. From what I have seen of him I should think him quite unequal to the carrying on of his business which he has done for thirty years to my knowledge in an active manner. - The Coroner then in a few words, expressed the duty of the Jury to be to decide upon the state of the deceased's mind, at the time he committed the fearful act; if they were satisfied that the state of his mind was a diseased one, then the verdict was before them, if they considered the evidence incomplete to make it stronger he would call further evidence. - The Jury however were unanimous in their opinion from the evidence produced and delivered in a verdict of Death occasioned by an Insane Condition of the Mind. The deceased MR ROBERT WEAKLEY was aged 73, was very generally respected and his distressing end has cast a great gloom over the minds of his friends.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 March 1848
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday evening an Inquest was held before the Borough Coroner, J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of THOMAS LEAR, aged 63, who was found dead in his bed in the morning. The deceased had eaten a hearty supper the night previously. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 March 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday morning, an Inquest was held on the body of MARY ANN CLARK, late servant at Mr Hallett, James-street, at the Military Arms, Stoke. Mr Hallett was present. The deceased had been dead four weeks, and buried three; but from circumstances which the Coroner, Mr A. Bone, became cognisant of, he called the Jury, which consisted of the following gentlemen:- Mr J. G. Towson (Foreman) and Messrs. S. Jenkin, Thomas Hatch, Charles Davey, John Facy, Thomas Phelps, Joseph Elms, Wm. Stonelake, Wm. Gist, Nicholas Tabb, Wm. Freeman, Chas. Richards, Joseph Bray, Geo. Shanton, John Ryder, Thos. Jenkins, Thomas B. Johns, Wm. Peek, James Bade, Jno. Wm. Grose, Edwin Rattenbury, and John Mackay. - The Coroner said, that sometime since he had had his attention attracted to the case they were about to consider, but the circumstances had not obtained in his mind sufficient force to induce him to call a Jury, until within four days, when a communication had been made to him, which, in his mind, left him no alternative. But he would charge the Jury against entertaining any of the rumours which had been floating about in the neighbourhood respecting the case, and give their decision solely from the evidence produced. It would be improper for him to attempt to bias the minds of the Jury; they must judge only from what should be laid before them. The Jury then went to the Church yard to view the body of deceased, and having returned, the first witness called was, Samuel Wheeler, the bill poster of Mr Hallett. Had been in his service from Christmas to the time of the deceased's death. Deceased was the only one living in the house besides Mr Hallett; she was housekeeper; had never seen her ill until a few days previous to her death; he had been called on at his lodgings by Mr Hallett on Tuesday, the 15th of February, to go after Mr Swain, Surgeon, and ask him to come to Mr Hallett; he did so, and then went to Torpoint for deceased's mother, ELIZABETH SCOTT. Deceased had up to Tuesday, been performing her usual work; she was sober. He also went for Mrs Moore a monthly nurse, in Stonehouse. - R. R. Johns was examined, but his evidence bore very little upon the matter, it only referred to the assault committed by Mr Hallett upon Mr Swain, on the Tuesday night he was called in. - P.W. Swain, M.R.C.S. was sworn: - I am a surgeon at Devonport. On Tuesday, Feb. 15th, from a message I received I went to Mr Hallett's house, he showed me into a room in which I found deceased in bed. As she did not appear to hear my enquiries of what was the matter, and Mr Hallett did not tell me, I proceeded to make a personal examination, and concluded she was gone in pregnancy six months. Mr Hallett however, said it was 8 months, for her husband had been gone to sea 8 months. I stated to him that I thought she was suffering from aggravated hysteria. He wished everything to be done for the girl, he was ready to pay everything he said. I desired him to give her a dose of opium and a purgative which he declined doing, saying Dr Glasson had prescribed other medicine. I then said in that case I would wish him good day, and left. By 11 o'clock, however, Mr Hallett had left a message for me to come a second time. I went and found that Dr Glasson had said it was a case for an accoucheur. I then investigated the case more closely and found she was suffering from puerperal convulsions, in which she would only be sensible at intervals. I said she must be bled, Mr Hallett objected, but at length complied. I then administered medicines to her. She was in the strongest convulsions I ever saw, her head and limbs being beaten about, and her tongue being masticated between the teeth. I examined her to see if I could produce manual delivery. I could not. I asked Mr Hallett to call in Dr Glasson, he refused, saying, I might go myself. I said I could not leave the woman. Mr Hallett seemed under the influence of liquor. I then said if he would not, I would go for Mr May, which I did. I returned with Mr May. It was 1 o'clock in the morning; we came to the conclusion that no manual delivery could be attempted. She was still frightfully convulsed. Her mother was very weak and could not hold her. We asked of Mr Hallett to send for nurses, he said he knew of none. We left him in the dispensary and went up stairs and at length Mr May went to the Workhouse for two nurses; Mr Hallett was asleep in his chair at the time. He awoke when Mr May returned, and a disgraceful scene ensued which I have no desire to detail, and is not relevant to the case. We left the women in charge, and returned home. I could not discover if the patient had been subject to any mental action which had caused the convulsions. Early the next morning, I and Mr May were summoned to Mr Hallett's again, and we attended the deceased until her death. She passed from convulsions into mania, I don't think she was once conscious. She died in a state of coma. On the Wednesday I delivered her of a 7 months' child. The nurses continued. The infant bore no evidence of strong action. The puerperal convulsions were caused by uterine irritation reflected back by the spine upon the brain. Anything irritating the uterus would produce convulsions. I have no reason to suppose that such were used in this case. Surgeons know of several drugs that have this irritating power, but it is unusual to use them except at the completion of the full time to produce labour. These drugs are not certain. I have no reason to believe they were used in this case previous to my being called in, they may have been, I cannot form an opinion. My power of forming one would be increased by a post mortem examination of the deceased, the primary cause of whose death was the uterine irritation. If any medicine had been given her the traces of it would be almost effaced - at least confused by the crotan oil and other medicines which Mr May and I administered during ten days of extreme illness. The morbid appearances could be little relied on without chemical analysis of a part of the structure of the body. The drugs named being of a vegetable nature and difficult to detect. Still, probably, I could form a better judgment of the previous condition of deceased by a post mortem examination. It is unusual for convulsions to occur at the 6th or 7th month of pregnancy. Among the symptoms I found she came to Mr Hallett on Sunday and said she could not see which is a symptom of puerperal convulsions. There was no evidence of any injection into the uterus, it was perfectly uninjured. I believe she was never sufficiently sensible to know of her condition nor to recognise those around her. - Mr Swain then proceeded to make the post mortem examination. - ELIZABETH SCOTT, living at Torpoint, mother of the deceased MARY ANN CLARKE, said her daughter had been a servant to Mr Hallett for 14 months, she told witness two months ago that she was pregnant. She said Hallett was the father of the child. Witness went to her when she was ill, being sent for by Mr Hallett, she saw him give her daughter a draught in a wine glass, which burnt the skin, made the tongue swell and turn black. She was insensible at the time. After she was delivered she said "I am very ill, I shall die," she understood what she said, did not remember her having said anything had been done to promote delivery, but she begged to go home with witness, for she was unhappy where she was. On telling the doctors that she had had convulsions, Mr Hallett said he would kick me out of the house. Her daughter was a single woman unless Mr Hallett had married her, which he gave reason to suppose he had, and her daughter told her she had the certificate. Her husband was not the deceased's father. - The proceedings were at this point adjourned to the workhouse at 6 o'clock, when - Richard Scott was examined, shoemaker, Torpoint, known the deceased 10 years. On Sunday the 13th February, called on Mr Hallett with a pair of shoes for his son, and asked to see MARY ANN, but was denied by Mr Hallett, who said she was ill and had her eyes puffed up with water bags and could not see. He went to Plymouth and returned, and Mr Hallett said he had given her four pills which had operated much. He saw Mr Hallett again on Wednesday, he said the job was over - she is delivered, the child is dead. He told me on one occasion he was nearer to MARY ANN than I (Scott) was, who said "not lawfully so," Mr Hallett said "that is nonsense." There was a box of baby linen prepared. - MRS SCOTT recalled, deposed to the fact of their being a plentiful supply of baby linen, a box full fit for a lady, Mr Hallett took the key from her and said it was his. The linen was newly made - one garment from a gown of deceased. In the midst of her evidence the witness fainted, Mr Hallett making some remarks at the time was checked by the Coroner who threatened to place him in custody if he disturbed the proceedings. - P.W. Swain was again sworn, said the medicine given by Mr Hallett according to the evidence of MRS SCOTT was no doubt that which he had prescribed. The patient made her tongue black by biting it. Mr Hallett had told him of the pills which Mr Scott had mentioned, if they were drastic the tendency was bad at such a time. As regarded the post mortem examination the body was not materially decomposed, the organs were whole and presented generally an appearance coinciding with the condition of the deceased before death. The bowels were rather reddish. He had brought with him the stomach, uterus, piece of the liver, but did not think that any chemical analysis would disclose anything like the drugs, which artificially might have produced abortion, but he was still satisfied that death resulted from irritation of the uterus. The effect of the p[ills Mr Hallett gave her was over when he saw her. The nurses were then examined, but there was nothing further elicited. - The Coroner said he was prepared to hear from Mr Hallett any evidence, at the same time no one could be expected to criminate himself, but being the only one in the house at the time of deceased being first ill, Mr Hallett was the only one that could offer any explanation. - Mr Hallett said he was willing to be examined. He said the deceased had lived as his housekeeper for 14 months. She was always healthy, some time since I saw a change in her size. I was aware 5 or 6 months ago that she was pregnant. I am the father of the child, I am not ashamed to own it. She complained to me on Sunday, the 13th Feb., she had a pain in her eyes, she could not see. She took some pills herself out of the surgery. The Tuesday after, she was very ill, I thought she had a fit of apoplexy. I called in Dr Glasson, he said it was a case for an accoucheur. I sent for Mr Swain. I administered nothing of myself. I do not remember telling Mr Swain she was married, it must have been to screen my being the father, but I do not remember it. I did not refuse to let Scott go upstairs, he did not ask to do so, I said she could not see to read for puffing of the eyes. I never saw MRS SCOTT open the box of baby linen, but the linen is mine and is fit for a queen. - Dr Glasson was then sent for whose evidence but slightly bore upon the case. - The Coroner summed up the evidence, and though it had taken a long time to accumulate, he thought it would not take long to decide upon, although Mr Hallett appeared to have conducted himself in a strange and unseemly manner. Yet there had been no direct evidence to prove the woman has been unfairly dealt with, but, he concluded, the verdict rested with the Jury. - The Court was then cleared and at nearly ½ past 11 o'clock the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had died from an irritation of the uterus, but by what cause that irritation was produced, there was not sufficient evidence to show.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 April 1848
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - On the 28 and 30 ult., an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS HOOKER, late an accountant attached to Mr E. Nettleton's Establishment, where he had been employed ten years: from this employment, Mr Nettleton had been obliged to dismiss him on Saturday night for habits of intemperance. It appeared from evidence that he purchased arsenic of Mr Denton, chemist, whom he had known for many years, he purchased the poison for the alleged purpose of destroying cats, and afterwards requested that opium might be mixed with it to prevent pain to the animals. He took the poison on Friday night. his wife in the course of the night discovering he was alarmingly ill obtained medical aid, but all was useless, he expired in an hour or two. A letter was in his pocket of which there can be no doubt that it was written just immediately before taking the fatal draught. The following is a copy:- I wish I could write the music of the Dead March in Saul! I would my God bless my dear wife, but I'm afraid that as everything goes wrong with me, that might be also reversed, considering that it would come from so polluted a person. - I faithfully promised to pay Rendle and Square this month.

Do. Do. Several Others    
Younghusband £30 0 0  
Bartholomew £ 4 0 0  
About 50 others ranging from 5s. to 40s. £62 10 0  
  ---------------  
  £96 10 0  


and not a sou to pay.
Altho' I hardly dare to say God bless my wife, I think God's Justice must without my invocation, that is if any person ever deserved to be blessed. - She is at this moment fretting her life out, because of my absence. Fate! what is Fate? - Here goes.
- The Jury declared in a verdict of Insanity. It appears that on a post mortem examination, there was a quantity of arsenic found in him, sufficient to kill six men.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 May 1848
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Thursday, by J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of WM. WHEELER, a child aged 9 years, who fell over the rocks on the Hoe, the day preceding, and was so much injured that he died while being conveyed to the Hospital. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Guildhall, before John Gard Edmonds, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN PENGELLEY, of William-street, 75, who, after retiring to rest on Saturday night, in his usual good health, was found lifeless in the morning. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 May 1848
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Accident. - A man named ROBT. PENNY, who was in the employ of Messrs. Lindon, of Finewell-street, left Plymouth on Wednesday morning for Laira, to look after a canoe entrusted to his care. After he had got into the boat it capsized and he was precipitated into the water and unfortunately drowned. He has left a wife and child, and what renders the matter still more distressing is that the poor widow is now enciente. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall in the evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of the deceased, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. - A blacksmith, named Thomas Smith, of Saltram Cottage, at the risk of his life jumped in the water on seeing the accident with his clothes on and some iron tools in his pocket, but did not succeed in rescuing the body until life was extinct.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 May 1848
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the Guildhall before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH FLOOD, aged 10 years, who met her death by her clothes taking fire. A verdict was returned of Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 May 1848
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury upon the body of WM. MACFARLANE, sailor, on board H.M.S. Canopus, from the evidence it was shown that on Saturday about 6 o'clock, the deceased was observed to walk towards the wall on Lambhay stairs, which was on one side 5ft. but on the other is 40ft. from the ground, he being rather tipsy at the time, ascended the wall on Lambhay stairs, and stretching out over it, was precipitated to the ground on the other side, he was immediately attended to, and surgical assistance procured, but the spark of life was extinct, in fact he was dead when first raised, the verdict was Accidental Death. He is a young man aged 23 and happily leaves no family, he was buried on Monday.

STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On last Monday evening, at about 6 o'clock, a boat containing eight men was unfortunately upset at the foot of Millbrook Lake, and the eight men precipitated into deep water, when one of them MR COOMBES, a farmer, residing in Millbrook was drowned although immersed not longer than about three minutes. The accident was observed by several parties and among them by the crew of one of the dockyard boats which was near when the casualty occurred, these men made the most energetic efforts to rescue their drowning fellow creatures and too much praise cannot be given to them, for their prompt and vigorous assistance they afforded, whereby they rescued from a sudden death and a watery grave seven human beings and also recovered the body of the then dying man; they then instantly rowed back to the guard ship in hopes of finding a doctor there to afford medical aid, but there was none on board, whereupon they immediately conveyed MR COOMBES and his son-in-law, Mr Henwood, who was also feared to be in a dying state, to the Mutton Cove Inn, where we are glad to be able to say that the latter was finally restored to life and consciousness, the former, however died. A more unexpected instance of the insecurity of human life has seldom occurred, and it another warning to wise men to be ever on the watch, for we know not the day nor the hour when the angel of death may call us away. Last evening an Inquest was held before A. Bone, Esq., the Coroner and from the evidence adduced it appeared the party in the boat at the time of the accident had been on a day's pleasure excursion, and had, shortly before left Torpoint. The boat was upset by one of the men accidentally falling on the gunwale. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 June 1848
PLYMOUTH - Dreadful Fire And Loss Of Life. - A fire, most disastrous and fatal in its consequences broke out early on Sunday morning in No. 2, Parade, Plymouth, it ignited in a part of the premises belonging to John Isaacs, a dealer in oil skins coats, "south westers" &c., and who on the day of the accident, and for a fortnight previously had had in his shop a cask the contents of which he did not appear to know, but which he believed to be coal tar; this had been leaking through the cask and he had determined to draw it off and take it to his manufactory in Mitre Lane: he set about this occupation on Sunday morning in company with a porter named Witherage. The bung had been out of the cask, and a portion of the tar had evaporated, and from the shop having been closed on Friday and Saturday, the gas had much impregnated the air in the shop, especially over the cask. After having drawn some quantity, the stuff ceased running, and Isaacs obtained a lucifer match and stretching over the cask struck it against the wall and on drawing it away, to see if the cask was empty, the surrounding atmosphere flashed, and flaming up filled the shop, burning some hair off Isaacs' head; the porter escaped unhurt into the street, and Isaacs ran to the inside room. In an incredibly short time the whole house was burning; at the back, the flames burst out of the windows, and in front the whole side was wrapped in raging flames, that stretching towards the opposite houses made them smoke, and it required constant dashing with water to prevent their catching fire. To the immense rapidity of the fire's progress, may be mainly attributed the fatal and melancholy results which attended the accident, two girls, sisters, named ELIZA ELIZABETH BAYLY, aged 18 and ELIZABETH HAMMOND, aged 8 years were burnt to death, after every means within the power of those present had been tried in vain to rescue them, as they were heard calling for help and seen at a window just previous to the falling in of the roof. - The engines of the West of England and the County Fire offices was soon on the spot, after the alarm was given followed by the Distillery, Custom House and Citadel engines. The West of England engine, which, was to first got into play, worked from a supply of water obtained at a plug in High-street, and its efforts were directed under the management of Mr W. Marshall, the active and persevering agent in the first place to prevent the flames extending to the adjoining property of Mr Stevens, from which the house where the fire broke out was only separated by the partition wall, and subsequently when the County, under the management of Mr Parsons, and other engines were brought into full play on the main body of the fire, the hose being carried over the roof of a house in High street to protect the property of the adjoining houses of Mr Atrill and others, to which the fire was rapidly extending. The Distillery engine was worked from a court at the back of the premises with much effect. The engines played for a period of 4 hours, by which time Isaacs' house was burnt to the ground, the adjoining dwelling house of Mr Stevens had sustained very considerable damage, Mr Atrill's had on the inside also suffered much, the fire extending downward from the roof. Much furniture and stock was destroyed by the fire, and by being hastily removed. The whole of the house, property and some stock and furniture was insured. During the progress of the fire, and on the front wall falling out, the director of the West of England Engine had a narrow escape of his life the mass of Brick falling so near him that the directing pipe was completely crushed and broken. So soon as the flames were sufficiently subdued as to allow search was made by the Borough Police and firemen of the West of England Office under the direction of John Edmonds Esq., the Coroner, for the bodies which had so unhappily perished, Mr Edmonds was early on the spot and rendered much valuable assistance throughout the morning. We have frequently had occasion to mention the obligations this locality is under to the West of England and County Fire Offices for the very efficient Engines kept by those companies, and the zeal and activity always manifested, by their agents and well trained brigades, and we do so with more than usual satisfaction on the present occasion, particularly as to the West of England Engine which from being brought so promptly into play and efficiently managed contributed much in checking the progress of the devouring element which at one time threatened destruction to the whole neighbourhood. - The Inquest upon the scarcely recognisable remains of these poor girls, which were exhumed by the men of the West of England Fire Office, was held on Monday, at the Guildhall, before the Coroner, J. Edmonds, Esq., and the following highly respectable Jury:- J. Beer, Foreman; J. Briggs; R. Lowcay; M. Hitchins; A. Marshall; W. Davey; E. Hopkins; J. Shilston; G. W. Swinburne; J. Tucker; H. C. Marten; W. Martin; W. Mennie; J. C. Hawkens; J. Holman; J. Gambell; A. Longmead; J. Parkin; W. Radmore; A. Simms; R. Boswarva; John Hallett; J. Campbell; Wm. May, which having been sworn. - The Coroner said they had to consider a trying circumstance in which two individuals had perished. They were all aware a fire broke out in the Parade on Sunday morning between 4 and 5 o'clock; from residing near the spot he was present from the time of the explosion which took place until the bodies were found. It was consequently in his power to observe what kind attention was paid to the sufferers, and he could not withhold his praise from any present; all made exertions ,and if there should be any mention made of the slack supply of water, it would be for their consideration. He then spoke of the exertions of the Superintendent of Police and of his men; and of his satisfaction with the Insurance Office agents, and the neighbours, he had never seen the Military exert themselves better than on the occasion. In this lamentable case the chief point they would have to consider would be one of law; if a fire accidentally occurs in a house, it is no matter what may be the results, nor what the stock, if inflammable or not; the owner of the stock is hold innocent; but if the possessor set fire to the house himself and if one life is lost the man is guilty of murder. But he had no reasons to apprehend such had been done in this instance, he knew not how the fire originated, that must be decided upon the evidence they would hear. There were in the house at the time the fire occurred Mr King the Landlord and his wife, Mr Isaacs and family, a Jew named Benjamin, MR and MRS HAMMOND, and their four children, two of whom had met with their death. They were taken up at 10 o'clock and removed to the Workhouse, to which place he invited them to proceed with him to view the bodies. On their return the examination of witnesses commenced. - J. Witherage, a porter, deposed, he was employed on Sunday morning before 4 and 5 o'clock, by Mr Isaac, in drawing off some "prepared stuff," used by Mr Isaacs in making oil cases, &c., while performing the work at one end of the cask, Mr Isaacs being at the other, suddenly saw all around him a flame, and an explosion took place, he ran to the street, and Isaacs to the back parlour, exclaiming "Oh my God! oh my God!" He had seen no fire or candle, nor match of any kind. He did not know what was in the cask, but did not think it was the cask exploded, he was touching it when it caught. In answer to Mr Isaacs he said he did not remember his (Isaacs) saying he would get a lucifer match to see if it was all drawn. He knew nothing of a lucifer match at all. - SIMON HAMMOND, a sailor, was then examined. He said he was father of the deceased, ELIZABETH HAMMOND and his wife was mother of the other deceased, E. E. BAYLEY, who was servant to Mr Isaacs, who was very kind to her: he had two rooms one with no window in it, where the girls used to sleep, but it was dismal and they changed to his and his wife's room and all were sleeping in the same room on last Saturday night; his daughter-in-law came to bed last, about 11 o'clock, when all was dark she said something very kind to him and his wife and said she had some sweetmeats for "NICKEY" her little brother, and went to bed, and all went to sleep. He was awoke, on Sunday about ½ past 4 o'clock, by Mr Isaacs knocking loudly at his door and calling "get up, get up, fire is in the house!" and passed on to his family's room, one pair stairs above witness's, who slept on the second storey back; he alarmed his wife and family, fled to the door, and thought to get out of the front window by ladder, but the flames had penetrated through the front room, and smoke poured up the stairs, he retreated to his family when Mrs King passed him and trying to get out of a small old fashion window blocked up the ingress of fresh air until those in the room were nearly suffocated; at length she got out by aid of a shute, he then seized his little boy 3 years old and descended by a ladder, gave the child to someone and returned, at this time the smoke poured from the staircase window. He then went up to say, I heard my wife calling, I could not see her for smoke, but felt into the window, and touched a hand, drew out my wife and took her safely down the ladder, I returned the staircase window was now burnt out, and flames licked the bars of the ladder, I passed through them and when near the window, I found my daughter JANE had got out but fallen under the ladder, to which she clung, I caught her, and took her down, but we were both dreadfully burnt, she is now in the South Devon Hospital. The flames were increasing and breaking out in other places. My daughter in law and daughter were still in the room, I saw the eldest she said, "Father for God Almighty's sake come and save me, 'save me!" I made another effort to go up, I went up two thirds of the ladder when it broke, I fell in the flames senseless and I don't know how I got out. If there had been 50 persons present more could not have been done, it was impossible to save the lives of the deceased. I have been in the house 2 years, I never saw Mr Isaacs prepare stuff or boil oil in the premises. I lost everything but my trousers, and my wife and children were quite naked. - Mr Pollard was sworn, he lived opposite and was awoke at ¼ after 4 o'clock, by an explosion, he sprang out and in a few moments the house was covered with raging flames, he saw Mr King at his window shouting for a ladder, one was obtained and Mrs King got out on it, and in coming down, the fire spread to it, it broke and he was hurt by a heavy fall; after this witness was engaged in preserving the house on the opposite side of the street, from catching fire: In answer to a question by the Jury he said he had permitted the cask of stuff belonging to Isaacs to be in his cellar, until Isaacs opened it, when it smelled so bad, it was removed to Isaacs' house, as the cask was too bulky to go into Isaacs' store room door. I saw the County Engine present, but the Fire plug near was so rusty, it could scarcely be removed, and when off, no water was on, and salt water was then used, there were other plugs higher up. Had the water been at hand directly, the fire would have been kept under; but he would not say the lives depended on this alone, since every exertion was made to rescue them. The front fell out at ½ past 6 o'clock. - John Stevens living near, had also been alarmed by the explosion, loud as an eighteen pounder; he went to Mr Carkeet's for the County Engine, had the keys thrown from a window, and assisted by Witheradge and Capt. Buckingham, got the engine to the Parade, he then went to the citadel, when the sentinel said he had made the alarm, and the soldiers quickly came to the spot. The want of water was felt very much; there was only one of Mr Carkeet's men present. - After the evidence of several other witnesses had been taken, Mr Parsons engineer of the County fire engine, said he was awoke by a Policeman at ¼ past 4 o'clock on Sunday morning, he was informed of the fire and proceeded to the Engine house, but the engine was gone, he went to the parade, he saw the engine being played with salt water; in the eagerness to put on the hoses they had been misplaced, he ordered them to be set right, in doing so the suction tube fell into the mud, and on trying the engine it would not work for some time, and at length the hose was broken in two, and they had to stop to mend it; he did not attempt to get fresh water, but it could have been obtained near the Distillery, there he would have taken it, had he been present first. Mr Carkeet had ordered none to take the engine except with a director, the keys should not have been thrown out. He knew where the plugs were; that one they had pulled up was an auxiliary, but the main ones were on the pavement, and the water was always on. - The Coroner said they looked everywhere for a fire plug but could not find one, they ought to be marked. - Mr Parsons: Some are; and the notion of alarm bells being serviceable is false, as it only creates a mob and confusion as in this case. - The Coroner: There was a well in the Parade that would have supplied the engines, but although it had been directed to be kept in repair it was found impossible to open it. - P.C. Coombe was then examined as to the finding of the bodies, and to their being carefully removed - they were horribly mutilated and burnt. - Mr Isaacs was offered the option of being examined, or not, and choosing the former, he was sworn. He said: I am a water-proof manufacturer, and had engaged Witherage on Sunday morning to clear out a cask of coal tar. After some time of drawing it ceased to run; I thought the cask was emptied and said "I will get a match to see;" I went into the parlour and got a match; I struck it against the wall near Witherage, and was bringing it to the cask, when a flame covered my face and flashed through the shop. Could not tell how the light was produced; I believe it to be coal tar that was in the cask; had it from Liverpool, cannot tell from whom; gave 1s. per gallon for it. These were answers to questions put by the Jurors, as coal tar is sold here for 5d. per gallon - he then said, I ran upstairs to save the lives; I never manufactured nor boiled oil on the premises. I believe the stuff in the cask not to be prepared coal tar for instant use; never had had any of it before. A sample of the stuff was sent for, and the Foreman spread it on a plate and held a lighted match over it, but it did not ignite, although a strong and most noxious odour filled the hall similar to the smell of coal tar. He was further pressed for a reason for the explosion; it was not the gas, he turned it off on Thursday: his premises are insured in £150, stock in £75, goods in £75; had insured 10 years in the West of England Fire Office. I cannot tell the cause of the fire; I heard an explosion, I think it must have been the strength of the coal tar escaped from the barrel, which had had the bung out in the close shop a day and two nights. I can give no other reason, I know none other; I saved the policy of Insurance. It was in a box, my wife reminded me of it, she and my children came away nearly naked, I had £24 in gold and £3 in silver in a drawer, it is lost. - The Coroner read the verdict, after having seen the bodies, and listening to evidence from 3 o'clock in the afternoon till 10 in the evening, after hearing eleven witnesses, and considering the evidence with great care, the Jury returned a verdict of "Casual Fire," and "Accidental Death" on each of the bodies.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 June 1848
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide Of A Sailor. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner on the body of a sailor named HENRY PEARCE, a sailor lately belonging to the brig Penguin, from which vessel he was a short time since discharged in consequence of suffering from general debility, which was picked up on the beach near Stonehouse Mill Bridge, under circumstances which left no doubt that in a moment of insanity, he had rashly put a period to his existence. The deceased was found lying on his back with a handkerchief round his neck, and blood running from one of his ears. A rope was fastened to a bough of a tree hanging over the water, and it would seem that the rope broke before the deceased was dead, otherwise the blood would not have flowed; when the tide came in he was nearly covered with water. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died by Hanging, but in what state of mind he was in at the time there was no evidence to show."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 August 1848
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday, at Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of ROBERT BUNKER, late housekeeper of the Plymouth Library. It appeared that BUNKER, who was a young married man, was acquainted with a Miss Ann Cuddeford, who resided with her grandfather in Cambridge-street; that he was a frequent visitor to her house, and that in her room he died. Her evidence, which was the chief, was the following:- Miss Cuddeford examined: I am a single woman, living with my grandfather. I have known the deceased for five or six years. I have been used to see him every other day, sometimes twice a week. He called on me yesterday, I should add, I am intimate with MRS BUNKER, we are good friends, she visits me. I have not seen her for a fortnight. The deceased called on me about half-past 8 o'clock. He appeared well. I was writing when he came in. He sat on the sofa; then he rose and went into grandfather in the next room. He returned, and grandfather called me; my grandfather has had a seizure, and cannot move. I asked BUNKER to come and help me to move him; he did so, and returned to my room. I then took downstairs some of the slops in my grandfather's room, and while downstairs I heard a noise as if someone falling; I went upstairs and on entering my room I found BUNKER lying on his back, and the table knocked down, and the things that were before on it scattered over the floor. I unclosed his stock by unbuckling it, I thought he was faint; I unfastened two buttons of his waistcoat; I did no more, and then obtained some cold water and bathed his head and hands; I did not make any alarm, because I thought it was only a fainting fit, and I have seen persons faint for a half an hour. He was in this condition when I heard Mr Mayne (who lived in the same house) coming upstairs, I called to him, he came in and felt the pulse of deceased; he said he was afraid it was worse than faintness. I asked him to go to MRS BUNKER and to get a surgeon, and he did so; the deceased had been lying in the faint state for little better than an hour, I had no idea he was dead, I thought he was only in a fit. I never saw him in a fit before. He was removed by order of the surgeon, Mr Fuge, to his house in Cornwall-street. This was all she knew of the death of the deceased. - The Coroner, during a portion of the examination observed that it was a highly improper thing to move a body whose death had occurred like the present, without the direct orders of the coroner, he hoped such would not be done again in Plymouth. - Several of the Jury considered the young woman, Ann Cuddeford had been exceedingly neglectful in not obtaining any assistance for one hour. A post mortem examination was performed upon the body during the Inquest the result of which was such that the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 August 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Serious And Fatal Accident At Morice Town. - We have this week the painful duty of reporting another of those distressing accidents which have from time to time occurred upon the Keyham Works. It could scarcely have been expected that works so extensive and intricate as these are, could be carried forward without producing casualties upon frequent occasions, early after the works were commenced, several fatal and other accidents did occur; recently, however, so well formed and attended to have been the regulations and directions of the contractor and his manager, Mr Hillas, that the effect has been no accident of importance occurred until Friday last, when by the downfall of a machine named a "traveller", used for moving immense masses of stone for the purpose of the formation of the docks &c., - one man was killed on the spot, and seven or eight others narrowly escaped the same fate, all of them being more or less seriously injured. The cause of this terrible accident is partly attributable to the negligence of certain carpenters who were employed in shoring up an upright of a frame, which supported the traveller on one side, and over which imperfectly shored upright it was about to pass when the frame gave way beneath it, and the machinery with the men in it fell from a height of nearly 30 feet; the duty of the carpenters was to have given warning of the insecurity of the pile, to the director of the traveller, which appears to have been neglected; but the blame does not rest entirely with the carpenters, since the man directing the use of the traveller, having observed that the pile was not properly made safe, should have prevented the traveller from passing over it. But, in whatever way the accident might have been prevented, its occurrence only adds another to the many bitter lessons we are constantly receiving, the aim of which are to increase our cautiousness, and especially in positions in which life is subject to so many liabilities to destruction. - An Inquest was held on Saturday upon the remains of the unfortunate man, WILLIAM HOOPER, before A. B. Bone Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury. The Inquest was held at the St. Aubyn Arms, Morice Town, and the Jury having viewed the body, and place in which the accident happened, The Coroner proceeded to call the witnesses. - George Thomas, labourer on the Keyham works, said - I knew WILLIAM HOOPER, the deceased; he has been a labourer on the works for two years. Yesterday afternoon I was on a wall named the Lock-entrance wall at work in company with about a dozen others; I was waiting for a mass of stone, which was being conveyed by the traveller to put it in its place. The traveller was passing over the wall. There were four men on the traveller working its machinery, which impels it forward on its wheels. I put the skids (two rollers of wood) at the spot on which the stone was to be lowered. As they moved the traveller towards the spot which I pointed out, and while at about 7 feet from the skids, I suddenly heard a crash; I immediately shrank down to my knees; the deceased fell at the same moment; he had been standing close by my side talking to me and with his hand upon my shoulder. He was the jumper man, and was to have bored a hole in the stone for the purpose of its being lifted after it had rested on the skids. It was intended to have put the stone on the Gazoon Wall, about two feet below where I had put the skids, and five feet distant from them. The first I observed after we had fallen, was the blood gushing out of deceased's mouth. It was the suspension bar of the traveller, which reaches from one of its extremes to the other, which fell upon his head and produced the fatal result. I then saw the traveller was fallen and broken to pieces, and that the bulk which supported the traveller was also broken. The deceased was killed on the spot, and was taken to the surgery on the works. The deceased was sober. I cannot explain the cause of the breaking of the traveller. - Edwin Meldram, a carpenter, was examined. He said: I have worked on Keyham works for 6 or 7 months. Yesterday, about 2 or 3 o'clock, I was at work with two other men, named Welman, the carpenter and Condy, a labourer; we were about to pull up a shore to fix it against a square upright or pile in the Lock-entrance; there were three shores which had been already fixed; while so employed, I heard a crash, and the traveller, and the rail on which it moves, fell. The traveller is wheeled on certain pieces of balk, which are supported by piles. I cannot tell what caused the fall. No one had cautioned me as to the safety of the shores. [After this point, and, indeed, previously, the witness appeared to give his evidence with the utmost reluctance, whether out of fright, ignorance, or cautiousness, it is hard to say; however, by dint of hard questioning, the following was elicited.] Yesterday, about 11 o'clock, I observed a portion of the bottom of the pile in question, was knocked out, and the pile consequently had no bearing at its base, and was resting solely upon the shores. The piece knocked out measured about 4ft. in height, and nothing had been put under the pile when the traveller was approaching; but the pile was supported by three shores, and we (the carpenters) intended to put a fourth shore, these shores were secured to the pile by iron spikes. The traveller broke just as I arrived, I did not hear anyone cry out in warning to the men in the traveller; I had at first put back the traveller that it might not fall on us, whilst we were shoring up the pile. I don't know whose duty it is to see that the piles are of proper strength. - John Toms was then examined. He said:- I was on the traveller yesterday, when it broke down. The pile was near the place where George Thomas ordered us to bring the stone. I saw the pile had been cut off at the bottom; and that there were three shores supporting it; no one gave us notice that the shores were not strong enough. There were three directions in which the pile could not slide out, because of the three shores fixed against it, but there being no shore on the fourth side, the pile slid away in that direction. I don't know whose duty it is to see that the piles are secure, I could see there was no fourth shore. I am breaksman, and have charge of the traveller. I fell with it about 30 feet! (he was not apparently hurt beyond mere bruises.) - Samuel Hillas was next examined. He said:- I am Manager upon Keyham Works for the Contractors, and have been so since the works were commenced. I know the pile which supports the balks on which rested the traveller just mentioned. In this case I gave David Welman (now present) orders to cut off a piece of the pile and shore it up, on Thursday. But afterwards I told him to postpone doing so until Friday. Before the bottom of the piles is cut off, it should be fully shored. I am a mechanic, if any mason or carpenter has any doubt concerning the safety of these frames, he comes to me for my opinion. I don't think a pile with 3 shores is safe; certainly the pile in question was not fit to support the traveller; I think it would be manifestly unfit. The carpenters that were about the job ought to have given the warning, and have guarded against the traveller coming over the piles. They have repeatedly received instructions to prevent any traveller from being so moved on such occasions. Welman has cut off hundreds of these piles, in the same manner as this was cut. - Edwin Meldram was again examined, to obtain, if possible, a knowledge of the position of the carpenters during the approach of the traveller, and the power they commanded of giving warning. The effort, however, was unproductive, of anything comprehensive - the witness was impenetrably dull. - The Coroner then called up Welman, who had superintended the shoring, &c., and stated to him the serious position in which he stood in connection with this case; and that should the Jury consider this accident, the result of carelessness or neglect on his part, the verdict might be manslaughter; but still if he could offer any explanation of this affair, how it was no warning was given, he was at liberty so to do, while he must be careful not to say what would implicate himself. - David Welman said he had given due notice. this, however, was denied, and The Coroner then adjourned the Inquest until Monday morning. - Monday. - The Jury having been assembled, at about 10 o'clock, the Inquest was resumed. - The Coroner observing they were well acquainted with the cause of the death of the deceased: but that it was a matter of surprise that any work was allowed to commence during the defective state of the pile; and the aim now was to discover how the traveller became moved, and on whom the responsibility of its motion rested. Ordinary caution at least, ought always to be exercised upon such great works, and proper persons should be employed to watch all dangerous proceedings. As the question stood, there was difficulty in finding this responsible person. Mr Hillas says, it is Welman, the chief carpenter; but it was George Thomas who directed the moving of the traveller. Now if it should be clear the carpenter is the responsible person according to evidence alone, and he had power to perform his duty, then the verdict would be clear, But it seemed to him on such Establishments important that intelligent and responsible persons should e appointed to superintend the dangerous operations, he did not wish to express imputations; he had reason to understand that Mr Baker was a gentleman of much kind-heartedness, who would not wish the absence of proper care in the establishment. But he did not find the system was perfect; he spoke with deference, but he thought when operations like the late fatal one were being proceeded with, proper persons should be appointed to superintend them - not persons engaged in manual labour. If possible, to discover any one so appointed, was the chief object in the adjournment of the Inquest and he had made these remarks to explain why he had adjourned. - Robert Condy, a carpenter's labourer on the Works, was examined, he said, he with Meldram, and their director, Welman, had taken out the base of the pile on Friday, when it was shored with 3 shores, he never knew operations carried on above piles, before the shoring was complete. The piece at the base was sometimes knocked out when there were only 2 shores. There was no particular place where shores were kept, and the three men were away from the pile in search of one among the timbers for 20 minutes. Welman from where he was searching, could have seen the traveller, and could have heard it move, but that work with much noise was going forward. When they returned with the shore, Welman got on the Arch, and immediately the accident took place. He heard no notice given not to move the traveller. When the pile is finished, the principal carpenter usually says its safe. No person is kept to give notice of the completion of the pile. - The Coroner: That is the point which shows a want of compactness in the system. - Richard Townshend, being sworn said:- I am assistant Superintending Engineer employed under government and have charge of Keyham Works. Being on Thursday in company with other officers in the performance of our daily duty of measuring the work. I observed the pile which Condy named, and that its fishing pieces were being removed, I said to a carpenter, and a setter, they must not remove them or it would come down; all four shores were required for this pile because it had so much to support. I think it was manifestly insecure for a traveller, without the fourth shore. I think nothing is so good as an officer to superintend at the alterations upon piles - not a labourer. The stone moved by the traveller weighed about 2 tons. - Samuel Hillas was re-examined. He had given orders to Welman, to find his shores on Thursday. He was of opinion that Welman could watch against the coming of the traveller in addition to attending to his other duties. None were employed in piece work. He had no doubt Welman understood that watching was a part of his duty. George Thomas, who ordered the advance of the traveller, received order from the setter Symons. - George Thomas re-examined - He never took notice that the pile was in any other than a sound state. He had received orders from the setter. - Samuel Symons, setter, who said he had given orders for the removal of the stone, but only to the eastward of the well-hole, he had not said "go no further," but he (Symons) knew the pile was not safe to go over. - G. Thomas:- The stone fell right over the well hole. - Daniel Welman said he was away when the traveller was set in motion and had been back a minute when he heard a crash come, he did not see the traveller approaching. - The Coroner summed up, and the Jury then considered their verdict, and between 5 and 6 o'clock it was delivered by The Coroner, who, having had Welman, Symons and Thomas called up, said - The Jury have returned a verdict of "Death caused by the pile being insufficiently shored, and a portion of it negligently knocked off from the bottom". There had been difficulty in coming to this verdict since there was a decided impression that their negligence was the cause of the accident, this was attributable to each of the three; to Symons from the careless directions he had given, knowing the pile to be unsafe; to Thomas for causing the traveller to be moved beyond his directions; and to Welman great blame for not having given notice as to the approaching traveller, indeed, had not the Jury considered the due performance of his other appointed duties, incompatible with that of watching against any passing over the pile, the verdict would have been against him for manslaughter. The incompleteness of the arrangements of the establishment in not providing a proper person to watch at such operations they trusted would be remedied. After a few other remarks the Inquest terminated.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 September 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday a fatal accident occurred near the Gas Works at Keyham. A man named HENRY GARLICK, was driving a horse and cart in Charlotte Terrace, the horse took fright, and ran at furious speed up Magazine-lane, and GARLICK to save himself jumped off, and in so doing fell, and the wheel passed over his body, causing immediate death. An Inquest was held the same evening before A. B. Bone Esq., at which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 13 September 1848
PLYMOUTH - A poor man named MARTIN met with an accident causing his death last week, on the Plymouth and Dartmoor Railway. In attempting to unhook a train of six waggons from another train, the wheel caught the heel of his boot, and drew him on the rail, and the train passed over his leg. His death was almost immediate. A Coroner's Inquest was held and found a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 October 1848
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - Suicide. We have this week to perform the melancholy duty of recording the death, by his own hand, of CAPT. J. FRANCIS WHARTON, R.N., a gentleman well known in this neighbourhood, in which he has resided for many years. He was strong and healthy looking, and the intelligence of his unhappy death was everywhere received with surprise. The fatal act was performed on Friday night, and on Saturday evening an Inquest was held upon the body at the house of the deceased, at No. 2, Portland Cottages, Stoke, by Mr A. Bone, Coroner, and a Jury consisting of the following gentlemen:- Major George Goodall, Foreman; Lieut. Thomas Shapcott, Capt. William Walker, Mr F. Williams Stehelin, Mr Joseph Rennolds, Capt. Henry Dickson Parker, Mr William Lancaster, Rev. Robert William Coles, Mr Richard Scott, Mr Herbert James Smart, Mr William Carham, Mr Thomas Hariott, Lieut. J. Cook Snell, Lieut. S. Ross Watts, Mr Charles Gray Graves, Mr Henry O'Neal, Mr John Bayly, Mr Edward Soady, Mr William Row, Mr John Flexman, Mr Lewis W. Lyne, Mr Robert Tucker and Mr Thomas Goss. - It was not without a great deal of difficulty that the Jury was obtained, several of those who were summoned not attending; the delay thus occasioned was nearly an hour and a half. The Coroner is remarking upon this circumstance, spoke in warm terms of the disrespect thus offered by the absent individuals to the Jury, and the matter engaging their attention; and which disrespect it would be improper to tolerate. The fine which it was competent for the Coroner to inflict was £5 and he should fine those that did not attend to their summonses. - After the Jury had viewed the body, the following witnesses were examined:- Mary Ann Visard was sworn, and said she was a single woman, and had been residing with the deceased as servant for four months. On the 2nd of Sept. his (deceased's ) wife left him to go to Ivybridge to reside with Mr Rivers; it was with CAPT. WHARTON'S consent; no one had been living with him but herself since that time. On Friday evening he remained home alone, after dinner, all the evening, except a short time that he was at Mrs Grants. He took his tea as usual, and supped; at supper he drank a half a pint of gin mixed with water. He desired her to lock up the house and clear the table; and asked her for a second candle, he already having one burning in his bed candlestick. He took them both upstairs; he did not complain, nor say anything to her; he was not sober, but he ascended the stairs without assistance. After he had retired he asked her for his little coat, which she gave him. He closed, and she fancied, locked his door, and she heard nothing more of him except a slight noise, which she fancied to be from a cord used in lashing his trunk. On Saturday morning she rose at 7.30 and at 9 o'clock went to his room to call him according to custom, but could get no answer; she then went to Mrs Grant's and told her of the circumstance, and she sent for Mr Banks, Surgeon, R.N., and after a while he and Perry, the constable, and others came, and attempted to get in at the bedroom door but could not; they afterwards entered by the window; she did not go into the room. He had been sometimes partially inebriated once or twice a week, but not for the last fortnight, except Friday night. MR JOHN WHARTON, son of deceased, had slept sometimes in the house since she had been in it, the last time was on Wednesday night. MRS WHARTON was there on Monday, she came to take away her things; she understood on Monday that deceased and his wife had separated from one another. He appeared unhappy. This week he had torn up a number of papers. He was writing on Friday evening, and took what he wrote into Mrs Grant's. - Amongst other answers to questions put by the Jury, one was that deceased was not accustomed to lock his bedroom door on retiring for the night. - John Perry, constable, was examined: he stated that from information he received, he came to the house of the deceased about 9 o'clock on Saturday morning, and after trying the bedroom door which was locked, and calling "CAPT. WHARTON" three times without answer, he said - I entered the room at the window by means of a ladder; the blinds were down; directly as I parted the curtain I saw the deceased apparently standing near the bed, but on looking higher I perceived a rope by which he was suspended to the post and tester of the bed, the rope being double, and the ends passed through the centre forming a running noose. (He produced the rope.) Mr Banks and others had followed me into the room. I jumped immediately upon the bed and cut the cord; Mr Banks then opened the vein of his arm, a little blood flowed, but he pronounced him dead. On my cutting him down, Mr Banks gave me a piece of paper. - Coroner: Did you see Mr Banks pick up the paper? - Witness: No. - Mr Banks was then sworn. - Coroner: Whence did you obtain the piece of paper now produced? - Mr Banks: It was given to me by Mr Lilicrap, who picked it up from the table by the window. - The Coroner then read the paper; its contents were as follows:- "My unhappy marriage has destroyed me. My reason has left me. J.F.W." - This was written in a firm hand, and was subsequently recognised as the hand writing of the unfortunate gentleman. - Mr Perry's examination was resumed. He said - I found cards containing addresses written as if for trunks; and in his pocket a letter from his daughter in Brixton. I found a brass candlestick, the socket of which appeared as if the candle had burnt out in it; a candle unburnt was lying in the candle-stick, and several other things were also mentioned. In answer to questions by the Jury, he said the right knee of the deceased was leaning against the bed the foot being resting upon a chair; the deceased was dressed in his stockings, drawers and shirt. The bed had not been slept in, nor laid upon - pen and ink were on his table. - Howard R. Banks, Surgeon, R.N., was examined: The deceased was quite dead when cut down. He had known him many years; had seen him last three weeks ago; he was then very low spirited and much depressed. - Thomas Wandsley was sworn: He saw Mr Lilycrap pick up the piece of paper produced in court and give it to Mr Banks. He also gave a description of the position of the deceased, on his entering the bedroom. - Richard Conday, Stoke, gave evidence that he was in conversation with the deceased on Thursday. He then was talking of speculations only. - LIEUTENANT RICHARD HILL WHARTON was sworn: He said his father had been low spirited for some weeks past; he had heard him say that he was in debt to the Bank, and he was afraid he should not be able to meet it. He (the deceased) had separated from his wife lately; witness did not think there was anything but a mutual agreement. He never had any reason for supposing his father was not quite sane. - COMMANDER JOHN A. L. WHARTON was then examined. He believed that his father's marriage, or circumstances connected with it, had made him unhappy. On Thursday he was with him nearly all the evening; he was much depressed on account of money difficulties. However, he did not say anything to alarm him (witness). - Mrs Grant was next examined: She said the deceased and she were old friends. On Friday night he came to her and gave her a parcel to give to MR RICHARD HILL WHARTON; he wished her good bye, as if he were going away on Saturday to his daughter at Brixton. He shed tears at parting, and he seemed very unhappy. She had given the parcel to MR R. WHARTON; it contained the title deeds of a house in Bridport and a policy of Fire Insurance. He stayed about half an hour with her. - Mary Ann Visard re-examined. He was going to leave on the 12th inst. for Brixton. He never used to have the pen and ink in his bedroom. - The Coroner then mentioned the duty of the Jury, and explained the law in the case of suicide, and the distinction made by it between suicide during insanity and that when the mind is sound, and re-capitulated the chief points in the depositions which had been made; the room was cleared for the consultation of the Jury, and at little after 11 o'clock they returned a verdict of "Death by Hanging, during a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 October 1848
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Singular Suicide. - On Tuesday morning an Inquest was held by the County Coroner, A. Bone, Esq., at the Plympton St. Mary Union, upon the body of a man who had committed suicide on Saturday under peculiar circumstances. The Jury summoned was highly respectable; the Foreman Deeble Boger, Esq., - After the Jury had viewed the body, the Inquiry was commenced; the first witness called, was Richard Gullett, who said he was a labourer of Colebrook, and on Saturday I had occasion to go inside a hedge in a field, called Lorcombe, in an estate named Farm, in Plympton St. Mary. At the side of a rick I observed the body of the deceased, RICHARD PARKER, lying against or near the rick, he was lying upon hay and a little covered him. The witness then related that he had seen him before on several occasions, when he had complained of hard treatment by the Relieving Officer of Plympton St. Mary Union, from whom, although at the time carrying a note from one of the guardians, Mr Molesworth, he had received abuse and no relief; he had, he said, been without food for several days and had slept under the rick several times, and upon Thursday last he had said to witness he was going to apply to the Guardians upon Friday for relief. - Wm. E. Watkins, labourer, was examined and stated after that he had seen deceased several other times, he saw him last Friday evening walking by the river, and on meeting him witness said, "How do you get on?" he replied, "the same, they (meaning the Guardians) tell me I belong to Plymouth." He was perfectly sober. - Nicholas Lockyer, Esq., who had put questions on behalf of the guardians to whom he was clerk, was sworn and examined with respect to the transactions at the Guardians Meeting on Friday, connected with this poor man. His evidence occupied several hours, an in substance showed that the man, RICHARD PARKER, had applied for relief on Friday to the board, that the board was divided in the opinion as to the affording of relief to him. He was called in three times and questioned, he stated himself to have been apprenticed out to Mr Sheppard, by that Union; he had since been to sea 40 years, and was 65 years of age. He had applied for and obtained relief in Plymouth, and was come to his own parish, as he thought it, Plympton St. Mary. The Guardians discussed the matter as though the case had been thrown on them by the Plymouth Guardians. In the meantime one of the Guardians, Mr Hull, went to the deceased and gave him some money, with which he left. It was then proposed, that an order for his relief be made out against he should return. This was opposed and put to the vote, the following gentlemen being present and voting:- For the order, Mr Young, Mr Reeves, and Mr Molesworth; against:- Mr Pitts, Mr Stanbury, Mr Hull, Mr Brown and Mr Barnes. The Chairman Col. H. B. Harris favoured he proposition but it was lost. - Other evidence was taken from Col. H. B. Harris, Mr Molesworth and Mr Young, directed to the above facts and the Inquest having been continued for above 6 hours was adjourned to Friday.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 October 1848
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Pauperism And Suicide. - The Coroner's Inquest, at Plympton St. Mary, upon the body of RICHARD PARKER a pauper, who cut his throat in that parish on Saturday week, and which was commenced on Tuesday, and reported in the West of England Conservative of last week, was adjourned upon Tuesday to Friday. On Friday morning the Inquiry was resumed. - Mr John Stevens, of the Colebrook Inn, deposed that on Friday, the 13th inst. he saw the deceased at his house, where he had bread and cheese and some cider, for which he paid 9d. of 10d; he was very silent all the time and quite sober. - Betsy Penny, cook at Goodsmoor, stated that she gave the deceased some food on the 3rd of October by direction of Mr Molesworth, and that he afterwards told her as the result of his being sent by Mr M. to Southwood, and that the latter refused to relieve him, swore, and threw Mr Molesworth's note at him. He was then sober, but trembling. - Mr Thomas Anderson said, that in the afternoon of Sunday, October 1st, the deceased came into his shop and purchased a penny cake, which he ate ravenously, remarking that he had tasted nothing since the previous morning. He saw the deceased several times afterwards, and told him to whom he was to apply for relief. He also gave him some food. He saw him on the 11th eating blackberries, in the road near Mr Strode's lodge; he said he was nearly starving, and witness gave him some pence. - Mr Stephen Henry Pode, surgeon, stated that he noticed a peculiarity in the appearance of the deceased whilst at the Board-room - a remarkable brightness of the eye and determined expression, which he spoke of to a person in the room. It was similar to what he had observed in an insane person. The deceased stated at the Board that he had earned 1s. 6d. at Plymouth, but none of the Guardians asked him how he had supported himself since that time. Southwood admitted that he received a note from Mr Molesworth. Mr Molesworth stated most vehemently that the man was in distress, and no one appeared to doubt it. Witness examined the body, and he had no doubt that the wound was caused by three or four cuts, inflicted by the deceased's right hand. The disposition to insanity indicated by the appearance described would be aggravated by want of food, despair, or excitement. A great number of cases had come under witness's knowledge in which Southwood had refused relief, and the same thing had often occurred with Stanbury and witness had had occasion to insist upon relief being afforded by medical order. - Mark Luke Morice Hull was about to be examined as a witness, but after some discussion, his evidence was not received, from the part he had taken in reference to the deceased. - Sarah Cookram, Bennett Newbury, J. Hambly, Henry Lavers, Henry Stanbury, and Thos. Pearce, were examined but stated nothing material. - Stanbury and Southwood here made statements but were not sworn. It was stated that they agreed to employ the deceased on the roads, or in the house if he applied again. Instructions to this effect were left with Dawe, the Governor of the Workhouse. Other witnesses were examined, after which the Coroner summed up the evidence, and the Jury, after three quarters of an hours' consideration, returned the following as their verdict:- "That the deceased destroyed himself whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity." The Jury added the following statement in addition to their finding:- "They believe that the unsound state of mind in which deceased destroyed himself was intimately connected with the refusals of relief he had received from different parties in the administration of the poor law. The Jury also desire to say that the Chairman (Colonel Harris), Mr John Yonge, Mr Molesworth, and Mr Rivers appeared to have done all in their power to obtain relief for the deceased, but as respects all the other parties referred to in the evidence, the Jury abstain from offering any opinion and refer the consideration of the evidence to the Poor Law Commissioners. They beg also to express their opinion of the incompatibility of overseer and guardian being united in one person." The Jury then expressed their obligations to the Coroner for the kindness, patience and ability, with which he had conducted the investigation.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 January 1849
TAVISTOCK - The accident which happened a few weeks ago to MR HEATH, the governor of the Tavistock Union Workhouse, whilst returning home from Plymouth, in the Standard omnibus, belonging to Mrs Down, of Tavistock, has resulted we regret to state during the past week in his death. The deceased was one of the passengers of the omnibus, one of the wheels of which came off when arriving near the rock, on Roborough Down, and the omnibus was overturned, throwing the passengers out, all of whom escaped with little injury, except MR HEATH, who had his thigh broken. Although he was immediately conveyed home by Mr Isaac's omnibus, and medical assistance procured for him, yet from the injuries he had received, Dr Richard Sleeman (who had attended him) was unable to set the broken limb; and mortification supervening, amputation was performed on Tuesday morning last, but death ensued on the following day. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, at the Board room, of the Union Workhouse, Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. MR HEATH was highly respected, and his death is very greatly regretted, as he was a humane and kind hearted man, and has always behaved in the kindest manner, to the inmates of the Workhouse of which he has been for several years the Governor.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 January 1849
Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon before A. B. Bone, Esq., upon the body of MARY WOOLCOCK, aged 72 years, this aged female resided in a cottage in Waterloo-street, and lived alone. On Sunday a woman of the neighbourhood went to her house in the afternoon and not receiving any answer, obtained the door to be broken in, and the old woman was discovered lying upon the floor dead. The Jury returned the following verdict - "Died from the Effects of the Cold."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 January 1849
The Suicide At The Breakwater. - The unfortunate gentleman who drowned himself at the Breakwater, on Saturday week, was named ROBERT NEWCOMEN ALGEO, he was a gentleman of Yorkshire. An Inquest was held upon view of the body last week, and the verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 January 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. Supposed Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning at the "William the Fourth" public house, Cornwall Street, in this town, before Major Herring, Coroner of Saltash, for the purpose of investigating the circumstances of the death of ANN CHURCH, found dead in the water at North Corner Quay. - From the evidence which was taken the following facts were made apparent. The deceased who was about 20 years of age, had been living as a servant in the employ of Mr D. H. Hainsselin, auctioneer of this town for the last six weeks. During that time the son of Mr Hainsselin had missed a sovereign from the pocket of a waistcoat, and in a manner which seemed to throw suspicion upon the deceased. Mrs Hainsselin had missed two pair of stockings. The deceased said she knew nothing of them, but a pair of stockings like them were found, in her trunk, she said she had purchased them and had purchased them and had given 1 ¼d. for them. On Saturday, Mr Hainsselin called in Mr M. Richards, draper, and asked him, in the presence of deceased the value of the pair of stockings; Mr R. said 2s. 3d. - and a shawl which the deceased said she had bought for 5s.; Mr R. said was worth 8s. or 9s. This was last Saturday evening, Mr Hainsselin told her to go to bed, and that on Monday he should make further inquiry concerning the things he had lost. She left the room went down stairs and quitted the house. She went to a friend's house and stated in her conversation that her place was a comfortable one, and she was satisfied with her treatment. From the time she left the house of her acquaintance, no intelligence of her could be obtained, until Sunday morning when the circumstance of a bonnet and shawl being seen on the beach induced a further search to be made, when the body of the unfortunate young woman was discovered by a boatman at North Corner, the body was taken to the house at which the Inquest was held. - The deceased was the daughter of a sawyer at Liskeard; Mr Hainsselin remained up on Saturday night waiting for her, and kept the door open, until that time. He told the policemen if they saw her, to tell her to come home. The whole of the evidence having been gone into, the Jury then held a brief consultation and returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Late MR MARSHALL, of H.M.S. Cerberus. - About four or five weeks since, during a night of most tempestuous weather, JAMES MARSHALL, then gunner of H.M.S. Cerberus, in this harbour, who was keeping guard on board of her, was missed from the ship. He was supposed to have fallen from the vessel into the river, and to have been drowned; his body, however, was not discovered, and his wife, whom he had recently married, and his friends, were in a deplorable condition of doubt and suspense, until Tuesday (yesterday) morning, when the body of the ill-fated man was observed by a sawyer, named Bailey, floating near the Ferry beach, Morice Town. The body was brought on shore, much mutilated and disfigured. A Jury was immediately called together for the purpose of holding an Inquest, which was made upon view of the body, before Major Herring, the Coroner of Saltash, at Kent's Ferry House Inn, Morice Town. In the course of the evidence it was stated that the last time he was heard on the night he was missed was to strike the half-past seven bells; the night was dreadfully windy. He was aged 56 years. By his death being made certain through the discovery of his remains, his wife, who has a family, will obtain an annuity. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "Drowned while in the execution of his duty."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 January 1849
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last at a small Farm House, called Uppaton, in the parish of Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., coroner, on the body of THOMAS GRANVILLE, aged 18 years. He resided with his father, MR JOHN GRANVILLE, who rents Uppaton Farm, of the Duke of Bedford, and met with his death on Friday last, whilst ploughing in a field alone, where he was driving the horses, and holding the plough at the same time. In the field there is a shored pit, which some miners a few years since left open, and the horses being near it by some means falling, and young GRANVILLE no doubt, endeavouring to get the horses out, fell and met with his death. On his forehead there was a mark of a blow, perhaps given by one of the horses which may have stunned him. He was found lying under one of the horses in the pit quite dead, and must have remained in that position two hours. His absence was not observed until the family expected him home to dinner, when a girl was sent to call him and found him in the situation described. She gave an alarm and the body was soon removed as were also the horses, which were taken out unhurt. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 February 1849
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday evening a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon view of the body of HENRIETTA BEER, late a widow of a Marine, who died five or six years since. The deceased died in the deepest poverty, on Thursday last. The circumstances of her death were rumoured to be at least singular, and the Coroner in consequence of the reports which came to his knowledge, directed the convening of the Jury, which was composed of the most respectable tradesmen of the town. The first witness called was a nurse of the Workhouse, she deposed that she had been called by Mr Edwards, the relieving officer, to attend as nurse upon the deceased at her home, who was lying there ill of an abscess in the side. Mr Giles, parish surgeon, attended to her; witness remained with deceased until Thursday, when, at between 5 and 6 o'clock, she died. Mr Giles had not visited deceased since that day fortnight and then he had not seen her for a week previously, and had only come after repeated requests made to him by the witness; when he came he said her complaint was in the head, but he did not prescribe any medicine for her. On Thursday deceased complained of being worse. Witness left her and applied to Mr Pardon, the relieving officer for the district, but he was so much engaged with the people applying for relief he could not attend to her. When she returned she found the deceased had expired. Deceased lay on a small mattress with a milled puff and a charity blanket, as her bedding, and her wearing apparel was almost entirely gone. This was obvious to any person visiting her. Witness showed a note stating that the deceased was ill, to Pardon, on Tuesday, he told her to take it to the court, which was open on Wednesday, she did so, the Governor ordered Pardon to visit the deceased, when she (witness) saw Pardon on Thursday, he said he did not see the use of coming out that night, as she would have her money the next day, Friday; deceased had 3s. a week from the parish for herself and two children, she had no fire from Monday to Thursday night, she was in great want. The examination of other witnesses occupied the Court a considerable time, some of them were neighbours of the deceased, they stated facts which tended to show a great want of attention on the part of the parish officials to the case of the poor woman. The sitting was adjourned at a late hour and resumed on Monday evening, when other witnesses were examined and circumstances were detailed throwing the odium of inhumanity upon the conduct of the surgeon of the district, and Mr Pardon and Mr Edwards, relieving officers. The evidence, however, which was very interesting, we are unable to report. The statement of Messrs. Whipple and Eales, surgeons, who made a post mortem examination of the body decided the Jury in naming the direct causes of the death of deceased, which they did by arriving at the following verdict:- That deceased died of apoplexy by Visitation of God; to this, however, they added the following minute which is sufficiently expressive of the feeling entertained generally by those who listened to the evidence. "The Jury feel it their bounden duty to express their deep regret at the extreme illness and destitution of the deceased for several weeks past, and which they think should have met with prompt and decisive attention from the Workhouse Authorities, instead of which her distress and sickness appear to have been overlooked and neglected by them."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 April 1849
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An important Enquiry into the cause of the death of an individual named ROBERT COLLEY, a marine, residing in Stonehouse, was held yesterday forenoon, before the Coroner, A. Bone, Esq., and a respectable Jury, at the Queen's Arms Inn, Stonehouse. - The deceased had for some time been suffering from stricture, and circumstances attending his death had rendered it necessary that an Inquest should be held upon view of his body. - James Sheppard, surgeon, was sworn and stated, that on the 10th inst., he had been called to attend upon the deceased at a house in St. Mary-street, Stonehouse, the deceased was in bed suffering from inflammation of the scrotum, the epidermis on the thighs was exfoliating, he had been suffering from stricture of the urethra for 12 months. He attended on the deceased from that day to the day of his death, which happened on the evening of the 22nd inst. The inflammation did not subside on the 13th inst. Mortification ensued and the deceased gradually sank until his death. On the 17th inst., Mr Sheppard made known to the deceased the approach of his death when the deceased made a statement which was committed on paper, and was then produced in court, by Mr Richard Rodd, solicitor. - Richard Rodd, solicitor, was then sworn, and read the statement of the deceased, which was attested by J. Ingle, Esq., Magistrate, it was as follows:- ROBERT COLLEY, being very ill stated, I have been long suffering from disease, and last Wednesday week, I appeared to Mr Hallett, James-street, Devonport. He did not examine me, I told him I had stricture. He asked me how old the stricture was, I told him about 13 or 14 years. He give me a box of pills and a box of ointment, for which I paid him 5s. 6d. He told me it would draw out the stricture, and I was to use the ointment where I felt pain. I had no redness there before I used the ointment, I rubbed a little that night and the following morning the parts were very sore and painful, and red. I used it on the following morning and night, and have used three times. On Saturday after, I went to Mr Hallett. It took me 2 hours and a half to go there and back again. I carried back the ointment to Mr Hallett, I shewed the parts to him, which were much swollen. He told me to knock of the ointment, and use milk and water. He did not ask me where I lived, and he did not tell me to have a medical man. He said "if I could stand, that he could not cure me." It was signed by ROBERT COLLEY, John Ingle, magistrate, Richard Rodd, clerk. - Mr Sheppard was re-examined, he said: He saw the deceased six days after the day on which he went according to the statement produced to Mr Hallett, he should conclude from the deceased's statement, that the inflammation of the parts was produced by the ointment of Hallett. It was the inflammation which resulted in the mortification which caused the death of the deceased. He considered decidedly that when the deceased went to the Mr Hallett on Saturday the 7th inst., and shewed Mr Hallett such an inflammation as it appears then existed that the plain duty of a medical adviser was to have taken active steps to secure, if possible, the reduction of that disease. He thought means ought then to have been taken to reduce the inflammation, any medical person would have thought there was probability of increase of inflammation during the three days from the 7th to the 10th. There were different kinds of mercurial ointment but he did not think a quantity of the size of a pea rubbed in would produce severe inflammation. It was a common thing to rub in such ointment without injury. He thought the walking exercise was injurious. He could not take the responsibility to say that it might have been evident to a competent medical man that the want of prompt medical assistance to COLLEY in the state in which he was on the 7th inst., would be probably fatal to him. - After this evidence had been adduced, the Coroner informed Mr Hallett, who was present, that an Enquiry such as the present, was not one, necessarily charging any person with a crime, but was simply one to ascertain, so far as possible, the cause of the death of the deceased person, that the evidence which had been given, certainly appeared to affect (he did not say in what degree) Mr Hallett himself, that he (the Coroner) would not receive any statement except on oath, and he therefore would not hear the observations which Mr Hallett appeared disposed to make, unless he was sworn. He thought it his duty at the same time to say that no man is bound to criminate himself, but if after this caution which he wished Mr H. seriously to consider, if he wished to make statement on oath, he Mr Bone would receive it. - John Hallett upon oath, said I am druggist and chemist at Devonport. I do not remember anyone of the name COLLEY, I remember a man coming to my dispensary Devonport for spasmodic stricture, but who he was or where he lived I do not know, for which I administered compound camphorated ointment of which I give him a box, the ointment was a compound of mercurial ointment and camphor according to the present London Pharmacopeia. I do not remember the same man coming to me a second time, I remember him showing himself on one occasion, I remember a man coming and returning the ointment, I do not remember what his appearance was, when he returned it, I think milk and water would reduce violent inflammation, but don't remember the man at all. - The Coroner then stated there was some further evidence in the case, which he thought it right should be adduced, and therefore adjourned the Inquiry until Friday next at half-past ten o'clock in the morning.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 May 1849
EAST STONEHOUSE - Adjourned Coroner's Inquest at Stonehouse. - The Inquest before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, to Inquire as to the cause of the death of ROBERT COLLEY, formerly a private in the Royal Marines, having been adjourned from Tuesday, in order that a post mortem examination of the body might be made and afford opportunity for further evidence to be obtained, was resumed on Friday, at half-past 10 o'clock at the Queen's Arms Inn, Stonehouse. - The facts brought out before the Coroner and Jury at their first sitting on this case were briefly these:- the deceased, ROBERT COLLEY, had for 12 or 13 years been afflicted with stricture of the urethra, and having unsuccessfully tried a variety of means to obtain relief, he some weeks since was induced to apply to Mr Hallett, who is well known in the neighbourhood for the perseverance with which he has, for many years, caused the walls in the towns, and the gate-posts and trees in the country, to be placarded with announcements of his wonderful cures, &c. The poor man, induced by the extraordinary things represented to be done by "Dr Hallett," as his bills set him forth, applied to that person at his "Dispensary" in Devonport, and according to a statement made and attested before a Justice of the Peace just before he died, it appears that Hallett give him a box of ointment which he was directed to apply to the affected parts and a box of pills which he was directed how to take, and for both of which articles he paid 5s. 6d. He followed the directions, and shortly after applying the ointment, his symptoms became much worse, and on the day or two after, he walked to Hallett's from his home in St. Mary's-street, Stonehouse, a distance of about a mile, and saw Mr Hallett, and returned him the ointment, stating the result its application had produced. He was directed by Hallett to apply a little warm milk and water. He stated he was about two hours and a half walking to Devonport and back. He became worse and applied to Dr Sheppard, who found the patient suffering from extensive and strong inflammation, and in great danger. Mortification supervened, and the poor fellow died; but prior to this melancholy event he made a statement of the circumstance above alluded to before John Ingle, Esq., Justice of the Peace. On the former sitting of the Inquest, it was stated by Mr Hallett that the ointment brought back to him by a man, but whether COLLEY or not, he did not know, he had burnt; but that the ointment he remembered supplying to deceased was composed of camphorated mercurial ointment and spirits of wine. Dr Sheppard appeared doubtful as to whether the quantity stated to be applied by the patient, (viz. a piece the size of a pea) would have produced the inflammation which had no doubt produced deceased's death. The Inquiry at this stage was adjourned, in the hope that the widow of COLLEY, who was in a very low desponding state, would have been sufficiently recovered to be examined before the Coroner and Jury, and to give time for making a post mortem examination of the body. - On the reopening of the Court on Friday, Dr Sheppard stated that from the exceedingly high state of nervous excitement of the widow, a state almost approaching insanity, he was afraid she would not be well enough to be examined. He had left her endeavouring to get up to come before the Jury, but, as the least thing would upset her and bring on hysterics, he was afraid the nurse would not be able to bring her down, nor did he think, if she were present, that she would be in a fit state to be questioned. - Mr G. H. E. Rundle, of the firm of Beer and Rundle, solicitors, Devonport, entered the room with Mr Hallett, and stated to the Coroner that, by his permission, he (Mr Rundle) desired to attend that court on behalf of Mr Hallett. The coroner at once consented and Dr Sheppard having been sworn, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of ROBERT COLLEY, and had found the affected parts internally in such a dreadful state of disorganization from disease, as to make it impossible to discover their state previous to the inflammation. The external appearance afforded but little indication of the amount of internal disease and disorganisation. Altogether the examination he had made neither confirmed nor altered his opinion as to the cause of death. - Mr Rundle put several questions to Dr Sheppard, who in reply stated that the stricture under which the deceased had suffered was a very bad one, although not one of the very worst type; that he had attempted to use the catheter, but without success; that an injudicious use of that instrument might produce death; that the inflammation of which deceased died might have been produced by other cause than the application of this ointment. - In reply to a Juror, Dr Sheppard said, the internal disorganisation was the result of active disease; and in reply to the coroner, that the external inflammation would probably produce the internal inflammation and disorganisation. In reply to further questions by Mr Rundle, he stated that he should not have recommended the use of a stimulating or mercurial ointment - he should have given some sedative application. - Mr Hallett was next sworn. He said he recollected some man bringing back a box with some ointment to his dispensary, but he did not know who the man was or whether it was within six months. When pressed by repeated questions from the Coroner as to the period of the man returning the box of ointment, the witness admitted that it was within three months, and that it might have been within a month. - The Coroner rebuked the witness, telling him that he had not given his answers in a way to do any credit to himself. - Allusion having been made to the newspaper reports of the examination on Tuesday, Mr Hallett said he had much occasion for complaining of the report of the Journal; which was not correct, more especially of the connection of his name in the heading with the words "Suspicious Case." A Juryman suggested that they (the Jury) had nothing to do with that, but that he could seek his remedy in an action for libel, to which Mr Hallett replied "Yes, I know it." - The examination of this witness was continued for some time, but nothing material was elicited further than has been already stated. In respect to the ointment in the box, witness produced a vessel containing he said the same sort, adding that he used a half hundred weight of it a year. In reply to Mr Yeo, one of the Jurors, witness said he was not a physician nor a surgeon. - Sarah Davey, the nurse who attended on deceased in his last days was called, but as she could not speak as to his state before he applied to Hallett, she was not examined. It having been ascertained that the widow could not be produced before the Jury and that if another adjournment took place, such was the state of her health that her being then able to give evidence would be very doubtful. - The Coroner said that he had been anxious to have obtained the evidence of the widow, in order to have enabled the Jury to form some opinion of the state of the deceased before his application to Mr Hallett. But this had been found impossible; and in respect to the widow of COLLEY, from the state she was in, it was not likely they should have been able to obtain much information had she been present, nor did it appear there was much ground to hope she would be better able to give evidence, if they should again adjourn. He had been anxious to obtain evidence of the state of the man before his application to Mr Hallett, as if assistance was not rendered either from ignorance or carelessness of the party who had taken upon himself the medical care of the deceased, it would become a serious question for the consideration of the Jury, whether the person so acting had not laid himself open to a criminal charge. It was of little consequence whether or not the inflammation were produced by the ointment, if it were proved that death ensued from the want of attention or ignorance of the party who had taken upon himself the responsibility of treating a patient. The Coroner at considerable length placed the case before the Jury. - The room was cleared for consultation, and after a delay of about an hour, it was re-opened. - The Coroner, in declaring the verdict, said - Mr Hallett, the Jury desire me to mention to you that they have, on this occasion, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased, ROBERT COLLEY, died from the effects of inflammation, but by what means that inflammation was produced they will not take upon themselves to determine. They wish me to say that they think there has been neglect in this case. They believe that if the deceased, when he exhibited himself to you on the 7th inst. had been in the same state he was on the 10th, and if you had dismissed him without any caution or advice, that you would have stood in a very different position - one that might have brought on you a criminal charge. I have before stated during this examination, that if a person takes upon himself the responsibility to treat patients, he is bound to be competent to discharge such a responsibility. The Jury believe that the deceased was in a bad state when he applied to you, but there has been no evidence as to his condition at that time, and consequently they have felt themselves called upon to return the verdict they have. If it could be proved that the deceased was in such a condition when he called upon you as to make it manifest that his life would be endangered without prompt medical advice, and you dismissed him without recommending such advice, and he had died in consequence of not receiving such medical advice, then you would have rendered yourself liable to the charge of manslaughter. And they are of opinion that not only yourself, but every person that will take upon himself the management of a patient, is bound to act with care and vigilance in the discharge of such an important duty. It is not only necessary to see the patient, but to take care that proper medicines are administered, and proper cautions given to the individual to prevent the danger and perhaps fatal consequences, that might otherwise ensue. - Mr Hallett:- May I not be allowed to reply? - I could say a good deal in answer to what has been said. - The Coroner: No sir, that would be very irregular. - Mr Hallett: Then I suppose I must take this as a vote of censure passed on me. - The Coroner: You may take it for what you think proper; but I think the less you say about it the better.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 May 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An important Enquiry was held on Monday, into the cause of the death of STEPHEN SNAPE, late a private in the 82nd regiment, quartered in this town. The Inquest was held at the Tamar Inn, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner and the following Jury:- George Gould, Foreman; John Tregear, George Pain, William Crocker, William Hockin, William Mullis, Samuel Bond, William Bews, James Kent, James Bowden, Roger Hortop, William George, and Samuel Elliott. - The Coroner explained the duties of the Jury, which, he said, would be first to view the body of the deceased, and then to hear the evidence which would be produced. - The Jury having returned from viewing the body of the deceased, which was much disfigured in the face and had red marks upon the trunk, the witnesses were called. - Thomas Fluel was sworn, and stated himself to be a custom-house officer. He said, I live in Plymouth; about half-past six on Sunday, A.M., I was on board the smack called the Caroline, then lying at the quay, off the Tamar Canal; on coming on deck at that time, I looked over the quarter, and saw the feet of a man above the water, and discovered upon further notice the body of a man; I called three persons and a constable; after he came the body was taken up, and taken charge of by him. The depth of water at the place where deceased was lying was about a foot; the tide was receding; he was lying across the canal, about midway from its entrance. I was up until 12 o'clock on Saturday, it was raining, and blowing freshly at that time. I saw the body was dressed in the uniform of a soldier. - John Shadwick said, I am a peace officer; I took charge of the body of deceased, and saw it brought to the place where it now lies in the Tamar Inn; I examined the uniform which was on the deceased, it belonged to the 82nd regt. - James Rowe was examined on oath. He said, I am a labourer in the Dock-yard; I live in the Tamar Inn. On Sunday morning last, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in my bedroom in the Tamar Inn, when I heard a whistle, and a man's voice hallooing; it appeared like the sound of a person in the state of being strangled; I did not then look out, but in two or three minutes, I heard the whistle and hallooa a second time; I then looked out; I did not see anyone at first, but on looking down towards the canal, which is within sight of the window, I saw a man stagger backwards as if struck, and fall on his face and hands; he rose up, and went in towards the wall, from whence I heard sounds, as of persons talking, but I could not see anyone; I saw two then come out and struggle; one of them was the man I had seen fall. - By the Coroner: How did you distinguish him? - Witness: He was covered with mud; it was a dark night, but there was a gas light near; I observed the colour of his dress. They had a scuffle, exchanged two or three blows, and I put on my dress to go down. I went alone to the spot; when I came down, I found three there, two besides the soldier; the soldier was stooping down taking up his breast plate; he had his belt in his right hand; as soon as I came within six or seven feet of them, the two men went into the house of Mr Elliott, the stone-cutter; he keeps lodgings. Mr Elliott was standing in his house, with the door in his hand, and another man was standing behind him looking over his shoulder; the soldier went to the door, and made a blow at the men there - the soldier appeared to me to be drunk; I knew the deceased very well; I can't say if the other men were drunk. When he made the blow, Mr Elliott closed the door; then I gave him (deceased) his cap and breast plate. I asked him to go; he said, "I am not going;" I then came away and left him, and returned to my bedroom. I did not hear any more noise. The spot where I saw deceased scuffling with the man was about ten feet from the quay, and two-thirds from the entrance of it. - Mr Fluel stated it was about half-tide and flowing when he went to bed at midnight on Saturday; there might have been four feet of water in the canal then. - Thomas Elliott was sworn, he said: I am a stone mason, I keep lodgings, and have four lodgers. About quarter -past twelve on Sunday morning last, I and my wife were going to bed, and I heard a whistle as through a man's fingers and someone say "a-hoy," and just afterwards I heard a rattling at the door; I went to the door and said, "who is there?" I heard a noise as of two persons scuffling; I went outside, and saw one of my lodgers, called Robert Tucker, and a soldier, having hold of each other; Tucker was trying to get towards the door, and the other was trying to get from the door. Tucker said frequently, "I'm home now at my lodgings," and the soldier said, "You must come with me," Tucker did not appear angry, but the soldier was handling him roughly. The soldier said, "I will have you, you shall come with me;" Tucker said, "I am home, go you home, that is the best for you;" Tucker was intoxicated, no less than the soldier. I put my hand on them both, and said to the soldier, "now go home;" and in a moment he caught Tucker by the hair of the head, and they were down in the road in an instant; they tumbled about in the mud for a minute whilst on the ground; I did not see any blows pass; the soldier was under Tucker; I did not see any blows struck; I am satisfied Tucker did not strike him; he was trying to free himself. At length they got up, and when Tucker made for the door, according to my judgment, he behaved with much moderation; the deceased rushed at him again and laid hold of Tucker; they had another struggle and both fell into the mud; the soldier was under both times; they arose by themselves; Tucker ran towards the door, and the soldier again seized him by the waistcoat and fell to the ground a third time, with Tucker upon him. Tucker's waistcoat was torn off his back; when they got up again, I took Tucker into the house; I stood outside and the soldier wanted to go in; he caught hold of me, but I got him off, and went inside; the deceased ran for his belt, and made a blow with it; I shut the door and a tenant of mine fastened it; for some time we remained inside; the soldier was quiet outside; the tenant, named Manuel, opened the door, and the soldier again approached the door, which was shut and re-fastened; we went to bed. In the morning I saw a soldier's belt and stock in the road. Tucker had been at the Royal Standard Inn on Saturday night. - Henry Manuel, the tenant of Mr Elliott, above spoken of, said he was an excavator at Morice Town; he heard the soldier say "I will fight you like a man;" Tucker was inside at that time. the witness corroborated previous evidence. - The Coroner at this point, after some conversation with L. P. Tripe, Esq., surgeon, stated to the Jury, that it would be requisite for the Inquest to be adjourned, as it was necessary that a post mortem examination of the body should be made by the surgeon. The Inquest was accordingly adjourned until Tuesday afternoon. - Tuesday - The Jury assembled at two o'clock and the Coroner having taken the chair, Robert Winnacott was examined. He stated, I keep a beer-shop in Morice Town. I remember the deceased person coming into my house, at about half-past ten o'clock; he called for a pint of beer; I served the pint; he drank some, and left about twenty minutes after, when I cleared my house. I then heard a noise outside. I saw the soldier and a man named Monaghan fighting; I led the soldier away; Monaghan did not follow; he was not sober. I went in and shut my door; I heard someone knock; I opened the door and the soldier asked for lodging for the night; I said I had no beds in the house vacant; he wished my good night and left. - L. P. Tripe, Esq., member of the Royal College of Surgeons, said, I saw the body of the deceased on Sunday afternoon, lying in an outhouse of the Tamar Inn, Morice Town, Devonport. The body was quite dead, and appeared to have been dead many hours; it was clothed in the uniform of a private soldier of the 82nd Regiment; the clothes were wet. On examining the face, before he was stript, a good deal of the skin and flesh of the face, especially round the eyes, lower lip and the ears, were gone; there was a scratch over the chin, and a slight mark; as of a bruise, under the left eye. The marks appeared to me to have been made by crabs or fish; the eyes were open, and the pupil dilated and a great deal of froth was oozing from the mouth. On stripping the body, I saw no marks of violence on him, except a slight bruise on the right knee and one a little below the left knee; it appeared as if he had probably gone to the ground with some force on the knees. This morning I opened the body of the deceased; the brain was very much congested as were also the lungs, and the venous side of the heart; the stomach was full of indigested food; the windpipe was filled with frothy mucus; there was a great deal of fluid mixed with the food in the stomach; I can't say whether it was salt water or not. From my examination, I form the decided opinion that the deceased died from drowning, and not from any injury received by him previously. There was a greater degree of congestion than I should have expected from drowning; but not greater than might probably be found in the body of one who had been drinking; there were three great excitements in the case, that of drowning, that of drink, and that of anger. - James Thomas, labourer, said he knew Monaghan. On the evening of Saturday, at twelve o'clock, he had seen him and deceased fighting; Monaghan's mother was lying dead at the time; he saw Monaghan go home. - John Marley, colour-sergeant to the 82nd Regt., stated the deceased, STEPHEN SNAPE, was a private in that regiment; he was 20 years old and had been in the regiment two years and nine months; he was a sober man generally; I last saw him on Saturday, the 19th inst., at about twelve o'clock, when he was on parade. - Sarah Elliott was examined. She corroborated the evidence of her husband. - Amelia Pincher gave evidence that Richard Tucker had been requested by her, to assist in getting a soldier (the deceased) out of her house, near the quay, on Saturday night about twelve o'clock. he had done so only at her request, and she never saw the soldier afterwards. - Robert Tucker was sworn, and stated he had been in the royal Standard Inn, William-street, on Saturday night. He added, as I was coming up the street at twelve o'clock, Amelia Pincher asked me to get a man out of her house; I did so; I never saw him before; he asked me to go to Plymouth; I would not; he said I should, and he seized me, and began to whistle; I got alarmed, and called for Thomas Elliott. He then repeated evidence similar to that of Thomas Elliott. - The Coroner then made several remarks upon the evidence and the Jury returned the following verdict:- "Found Drowned in the water of the Tamar Canal; but how or by what means, there is not sufficient evidence to show." The Court then closed.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 31 May 1849
EAST STONEHOUSE - Found Drowned. - On Saturday morning, 26th May instant about half-past six o'clock, the ferryman who plies from Catdown to Oreston, found the body of a young woman in the centre of the stream. She was of middle stature, apparently nineteen years of age, florid complexion, full face, and brown curly hair, was respectably attired having a striped stuff dress, [?] figured stripped apron, light victorine, black stockings and black laced boots; her pockets were a pair of gloves, handkerchief, bible and hymn book in which the name of AGNES PETHERICK was written on a ticket, showing deceased to have been a member of the Christian Society. Deceased had on neither cap or bonnet, and there were bruises of a suspicious nature about the forehead. The body being recognised as that of AGNES PETHERICK, a resident of George-street, Stonehouse, was conveyed thither, and on Monday an Inquest was held at the Three Kings, public house, before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner. The state of the body, in the circumstances under which it was found, and the known steady and regular habits of the deceased, created very considerable interest in the neighbourhood, and the prevailing opinion among the gossips of the neighbourhood was that the unfortunate woman must have come to her death by some foul means. Several witnesses were examined, but their evidence went simply to verify the facts above stated, and the Enquiry was adjourned until Tuesday, in order that a post mortem examination of the body might be made. On Tuesday the Inquest was resumed at the Queen's Arms Inn, and Mr H. Perry, Surgeon, and several other witnesses were examined. Mr Perry, having examined the body, stated that there were no marks of violence, and the appearances were in every respect, such as he should expect to find in cases of drowning. His opinion was, that deceased came to her death by drowning. The other witnesses stated, that a boat had been observed about one o'clock in the morning going in the direction of Oreston, from Plymouth, and that a man and woman were aboard it; that they were apparently angry with each other and two of the witnesses heard the man say to the woman in angry tone, " "I'll throw you overboard, if you do not hold your tongue." A boy, 14 years old, a resident at Oreston, deposed to the picking up of the deceased's bonnet on the shore, where it had been apparently washed in at a place about a half-a-mile westward of the spot where the body was picked up. There was no evidence to show that deceased had been seen near the water Friday night, she having been last seen in the street, not far from her home, at about eight o'clock that evening; nor, did it appear that anyone knew of her having on any previous occasion walking by the water-side. After the Coroner had summed up the facts of the case, the Jury consulted for a few minutes, and then returned as their verdict - "That the deceased was found Drowned, but how she came into the water the Jury have not sufficient evidence to say."

EAST STONEHOUSE - On the 26th instant, at East Stonehouse, an Inquest was held before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM LAMBERT, who was found on the 24th inst., lying on the deck of the Grecian sloop, in Hamoaze, near to the Dock-Yard, in a state of insensibility, and who was found by the Jury to have died a few minutes afterwards from Asphyxia produced by excessive drinking.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 14 June 1849
DITTISHAM - An Inquest was held at the village of Capton, in this parish, on Tuesday last, on view of the body of JOHN WOTTON, a labourer on the farm of Mr Trant, of Little Coombe, in the same parish, who dropped down dead just as he was commencing his labours on Monday morning. It appeared from the evidence, that deceased met with a fall about a fortnight since, which had not, however, been taken any notice of, and he had continued to go to work as usual. Dr Thompson, of Totnes, who accompanied the Coroner, Mr Gribble, gave it as his opinion that death was clearly occasioned by the fall. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, the 11th instant, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of JOHN WHEELER, aged 88 years; he was a pensioner from the Army; he was taken suddenly ill in his bed, in the Cross Keys, Lower Lane, Plymouth, at about half-past three o'clock, on the night of Sunday and died shortly after; the verdict returned was "Died by the Visitation of God." This case was not one of cholera.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 5 July 1849
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall on Monday before J. Edmonds, Esq., and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN STACY, a prisoner who died on Sunday morning. From the evidence of the surgeon, death had been caused by disease of the lungs. Verdict, "Died from Visitation of God." Prisoner had been committed to take his trial at the approaching sessions. It is said that he was a returned convict, and had not long been in the country.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Wednesday last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the infant son, aged 5 weeks, of MR W. B. BOON, ironmonger, Whimple-St., Plymouth. It appeared from the evidence that the mother of the child was in the habit of taking laudanum, and kept the bottle containing it on the chimney piece, where was placed a bottle containing cough mixture for the child. The infant appearing unwell in the night, MRS BOON requested the nurse to pour out a dose of the mixture, which she did, but unfortunately took the wrong bottle, and a spoonful of laudanum was thus given to the child, from the effects of which he died at about 6 o'clock in the morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from the effects of Laudanum administered by the mother Accidentally."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 12 July 1849
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was holden at the Plymouth Guildhall on Monday last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH BURNS, aged 24 years, who was found dead in bed at the Mechanic Inn, 35 St. Andrew-street, on Sunday morning last. Verdict, "Found Dead, which resulted from disease of several days, but the precise nature of that disease unknown to the Jurors."

TORQUAY - A Fatal Accident. - On Friday evening, June 29th, WILLIAM CUMMING, foreman of the quarrymen, was standing on the edge of a precipion, giving directions, when the earth under his feet gave way, and he fell a depth of 200 feet. He was taken up quite dead, and shockingly mutilated. An Inquest was held on the body the next day, and a verdict in accordance returned. He was 56 years of age, and has left a widow and eight children.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 26 July 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner of Devonport, at the Sportsman's Arms, on the body of GEORGE EDWARD SCANTLEBURY, a blacksmith belonging to her Majesty's Dockyard. It appeared in evidence that the deceased, with some other persons, were, on Sunday afternoon last, at the Milehouse Inn. They there drank gin and water, and remained till about six o'clock in the evening, and were joined by two females. From thence they proceeded to the Camel's Head, and there they remained till a quarter before nine o'clock, and whilst there, the deceased fell asleep. The deceased, with the two young women, and two young men, left the Camel's Head, and walked on a little way, and then he went back to get two cigars; he returned, and they all walked on again. Deceased went to the water side, very near to the turnpike gate which leads from the Saltash road southward towards Devonport. The deceased called by name one of the persons to go into the water with him several times, and he was in the act of talking off his clothes, and the person called to by the deceased at length went down and went also into the water. On getting into the water, the deceased told him to follow him through the archway under the road. The person who followed the deceased whose name is William Worsley went a little way under the archway when the water did not reach above his middle, and then he returned. The tide was running with them as they went to go thro' the archway, and Worsley dragged himself back, but with difficulty and did not see deceased any more after seeing him go under the archway. Worsley saws the deceased picked up dead the following morning very early. The verdict of the Jury was that, Accidentally by some means unknown to the Jury, the deceased became Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 August 1849
EAST STONEHOUSE - Preliminary Enquiry By The Coroner. - On Tuesday morning a preliminary Enquiry was held at the Queen's Arms Inn, in Edgecumbe-street, respecting the death from cholera of a man named GILL, a mason by trade, in Lane's-court. Mr Bone, the Coroner, instituted the Enquiry under the following circumstances. Dr Sheppard, a county magistrate, received a letter from Captain Toup Nicholas, Superintendent of the Royal Naval Hospital, stating that the deceased had called on him with a letter signed by Mr Kay, assistant-surgeon of the Royal Marines, setting forth the existence of a very unwholesome nuisance in the immediate neighbourhood of his house, arising from the deposit of night-soil, &c., on the quay, Mr Pike's slaughter-house, and the bad state of the drain of Lane's-court, which the man stated to Capt. Nicholas he feared would be the death of him or his family. On Saturday it appears the man was seized with cholera, and on Sunday he died. Captain Nicholas therefore submitted to Dr Sheppard the desirability of a Coroner's Inquest being held; and desired him to take the necessary steps. Dr Sheppard thereupon communicated with Mr Bone, who gave direction for summoning a Jury. The Churchwardens addressed a letter to Mr Bone, enclosing statements from some of the medical gentlemen, representing the great alarm, if not danger, which would arise from viewing the body after the man had been dead forty-eight hours and also buried. Mr Bone consequently requested the attendance of some of the medical gentlemen, members of the Board of Guardians, and others of the respectable inhabitants of Stonehouse, to meet him for a preliminary Enquiry; his object in which, he explained to them, would be to hear all the evidence touching the matter, which could be brought, in order that he might be enabled to judge if there was a positive necessity for holding an Inquest, according to law. If he found it necessary to do so it would then be imperatively necessary to exhume the body of the deceased. Mr Bone explained that the Board of Guardians were not legally bound to act as a Board of Health; nor were they legally responsible for the state of the town. But, as a voluntary act, they deserved credit for their exertions; and would, probably, be otherwise held responsible in public opinion. - Dr Isbell said he first attended the deceased about half-past three on Sunday morning, and found him suffering from cholera, of which he died at seven in the evening. On the quay, behind deceased's house, there was a large accumulation of night-soil and the sweepings of the town, within 25 feet of the window, and from which there was an effluvia of the most offensive description. All this filth was carried through Water-lane to the quay, and the quantity which was spilt, in carriage, caused a most abominable stench, which he thought was quite sufficient to produce, or, at all evens, increase fever of any other disease. The inmates of GILL'S house had also called his attention to a drain which passed through the court, the smell from which was also most offensive. He was of opinion this effluvia was sufficient to accelerate the death of GILL. - Mr Chapple said he was a member of the Board of Guardians, who, acting as a Board of Health, had devoted a very great part of their time, during some weeks past, in giving their attention to all nuisances which they could find; and had served a great many notices on various individuals to remove the nuisances, and which had been promptly attended to by those individuals. The heap of soil in the present case was placed on the quay only till it could be removed elsewhere. He did not believe that to be the cause of the outbreak of cholera, at least, not so much owing to that as the importation they had in this locality from Stonehouse-lane; for no case of cholera had appeared in Stonehouse, until the Plymouth authorities had driven the people out of Stonehouse-lane, when they took refuge in the courts about Fore-street, Stonehouse; in fact, Stonehouse had for a long time had the credit of the cases in Stonehouse-lane. There existed no such place at the present day as Stonehouse-lane, the place so called was King-street, Plymouth. The Board of Guardians, on Thursday last, had a notice from Mr Eastlake, solicitor, signed by Captain Toup Nicholas, and Lieut. Tulloh, respecting the nuisance caused by the deposit of manure on the quay, belonging to Messrs. Cridland, Drown and Deacon, also Mr Pike's slaughter-house. The Board had their notice served on Saturday on those parties. Captain Nicholas had stated that eight marines had been buried from the Naval Hospital, who had been brought in from the locality now in question. That was not the case. Those marines had been brought from Barrack-street, George-street, and other places, but not from Rowe's or Lane's courts. - JOHN GILL said he was son of the deceased. On Saturday evening, when he came home from the country, where he had been at work all the week, his father complained of being unwell; he said the drain in the court was choked. It was then being cleared, and all the family suffered very much from the dreadful stench. His father had diarrhoea, and was also sick, and continued to get worse till he died on Sunday evening. - Mr W. D. Lane said he was a member of the Board of Surveyors. On Friday last, when he came home from the board, he saw a messenger from the Hospital, who said he had been sent by Captain Nicholas to see the state of the houses in that court. He told the messenger to go down to GILL'S house, which was his own property. The messenger came back to him and said the GILLS complained of his (Mr Lane's) privy being choked. He immediately sent for a man to examine it, and the drain was opened and cleared. The old man GILL was standing by and looking at the man's work when he opened it. The openings to examine the drain were made in the court and closed again on Saturday morning; and by Monday morning the privy and drain were thoroughly cleared. - MARY GILL, widow of the deceased, said her husband was in his sixty-fourth year; and that about a fortnight since he had complained of diarrhoea, which he thought had been caused by drinking a little cider. - Mr John Eastlake said he had instructions, as Admiralty solicitor from Captain Nicholas to take legal steps for the removal of the manure, &c., from the quay. He went to see it about ten days since, and a very great accumulation of filth was there. Capt. Nicholas had offered to send barges to remove it, and lime to throw on the manure. - Mr Henry Cridland said: On Saturday last I had notice to clear the quay. My own deposit was nothing but ashes and street sweepings. The deposits of Drown and Deacon have, I believe, some portion of night-soil. On receiving the notice, I issued 500 circulars to farmers and I have today made arrangements for the removal of 700 tons of manure immediately, so that there will be none deposited on the quay for many weeks. On Friday last I contracted with the Board of Guardians to remove all the soil of the parish without making any deposit in the parish. I am a fellmonger by trade, and I generally receive from the butchers 150 or 200 sheep skins every week, which are deposited on the quay, but I should be a very bad tradesman if I allowed them to get in an unwholesome state. - Capt. Nicholas said; he had found the smell very offensive in passing the quay in his b oat, and considering it must be injurious to patients brought by water, he had felt it his duty to take some steps to get it removed; and it was on public grounds he had made the communication he did to Dr Sheppard. - This seemed to be all the evidence relating to the matter. - Mr bone then said, from what he had heard, he thought it would not be necessary to hold a full Inquest. He should carefully read through the evidence, he had obtained, and should it then appear to him there was any material point which required such an investigation he was ready as his duty required to proceed with it; and he did not himself think there was such danger to be apprehended from the exhumation of the body as many people appeared to fear. In the present case, it had only been his object, as it was his province to endeavour to ascertain if there could be shown any wilful or criminal inattention to any notice which might have been served on those parties to whom the nuisances complained of belonged. The evidence he had heard, he thought, showed nothing of the sort, but that those parties had taken the most active and laudable means for their immediately removal. Had they neglected to do so, they would perhaps have found themselves under an imputation of manslaughter.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 6 September 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday an Inquest was held at the Workhouse, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of SUSANNA SANDERS, otherwise called SUSANNA BUTTERS, who was found drowned at North Corner on the morning of the second instant. It appeared in evidence that she had been out wandering about the streets from 11 o'clock the preceding night, till 2 o'clock on Sunday morning. She had been persuaded to go to her home, but did not do so, but left to speak to some man. About a quarter before 4 o'clock in the morning, she came to the room of Susanna Row, in Chapman Alley, Cornwall-street; she had been drinking, but was not very [?]; she was alone when she came in; she seemed cheerful and not to have been ill-used. Susanna How had known her for 12 months. Susanna How took the pin out of the top of her frock, and then the deceased said good night, but she did not go to bed. She did not remain upstairs 10 minutes, and then came [?]. How asked her what was the matter, she said "nothing at all." She went out, and about 3 hours afterwards she was found drowned. The deceased was a woman of the town - lived alone, and was much given to drink. The deceased, on leaving the room of Susanna How, had no bonnet on, she left it in the room. The Jury returned the following verdict "The deceased was found drowned in the water of the Hamoaze, but how or by what means she came to her death, no evidence appeared to the said Jurors."

PLYMOUTH - On Tuesday, three Inquests were held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner of the Borough of Plymouth, one was on the body of a boy, about twelve years of age, named BENJAMIN JOSEPH BOWYER, who met his death by falling into the water at Sutton Pool. A verdict of Accidental Death by Drowning was returned.
The second on the body of a female child found in Sutton Pool; and the third on the body of a male child found under the Hoe, both were still born.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 13 September 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - On Saturday week a sailor named GREET accidentally fell from one of the tops of the Nautilus Brig in the Sound, and struck against the side of the ship while falling. He immediately sunk. The body has since been recovered, and an Inquest held at the Military Hospital Inn, on Monday, before A. B. Bone, Coroner. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 4 October 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Smith's Tamar Inn, Morice Town, on Thursday evening, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named GEORGE MALLETT, whose death was supposed to have been occasioned from his having been struck on the head with a can on the day previous to his death. The Jury having been sworn, and having viewed the body, proceeded to examine the witnesses. The first called was JANE MALLETT, mother of deceased, being sworn, stated that her son went to the St. James' district school, in Moon-street; on Monday last he came home about one o'clock, and was then crying; she asked him what was the matter, and he said that Joshua Coe had struck him on the head with the cane; he seemed to be in great pain, and could not eat any dinner, but expressed a wish to go to bed; he went to bed, and slept for one hour and a half; he then got up for about half an hour, still crying and complaining in the head; he went to bed again still complaining of pain in his head, and about 12 o'clock the next morning he became much worse, and vomited a quantity of bloody matter; Dr Rowe was sent for on Tuesday, and came about half-past one o'clock, just before the deceased died; she did not observe any mark on his head, neither did she think of looking to see if there was any swelling; she never knew him complain in his head before; when he was in his sleep he breathed heavily. - Henry Joyner was then called; before he was sworn, one of the Jurors objected to the Rev. E. B. Hutchison remaining in the room, lest his presence should influence the witness in giving his evidence, and, although requested by the Coroner to remain, that gentleman immediately retired. He (Mr Joyner) then stated that he was the master at St. James' District National School; the deceased was entered there as a scholar last Tuesday fortnight; on Monday last he came at the usual hour, but not being able to say his lessons he was kept in; there were two pupil teachers in the school between the hours of twelve and one, and he was quite sure that the deceased had received no corporal punishment from either of them, for they had no authority whatever to inflict such punishment on any of the children; witness had given the teachers orders to send the deceased, and others who were kept in, home at one o'clock. The witness was asked by the Jury numerous questions respecting the detail and management of the school, which were difficult to reconcile with the subject of the Enquiry. - Thomas Henry Full was sworn, after a charge from the Coroner, on the nature of an oath, and that it was not required by law that he should say anything to criminate himself. He stated that he had been a pupil teacher in the school since the 1st of December 1848, that the boys were kindly treated and never chastised except by the master. The pupil teachers and monitors were strictly enjoined never to strike a boy. On Monday he remained in the school till one o'clock, and never saw anyone strike the deceased. - Dr Row having returned to the room, after making a post mortem examination of the body, by order of the Coroner, was sworn, and stated that he saw the deceased on Tuesday about half-past 1 in the afternoon, he was in bed, and lying on his right side, and breathing heavily; he only breathed once or twice after witness arrived; on examining the deceased's head externally he could not discover any mark, and he was of opinion that no serious blow had been inflicted; on opening the head and cutting into the scalp he found it quite sound, and not in the slightest degree injured, the vessels of the brain were a little congested and rather fuller than usual; on cutting into the brain a large quantity of fluid, at least a wine glass full or more, was discovered at the lower part, where there were one or two patches of inflamed membrane; the other portion of the brain was healthy; he was, therefore, of opinion that the deceased died of water on the brain, produced by natural causes; the quantity of water found on the brain could not have been produced in 48 hours; the deceased, he believed, was delicate and scrofulous. - By the Jury: He should think the disease had existed for at least a month; a blow in the head would have accelerated death in a person so diseased; but he had for some months attended a boy in William-street, afflicted with the same complaint - and he was at last found dead in his bed, having died without any exciting cause. - Edwin Hoskin was sworn, and stated that he was a monitor in the St. James' district school, and on Friday last, when he was taking the fourth class out in the school to read, the deceased, GEORGE MALLETT, was struck on the side of the head by the door, which closed in consequence of one of his school fellows knocking away a piece of iron, which kept the door back; the deceased cried a little, but when it came to his turn to read he did so, and never cried afterwards. - Richard John Carveth was sworn:- and deposed that he was a scholar in the school, and had seen the deceased fighting on Sunday last with a boy named Thomas Mutton, who usually attended the Methodist Sunday School in Gloucester Street. It was a real fight, and they were encouraged by some other boys. - Joshua Jonah Coe was sworn, and deposed that he was a pupil teacher in the school; he was present on Monday between twelve and one o'clock, but did not see anyone of the boys strike the deceased, neither did he strike him himself. He had orders not to strike any boy and he never did. - The Rev. A. B. Hutchison, who was present during the Enquiry, said that he felt deeply interested in this case, both on account of the sudden and melancholy death of the poor boy, and character of the pupil teacher, who seemed to be implicated. Notwithstanding the reflection which, at an earlier period of the Enquiry, had been made by one of the Jurors, upon the effect which is presence was likely to exert upon the testimony of one of the witnesses, he could truly and unhesitatingly say, that it was his earnest wish that the case should receive the most strict and searching enquiry, and he would be very happy to bring forward any and all the boys who were in the school at the time the deceased last left it, if the Jury considered it necessary; or assist in any other way that could be suggested. He described in what way the door referred to was situated, but expressed his belief that it could not have occasioned any serious injury to the boy. - The Coroner was glad to hear the remarks that had been made by Mr Hutchison. He had always regarded the school as one likely to prove a great blessing to the neighbourhood and from the deep interest manifested in its welfare by the Clergy of the district, there was to his mind prima facie ground for believing that the children were well looked after and kindly treated. He then went carefully through the depositions, remarking that he did not think there was any evidence whatever to show that the deceased had received any violent blow which would be likely to accelerate death, therefore he considered that the only verdict the Jury could come to was that the deceased died from natural causes, proceeding from water on the brain. - The room was then cleared, and after about an hour's deliberation the Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased died from Effusion of Water on the Brain, produced by Natural Causes; but whether accelerated or not by any other cause there was not sufficient evidence to enable them positively to determine."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 4 October 1849
PLYMOUTH - Important Coroner's Inquest. [continued from our last.] - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ELLEN ROBERTS, which was commenced on Tuesday, 25th September, was held on Tuesday last, at the Guildhall. J. Edmonds, Esq., presided. The Coroner stated that since their last meeting, which was adjourned for a week, to allow time for Mr Herepath to make an analysis of the parts of the deceased, a reply had been received from Mr Herepath, which however, would not be produced to the court, as he was of opinion, that if it was thought necessary to have the results of the analysis before the Jury, it ought to be given in via voce evidence, and he should have Mr Herepath down; but his own opinion was that such a course was not necessary. - The Foreman (Mr M. Swinburne) said he wished to express an opinion, entertained by the Jury generally, upon a matter of importance. As those proceedings originated in the Board of Health and he first intimation they received of the necessity of holding the Inquest came from that body, it appeared to them (the Jury) it would have been the duty of the Board of Health to have had someone here to represent them, and to conduct the case on their behalf. As the matters to be decided on were important and much concerned private property, the duty of prosecuting ought not to be left to the unprofessional powers of the Jury, especially as the gentleman who stood in the light of the defendant (Mr Payne) had the assistance of a skilful and learned professional friend. It certainly did look as if the Board of Health, which had originated the Enquiry, shrunk now from the responsibility of sifting the matter to the bottom. He could not reconcile their indifference with the fact of their existence as a public body. - The Coroner said, he should to a certain extent agree with the Jury. He should think it was the duty of the Board of Health to have sent someone to attend and watch the proceedings, but he was endeavouring to hold the scales of justice as even-handed as he could; and, notwithstanding the absence of any person from the Board of Health, he should take care faithfully to discharge his duty. He knew it was a painful duty which they had to perform, for not only was the property concerned in their decision, but even more, as one of the objects of the enquiry was to discover if any person, by negligence or otherwise, was culpable in causing the death they were holding Inquest upon. He then asked if any person was present on behalf of the Board of Health? No one replied. And the business of the Inquest was now commenced. - John Benbow, M.D., residing in Oxford-place, was examined: I am surgeon of No. 2 District, and I am associated with Mr Prowse, in that district, Higher-street, and Coxside, are situated in it. The deceased was taken to the hospital on Sunday September 16th, my attention was directed to her about twelve or one o'clock on that day, she was then suffering from premonitory symptoms of cholera. Dr Budd had been applied to first, I should have first stated what the premonitory symptoms were, they were violent sickness, great prostration of strength, and probably pain in the bowels as evidenced by the drawing up of the legs. A few hours afterwards these symptoms increased in severity with increased prostration. I then considered it a case of decided cholera, it was then in the evening. The disease, the cholera, was a mild attack, and I never considered the child dangerously ill. The following morning I again saw the child. The cholera symptoms had greatly abated, and my attention was directed to the appearance of the child's face, there was great congestion of the skin generally, and, on some parts of the face, she had peculiar eruptions. The child went on well during that day (Monday) in so far as regards choleraic symptoms, but on the Tuesday morning the eruption covered nearly the whole of her body. The voice was affected, there were excoriation of the lips, the inside of the nose, and the mucous membrane of the cheeks and the throat and tongue were greatly inflamed. The genital organs were also severely affected, the inside of the organs were excoriated, and also greatly inflamed, whilst many of the glands on the right thigh were greatly enlarged, and one of them so much so that it presented nearly a state of suppuration. The child continued in this state until Wednesday morning, when she was taken by her mother from the hospital to her own house after which time she was specially attended by Mr Prowse. I saw the child, I believe, on Friday and Saturday. I was interested only in the state of the skin and the general inflammation. I observed at the time I visited her, the glands I have adverted to, still continued in a state of suppuration, but the general irritation of the skin had greatly subsided, the eruption remaining in patches only; this was on the Saturday. I did not see the child again till after her death. On Tuesday last, in the post mortem examination of the body, I assisted Mr Prowse, in the presence of Dr Budd, the result of which was: I found the exterior of the body presented still the distinct marks of the eruption. The gland in the thigh was covered with a large slough, the nostrils presented symptoms of great irritation being covered by crusts or scabs. Both lungs were extensively diseased, as were also their coverings, the disease was pleura-pneumonia, my opinion is that the cause of this was the irritation produced by the fumes of the noxious gas, inhaled while at the Coxside hospital. I visited the house on Sunday the 16th September, about ten o'clock, after I had been there some short time, I felt a dryness in my mouth, with a most distinct metallic taste. In the evening I felt in the same place, a constriction, irritation and lightness in the throat. On the following day, Monday, the inside of my nose was excoriated, as also were my lips and tongue, and I had a very frequent desire to vomit, in consequence of the irritation in my throat. On Wednesday evening the children were removed. My irritation in the throat remained for several days. In my opinion the cause of the irritation was most clearly the result of the noxious fumes in the hospital. I had an attack of bronchitis afterwards, and was confined to my bed for two days. Last Tuesday night I was suffering severely from cold and inflammation of the throat, and general symptoms of bronchitis. I saw a great number of children in the hospital, I believe there was not one that did not suffer from eruption, or inflammation of the throat or irritation of the nose or neuralgic pains of the face, but they did not suffer so much as the deceased - my attention was most chiefly directed to the genital organs of the children, and I found the eruption appeared there more constantly than on any other parts of their bodies. I think it was caused by the same agent which produced the other symptoms. The walls of the loft were not brushed down, nor was the floor swept, until there had been a sprinkling of water over them, and much more copiously than I desired; the floors were more washed than swept. On Saturday last, I collected a portion of the dust from various parts of the cholera hospital both within and without, also from a shed in Mr Bayly's yard. I subjected the powder to analysis and all the specimens collected strongly presented the signs of the presence of arsenic. I produced the [?] of copper. I [portion unreadable]. - By the Foreman: I do not think that the irritation of the parts was the result of the dust being disturbed by the children. The irritation of the skin was produced chiefly at night when there was no movement; the persons in the hospital always complained of it in the morning. After the floor was swept or flooded, something obnoxious might have remained on it. I do not think the filthy state of the loft and its having been so imperfectly brushed, was the cause of the symptoms. I believe they were produced by the frequent introduction of arsenic in some form of gas, and not by that previously deposited in the loft. Undoubtedly, this also was of this description, where arsenic was or had been previously deposited; this is my medical opinion. As long as the arsenic remained on the roof, there would be no harm. I believe the patients would not have been afflicted so much if the arsenic had not been in a gaseous form. I believe they would have been as liable to the eruptions, &c., if the children had been put in a room perfectly clean, but subject to the noxious fumes. - By the Coroner: If the particles of dust were brushed off they would fall on those who were in their vicinity. I don't think it would affect the throat. - By a Juryman: I was afflicted in the day time on Sunday. I do not know that the chemical works were in action then. I think the fumes might come from the charged chimney whether they were in work or not. - By the Foreman: The persons nearest the door were most affected; the deceased did sleep there. I have never suffered from poison before. Within three months, I have attended some private patients living in the vicinity of the chemical works; they were children. They were affected with enlargement of the glands, indigestion and general ill health. Arsenic will produce such symptoms. - By a Juror: I merely advised the application of warm water to the face and other parts of the body affected with the eruption. On Tuesday morning I considered the deceased was free from cholera. I have seen similar eruptions to those I have mentioned produced when arsenic has been given medicinally. - By Mr Rooker: I have not been long in practice in Plymouth; about twelve months. I have been in partnership with Mr Hicks. He does not live very near the chemical works. I separated from him yesterday. I have heard him refer to these works, and my attention has been directed to them for some time. I attended four or five patients affected as I have described, near the works, in one week. I have attended others in the town for swollen glands, but it struck me as extraordinary that there should be so many instances in conjunction at one time. I thought there must be something peculiar in the air. I recommended the patients to leave the neighbourhood. My partner has not complained of the chemical works, but we have often spoken of them. I did not attribute it to arsenic, for I did not know the chemical works were used to produce it. Mr Hicks and I have had conversations on the works; we noticed the fumes arise from the chimney, and we thought it was arsenious acid; this was previous to the children being removed to the hospital. The nearest of my patients to the works was in Sutton-road, a few yards from them; and the furthest nearly a quarter of a mile off. From various quarters we had information that something injurious was carried on in the works. I stated there must be great impurity in the air of the neighbourhood. There was a bad smell; which was perceptible on passing the works. I was only induced to believe that there was nothing injurious carried on there from a certificate given by an eminent chemist of this town to that effect. I visited the hospital several days. There is a window opening towards the water. I can't say there are not windows on the side towards the arsenic works; but I know there are cracks. I have observed that the windows towards the arsenic works are closed. There is a large door on this side. I was there on Saturday night and on Sunday; my nose became excoriated; I lost the sense of smell. I knew of the existence of the fumes from the metallic taste. I felt the taste in my parlour after I had been in the hospital; this was the persistent consequence. I felt it violently on the top of the stairs of the hospital; the symptoms were felt mainly outside. The metallic taste first annoyed me on Saturday night. It aroused my former suspicions of the works. I mentioned this and my taste to Mr Harper. He strongly asserted that he did smell garlic at the Hospital. That did not allay my feeling of alarm, and the statement of Mr Harper confirmed my opinion. I did not raise any objection against the children being placed in the loft. I believed any place was preferable to Higher Street. I mentioned my suspicions to no one before speaking to Mr Harper. On Sunday morning when I entered the rooms they were in a very dusty state. The beams and roofs were white and powdery. I examined the floors of the inner loft. I thought it was covered by a preparation of lime. I have not examined the substance. I did not think it was a preparation of lead and barytes. I placed three persons in the inner room, in the loft. They were in a state of collapse. They were not affected with the peculiar eruption, and did not die. I have visited the lofts where the collapsed patients were, and found the beams with a quantity of dust on them. I was there early on Sunday morning, (the 16th) and I believe there had been no steps taken to cleanse them. I directed the floors to be swept, and to be previously sprinkled with water, still not to let a great quantity of water fall, as it might be injurious by evaporation. I had been up four nights that week. On Sunday night straw was distributed over a part of the floor. Before the rooms were swept part of it was removed. The loft was slightly swept on Sunday. It was better swept on Monday, when it was also deluged with water. The eruption did not appear before the rooms were swept on Sunday, but it did appear to a slight extent on Monday before it was swept. At that time about 12 or 14 children were ill. I think the loft was swept on Monday about 11 o'clock. I am not aware that the loft opens by four windows into the burning room of the works. On Tuesday evening one of Mr Payne's men said, there was arsenic in the shed mixed with lime. I have been in both lofts. I think there are some windows in the inner loft closed with plaster. If these were open, I think there would be a means by which the fumes of arsenic would enter the loft. If dust were thrown on the skin, it would not cause such eruption, as the children had, but the dust of arsenic would do so. Those who were near the door, were intensely affected, while others suffered less, the children that were in the yard were also much affected. If there were a current of air, and particles of arsenic in the loft, I do not know that the particles would be carried by the draught to the doorway. In a hot room, the warm air finds exit at the top of the doorway, the cold air entering at the bottom. If the dust of arsenic were flying about in the air, it would therefore be carried out of the loft at the top, and fresh air would come in over those near the door. I do not think the same rule would apply to a fume in a room. In my absence Dr Budd saw the deceased and prescribed for her. I do not know if Mr Prowse prescribed for her. I gave her calomel powders. I saw the eruption on the children on the Monday morning, several others were slightly affected. On Wednesday I was first suspicious that the arsenic was there. All the symptoms I have mentioned I saw on Tuesday. On this day I thought the child was poisoned by something noxious in the air. I ordered a screen to be erected at the door of the Hospital. I did not change medicines. I did nothing more to allay the disorder of the child than order the application of warm water to the eruptions, &c., nor did I tell Mr Prowse to alter the medicine. I saw her again on Friday and Saturday, and she was worse. After leaving the Hospital, she was particularly Mr Prowse's patient. Respecting the tests I collected the material, and I numbered them as I did so, there is one from the walls of the loft and two from other parts. Having tested the powder from the walls of the loft I produced metallic arsenic. This is evidence that arsenic was in the loft, but I believe the injury sustained was from the constant introduction of arsenic. I think a great quantity of the arsenic I have tested was deposited within a short time. I believe the fumes in the loft came from the top of the chimney. The fumes came probably also from the burning-room, as well as from the chimney. If the burning-room were very full of gas, it would escape through the crevices I spoke of, into the loft. I do not believe that a person could live in the loft at such a time, the fumes filling the burning-room. The chimney is 100 feet high. I should expect in ordinary circumstances that the smoke would be carried away to other yards, I have felt it in Mr Bayly's yard. I was there on Saturday last, and I saw the fumes of the chimney descending towards me. I think, the wind blowing from a certain quarter, would cause the fumes to descend into the yard near the works. The report of the death of the child, to the Board of Health, was given on Sunday. I believed the child was poisoned with arsenic before she died. I believed I was also, we treated the symptoms as they arose. The room in the loft was "cold and draughty." I was present when the child was removed, the child was weak, the child was taken home in blankets, she might be affected by cold either in hospital, or at her home, which was a miserable house. Cold might produce inflammation, but not in the active state exhibited in the child, and the disease would not have terminated so quickly. - By the Coroner: From the Sunday to Monday I was much engaged in attending the cholera patients, so my mind was much occupied. The arsenic I took to test was from the inside of the loft, and the outside on the walls, and from Mr Bayly's yard. It is very improbable the deceased suffered from pneumonia at the time of admission in the hospital. - By Mr Rooker: There was no inflammation of the stomach viscera, or, rectum, discernable on the post mortem examination. I am sure, that Christison, refers to many cases in which those symptoms were not present after poisoning by arsenic. - Mr Rooker read extracts from Christison, in which a different view was taken of the effects of arsenic. - Witness asked what edition of Christison it was, Mr Rooker was reading from? - Mr Rooker said of 1836. Witness said Oh! mine is for 1848 I think - (laughter). - By the Foreman: I think her death would have been occasioned by the gases, had the deceased been in perfect health before entering the hospital. -
[More details followed from witnesses on the factory construction and recent ill health, followed by the Inquiry being once more adjourned].

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 11 October 1849
PLYMOUTH - Important Coroner's Inquest [continued from our last]. - The Inquest on the body of ELLEN ROBERTS, which had been adjourned was resumed on Monday. - [Two further columns of evidence, resulting in:-] The Coroner addressed them on the evidence which had been produced before them, and, at the close of his remarks, directed them to find a verdict of manslaughter against Mr Payne, if they should consider the death of the deceased was occasioned by his carelessness in conducting the arsenic works; but if they were not of opinion that his neglect or carelessness was the cause of the death in question, they would find a verdict accordingly. - The Jurors were then left alone to consider their verdict, and, after remaining in deliberation nearly two hours, the public were readmitted and the following unanimous verdict of the Jury was read by the Coroner: "That the deceased, ELLEN ROBERTS, on the 23rd day of September last, at Higher-street, in the borough of Plymouth, died of inflammation of the lungs, supervening on an attack of the cholera; and that the deceased's attack of cholera took place on Sunday the 16th day of September, whilst the deceased, ELLEN ROBERTS, was at a loft, used as a hospital, at Sutton Road; and the Jurors believe that the presence of arsenic in the hospital was an exciting cause of disease in the deceased." - Mr Rooker thanked the Coroner and Jury on behalf of Mr Payne, for the kind and patient hearing which he had received at their hands. The Inquest was then terminated.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 18 October 1849
SALTASH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Saltash, on Friday last, before the Coroner of that Borough, W. Hutchison, Esq., R.N., (who is also Mayor of the borough of Saltash), upon the body of ROBERT WILLIAM WHITEWAY. It appeared, from the evidence given, that the body of the deceased was found on Friday morning lying on the beach between Stonehouse and Millbay. The deceased was about 35 years of age, and was a shoemaker, and had lived in Devonport. A bill against him was found in his coat pocket. There were marks of blood upon the deceased, and it was the opinion of the witnesses that he was stunned when he fell into the water, and that the water afterwards flowed and suffocated him. He was lying below high water mark. The deceased had been missing from his family since Wednesday, and was in the habit of getting drunk, and when in this state he had no control over himself. The verdict was to the effect that he was Found Dead, but how or by what means he met with his death was not made clear.

STOKE DAMEREL - On Tuesday, an Inquest was held at Burt'[s Ordnance Arms, Fore-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Braund was Foreman, to Inquire as the cause of the death of a woman named JANE BELL, who had for several years resided in Andrew's Lane, in Devonport. From the evidence of the several witnesses who were examined, it appears that the deceased JANE BELL was about 40 years of age, that she had formerly been well known as a woman on the town, had subsequently married a MR BELL, who had died about twelve months ago, and since that period she had lived alone in the house where she died, and which was a house of ill-fame. She was addicted to habits of intemperance and about two months since, whilst intoxicated, made a fierce attack upon some man who was in her bedroom with a young woman. She struck him on the head with a poker, and put him in such bodily fear that he fled without properly dressing himself; and created so much alarm that the police were called in, and the poker was wrested from the infuriated woman. This circumstance appears to have made so deep an impression on her mind that she has been constantly speaking of it to her neighbours and others, and when at all excited with liquor she would talk of it in the most incoherent and wild manner; saying that she had knocked down a legion of devils with her poker, and that the police were devils in disguise; that she would fetch her poker from the police station &c. She had been drinking freely throughout the last week, and had been in a constant state of wild excitement and on Sunday evening, although not then drunk, she was much excited, and made an attack upon a little girl of about ten years of age, who waited upon her. On Monday she was seen about the middle of the day by two persons, both of whom spoke of her manner as particularly wild. One of these persons fetched her a pint of beer and a sheet of writing paper, and got a letter written for her to her sister, a MRS MITCHEL, of Falmouth, at the request of the deceased, asking her sister to come up directly as she was ill. Before this person took the paper to the person who wrote the letter deceased attempted to write, and found she could not; and a half of the sheet of paper was produced by a policeman which he had found on the table in her kitchen, and on which the words "Devonport - Dear Sister, I have taken" had been recently written. The witness who had got the letter written, after posting it returned to the house of the deceased, about half-past one on Monday and found the door fastened. The door continuing closed, and no sounds being heard in the house, the attention of the police was called to the circumstance; and at about ten o'clock, with the sanction of the owner of the house (the deceased had no relations in this neighbourhood) the door was forced. The deceased was found in bed, partly undressed, in a state of coma. Mr May, surgeon, was sent for by the policemen, and being absent, his partner, Mr Cutcliffe, came, and shortly afterwards Mr May. The symptoms and appearances were such as induced the surgeons to believe she was suffering from the effects of some narcotic poison; they accordingly had recourse to the stomach pump. The contents withdrawn, furnished no indication, either by smell or otherwise, of the presence of poison, but, nevertheless, so strongly was Mr May persuaded that the unfortunate woman had taken poison that he, in company with the police-inspector Cook, searched the house, and in the kitchen on a tea-board they found part of a pint of beer, a bottle marked "morphia" containing a small portion of powder, which Mr May subsequently found to be morphia; a saucer in which some beer had been placed, and around the inside of which there was adhering some gritty substance and a mark such as would be produced by its application to the mouth for the purpose of drinking. The substance on the saucer, Mr May on applying a test, found to be morphia. A post mortem examination of the body had been made by Mr May, and the appearance of the stomach was that of an intemperate person, the brain was much congested, but there was no extravasation. His opinion was that deceased had died from the effects of taking morphia. The Jury after a consultation of some minutes, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had died from taking poison, she being in an Unsound State of Mind at the time of so taking it. In the house of the deceased the goods were stated to be in the utmost confusion; there was a large quantity of female wearing apparel on the stairs leading to the garret, as well as on the garret floor. Under one of the two feather beds on which she was lying was found 19s. 6d. in silver, and an elegant gold watch and appendages; and in the room another gold watch and a number of rings, &c., were found. The relatives of the deceased, at Falmouth, have been written to by the Police.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 25 October 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Case. - Coroner's Inquest. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday morning last, at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq. the Borough Coroner, on view of the body of MARY ANN LEY, aged 34 years, the wife of a pensioner residing in a house on the Quay, at Morice Town, called the Pottery Quay. The facts, which will be found detailed below were considered of a nature to render a post mortem examination advisable, which was conducted by Dr Barlow. The Jury reassembled on Friday afternoon when the following particulars were deposed to by a number of witnesses. It appeared that on the 2nd inst., the deceased was returning to her home on the Pottery Quay, after having drank rather freely, when she was overtaken by a master of a schooner then in the Canal, and his wife in company with the mate. The deceased said something to the Captain which appeared to annoy him, and he put his hand against her breast, when she fell to the ground striking her head against a stone. The party then left her and deceased managed to raise herself from the ground and reached her home. Shortly after a man named Jenner was passing her house and hearing the cries of murder, directed his attention whence the sound proceeded, and he discovered smoke issuing out of the door of deceased's house, and on looking through the window saw a mass of flames; he opened the door and found that the deceased had caught herself on fire. He immediately brought her into the road and quickly put the fire out without deceased receiving any serious injury, and he then took her into the house and left shortly after. The husband of the deceased was at Millbay at the time of the accident unloading a vessel. On returning about 9 o'clock the following morning and finding his wife very unwell, he came to Devonport for a surgeon whom he implored to come and see his wife, but without success, as there did not appear ready means of payment. He was told to go to the parish surgeon and was referred to Dr Barlow, of Morice Town, who attended the deceased until Wednesday morning last, when she died. The head of the deceased was opened by Dr Barlow yesterday

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 22 November 1849
TOTNES - Melancholy Suicide. - On Wednesday morning the 14th inst., MR ROBERT FOALE, a respectable farmer, and overseer of the poor of the parish of Ashprington, was found hanging, and quite dead in a hay-loft. MR. F. was unmarried and was in partnership with his brother, also an unmarried man. He was sober, honest and industrious, and his untimely end is much lamented. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Thursday last, when it was proved that he had been in a desponding state for several days, and a verdict of "Destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned. He was buried in Ashprington churchyard on Monday morning.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. Suspected Infanticide. - On Monday the 19th instant, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a newly-born male child, which was found on the premises of Mrs Nicholson, No. 34 Portland Square, and was supposed to have been put out of life by its mother, ANN TUCKER, servant to Mrs Nicholson. - After the Coroner had addressed the Jury, he examined Miss Mary Ann Nicholson, who said: our establishment consists of my mother, myself, Miss Agnes Love, and a female servant called ANN TUCKER, who is between 30 and 40 years of age. On Thursday night, the only persons in the house were my mother, myself and the servant; Miss Love went out of town on the morning preceding. At that time I had no suspicion that ANN TUCKER was pregnant. The last time I saw her, before going to my room, was about ten o'clock; she had been complaining for several days of loss of voice. I was asleep until about half-past one on Friday morning, when I was awoke by a noise as I thought from the room adjoining my bedroom; in that room ANN TUCKER slept; I lit a candle and went towards ANN TUCKER'S room; I found the door bolted; I said, "open the door," she did so immediately; when I came into the room I said, "why have you a candle burning? and what is this noise?" She said, "I have the candle burning because I have heard noises too, and have been frightened, I have heard the noise ever since I came to bed." I said to her, "ever since you came to bed, then why did you not come to me?" She said, "I could not come to you, I am one of the worst hands to go to anybody else, I would rather bear my fright alone." I have forgotten to state ANN TUCKER said the noise had proceeded from the cats on the roof. I do not think I was in ANN TUCKER'S room more than a minute, but during that time I heard the same noise as I had previously heard, but more distinctly. I heard it still most distinctly when I came back from my mother's room. When I came to my mother's room she was asleep and comfortable, on which I returned to ANN TUCKER'S room; she had still a candle burning, I think she was in bed, but I am not certain; I heard the noise louder than I had before. I said, "ANN, that noise is surely something in one of your boxes." "Oh, no, no," she said. "Don't be so frightened." I then returned from the room; I think she followed me to my own door. I asked her what was the matter with her - (The Witness at this point of her evidence became agitated, and fainted, but at length the examination was resumed) - in consequence of seeing blood on the floor, she replied "the fright has turned me very much." I went down and saw my mother and told her that I heard strange noises and spent the rest of the night in my mother's room. ANN TUCKER went to her bedroom. I never was present when a child was born. The noise I heard when I was in ANN TUCKER'S room was a throttling noise, such as I had never heard before. I did not hear a child cry. On Friday morning at about seven o'clock, as ANN TUCKER was going down stairs, I called to her from my mother's room; she came in; as soon as she came in, I asked her if she had slept since; she said "No, I have been very bad ever since, I have left the bed in a sad state, and I am very weak." I told her not to do anything but what she was obliged to until after breakfast. At this time I had not the slightest idea that she had had a child. About half-past seven I went downstairs. I found ANN TUCKER in the kitchen; she seemed weak. I said to her I would send for Mr Square, who is our family surgeon. She said, "I hope you will not, I do not want him, I shall soon be better." I begged she would sit still. I made her some tea, and she seemed better; it was now about half-past eight. ANN TUCKER worked as usual all the morning. I had a person to assist her who came in the afternoon. Mr Square was sent for, he came and saw ANN TUCKER. I was not present. After that interview, I had reason for believing ANN TUCKER had had a child. She was put in her own bed. This was about seven o'clock in the evening. She is now in my mother's house. From the time I awoke on Friday morning till I returned the second time to ANN TUCKER, I do not think more than fifteen or twenty minutes elapsed. I have seen the contents of two or three of ANN TUCKER'S boxes, and have not discovered any article of baby-linen. I know persons were employed to search the water-closet. On Saturday, at four or five o'clock in the afternoon, ANN TUCKER told me the body of the child was in the kitchen chimney. She was in the kitchen all Friday, from about seven in the morning till seven in the evening. I feel quite certain that the noise which I heard came from a box to which I pointed when in ANN TUCKER'S room. I think it came from the box. I wish to correct the expression "I feel quite, quite certain" to "I firmly believe." I was very much frightened and agitated, and, although I believed this, I tried to persuade myself that it was a foolish fear and that the noise was outside, but I felt sure it was in the box. I did not look under the bed. I looked into the box on Saturday and there were no marks as of a child having been put there. - Mr W. J. Square, surgeon, said - On Friday evening I was at Mrs Nicholson's house at half-past five. I saw the servant about six. I said to her "I believe you have been delivered of a child." She replied "I have not." I then proceeded upstairs without her, and, from what I saw there, I was confirmed in my previous belief. I examined two or three boxes whilst upstairs in her room. I found only clothing, but no marks of blood, or baby-linen: I came downstairs. I think it was then I asked her "What have you done with the child?" To this she gave no answer. I then asked her, "Have you thrown it down the water closet?" She told me she had done so. I then desired she might be sent to bed, which was accordingly done. I had some conversation with the family, as to the course to be pursued, and it was determined to acquaint the police of the matter; and on the following morning search was made in the water closet, at about 10 o'clock I arrived at Mrs Nicholson's house, when I was shown an afterbirth by Mr Parsons, the plumber. This afterbirth was quite fresh, as if it had been recently removed from the body, and the umbilical cord was divided by a clean incision, and at about 3 inches from the afterbirth. That I think terminates my observation. I have attended ANN TUCKER since; I saw her half-an-hour after I had seen the placenta. I told her "the afterbirth had been found, but not the child." She did not seem to have any distinct idea about the afterbirth, but told me that she had thrown all into the water closet. I asked her where the child was born? She said, "In the chamber vessel." I said to her, "Did you let it remain there?" She answered "Yes." I also asked her whether the child cried or made a noise? She said, "yes." To the best of my belief, she meant the child had made a noise, not a cry, in the common acceptation of the word. I asked her how long it had done so before Miss Nicholson came to the room? She said, "a few minutes." I could not then get any more information from her, except that the noise ceased soon after Miss Nicholson went downstairs. She said, while Miss Nicholson was in her (the servant's) room, the child was in the chamber vessel. ANN TUCKER insisted on stating that she had put all into the water closet. Before I left the house on that morning, I took possession of the afterbirth, and from an examination of ANN TUCKER on Saturday morning, which I made, I am positive that she had been delivered of a child within two or three days at least. On Saturday night last, at 9 o'clock I made a post mortem examination of the body, in the presence of Inspector Damerel. The result of that examination was as follows:- That the child was a recently delivered male infant, at or about the usual period of nine months. The body was smeared with soot, it must have been in a sooty place, I was obliged to wash it. The length of the umbilical cord attached to the child was 13 inches, 7 of which were shrivelled and dry, as if from the application of heat, there was no ligature on the cord. The skin of the body and limbs was of the natural colour, that of the face somewhat redder than usual. There were no bruises on the body anywhere - a very important point - on the left cheek is a mark like the scratch of a nail, about half-an-inch long, and on either side of the neck just above the collar bone, are 3 or 4 slight marks of a like character. There are no marks round the neck, like that which might be produced by a cord or ligament. And on reflecting the skin of the neck there were no marks of extravasated blood. On examining the interior organs of the chest, I found the thymus gland and heart in their natural position, the right lung was visible, and extended nearly to the middle of the line; on turning the heart and thymus gland aside, the left lung became visible. The upper lobes of the right lung, and some portions of the lower lobe were of a pinkish colour, the other portions were livid. The edges and other portions of the left lung were crepitated, about the darker portions crepitation was much less evident, and two lungs weighed 860 grains. Both lungs, I should have said, put together in water floated very decidedly; having cut the right lung into 14 pieces, each portion floated, having divided the left lung into 15 portions, each portion also floated. On examining the head, I found a considerable quantity of bloody infiltration under the scalp, There is reason to believe, from this infiltration, that the woman carried the child about her body for a considerable time, and with its head downwards. The brain itself, was perfectly healthy. I do not know if this is the first child; I suppose from fright and other causes there are probabilities when a woman is alone, of her becoming unconscious and incapable of action under circumstances of childbirth. A child on its introduction sometimes does not cry for a minute or two after it is born; the noise children sometimes make when born is a peculiar noise, not exactly a cry in the ordinary acceptation of the term. A child making that noise would be born alive; when a woman is alone and unassisted, the child might die in a few minutes without any violent means being employed towards it. I have known cases where the woman has been unassisted in which, the child has been born in a chamber pit, or on the ground; in either case it is very likely for the child to perish. Any woman being alone when delivered of a child, would be placed under great difficulties; all depends on circumstances how long the child born in a vessel would live, it might be smothered by being pressed by the afterbirth or by the discharges. - John Parsons proved the finding of the after-birth in the water-closet, and Inspector Damarel the discovery of the body of the child concealed in the kitchen chimney. - Superintendent Gibbons said: When I saw ANN TUCKER I said to her, "We have searched the water-closet and the child is not there." She answered, "Then I don't know where it is, I put it there." I went downstairs and a further search was made, but the body was not found. I went to her a second time, to the best of my belief between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I said to her "we cannot find the body." She then said, "I will tell where it is if Mr Square will forgive me." I told her "I have no authority, your own conscience will dictate to you what to do." I did not hold out any threat or promise to her. She said nothing more to me, and I left the room. I recollect her once saying, "I wish I had it (the child) by my side." - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury found a verdict, substantially acquitting the mother of the charge of having caused the child's death by violent means. She will however, as soon as she is well enough, be called upon to answer the charge of concealment of the birth.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 29 November 1849
KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held here yesterday before Mr Cockey, the Deputy Coroner, on the body of a little girl, named CLARA JARVIS, two years old, which had been burnt by death, by accident, during the temporary absence of its mother. The circumstances were of the ordinary kind, and the facts having been proved, Mr J. F. Bickford, (the Foreman), suggested that there was no necessity for examining the surgeon (Mr Pearse); there could be no doubt as to the cause of death, and (he said it with great respect towards the worthy surgeon), it was their duty to keep down the expenses of Coroner's Inquests as much as possible. The Deputy Coroner said, the expenses of Inquests were closely scrutinised at Quarter Sessions; Mr Pearse, however, was present as registrar, and had not been summoned, and if the Jury agreed in the opinion of their Foreman, he would not press his being examined; he was sure, indeed, that Mr Pearse would be the last one to desire it. The Jury with one exception (Mr Prowse) expressed their concurrence with Mr Bickford's view, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Monday, at half-past three o'clock before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of a young woman of 22 years age, named MARY ANN DENNIS, who died suddenly on Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock. The Jury, having viewed the body at the house of the father of the deceased, in St. Andrew Street, and having heard evidence, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 6 December 1849
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy And Fatal Accident. - On Thursday a fatal accident occurred in Catherine Street, Devonport, MR H. DATE, of Fore-street, fell from the top of the bulk in front of the premises of Messrs. Fox and Sons, and sustained such injuries that he died on the spot; the circumstances of this frightful catastrophe will be understood by the evidence given at the Coroner's Inquest on the view of the body. MR DATE, who was much respected, had just opened business of an ironmonger, in addition to his own business as a plumber, in Fore-street, and was about in the course of a few weeks to be married. - The Inquest was held on Friday before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Borough Coroner, at Tubb's Boot Inn, King-street. The first witness was Henry Murch, a porter of Messrs Fox and Son, Wine Merchants, Catherine-street, who stated that on Thursday morning last, in consequence of the rain leaking through the bulk of his employers' premises, MR DATE, the deceased, who was a plumber, was sent for to examine the lead flat. Deceased discovered that the leakage was caused by a break in the lead, and told witness that he would go home for some tools and return to repair it. The top of the bulk is narrower in the middle than it was on either side; deceased was in the act of passing the narrow part of the flat when witness saw his foot trip, and he fell in a slanting direction with his head downward, on the stone step in front of the shop door, a height of about eleven feet. Witness had no power to save him. Deceased appeared quite well, and was conversing cheerfully immediately before the accident occurred. - James Laundry was coming up Catherine-street on the morning in question, and saw the deceased and the last witness on the flat together. He was looking at deceased, who, was walking on the lead flat over Messrs. Fox's bulk. When deceased came to the narrow part he put out his right foot, slipped, and he fell headlong on the stone in front of the shop door. Witness immediately ran to his assistance, lifted him up by the shoulder and seeing the blood gushing profusely from his forehead he placed his hand over the wound to attempt to stop it. Deceased did not even struggle after he fell and when witness lifted him up he appeared quite dead. He was taken into the courtlage at Messrs. Fox's and examined by Mr Kerswill, surgeon, who was promptly in attendance, and who, on arriving, pronounced life to be extinct. Deceased was subsequently removed to his residence in Fore-street. - The Coroner asked the Jury if they considered any further evidence necessary, and they at once replied they did not, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Extraordinary Suicide. - On Monday, a Coroner's Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a double Jury, at the Portsmouth Passage Inn, Cornwall-street, on the body of man named WILLIAM CURRY. The deceased had, for some years, carried on business as earthenware dealer, and, besides a standing in the market, kept a shop in Cornwall-street. He had lately been less fortunate than usual in his business, and has been observed to be depressed in spirits and to have had an embarrassed manner. On Sunday the wife of the deceased, and other branches of the family, went to Plymouth to attend a funeral service. They left their homes about half-past ten, and pressed him to accompany them, but they could not persuade him, and he remained at home; the family did not return till the evening, when they found that, during their absence, a girl had called at the house, and, not being answered on knocking, some alarm was excited as the deceased was known to be in the house; and at length three men entered at the window, and on proceeding to a closet adjoining the bed-room of the deceased, they found him lying on a bed, and from his appearance it was judged that his life had but just departed. They found the room had been closed and that the air had been excluded from it by means of rags, &c., stuffed into the crevices; there was a pan containing some charcoal in the room, and it was by means of burning this charcoal that the deceased had occasioned his death. How the deceased procured the charcoal was not known, none was found in the house but that which was burning. It would seem that the unhappy man having set fire to the charcoal, had gone to bed to meet his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 13 December 1849
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death - On Saturday afternoon, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, upon view of the body of an old woman named SUSANNAH FOSS, who was found dead in her bed on the morning of Saturday. The last time she was seen alive was the Friday evening, at about 8 o'clock, when she was seen walking up Lower-lane, in a house in which she resided. She lived by herself, but there were no circumstances of suspicion connected with the case, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 20 December 849
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Accident. Death Of A Seaman. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, King-street, to Inquire as to the cause of death of JOHN ASH, who had died in Granby-street, Stonehouse-lane, on the previous Saturday, as was supposed from the effects of a fall into a cellar under circumstances which will be seen by the following statement: The deceased was a fine healthy looking seaman of about 37 years of age, he was paid off on Saturday week from H.M.S. Constance, and it is stated received about 50l. Before leaving in the Constance when she was commissioned 5 or 6 years since, he had formed an attachment for a young woman named Palmer, residing with her parents in Granby-street, Plymouth, and when he was paid off he placed the money he had received in her hands for safety and arrangements were made for their marriage on last Friday. When he came on shore he made Mrs Palmer's house his home. On Thursday last, his mother, the wife of a labourer at Chagford, having come down to see him, he left with her for Saltash to see his sister who resides there as a servant. He drank some beer on his way thither, some more at Saltash, and probably still more on returning to Plymouth. On arriving in Granby-street, at about 7 in the evening, having left his mother at Saltash at 3, and when within two doors of Mrs Palmer's house, he stumbled and fell against the doors of an underground cellar belonging to Mr Humphrey Boon, mason. The fastening of the doors gave way, and the poor fellow fell head foremost into the cellar, a depth of about 4 feet, his head coming in contact with a loose stone. He was taken up insensible, and conveyed to the house of his intended mother-in-law. His friends not thinking the injuries sustained so serious as they turned out to be, put him to bed and contented themselves with their own nursing. On Friday he appeared better, he was sensible, and conversed with the persons around him; on Saturday, however, he became so much worse, that Mr Whipple, the surgeon, was sent for; and on arriving, that gentleman found the poor fellow labouring under inflammation of the membranes of the brain. He used every effort which his knowledge and experience suggested, but the disease had assumed a power defying all medical skill, and at 12 o'clock on Saturday night, terminated in death. A post mortem examination was made at the request of the Coroner by Mr Whipple, and the brain was found considerably contused opposite where the head came in contact with the stone. At the base of the brain two ounces of water, the result of inflammation, was found. These facts were proved, and that the doors of the cellar had not been so firmly secured as they might have been, and that, on Friday, the friends of the deceased gave him brandy, by which Mr Whipple was of opinion death was hastened. After a patient Enquiry, the Jury returned verdict to the following effect:- "That the said JOHN ASH died of inflammation of the membranes of the brain produced by concussion of the brain arising from his Accidentally falling into a cellar in Granby-street, and which concussion of the brain terminated rapidly from the quantities of stimulants which the deceased had taken previously, and subsequently, to falling into the said cellar." The Coroner at the unanimous request of the Jury cautioned Mr Boon to have the cellar door thoroughly and satisfactorily secured in future, which he promised; and on the further suggestion of the Jury, the Coroner stated he would apply to the authorities for a public light to be placed in or near Granby-street.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 3 January 1850
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth on Wednesday last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of an infant male child, the son of MR F. G. GREENSLADE, Vauxhall Street, Plymouth. The child was on Wednesday morning found dead in bed by the side of its mother. The Jury returned a verdict of "Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before the same Coroner, upon the body of a labourer, named THOMAS FLETCHER, who was found dead in his bed on the morning of Saturday last. He had been complaining of being poorly some time before, and had gone to bed in that state. The Jury found a verdict of "Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - On the same day, at the Globe Hotel, Plymouth, by the same Coroner, upon the body of a commercial traveller, MR C. ROGERS, who had been staying at the Globe Hotel since Thursday morning. He had several times complained of sickness, and on Friday night went to his bedroom, taking with him some brandy. On the following morning the deceased not making his appearance by eleven o'clock, one of Mr Radmore's establishment went to his room, and on looking in saw the deceased lying upon the floor. He was found to be perfectly dead. Several pills were found on his table, together with some diluted brandy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 10 January 1850
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday an Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, upon the body of WILLIAM DOUGALL, a waterman. - William Irvin, an officer in the Coast Guard Service, deposed that he had known the deceased about 12 months, he was a waterman, and about 62 years of age. Yesterday at about half past 11 o'clock a.m., witness was on duty in a boat with two others, just inside the corner of the Garrison wall, the deceased was there also alone in a boat, under sail and he was going inwards, the wind was about west and was blowing strong, but the old man was becalmed. He then saw a barge, the John and Mary, coming in and a man was steering her called Thomas Jeffery. He was running in with the barge at the rate of full 5 knots an hour, on the larboard tack, and making towards Sutton Pool, the people in the barge shouted for the deceased and witness's boats to keep out of the way, but they had not time to do anything and in an instant the barge took the witness's boat on the starboard quarter. Witness heard the deceased cry out "Oh God you have run me down!" Immediately afterwards the deceased and his boat came up astern of the barge, the deceased was then alive - the boat was bottom upwards. One of the men in witness's boat put the boat-hook out and the deceased caught hold of it, and he was taken in. It was very cold and rough. He was alive when he got in the boat and vomited several times; they pulled away for the Barbican, but before he was landed he had died. Whilst proceeding to the shore with the body witness passed the barge and said to Jeffery "You ought to be tried for your life, you have drowned the man - he is now dead;" the bargeman's reply was "keep out of my way then, you will be in my way again directly." On arriving at the Barbican, the body of deceased was placed in the charge of the police. When there was a clear passage and the wind to the westward, barges generally kept as close to the garrison wall as they could. There was plenty of room yesterday for the barge to run in. Neither Jeffery nor his crew ever afforded to render the slightest assistance. Neither witness nor deceased could see the barge coming in from the Sound as they were inside the quay and the barge struck the boat within a few seconds of their seeing her. It was his duty to look out for anything coming and witness did look out but did not see the barge, for the vessel was completely shut out by the point; the deceased was steering his boat with his back to the barge. - By the Foreman: The man steering the barge had sufficient power over her to have steered clear of the boats, thought he opened so suddenly upon them. - By a Juryman: The barge had not lost her way when she came round the point though her sails began to flap. - Joseph Clarke said if there had not been any boats in the way, the barge had her proper course for Sutton Pool; but he thought the barge must have seen the boat of the deceased; the people of the barge ought to have seen her; if the barge had been further over she would not have been becalmed, and the boats would have been avoided. - William John Seaward, Superintendant of the Emigration depot, said he called to Jeffery, who was on board the barge and said "You ought to keep more to leeward," and he replied "I'll not keep further off for anyone." Shortly after this he saw the boat of the deceased run down by the barge. - There was plenty of room for the barge to have passed outside the boats, and to have cleared the whole of them. - Thomas Jeffery, being desirous to be examined, said, when I opened the point mentioned, I was looking out for a course to run in; the tide was making down, I saw boats ahead, I told my mates to hail the boats which they did, when I came close to the point I had my helm hard to port, I called another man to assist me to do so, and by his assistance I cleared the preventive boat. My crew assisted in hauling our boat in by the painter, the preventive boat was holding fast by our boat, and I consider this was assisting the preventive boat to get near the deceased. I thought I was steering clear of the deceased's boat, and I should have had he pulled towards Catwater instead of towards the wharf. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," accompanying it with a caution to the bargemen in general with regard to the management of barges and an expression of their approbation of the conduct of the men in the preventive boat. - Mr Irwin had the body of the deceased carried to his residence in New Street, and we understand the Coroner has written to that gentleman acknowledging his humanity. The deceased has left two daughters industrious young women, who buried their mother only on Christmas-day last.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 17 January 1850
BUCKLAND BREWER - Bideford. Charge of Murder. Most Horrid Cruelty! - Much sensation has been created in the parish of Buckland Brewer and the neighbourhood, by an occurrence which has led to the awful charges of Murder against a farmer and his wife. It appears that about four months ago, a farmer, named Bird, being in want of a servant, applied to the Union, and took therefrom the daughter of a man named PARSONS, who was transported some years since, who was well recommended by the Governor. On Friday the girl died, and an Inquest was held on her body, the result of which proves that her death was the result of ill-treatment. A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned against the farmer and his wife, by the Jury. The treatment of the deceased as deposed to by the various witnesses was brutal in the extreme and the description of her body as given by the surgeon, Mr Gunner, and others, horrified the assembly in the Court. It is sufficient to say that her body was a mass of wounds, bruises, abscesses and cuts from whips, sticks &c.; and the deceased was reduced to this frightful condition by the conduct of the prisoners, which excited the deepest indignation and it was with difficulty that the perpetrators of this horrid crime were kept by the Police-officers from the Court to the prison. So much excitement has not been witnessed in the place since the unfortunate omnibus accident, three years ago.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 7 February 1850
EXETER - Murder Of Two Children By Their Mother. - On Sunday morning, public attention and horror was excited by the rumour that a woman had murdered two of her children, by throwing them into the Canal, and had attempted the life of a third in the same way. This rumour was confirmed at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, by a woman being brought in custody to the Guildhall, and the following entry made in the charge-sheet - "On suspicion of causing the deaths of ELIZABETH and HARRIETT, her two children, by wilfully throwing them into the Canal." The Inspector on duty could not obtain from her, her name and she said she did not know the name of her husband. - From enquiries instituted, we have obtained the following information, relative to this sad affair:- The prisoner, ELIZABETH BRADFORD, is the wife of a carpenter and joiner, living in Wood's Court, Summerland-street. On Saturday afternoon, Mrs Curry, a friend of the family, which consisted of the prisoner, her husband and three children, called and took the children with her to her apartments in Castle-st. They were aged respectively, about 8, 6 and 4 years - the youngest being a boy called JAMES, and the two elder ones, the deceased, named ELIZABETH and HARRIETT. Between 6 and 7 in the evening, the prisoner took them away; she did not remain more than a minute or two, but Mrs Curry observed she looked very much agitated and therefore offered to accompany her home. MRS BRADFORD refused, saying, "I know you are very poorly and you shan't come with me." About 7 o'clock the same evening, a woman, supposed to be the prisoner, was met by a Mrs Rowe and her daughter, very near the first drawbridge on the Canal, which is a full mile from Mrs Curry's, in Castle-street. She was carrying one child in her arms, and had one on each side of her. Mrs Rowe observed that she walked very close to the water, and said to her "My good woman you'll certainly fall in, if you walk so close to the edge of the water; there are chains and ropes about, and you will get tripped up." The woman replied "thank you," and moved away towards the wall. About a few minutes before eight, a person, named Edmund Palmer, an assistant to Mr Geo. Cooper of Fore-street, who lives on the Haven Banks, was returning home from his work, and, when he had arrived just at the spot where Mrs Rowe accosted a woman, under the circumstances above stated, he heard a splash in the water. He proceeded on to the drawbridge and then heard the cry of a child. He saw something in the water and called out for assistance; a woman came up, apparently from the bank, which is lower than the bridge, and said "that is my dear child- my poor JIMMY." Palmer obtained a light from a neighbouring house, and returned to the spot: the child was still floating; he held out his umbrella and told the child to catch hold of it, which the little fellow did, and was thereby saved. Mr Lyddon, a surgeon, attended upon him, and he soon recovered. The mother was taken into custody on the spot, by Ratcliffe, the constable of St. Thomas, which is a parish in the County of Devon, contiguous to the City of Exeter, but, upon the recommendation of Mr Lyddon, she was taken home. It was then unknown that she had had three children with her; but as the city police ascertained that the two girls were missing, they proceeded early on Monday morning, to drag the river and canal. Inspector Stuckes discovered the body of the youngest girl, floating very near the drawbridge on the Canal side, and the body of the other was found in the basin or Wet Dock, so that it seems probable the eldest girl was pushed or fell into the water at a different spot, which would account for the lapse of time between Mrs Rowe meeting the unfortunate mother and the first alarm being made by Palmer. When the body of the eldest child was taken up, the face was completely covered with dirt. - It is said the poor woman had been in a great deal of trouble. The house in Wood's Court had been left to her by her father, and she came with her husband from London, a short time ago, and since their residence in Exeter he had little or no work, in consequence of which they had suffered great privations. The house was agreed to be sold to her brother, whose name is GANDY, a letter carrier in the Exeter Post Office, but, after the deeds were drawn, some dispute had arisen and proceedings were threatened. On the way to the station-house, the prisoner frequently exclaimed against her brother "Oh! my treacherous brother and that wretch," (meaning her brother's wife). On Monday she said the bailiffs were coming to take all her things, and it was owing to distress that she did it; but subsequently being asked about her children, she said "they are all home to house." - She is a woman, apparently 45 years of age, small in stature, with dark brown hair and a very sallow complexion. There seems little doubt of her being quite insane, and the precaution of keeping [portion of text missing} with her, has been very properly adopted. An Inquest has been held but the Jury have returned an Open Verdict that the children were Found Drowned, but as to how they came into the water there was no evidence to prove. - The evidence against the mother will be taken before the Magistrates at the Castle, on Wednesday, (this day).

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 14 February 1850
EAST STONEHOUSE - Distressing Instance Of Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Queen's Arms, Stonehouse, before J. Edmonds, Esq. (A. B. Bone, Esq., being absent in London,) on the body of JAMES MCCARTHY, evidently from having taken poison. A paper was found in his pocket, indicating that he had procured and taken sixpennyworth of the essential oil of bitter almonds; and this was confirmed by a post mortem examination. Mr Jas. Postlethwaite deposed that the deceased had been in his employ, and he had discovered that he had received cash of parties which he had not handed over to witness; he had discovered amounts to about £15; the last time he saw the deceased was on Saturday, when he made an engagement to meet him on Monday, to enter into a different arrangement, - to sell on commission, but he never came; deceased must have known that witness would have discovered his defalcations. ELIZA MCCARTHY, widow of the deceased was then called; the poor woman seemed in great distress; she deposed that her late husband left his bed on Wednesday morning, and she afterwards saw him in the kitchen, she did not see him take anything, he appeared in a very hurried and tremulous manner; she desired him to return to bed, and he did so, she went up immediately after and found him insensible; Dr Sheppard was then sent for; he shortly after died she found the paper now produced, he has had great difficulties for many years, and his mind had been distracted for many months past. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Queen's Arms, Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury, on the body of a little girl, named SARAH TRUSCOTT, who caught herself on fire during the temporary absence of her mother, and died on Tuesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 14 March 1850
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. Frightful Death. - On Monday afternoon, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at No. 25 Union-street, Stonehouse, the body of a superannuated excise officer, named JONATHAN GUY BURTON, who met with his death by falling, on Saturday evening, from his bedroom window, in the house, to the ground. It appeared from the evidence that the two sons of Mrs May, in whose house the deceased lodged, were sitting in the kitchen on Saturday night, at about 9 o'clock when they heard a sound as of a heavy fall in their court. On their going into the court, they saw the deceased's legs hanging out of a water butt, into which his body had fallen and doubled up, and the butt was thrown upon its side; the deceased was dead. They called assistance and sent immediately for Dr Sheppard. One of Mr May's sons was the last person who saw deceased alive, bit was about 8 o'clock the same evening, when the servant took him his supper, broth, which he ate with heartiness; he was, at that time in bed, and after his supper was left as usual, without a candle. They had not noticed anything peculiarly strange in his manner lately, he had always been a silent old man and was about 64 years of age. - Dr Sheppard of Stonehouse, said: I was called and went on Saturday night last to the deceased; I found him in his bed where the Jury have seen him, he was quite dead. I examined him; there were apparently no bones broken or dislocated, but there were some scratches on his knees and many on his shoulders; his shirt was wet through up to his neck. He was a harmless, inattentive, taciturn, morose, old man; his habits were generally dirty in the extreme; he had lived very freely and had of late, for many years, drunk to excess. I have attended him many times professionally, and he was a monomaniac in one point; he always considered he was not superannuated from the excise, though he had been superannuated many years. He always seemed miserable. He had a seizure about two years ago. He would lay for weeks in his bed without getting out of it once. I always, for late years, considered him decidedly imbecile; his mind was weakened by over stimulant. I consider he was melancholy. His death resulted from the shock or concussion occasioned by the fall; the window of the room in which he usually slept, was 25 feet from the ground. When I went to the room on Saturday night, I saw the window was open. The window has a regular sash, and is about 2 feet from the floor. - The Coroner summed up the chief points of the evidence, and the Jury, after a short consultation, returned their verdict that the deceased committed the act, by which he came to his death, while in an Unsound State of Mind.

DARTMOUTH - Found Drowned. - The body of a labouring man, named RICHARD KELLY, aged about 26, until lately resident at Torquay, and a native of Crediton, engaged at the Sandquay Granite Works, was picked up in the Oxford Slip, on the morning of Wednesday (this day week), and an Inquest held on the same day before J. M. Puddicombe, Esq., Borough Coroner. It appears that the last place he was seen at, was a low public house on that landing-place, and he must have taken a wrong direction in leaving it and unconsciously walked into the river.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 28 March 1850
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening, at East Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., upon the body of JOHN HOCKRIDGE, waggoner. It appeared that on Tuesday afternoon, the deceased was assisting other men in removing a large stone from a wagon in Phoenix-place; the stone was three tons in weight and the deceased with another man were in the wagon poising the stone with crow-bars; when the stone was pushed on rollers to the back of the wagon the fore part of the wagon was jerked upwards, and the two men in the wagon were precipitated over its sides and fell upon the ground; the deceased was so much injured by the shock that he died. A verdict in accordance with the circumstances of the case was returned. The deceased was the father of a large family of 10 children, who by this melancholy accident are deprived of their only support.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 4 April 1850
PLYMOUTH - Death By Fire. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday evening, at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, King-street, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY HALL, an old woman, aged 82, who has been receiving relief from the parish of St. Andrew, for some time. It appeared that she resided in Flora-street, and on Saturday afternoon was found by a neighbour, who entered her room, lying on the floor, with her clothes burnt about her breast; medical assistance was procured, but she was unable to speak, and died shortly afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - A man, named THOMAS WEDLOCK, pensioner, who resided in Monument Street, Devonport, on Wednesday last, after having attempted an assault of an aggravated nature on a little girl, aged about 12 years, committed suicide. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, when a verdict of Felo-de-se was returned. He was buried between nine and ten o'clock on Friday evening. Deceased was a married man, with family, and aged about 51.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 11 April 1850
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest. - A man named BOOLDS, who had been working for the last fortnight on the new works at Keyham, left his home in Stonehouse on Friday morning last and never returned. Not being able to work, through the painters being in his way, it is supposed, although generally a sober man, he must have got intoxicated; at all events his body was on Tuesday picked up on the mud near the Ferry House at Newpassage. An Inquest was held before W. Hutchinson, Esq., Mayor of Saltash, at the Ferry House Inn on Tuesday afternoon, when a verdict of Found Drowned was returned. BOOLDS was about 50 years of age, and has left a widow and one daughter.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 18 April 1850
ASHPRINGTON - Melancholy Suicide. - On Thursday morning last, a poor man, named QUICK, who for a short time had resided with his brother-in-law, Lee, at Cross-lanes, in this parish, was found suspended to the bed-post by his neckerchief. He had been hopelessly ill for a long time, and was in a desponding state of mind. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday, and a verdict of "Insanity" returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Thursday 2 May 1850
BERRY POMEROY - Suicide. - On Sunday morning last WILLIAM STABB, a labourer, in the employ of Mr T. Michelmore, junr., of Berry Pomeroy, destroyed himself; the poor man arose as was his usual custom at five o'clock to look after the cattle, and at seven o'clock he was found suspended by the neck in a linhay close to his dwelling house quite dead. for some time past he has been in a very dejected state. A Coroner's Inquest was held over him on Sunday evening and a verdict returned that deceased destroyed himself whilst labouring under a Temporary fit of Insanity. He has left a wife but no children.

PLYMOUTH - On Wednesday evening an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of WILLIAM PILE, fishmonger, who died at noon the same day. He had gone to visit a friend in Kinterbury Street, with whom he remained to dinner. He had taken a piece of meat into his mouth, when he became very ill, and died in a few minutes. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Smith's Tamar Inn, Morice-town, before W. Hutcheson, Esq., the Mayor of Saltash, on view of the body of a man named EDWARD MARSH, a carter of Plymouth. It appeared that the deceased was steward to some sick club, and that on Wednesday morning he left his home, having received 8s. 6d. on account of the club to pay some sick person, and that he had not returned again; that he was seen in Morice-town on Friday and Saturday, and, in reply to some questions, said he had no money; he asked a woman on Saturday for something to eat, and she gave him a piece of bread and butter. The body was found in the Tamar Canal on Sunday morning, on the mud, by a shipwright with the legs over a cable attached to one of the vessels lying there. The body was placed on the slip and thence removed to the Tamar Inn. It is supposed that the deceased spent the money with which he was entrusted; but whether he came into the water by accident or by his own wilful act there was no evidence, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was therefore recorded. the deceased was 34 years of age, a married man and was in the employ of Mr Dustow.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 May 1850
BRIXTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at Brixton, on view of the body of SARAH ELLIS, a child of about 7 years old, the daughter of a labourer, who, while at play, accidentally swallowed a portion of a nut-shell, by which she was very speedily suffocated.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 June 1850
PLYMSTOCK - On Friday last an Inquest was held at Plymstock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for this district of the County, on the body of a young child, named WILLIAM HENRY JOHNS. It appeared that the poor little fellow was sent out on Tuesday afternoon in the care of his brother, who is 9 years old, and 20 minutes after, he was observed by a labourer, hard by, floating in the water, three feet from the quay. His brother had joined in some play, and by an unfortunate accident the little boy had fallen into the water; he was dead when taken out. the verdict of Found Drowned was returned by the Jury.

EAST STONEHOUSE - A fatal accident occurred on board the Impregnable, lying in Hamoaze on Monday. One of the boys on board named THOMAS PORTER, fell from the top-gallant yard, striking the deck with great violence, and was taken up senseless; he was at once removed to the Hospital at Stonehouse, but, while being conveyed there, he expired. An Inquest was held yesterday upon the body of the deceased at the Hospital Inn, before Mr Bone, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

EXETER - MR SAMUEL HELE, resident dispenser at the Exeter dispensary committed suicide in the library of that institution on Tuesday last, by swallowing prussic acid. The deceased who was in his 48th year was connected with the dispensary from the time of its foundation in 1818, and was highly respected. For some time past, however, MR HELE had been suffering from depression of spirits and some six or eight months since he attempted self destruction by stabbing himself with a pen-knife. An Inquest was held upon the body on Tuesday afternoon before Mr Frederick Warren, Coroner, and was adjourned in order that a post mortem examination might take place.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 June 1850
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of DANIEL SLEEMAN, a carpenter, aged 34. A fortnight since he was engaged on the building of the Stonehouse Mechanics' Institute, and, while standing on a scaffold, which he had himself erected, it broke from under him, and he fell into some rafters 18 feet below where he was standing. He was sensible when take up, but was much injured. He was conveyed to the South Devon Hospital and after lingering in much pain until Friday, he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 June 1850
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday a Coroner's Inquest was held in the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of JOSEPH BROWN, a mason's labourer. The circumstances under which he met with his death were detailed in evidence, and it appeared that the deceased was in the employ of Mr Harvey, builder, who has contracted to erect some stores for Mr Hicks, wine merchant, and on Thursday the deceased was at work upon these stores, in Sutton Wharf, and was in the act of getting up some bricks under a cricket arch, when the arch suddenly fell and buried him; the other men at work there instantly lent their assistance to rescue the unfortunate man from his painful position; when they had done so they found the deceased was speechless; he was immediately carried to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered in great pain until Friday afternoon, when he died. Mr Oswald C. Arthur was the architect for building Mr Hicks' stores, and he said the span of the arch was 18ft.; and 6 inches was the clear to the length of 70 feet. On Thursday morning he was on the arch and there was not the least indication of danger then. He thought what had occurred was one of those accidents which human foresight could not prevent. The whole of the eastern wall fell with the arch, which was a proof of its strength. One of the masons who was at work at the buildings at the time the accident took place, said he had been on and under the arch two or three times on Thursday and there was no suspicion of danger, if there had been, the arch could have been easily shored. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death Accidentally, Casually and by Misfortune.

PLYMOUTH - Awfully Sudden Death. - On the same day, and at the same place as the above, J. Edmonds, Esq., held an Inquest upon the body of a young, unmarried woman, named CHARLOTTE LEWIS, who met with her death in a very singular manner. It appeared from the evidence of a woman, living in the same house with the deceased in Richmond-street, that on the forenoon of Saturday last she went into the court-yard and accidentally fell, when she arose she felt sick and her eye was blackened from a blow she received in her fall; she was taken into the witness's room, and, after a while, seemed to recover a little, and was able to take a cup of coffee; she then lay down on a bed in the room, and in a short time sat suddenly up, uttered a piercing scream, and fell back upon the bed. She never spoke again, but died almost instantly, and before any surgical assistance could be procured. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 July 1850
BRIXHAM - An Inquest has been held on ARTHUR, who was killed in endeavouring to stop a runaway horse, as stated in our last, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devon, at the Crown and Column Inn, on view of the body of a young woman named TOWELL, aged 20, the daughter of a labouring man residing in Stonehouse. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased left her home on the morning of Tuesday last, as was supposed, to follow her usual occupation, selling fish, instead of which, it appears she visited several beer shops and public houses here and at Torpoint, and continued drinking until she became quite intoxicated. She, several times during the day, said she would destroy herself before sunset; but no notice was taken of it by her companions beyond telling her that she would be placed under confinement if heard to use such threats. In the evening she was on the quay at Mutton Cove, and, taking her companion by the hand, shook it, saying "good bye," and, after being stopped twice in her attempt to jump over the quay, she succeeded in her purpose. An alarm was instantly given, and some watermen went to her assistance. She was picked up and taken to the Mutton Cove Inn. She was then living, but said she was "going fast." This was between 7 and 8 o'clock. Mr Baldy, surgeon, of Pembroke-street, was speedily in attendance, and by his directions, her clothes were stripped off and hot water applied to her feet and stomach. After directing some tea to be given her and that he was to be called again if any worse symptoms appeared, he left. Mr Baldy was again sent for, but he explained that he was engaged and desired that the parish surgeon, Mr Bennett, might be obtained without delay. Dr Row, who had been also sent for, promptly attended, and personally devoted nearly an hour in the attempt to save the life of the unfortunate poor creature, but without success. His humanity, however, is not the less commendable. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased Drowned herself during a Temporary Fit of Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 July 1850
CORNWORTHY - Mysterious Death. - An Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, in this village on Monday, the 15th instant, on the body of an illegitimate child of ELIZABETH CLARKE, ten months old. It is alleged that some medicine had been given the child on the Friday evening before, and that it immediately became ill. It died about five o'clock on the following morning. Mr N. Thomson, surgeon of Totnes, attended the Inquest and made a post mortem examination of the body. He took out the stomach for the purpose of having the contents analysed. The Inquest was adjourned to Monday.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 July 1850
CORNWORTHY - Mysterious Death. - As stated in our last, the adjourned Inquest on ELIZABETH CLARKE'S illegitimate child was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday, the 22nd instant; but, though the investigation is terminated, we still feel justified in calling the fate of the poor infant a mysterious death! Charles Ash, post-office messenger, deposed that he brought from, Totness and delivered to SOPHIA CLARKE a draught in a bottle, and a paper packet, that the former was directed for "SOPHIA CLARKE" and he thought the latter was directed for "ELIZABETH CLARKE'S child," but might be mistaken. SOPHIA CLARKE deposed that she administered some of the powders to her daughter ELIZABETH'S child; that the child then fell asleep, and slept several hours, that it then awoke and could scarcely breathe, being nearly suffocated; that Doctor Hains was sent for, and soon arrived, but the child was then dying, so that he could give it no relief; that the child died shortly afterwards; that Dr Hains looked at the powders and told her to take them as previously directed, and by no means to destroy the paper in which they were wrapped; that, notwithstanding this injunction, her daughter, ELIZABETH, burnt both the powders and the backing paper. J. Hains, Esq., surgeon, &c., deposed that the powders as well as the draught were intended for SOPHIA CLARKE, and were so marked; and that he neither then, nor at any other time, sent any medicine for her grandchild. N. Thompson, Esq., Surgeon, deposed to the post mortem examination made by him, &c. Several other persons were examined, but nothing further of importance was elicited. A verdict of "Accidentally Poisoned" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 August 1850
STOKE DAMEREL - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the King's Arms in George-street, Devonport, on the body of RICHARD ROW, late a shipwright in H.M. Dockyard. He was working about three months ago, on a stage in one of the slips, assisting in the construction of the Sanspereil, now building there. Whilst endeavouring with a bar to heave a screw out from the side of the ship, the end of the bar accidentally slipped out of the eye of the screw; he consequently lost his balance, and fell through the space between the inside of the stage and the side of the vessel, into the slip, a depth of twenty-five feet. There were two feet of water at the bottom of the slip into which he fell. He received no fracture and walked home, but continued to suffer from the effect of the fall until his death, which happened on Saturday last. Mr Laity, surgeon, who opened the head, stated that he found a considerable effusion of serum on the brain, which caused his death, and that the fall described had, he had no doubt, occasioned that injury. There appeared to be not the slightest blame attachable to anyone, and the Jury, without hesitation, found a verdict that the deceased had died from the accident as before described, whilst in the execution of his duty as a shipwright in the Devonport dock-yard.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 August 1850
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - On the 8th instant, a woman named COOK went to fetch a kettle of water, leaving her child, a boy 5 years old, in the room, and on her return found his clothes burning. The poor child was dreadfully burnt and soon died. An Inquest on the body has been held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of Accidentally Burnt, returned.

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident. - A very melancholy and fatal accident happened on Wednesday afternoon last. As Mr Wm. Minhinnett, farrier, and MR GEO. MARRIFIELD, tallow chandler, of this town were returning from Whitchurch-down race course, after passing Hanking-shop turnpike-gate, they rode very fast towards Vigo Bridge, which crosses the river Tavy at the eastern part of the town, when from some cause Minhinnett's horse struck its shoulder against the parapet wall of the bridge and fell. MERRIFIELD'S horse, which was close behind, shied at the fallen horse, and leap over the parapet wall of the bridge with its rider, and both were precipitated into the river, a distance of about 30 feet. The horse was killed on the spot and MERRIFIELD'S skull was dreadfully fractured, with an arm, shoulder and thigh broken. He lingered until 11 o'clock the following day, when death terminated his sufferings, leaving a wife and three children to deplore his loss. Minhinnett's horse had it's shoulder broken and has since died. An Inquest was held on Saturday on the body of MERRIFIELD, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, at the Golden Lion Inn, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 August 1850
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at the Devonport Workhouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a new born male child, of an unmarried woman named SARAH CLINTON. - Jane Dennis a seaman's wife, living in Boot-lane, said I know SARAH CLINTON, she had lived in the house with me, but is removed to King-street; I lent her a chair, for she had no things of her own, on Monday I wanted my chair, and went to CLINTON'S room for it. I knocked, CLINTON answered that she would open the door shortly, but that she felt ill. I went away and came again at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, when CLINTON opened the door to me. I then saw the floor was covered with blood; CLINTON was only partly dressed, there was no bed in the room, but there was a sofa. I saw she was ill, I said she had had a child, she sat down and then I saw a child in her arms wrapped in a skirt. The child was dead. I had told her before I thought she was in the family-way, and that she ought to provide some things. She said she intended to do so when she got some needle work which she was engaged upon. When I saw her, she was so ill, I went for Mr Laity, the surgeon, who came immediately. I have been in attendance on her since; she told me the child was born dead and she was not bad a long time, she said she knocked at the partition with her hand, but no one came, she was lying on the sofa at that time, but she was not aware that she was so near her confinement. - Jane Betty, wife of John Betty, optician, Devonport, said I have known SARAH CLINTON, better than 20 years, she is a sober woman, as to drink; she was 29 years old last Christmas, never saw her keeping company with a young man; she had a shilling a week from the parish. - Richard John Laity, Member of the College of Surgeons, said I first saw this child at half-past three on Monday afternoon; it was on a sofa with its mother, and was quite dead, I had it removed to the table, and examined it; it was a full grown child. The upper part of the child appeared clean and white, but the lower parts were covered with blood. It appeared as if it had lost a good deal of blood; it was a very fine child, there were no marks of violence on it, nor any bruises on its surface; the mother said the child was dead born, and that she had not anything prepared for the birth, but she had hoped to get some things after she had returned some work which she had in hand. The same evening I made a post mortem examination of the child at the Workhouse. I opened the chest, found the lungs quite developed, they had a crepitating sound under pressure, I removed them, and applied the usual tests of inspiration and there could be no question that the child had breathed, I cut the lungs into pieces and they floated on the water; the other viscera were healthy, the weight of the lungs was 850 grains without the blood, - the length of the body was 20 inches, the weight of the body was 6 ½ lbs., 6 or 7lbs. is the average weight of a new born child. I examined the head; there was no congestion of the brain, but rather less blood than natural. My opinion is that the child was born alive, and I think it died from loss of blood -syncope. The umbilical cord was not tied tightly so that the blood could not flow from it, and the loss of a small quantity of blood, when the child was standing upright, would be sufficient to produce syncope, and if the child were then kept upright, - death. If the child died of syncope produced by haemorrhage, then that would not be a natural death, and I can account for the death in no other way. - Mary Voisey living in the house with SARAH CLINTON, said I live on the same stair platform as SARAH CLINTON, I never saw her otherwise than sober. She scrubbed out her room on Saturday morning, and afterwards went out to work. I saw her on Sunday morning last and took into her a little jacket. She was alone, but said nothing: I had no idea she was with child. On Sunday night I heard no noise during the night, I was up at half-past four o'clock on the Monday morning; but I heard not the least sound from CLINTON'S room. The first I heard of her was when I heard Mrs Dennis asked CLINTON for her chair. When I saw her she said "Oh! Mrs Voisey my baby is dead," she burst into tears. I said "Why didn't you call me," she said I did call to your little boy, but in doing so I fainted and I suppose the boy did not hear me. She said the child had never breathed. - Catherine Cottener, living at Newpassage, said, I know SARAH CLINTON, I saw her last 2 or 3 months ago, she had a little child with her and said children were very troublesome, but she said, if she had 20, she would not destroy one though she believed there was something which would destroy them. - James Lancaster, Relieving Officer, said:- SARAH CLINTON has had relief for some years from Stoke Damerel parish; she came to the office to receive it on Monday week last, I asked her if she was married she said no, I said "you are in the family-way," she said no, I said, "there is not much doubt about it, but are you, or are you not?" She still denied it, and said she was the best to know, I said, if she persisted in denying it, she must be examined; she still denied, and I gave her the order to examined, and in half-an-hour she returned and said Mr Laity was not home, I still refused to give relief and then she said "well, it is so;" I said I could give her no further out-relief, but she could have an order to come into the house; the evidence was then closed. - The Coroner thought it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquest. The principal point in cases of this sort was whether the child was born alive. Mr Laity said this was a fine child, and he had made a post mortem examination of the child, and from the appearance of the lungs, he thought they had been inflated. He also stated that he was of opinion that it was born alive, and, from other circumstances, in addition to these, he was induced to think the child died of haemorrhage. It seemed the umbilicus was not properly secured. The question for their grave consideration would be the particular cause of the death of the child. If they should consider the opinion of Mr Laity was correct, they would have then to consider if the want of security on the umbilicus was the result of design or accident; if of design then murder would have been committed; now he was not aware any further evidence could be laid before them, but he thought, where there were circumstances demanding such grave consideration as the present case, the decision should not be pronounced hastily. He thought therefore, he should best discharge his duty if, instead of asking for their verdict, he adjourned the Inquest. The Inquest was adjourned till Monday.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 September 1850
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at Newpassage, on the body of JOHN ELLIS, a workman at the steam-yard, who, while walking on a plank over the caisson slipped and fell between the caisson and the sea wall and crushed his head so much that he died shortly afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 11 September 1850
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held, at the Plymouth Guildhall, on Thursday evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a very respectable Jury, Mr Thomas Morris, Foreman, on the body of ELIZABETH BEER, the wife of WILLIAM BEER, a fisherman, who died under circumstances, which led to a belief that she had taken poison, or had had poison of some description given to her. The body having been viewed, the first witness called was SARAH BEER, who said: I am a daughter of the deceased, who is the wife of WM. BEER, a fisherman, residing at 16 Catte-street. My mother was about 44 years of age, and had eight children. The last time I saw her alive was on Wednesday evening, he 28th ult. I believe she left her house on the following day, but I do not know the reason why. I heard nothing more of her until last Monday, when I was informed she was at Mr Wakeham's, at Stonehouse. I searched for her all day on Saturday and Sunday, but could not find her until the Monday, when I went to Mr Wakeham's, where I saw her in bed, and asked her when she was coming home, to which she answered "I'm coming home in the morning." She came home the next day in a coach, and was laid on the bed; my father at this time being at sea. I wished to make my mother some tea, but she refused to have any. My sister, LOUISA BEER, and I, quarrelled, and she told me I was not wanted any more, and I went away for the night. I returned the next morning about half-past 9 and then found that my mother was dead. - By a Juror: I do not usually reside with my mother. The reason I left the house was that my sister told me I was not wanted any more. - LOUISA BEER was then called, and answered the Coroner as follows: I am about 13 years of age. I cannot read. I go to a place of worship every Sunday. I do not know the Lord's Prayer or the ten Commandments, and I don't think I ever heard them. I do not know when my birthday is. - The Coroner: I did not think such fearful ignorance existed, with such a class of persons, in Plymouth. - Examination resumed: On Tuesday evening last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, my mother came home in a cab. The only persons in the room all night were the deceased, two children and myself. My mother was in bed, and she desired me to do the same. There was a candle burning at this time. I sat up in the bed occasionally, and, some time after my sister left, my mother asked me for some cold water, refusing to take anything else; she drank three times. She kept on crying and brought up something on the floor. In the morning, about 7 o'clock, I called to a neighbour, Mrs Short, and she came in and asked my mother if she should do anything for her, but my mother answered "No." Mrs Short then sent me for Mr Giles, the surgeon, but I returned without being able to find him. Mrs Short then went for him herself. I remained with my mother until half-past 9, at which hour she died; that was before any medical man came. She did not say anything before she died. My brother came in just before, and went over to the bed. The deceased looked at him as if she did not know him. - By the Foreman: My sister did not give my mother anything to eat or drink before she went away on the Tuesday evening. - By the Coroner: When my mother went away, on the Thursday morning, she said she was going to the market to get something for dinner. She was then spirited. - By the Foreman: She would drink spirits sometimes, but not very often. - By the Coroner: My father searched for her day and night, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. My father was upstairs when she went away, but there had been no quarrel or angry words between them or between any member of the family. - Sarah Wakeham sworn: I reside at No. 1, Brownlow-street, Stonehouse. I have known the deceased about six years, but have not seen her above three times for the last three years: she came to my house on Friday morning last about 8 o'clock: I offered her some breakfast, but she declined taking any, saying she was very poorly; she looked much fatigued. After breakfast, between 9 and 10 o'clock, I asked her if she would lay down on the bed, which offer she readily accepted, and I took her upstairs and she laid down on the bed with her clothes on: about half-past two I went to the bedroom, and about ten minutes after that she came down and took some tea, after which she sat down by the fireside until half-past 6 in the evening, when she again laid down for two hours; between 8 and 9, I went up to her and offered to see her part of the way home; she said, "I will not go home for the night if I leave the house." I then consented to her staying the night, and did not leave her till 11 o'clock, and saw her again about 8 the next morning, when I gave her some breakfast and some gruel in the forenoon; at dinner time I asked her to get up, but she complained of being too poorly. She continued in my house all day on Saturday and on Sunday was getting worse and I sent for Dr Sheppard, who arrived shortly after, and on Monday she said she was better. About 10 o'clock her daughter came in and saw her mother: on that day deceased said she would rather go in the Workhouse or in the streets than go home, but on Tuesday she wished to go home, and asked my husband to pay for the cab, which he did. About 9 o'clock she left my house in company with her daughter and niece: at that time she appeared comfortable and spoke cheerfully, and after that I saw nothing more of her. I had no idea at that time that she was near her death. - By the Coroner: I did not sent to acquaint her family where she was, because it was her express wish for me not to do so. - Jane Short deposed that she went for Mr Giles, the surgeon, and returned without him, when she found MRS BEER dead: she did not hear any person having words in the house: deceased was subject to melancholy fits. - James Sheppard, M.D., saw the deceased at Mrs Wakeham's, and prescribed for her on Monday; he considered she was better. He saw her on Tuesday and gave her medicine - she appeared desponding and melancholy, but was eventually better, and in his opinion she might have been moved into Plymouth with safety. The next morning he was informed she was dead. Witness went to the house of the deceased, and from the circumstance of her having been better on the day previous, and the neighbourhood being determined to have her, as they stated, "crowned," he collected some of the substance which she vomited. He then examined the room, but could not find anything about it, to indicate that she had taken poison. He made a post mortem examination of the body and found the external part of the body presenting no particular sign whatever. He opened the chest and abdomen, and found the lungs and heart healthy. Dr Sheppard then minutely described the state of the body, and said he believed that the condition of the liver and the membranes of the brain occasioned those low melancholy desponding feelings which were termed "monomania." He had examined the contents of the stomach, though not very minutely, but did not discover any poison, and the whole result of his enquiry was that she died a natural death. - The Coroner ably summed up, saying that after the evidence of Dr Sheppard, there was no doubt that the deceased died from natural causes. He animadverted on the conduct of the first witness, who had so cruelly left her dying parent, and he was sorry that she was not present to hear the few words of admonition he intended to have given her. With regard to the other daughter, LOUISA, it was painful to contemplate, that in Plymouth, where schools were so plenty, and the education of the poor so much looked after by benevolent individuals, that a child of parents moving in a decent sphere, should be found to be so grossly ignorant; it was a subject for deep lamentation, - but he hoped such an example of almost utter ignorance must be considered as an exception to the general state of persons in their class. Having then feelingly alluded to the absence of the mother of a large family, for several days, without anyone knowing where she was, he said it would be, he considered, the duty of the Jury to return a verdict that the death of the deceased arose from natural causes. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from Natural Causes."

BRENTOR - On Monday an Inquest was held at Brentor, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on view of the body of WILLIAM SMALE, a respectable labourer of about 68 years of age; the deceased was engaged in assisting in making a drain, and when he was at the bottom of a drain, a quantity of the earth on one side fell in upon and buried him; he was taken out a few minutes after the accident quite dead. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 September 1850
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday afternoon, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy named JOHN DENHAM, of 13 years of age, who came by his death under peculiar circumstances. A double Jury was empanelled, and he Coroner, in opening the proceedings, stated that there was little doubt that the boy had drowned himself, and the chief question which would occupy them would have reference to the state of mind n which the boy was at the time he destroyed himself. He (the Coroner) had thought it his duty to empanel a double Jury, because there was a possibility of much difference of opinion on this point. He then requested them to attend with him and view the body of the deceased, and he would advise them to view the body with more than usual minuteness and attention, that they might observe if there were any marks upon the deceased. - The body of the deceased having been viewed:- the Coroner said: Gentlemen, having view the body, I am satisfied there are no marks of violence upon it; we will now call the witnesses. - THOMAZINE DENHAM, mother of the deceased, said: I live at No. 1, Russsell-street, my husband is a cab-driver. The little boy who was drowned was 13 years of age; I am his step-mother; I have been married to his father nine years. I have two children by this marriage. The youngest is six years old. On Sunday morning I went with the deceased to the School of George's-street Chapel, at twenty minutes after nine. I went with him, because the Sunday before he had done something amiss, and I went with him to see he went to school all right. I left him at school, and returned to my own house, and cooked my dinner. The boy came home at half-past 12; his little brother, WILLIAM, returned before him and communicated something to me. I said to the deceased, on his return, "You have behaved naughty at the school, and Mr Tucker is coming over. Your father said, if you behaved naughty again, I was to keep you without dinner." He made no reply. Mr Samuel Nicholson, the preacher at the Baptist Chapel, came up to pray by my little girl, who was ill. All my family knelt with him in prayer. Mr Nicholson went away in a quarter an hour. I went for the dinner; I brought it in, and put it on the table. I first helped the sick child - she is very ill, but hearty; then THOMAS, nearly 8 years old; and then the deceased, he was then standing by the side of the table and said grace; then I went to help myself; before I helped myself he went to the door; I caught him; he said, "I will jump over the quay or cliff." I held him by the arm, and called someone, but he was too strong for me, and slipped out of my hands. He was caught on the stairs by Mr and Mrs Gill and he came back to my room again; as soon as they left him at the door, he flew to the window, which was up, and jumped out into Frankfort-street, saying, as he did so, "I will." I went in search of him, but could not find him. I returned and when I saw his father I told him what JOHN had said. We went no where in search of him, for Mr Gill and his father thought he would return home. A little after two o'clock, the body of the deceased was brought to my house; a surgeon was sent for, but he was found to be quite dead. He was very sulky at times, but he was generally of a very good and willing temper. I don't think he took the slightest notice of what I said to him about the school. He was always in the habit of saying grace; when he said grace, his mind was seemingly quite composed. I was always in the habit of helping the youngest first at meals. I do not think he was hurt on account of it. He put his hand on the table as if to take up his fork, when he suddenly ran to the door. I never saw anything of that sort before. When he rushed to the door, he was entirely like a person deprived of reason. He never jumped out of the window before. No violent blows had been given to the deceased either by his father or myself. - Mr Tucker: I was at the school yesterday, and the conduct of the deceased yesterday was different from what it had been on former days. He behaved very well, which was unusual, as he was a troublesome boy generally. He was not punished at all that morning at school, and no threat was used towards him. - Thomas Hambly, a boy living in New-street, said, I was under the Hoe yesterday afternoon. I saw the deceased and a less boy near the Two Coves. I had just come out of the water, I saw the deceased take off his coat and give it to his brother, I next saw the deceased in the water, he went overboard from the quay. I heard him say to his little brother, "My mother won't give me any dinner and my father won't give me any and I don't want any." He was not long in the water before I saw a gentleman run over but not in time to save him, two young men were there, but when deceased sunk they ran away. His brother was crying. I cannot swim well. I did not see him jump off the quay. I don't know whether he could fall off. - Charles John Banger, a waterman, said: I was on the Hoe yesterday about two o'clock; I was standing at the landing place, I saw people assembled near the Two Coves. I got a boat and went over to the spot, and I searched for the body with the boathook, and I dragged it up and hauled it in the boat. I took the body round to the Barbican. The body was quite dead when I took it in the boat. - Mary Gill, who lives in the house with MRS DENHAM, was examined, and corroborated the evidence of the mother of the deceased. - The Coroner remarked that he was glad he had made some remarks at the commencement of the Inquiry, because the event showed that it was unwise to be swayed by the public rumours, and that it was necessary they should have every possible piece of evidence before them previous to their arriving at a decision. The evidence had shown that the deceased had not been ill-treated in any manner either at home or at school. For his own part he (the Coroner) believed there could be no doubt that the deceased had killed himself through a sudden alienation of intellect. Such had been the case when men of knowledge and of high station had committed suicide, and such, he thought it must be the opinion of the Jury, was the case now. He then directed the Jury to consider their verdict. They returned one of Temporary Insanity. - The Inquiry had excited no little interest in several of the inhabitants of the town.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 September 1850
PLYMSTOCK - Distressing And Fatal Occurrence. - On Friday last the inhabitants of Bovisand, near Plymouth, were thrown into a state of very considerable excitement by an occurrence through which a young lady of highly respectable connections and who was herself very much respected, lost her life. For some time past MISS DOLLING, daughter of the late CAPT. DOLLING, R.N., and sister of LIEUTENANT DOLLING, commanding the Nautilus, naval apprentices' exercise brig, at this port, has been a visitor at the residence of John E. Elworthy, Esq., at Bovisand, and on Friday last, she left the house shortly after 10 o'clock in the forenoon, for the purpose, as it was understood, of a walk on the beach to bathe a favourite dog. After an absence of more than three hours, the little dog having in the meantime returned, the family of Mr Elworthy became alarmed, and a search was made. On the beach at Bovisand, lying between two rocks, the body of the unfortunate lady was found quite dead, floating in the water. The body was taken up and conveyed to Mr Elworthy's house, where subsequently an Inquest was held before Allan Belfield Bone, Esq., County Coroner, when the above particulars were adduced in evidence, and also that it was supposed, from the position of the body when found, and the nature of the ground, that the unfortunate lady must have over-balanced herself and slipped from the rocks, when trying to catch the dog, whilst it was in the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." MISS DOLLING was about 32 years of age, and her distressing and untimely death is naturally a source of much grief to her bereaved relatives, and to Mr and Mrs Elworthy.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 October 1850
BRIXHAM - Inquests. - Two Inquests have been held here by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner. The first was on the 19th September, on the body of J. BANKS, one of the crew of the trawler which was run down by the Brunswick steamer some weeks ago. The body was picked up in Allsands.
The other was on the 23rd of September, on the body of HENRY BRINGHAM, who fell over the pier when looking for his father - Verdicts: "Found Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 October 1850
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, on the body of JAMES MILLWARD, aged 48 years, who was, before his decease, master of the Laurina Thomson, merchant vessel, just arrived in port from Trieste, with a cargo of wheat. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased went to the Ring of Bells public house, on the afternoon of Tuesday, and remained until about half-past ten in the evening, when he was asked by the landlord to take some supper. He accepted the invitation, and had just commenced eating, when he was suddenly taken ill, and died in about twenty minutes, before medical assistance could be procured. - Verdict "Died by the visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Suicide - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday afternoon an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of an old man named THOMAS NOBLE, who caused his death by hanging himself on Monday morning. - Susannah Davis, wife of a mason, said the deceased had lived a neighbour with her for four years; he was a superannuated pilot, and was about 72 years of age. He and his wife occupied a little tenement at the back of the house in Lambhay-street, in which she lived. She saw the deceased several times on Sunday, he was past all labour, and had been deprived of his senses for twelve months. Between 7 and 8 o'clock, this morning, MRS NOBLE ran into her (witness's) room, and said, "My dear Mrs Davis, come into my room, I'm afraid my husband has hanged himself up." She and another woman followed her to her apartments. She found the old man hanging to the tester of the bed; he was partially sitting on the foot of the bed, a handkerchief was about his neck, by which he was suspended. She cut the handkerchief, and, with other neighbours, she got him on the bed. She went for Mr Eales, a surgeon, who came, but the deceased was quite dead. When she cut him down he was in his night clothes. She had no reason whatever to suppose that any other person than himself had hanged him. Every attention was paid to him after he was cut down. At the time he hanged himself he must have been out of his mind. He had attempted to commit suicide before, nearly five months ago. - NANCY NOBLE, wife of the deceased, said he received 13l. a year superannuation, and he was assisted by his son, so that he wanted for nothing. On Saturday night and Sunday night, he slept on a sofa bed; last night she kept a rushlight burning, and this morning, before daylight, he went into another room, and returned and lay down; at about 7 o'clock he went into the other room again, and she thought he was very quiet, and went in to look for him, and then she saw him hanging to the bedstead. He was getting blind, and it was always his trouble, fearing he should be altogether blind. - The Coroner said he thought there could be no question that the deceased was not in his right senses at the time he committed the act of suicide. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was "Insane" at the time he destroyed himself.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 October 1850
EGG BUCKLAND - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Egg Buckland, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday, 22nd inst., on the body of RICHARD BURRING, a farm labourer, in the employ of Mr Anthony. - Maria Yabsley, servant to Mr Anthony, deposed that about half-past five on Monday morning, she went, as usual, into the orchard to gather wood, and saw something white against a tree. She was very much frightened, and called Joseph Spear. On Friday night she let the deceased into the house about nine o'clock, and he appeared to have been crying. While he was unlacing his boots, he said he had been to Ridgeway, and had seen Mary Lytton with another man. He did not say any more, but went to bed; he was sober. - Joseph Spear said he slept in the same bed with deceased. Went to bed about eight o'clock on Sunday night, did not hear deceased come in or go out, was called by Maria Yabsley, about half-past five on Monday morning and found deceased hanging to a tree in the orchard. Witness called another man, Thomas Rogers. - Thomas Rogers deposed that he cut down the deceased who was quite dead. - Mary Lytton lived at Ridgeway. On Sunday afternoon deceased came to see her; and asked her to walk out with him; she refused. A man named Lucas was with her at the time. Deceased seemed to be angry because she would not walk with him, and because Lucas was with her. Deceased said he would bid her farewell and went away. He had never threatened to do harm to himself, and she did not think he would have done so. He was always of rather a quick temper she thought. He was nothing to her, though she supposed he thought he was; she had never given him any encouragement. - JOHN BURRING deposed that deceased was his brother, and about 23 years of age. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased Hung himself during a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 November 1850
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Suicide. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the White Lion Inn, King-street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the death of JOSEPH JUDE. The Coroner and Jury having seen the body lying at the house of the deceased the following evidence was taken. - CHARLES EDWIN JUDE, an intelligent boy of ten years of age, deposed:- Deceased was my father, he was leading man of joiners in the dockyard; I saw my father at about half-past two yesterday, at home, sitting by the fire-place in the usual sitting room of the house in Granby Street. He was trying to go to sleep, I went out with my brother and came back and went into the room, and my father was just going out of the room towards the court. I did not see anything in his hand. My mother - thinking he stayed longer than usual - went to the door of the privy, and she hallooed for "JUDE," and, receiving no answer, burst open the door, and then saw my father on his knees; mother caught him round the waist and then screamed; I called the neighbours and then went for Mr Rutter; Mr Rutter not being home I came back and my mother sent me for Mr Crossing. He was living when I came back, but could not speak. My father has been ill for some time. - William Doubtfire: I live next door to where the deceased did live; I have known him for about twelve months; I had observed something strange about him for the last five or six months. I heard the alarm yesterday afternoon, and went into the court of deceased's house; I saw the body of deceased lying on his back in the court with his feet in the privy. I saw a cut in his throat - it had stopped bleeding, but the court and privy were covered with blood. The razor with which he cut his throat was lying on the floor of the privy, all over blood - the neckerchief was beside the razor. He was dead at the time. His hands were both very bloody - his left hand especially. I thought he must have held his head with the left hand while he cut his throat with his right. - Policeman Lucas said that the door of the privy had evidently been fastened. He produced the razor with which the throat had been cut. - CHARLES EDWIN JUDE identified the razor. - Amelia Stephens, the wife of Frederick Richard Stevens, printer, said: The deceased married my sister, I frequently saw him, he was sometimes insane. About two or three years ago he was outrageously mad, and was obliged to be confined by a strait waistcoat and was sent to the Plympton Asylum for a fortnight. I saw him twice yesterday; when I first saw him he was very low; I went to Mr Rutter and he came and took a basin of blood. On the afternoon of Thursday he walked up and down the room in a very excited state; he unhung a looking glass and placed it with its face down on the table, and when my sister took it up, to replace it, he said "let it lie." - Mary Sturges, the wife of a joiner in the Dock-Yard, had known him for many years and had known him several times out of his mind. She had not seen him for about four months before his death. - The Coroner said perhaps the evidence might have been more close if the widow were examined, but this was undesirable if there was sufficient evidence without her, and therefore it would be for them, with the evidence, to say, first whether he died by cutting his own throat, and, if so, in what state of mind he was at the time of his so cutting his throat. The case appeared so clear a one, that he thought it could leave very little doubt upon the mind of the Jury as to their verdict, both as to deceased killing himself, and as to his condition of mind at the time. - The Jury at once returned a verdict that JOSEPH JUDE died by cutting his throat, he being in a state of Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday evening an Inquest was held in the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of JAMES BRIMMACOMBE, a mason, who had died that morning in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. It appears that deceased was a mason, and that while following his work on Tuesday, in a sewer in Copper-house lane, a part of the wall which he had built fell upon him and fractured some of his ribs, and he was otherwise injured. He was at once removed to the Hospital, and every possible attention was paid to him, but he died from the effect of the injuries he received on Saturday morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 27 November 1850
MODBURY - Suicide. - An Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the 16th inst., on the body of MR THOS. PROUT, ropemaker, who was found hanging, quite dead, in his workshop on the 13th. A verdict of Insanity was returned. It appears that when he committed the act he was in a state of delirium tremens, brought on by excessive drinking; a most melancholy catastrophe which, we hope, will prove a warning to others.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. Yesterday morning (Tuesday), FANNY ELIZABETH WHITE, an infant nine weeks old was found dead in bed by the side of her parent, in Whitecross-street, Plymouth. A Jury was empanelled in the evening, by John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the cause of death.

STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on the 15th inst., by Allan B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JOHN HOCKING, a seaman of her Majesty's ship Styx, whose death was occasioned by the effect of an accidental fall down the hatchway of the ship Verdict accordingly.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 December 1850
Melancholy And Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday lat, on board H.M.S. Lancaster, in Hamoaze, before Edmund Herring, Esq., Mayor and coroner of Saltash, on the body of MR TOBIAS PALMER, boatswain of that ship, who met with his death under the following painful circumstances. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that on Tuesday night the deceased had the first watch from 8 to 12 p.m. He was on the upper deck, and was heard to strike four bells (10 o'clock), by his wife and the watchkeepers on board adjoining ships. About one o'clock on Wednesday morning, not having come below, to call the man who had to keep the middle watch, his wife became uneasy, and arose from her bed, and went out on the main deck in order to ascertain where he was, but not succeeding in her search, she called the boy, and also the man, being alarmed at not finding him. It was then half-past one in the morning. They endeavoured to ascend to the upper-deck, but could not, as the hatch over the ladder was down, and some weight pressing upon it, which they could not life. The man went out of one of the main deck ports, and got up by the ladder on the ship's side. The wife of the deceased went to the after-ladder, and, having burst open a door at the top of it, went on the upper deck. On going to the watch-house, they found the deceased lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood, caused by a cut which he received over the left temple, his nose flattened, and bruises on his cheek; his feet were outside the threshold of the watchhouse door, and one of his shoes off lying at his feet. He was turned over on his back, and the blood wiped from his face, but was apparently dead. Assistance was procured from the ships near, and signals were made for a surgeon, who on his arrival from the Agincourt pronounced him to have been dead a considerable time. As the deck was slippery from the frost, it is supposed that whilst in the act of going into the watch-house, he slipped his feet, and falling forward received a severe blow which (being a stout man), caused his death. His wife and family have been thrown into the greatest distress of mind through the melancholy occurrence. The Jury returned a verdict that he died from the blow he received from the fall, whilst in the execution of his duty. The deceased had been about 35 years in Her Majesty's Service, 24 ¼ years of which he served as a boatswain and was much respected by a large circle of relatives and friends. His body was removed from the Lancaster, to his residence on shore on Wednesday evening, and was interred at the Plymouth Cemetery on Sunday afternoon.

PLYMOUTH - On Thursday morning last an Inquest was held at Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an infant named FANNY ELIZABETH WHITE, aged nine weeks. The deceased was, on the morning in question, found dead by the side of her parent, who resides in Whitecross-street, Plymouth. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Murder In Stonehouse Lane. - We stated very briefly in our last, that a man named WILLIAM BROWN AMBROSE, a carpenter, and very respectably connected, had been brutally assaulted, on the night of Saturday the 16th November, - that his life was despaired of; and that three men named William Thomas, Benjamin Hurd and William Wyatt had been taken into custody on suspicion of being concerned in the attack. Since then AMBROSE has died and the authorities, as will be seen below, have been anxiously investigating the circumstances in the hope of discovering the murderers. Hitherto they have, unfortunately failed; and notwithstanding the increasing vigilance of the police, the whole affair appears shrouded in impenetrable mystery. AMBROSE died on Thursday and on the same day, the three men who were in custody, were brought up before the Magistrates for examination. - The Superintendent of Police said, since these men were last brought up, enquiries had been made, the result of which was to show that neither Hurd nor Wyatt could have been concerned in the attack. The witnesses to prove this were present. They had also some witnesses present who saw the attack, and through whom he hoped, some light would be thrown upon the matter. - The Mayor said they would hear the evidence the men in custody were desirous of calling, and such others as were prepared to throw any light upon the matter. He asked the prisoner Thomas if he had any statement to make. If he did this, it must be entirely voluntary, and what he said would be written down. -
[There then followed the evidence given to the Mayor.]
The Inquest. - The Coroner (John Edmonds, Esq.,) sat at the Guildhall on Friday afternoon, at five o'clock to Enquire into the circumstances of this most mysterious case. A Jury was empanelled of 21 of the most respectable tradesmen of the town, who chose Mr Joseph Wills, of George-street, as their Foreman. The other gentlemen were Joseph Norrington, Robert Symons Damerel, Robert Foale Oldrey, John Francis Madge, Thomas Morrish, Thomas George Pearce, Thomas Jones Stevens, Charles Lampeer Dwelley, Edward Charles Philp, Edmund Lee, Charles Revell, Josiah Avent, William Murry, David Thomas, Benjamin May, William Underwood, William Dungey, Henry Seaman, Thomas Peters, and Richard White. - The Jury having been sworn, The Coroner addressed them, and explained the position of the case, as far as he understood it, and the kind of evidence upon which, as far as was at present known, they would be called upon to form their judgment. It might have been expected that, in a case like this, where a grievous assault had been committed, which had not resulted in death until many days afterwards, some formal deposition of the dying man would have been taken, which might have been made legal evidence in this or any subsequent enquiry. He very much regretted to inform them that nothing of the sort had taken place, and he mentioned the fact now, in the presence of the press, in order that those who had been guilty of any neglect might take the responsibility; and that the innocent might not be blamed. Here, in a town like Plymouth, with an immense population - where the mayor and magistrates are always at hand - where the doors of justice were always open - where the Superintendent of Police was always at his post - and where the police, generally, were active and vigilant, and easily accessible, at all times, it turned out that no information of this murderous assault, committed on the night of Saturday the 16th of November, had been given to the authorities until Monday the 25th - more than eight days afterwards. The mayor and magistrates, as soon as they received the information, at once proceeded to the house, for the purpose of making enquiry into the matter, but they found that the unfortunate deceased was then in such a state that it was quite impossible his examination could be taken. If any of the many parties to whom the facts were known, had communicated either, with the magistrates or the police, at an earlier period, the case would have assumed a different aspect, for the Jury then would in all probability have had before them some deposition of the murdered man, to assist them in their investigation. That there was no such deposition - that the man had, in point of fact, died without any declaration whatever, as to the cause of his death - was no fault whatever of the magistrates or of the police. The remainder of the learned Coroner's address was confined to a statement of the facts of the case, as they afterwards came out in evidence. - The Jury then proceeded to the house in Central-street, in which the unhappy man had died, for the purpose of viewing the body. On their return, Thomas was brought into the Hall in custody, and told, by the Coroner, that he might remain during the investigation if he pleased; and that he might also, if he thought fit, make any statement, or ask any questions - being first cautioned, that whatever he said, would be taken down, and might be used against him hereafter. He expressed a wish to stay, and the examination proceeded. - Ann Stevens said: I reside at No. 10 Central Street in this borough, and am a single woman; I have known the deceased about seven months; he was 25 years of age, and a builder by trade: when he first visited me I was living at Vosper's lodgings in King Street; he has resided with me constantly for three months past; before that he only came to see me in and out; I have known Thomas for the last nine months; he came to visit me occasionally; AMBROSE was aware of it; we lived in Central Street for two months; during that time Thomas called twice; AMBROSE was, on each occasion, present; he was also present when he came to visit me at my room, about a month before I went to live in Central Street; Thomas then left the room and called me out and AMBROSE desired me to go to him; I went out and spoke to him outside the front door; Thomas said to me "Do you mean to stop with AMBROSE?" I said "Yes I do;" Thomas said "Then I'll bid you good bye forever." I have heard that Thomas is a married man with two children; he never made me an allowance; his first visit to me in Central Street was about a month ago; I think it was on a Sunday evening about nine o'clock; he sat down and talked with AMBROSE, whom he addressed in a very friendly manner. [The witness, at this point in her examination, appeared a great deal affected and shed tears.] He remained in my room about two hours, and before he went away he asked AMBROSE and me to go a little way with him towards his home at Newpassage; I and AMBROSE did go with him in consequence of that invitation; we went first to a public house in Devonport called, I believe, the "Black Horse" [Thomas intervened and said it was the "Horse and Groom]. I can't speak positively to the name of the house; we had a glass of ale each, at that house, and AMBROSE and I left Thomas outside the door; we returned together to my residence in Central Street; no angry word whatever passed between the two men upon that occasion; and they parted from each other in the most friendly manner; on Saturday, the 6th inst., AMBROSE and I went to bed at half past ten o'clock, and about five minutes past twelve we were aroused by a knocking at the window; AMBROSE asked who was there, upon which a voice outside replied "It's me, Bill;" I recognised the voice of Thomas; AMBROSE got out of bed and opened the door, and Thomas came into the room in which I was in bed; he was about half tipsy; I cannot account for his coming at that hour; I had made no appointment with him to come at that time or at any other time that night; AMBROSE lit the candle upon Thomas coming in, and did not appear at all frightened or annoyed; he was perfectly sober and got into bed again, while Thomas took a chair and sat at the bed side, on the side on which AMBROSE WAS; he took out half-a-crown and threw it on the table, and asked me to get half a pint of gin to drink; I said it was too late, and that I could not get any; Thomas said "BILL, will you get up, and go a little way with me, as far as the half-penny gate, for company?" I understood him to mean the Stonehouse Bridge Gate; AMBROSE answered "No, I don't think I shall, tonight;" Thomas said, "Come, BILL, you had better go," and AMBROSE at last got out of bed again; I said "What are you going out tonight for - how long will you be?" AMBROSE said "I shall be back again in three or four minutes, I will run in as far as the halfpenny gate with you Tom;" Thomas was dressed that night in a black frock coat and black cloth trousers; deceased was at first reluctant to get out of bed, but after he had got out and dressed himself he was very willing to go, and I could not keep him back; I said to him "You won't go into any public house, will you?" and he said "No, I will not - I shall not stay five minutes;" the deceased and Thomas left the room about half past twelve; they appeared then to be very friendly and AMBROSE was in good health; after they left I fell asleep; the candle continued burning; a few minutes after two the deceased returned; his head was bleeding very much; he spoke to me and appeared sober; I got out of bed and saw blood streaming down his forehead; I held up his forehead, which was broken in, but he did not complain of any pain; he appeared very ill; in about five or six minutes after he came in Thomas also returned; at this time the deceased had a little recovered; I observed dirt about Thomas's coat; it was very dirty on one side, as if he had fallen or been knocked down; Thomas shook the collar of his coat and said "Oh, BILL, have they knocked your head - they have not hurt me;" he said "Come on BILL, if you can come out again, if you can fight one I can fight the other." Thomas appeared to be very tipsy; he had evidently drank more after he left my house; AMBROSE got up and took the poker and said, "I'll go and serve them out if I die for it;" he still appeared to be perfectly sober; he and Thomas appeared then to be going away in search of somebody, and AMBROSE would have gone if I had not held him back; the deceased never once upon that night, expressed an opinion that Thomas had injured him, or had been the cause of injuring him; I prevented AMBROSE from going out; and I said to Thomas "If you choose to go you may go, I don't prevent you from going, but he shall not go; I don't want him finished - he's nearly murdered already; Thomas made no reply, and the deceased was undressed by me and went to bed; by this time the bleeding had increased very much; Thomas was sitting on a chair, and deceased said to him "Take off your boots and lay down on the bed, and I'll borrow then to go to the doctor;" Thomas did take off his boots, and lay down on the bed and went to sleep; AMBROSE and I went to Mr Harper's, the surgeon, and were absent about two hours. Thomas was still asleep in bed; AMBROSE undressed himself and got into bed; about seven o'clock he called Thomas and said, "Come it's time for you to go home." Thomas, upon that, roused himself, and put on his boots, and scraped off the dirt from his coat, and went away; he first shook hands with AMBROSE and wished him good bye, and promised to see him again the same afternoon; AMBROSE, at that time, expressed no apprehension that Thomas had been concerned in the attack upon him, and their parting was a very friendly one; in the course of Tuesday afternoon, AMBROSE became worse; between two and three o'clock that afternoon Thomas came to my room and said, "Oh, BILL, are you in bed?" At that time AMBROSE was sensible; I said "Where did you expect to find him; you could not expect to find him any place except in his bed or in his coffin"; Thomas said "You are talking as if it was my fault; do you think it was my fault, BILL?" Deceased said "I don't think you did it, but I think you know something about it, and so does Annie too"; Thomas at that time remained in the room about a quarter of an hour; he said to AMBROSE, in my presence, "I could not see the men, because I was so drunk; and I don't know how I got away from them"; during all the conversation, AMBROSE never once charged Thomas directly with having made this assault upon himself. I wished AMBROSE to inform the police, on the Sunday, of the assault which had been committed on him, but he would not do it, nor would he allow me to do it; he did not think he was hurt very much; and he did not wish to have his name exposed at the Guildhall. I told him, as we were returning from the surgeon's on the Sunday morning, that as he was well enough to go, he ought to go at once to Mr Thomas, the inspector; but I could not persuade him to do so; for the first two days he appeared as well as you are, but then he got suddenly worse. - The Coroner said the witness appeared to have acted properly; and repeated the observations she had made, at the commencement of the case, as to the difficulty in which they were placed with respect to the investigation; in consequence of no information having been given to the proper authorities, in sufficient time to enable them to take the declaration of the dying man. - In answer to the questions of the Coroner, the witness said she knew nothing more about it, except the description the deceased had given of the men who had attacked him. - The Coroner said, no declaration made by the deceased could be received as evidence, unless the party affected by that statement were present at the time. - By Mr Seaman: When Thomas and the deceased went out from my house, I had no idea they would have any affray, and, when they returned, the affray they had got into was quite unexpected. - By Mr White: It was a light night when the affray took place: Thomas gave as a reason for not being able to see the men who attacked them, not that it was so dark, but that he himself was so drunk. - Mr White proposed to examine the witness with a view to ascertain whether AMBROSE had ever expressed any dislike, or jealousy, of Thomas, in consequence of his visits to the house. - The Coroner, however, for the reasons before given, declined to allow any such question to be put. - By Thomas: I remember the first Sunday evening when you called upon me in Central Street; that was the evening when we went to Devonport with you; you knocked at the door, and I opened it; you said "is WILLIAM in?" I said "he is" - you did not go over to the bed and shake hands with WILLIAM AMBROSE when you came into the room; you said "Well, BILL, how are you?" AMBROSE said "Well Tom, how are you?" You said, "Very well, thank you"; AMBROSE said "Don't you think I'm ill because I'm in bed; I have just come in and got into bed"; he got up and dressed, as I have said, and he and I went with you to Devonport; it was between twelve and one when we got there; we parted good friends, and I never saw you again until last Saturday week; I had never called at Mr Bustin's, in the meantime to leave the number of my house, and desire you to call on me; it was not very likely, when I had AMBROSE with me; I told you at that very time, when you wished me farewell forever, that I wished to have no more to do with you, - that you were a married man, and AMBROSE was a young man, and meant to marry me, and then I should be a very different person from what I was then; you did not call upon me on a Wednesday, about ten days after this; I did not tell you AMBROSE was gone to measure the plastering of two houses, but that he would be back to dinner, and I wished you would stay; I do not recollect, on a Saturday evening, soon after this, going with you to the Exmouth Arms, where you had a glass of gin, and I a glass of ale; I did not go with you to the Exmouth Arms, at all; I do recollect your calling, on a Sunday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, WILLIAM AMBROSE then being in bed; I don't know that you stopped to breakfast; he asked you to take a cup of tea and you did so. - Thomas: You could not recollect if before? - Examination resumed: You stayed about half-an-hour; don't recollect you shook hands with him before you left; Mr Summers was present when you first came in; on leaving the room, after getting up on the Sunday morning of the 17th, you said you would call again in the afternoon if you could. I observed you scrape the collars of your coat before going out, but not the tails; when you came into the room on Tuesday, and I said, "did you expect to see him in his coffin?" but you said nothing to me, but said to AMBROSE, "Do you think it's my fault?" I never heard the deceased describe the short man to you at all; when he was describing the tall man he said he was an oldish man with a long nose; but I did not hear you reply to him. I heard him say it was the tall man who struck the deceased, and he said he was another such a man as Wyatt, and he said he could swear to the man who struck him in any dress. On his mentioning Wyatt's name, you said to deceased he had been ill for a fortnight with a bad arm, and you could get him at any time. The change for the worse happened on Tuesday, after you left. I don't know that you ever saw the wound in AMBROSE'S head. I heard you say to deceased if you and AMBROSE went out and appeared drunk you might find the men. - By the Coroner: Deceased became delirious about an hour after Thomas left. I never had any illicit intercourse with Thomas after my acquaintance with AMBROSE. I did not say anything to Thomas about the necessity of calling in the police or a magistrate. He knew of my intended marriage with AMBROSE. - Mr Thomas Harper: I am a surgeon; have known deceased about 18 months; I believe he was a carpenter, but he has been to sea; I attended him occasionally; I remember the morning of Sunday, the 17th November, about half-past three, deceased came to me with Ann Stevens; I examined his head, and found a wound on his forehead, about three-quarters of an inch long between the forehead and the temple; It appeared deep, and I pressed my finger to the bone which appeared injure by the blow. About eight o'clock the same evening he came to me again; there was no appearance of danger at that time; saw him again on Tuesday afternoon; saw him at Ann Stevens' house; I had been sent for to visit him; he appeared suffering from fever; removed the adhesive plasters and applied poultices; continued to attend him once or twice a day to the time of his death; I heard that he had been delirious the Tuesday evening, but I have not myself seen him at any time in a state of delirium, he has answered my questions perfectly. I made no communication on the subject of the case to the magistrates or police; had no reason for not doing so. On Monday he was in a state approaching stupor; he was sensible in regard to answering questions, but was not able to give any information; he had no recollection as to the assault; about five or six o'clock in the evening of that day, an examination of the head was made; Mr Whipple was present with me; we found that a portion of the bone was depressed, and the operation of trepanning was performed about 9 o'clock; the Mayor was in the house at the time, having come about 7 or 8 o'clock, and remained until nearly 12; the man was not, during that time, in a fit state to be examined; information was not given to the police by me, but by the brother of the deceased; at the time of the operation I discovered five or six pieces of bone, beneath the level of the surrounding bone, pressing on the brain; I think the injury was inflicted with some sharp instrument; I think the deceased could hardly have given evidence after Tuesday the 18th; he died yesterday between 12 and 1 o'clock; have made a post mortem examination, in the presence of Mr Whipple, the result of which was as follows:- The appearance of the body was healthy; all the internal organs were also healthy, with the exception of the brain; on the head was a large wound; principally caused by the operation; in the membrane of the brain there was an opening or wound, corresponding with the original external wound, about the size of a large quill; leading from this wound, there was a large cavity, extending for about 2 ½ inches back towards the brain; the surfaces of the cavity were secreting pusulent matter; but the cavity was not filled with pus; the other portions of the brain surrounding appeared inflamed; and in my opinion the deceased died from the effects of this wound in the head, inflicted by some sharp and penetrating instrument. - By the Foreman: I saw deceased first on the 17th; I apprehended danger on Wednesday the 20th. - The Foreman: Was any cause assigned for the wound? - The Coroner said the question could not be put. - The Foreman thought that the question was a most important one. - The Coroner repeated that all the difficulty arose from no communication having been made to the authorities. If the deposition of the dying man could have been regularly taken, it would have been legal evidence, in that, or any other court, against any part affected by it; but, in the absence of such a deposition, no statement made by the deceased, either to the surgeon, or to any other person, could be received as evidence, unless the individual to whom that statement referred were present at the time. - The Foreman said here were two living persons, who had had communication with the deceased, after the assault had been committed; and it seemed hard that they were not allowed to ask what was the effect of these communications. - Mr Morrish suggested that the Jury were not bound by strict rules of law. - The Coroner said they were bound in that Court by every rule of law; and it was his duty to take care that no evidence was received that was not legally admissible. They must remember that there was a man in custody, and that they had a duty to perform towards him. It would be most unfair to that man, if he were to permit him to be prejudiced by loose declarations made in his absence - knowing, as he did, that none of these declarations were evidence. - In answer to further questions, put by Mr Wills, Mr Harper stated that he made a communication to the friends of the deceased, of the state of danger in which he considered him to be, on the Wednesday following the assault; that was when he first apprehended danger; he made that communication to the mother-in-law (MRS AMBROSE); he had told her, on the Sunday evening, the day on which he first saw the deceased, that he had received a wound on the head, and that in cases of wounds on the head it was impossible to say at what time danger might arise; MRS AMBROSE had heard of the injury, and had come to him to enquire about it, but he did not think she knew, at that time, where the deceased lived; she asked witness to tell her, which he was unable to do, for he did not know himself until he was sent for on the Tuesday. - A good many questions were put by Mr White (one of the Jury); and afterwards further questions by the Foreman (Mr Wills), as to Mr Harper's reason for not giving any information to the Magistrates or the police. He stated that he thought he had discharged his duty in communicating to the friends of the deceased, the state of danger he was in; he did not consider it his duty to communicate every, or any, case of assault that came under his notice to the magistrates; it was the duty of the party assaulted or his friends to do so. - Mr John Whipple, surgeon, who had been present with Mr Harper, at the time of the operation, on Monday, and again at the post mortem examination , confirmed that gentleman's testimony. He thought it right, under the circumstances, to state his own opinion that, if the deceased had been examined within half an hour of the infliction of the wound, he would even then have been unable, from the nature of the injury, to give such a statement of the circumstances as could have been made legal evidence; he might have been able to answer common questions, for he did that on Monday evening, when the Magistrates were in the house, but he would not have been able to trace back a chain of circumstances, so as to give a consistent and connected account of them; his memory would have failed; that was his opinion, and, of course, only an opinion; but, if he were on a Jury himself, he should not like to condemn any man, upon evidence given by a person whose brain was in such a state as this man's was, even immediately after the accident; unless indeed, he were present at the examination and saw how the questions were put and how the answers were given. - Mr T. Morrish, having himself received a similar injury, could say from experience that, for the time, his memory was altogether lost. - George Bustin: I live in King-street, and am a licensed victualler; have known AMBROSE eight or nine months; had seen Thomas only twice before I saw him here in custody; I know Anne Stevens also; about four months since she called at my house and enquired for Thomas; I said I did not know him: she said, if anyone called to ask for her I was to enquire whether he was Captain Thomas, and was to tell him where she lived; a few days after that Thomas came to my house and I directed him where to find Ann Stevens; I remember Saturday the 16th instant; someone knocked at my door between twelve and one; I was in bed; I got out of the bed, and went into the stairs and asked who was at the door; AMBROSE spoke; I knew his voice; he said he wanted some gin, for someone who was taken very ill; I opened the door and let in AMBROSE and Thomas; AMBROSE asked for half a pint of gin and peppermint in a bottle, which I gave him, and he put it in his pocket; Thomas paid for it and AMBROSE said he would repay him next day; they were both perfectly sober: AMBROSE drank a glass of rum and Thomas a glass of wine; and then they had a glass of wine each. AMBROSE held up his hand and said to Thomas "do you know this ring?" Thomas said, "I know it perfectly well; it's a ring I gave to Annie." AMBROSE said he was going abroad and would not take away the ring, but would leave it at home with Annie; Thomas said, so long as he left it with her, he did not care, but he should not like to have the ring taken away; AMBROSE said, "I think Annie likes me, better than she likes you;" Thomas made no reply; AMBROSE said, "if you like you may sleep with Annie tonight; Thomas said, "No, I shall not go near the house, until you are gone: the time is not very long?" AMBROSE broke a glass by accident which he promised to pay for next day when he received his money from his father; they went away, and, as I understood from AMBROSE, he was to get another bed, and the Captain was to go home to Annie; they were not in my house above a quarter of an hour, and I am quite positive no angry word passed while they were there; I never saw Thomas afterwards until I saw him in the Guildhall. - Hannah Nicholson: My husband is a stone-mason, and I live at 17 Stonehouse-lane; have resided there sixteen or seventeen years; it is about four or five doors from the old toll-house; between my house and the old toll-house is a lane on the right called Quarry-lane; last Sunday week, about half-past one in the morning, I was crossing from Stonehouse towards my house, in company with my sister; on passing under the Hospital wall, I saw three men and two women; they appeared to be struggling and fighting; the two women were endeavouring to get the one man away; when they separated, the two women and one man went towards Stonehouse, and the other two men towards Stonehouse-lane; I saw them go up Quarry-lane before I went into my own house; one of the men had on a round fustian jacket and a cap; I did not notice what the other had on; about five minutes after I got into my kitchen, I heard footsteps, and went to the foredoor, where I saw the same two men stood talking to one another; I noticed from their talk that they were Irishmen; I was waiting up for my husband and brother, and had gone to the door to look for them, but, seeing only these men, I went back to the kitchen where my sister was; in a few minutes I heard loud calls of "police," several times repeated, and also a cry of murder; it was a man's voice; I went to the foredoor and I then saw one man standing in the middle of the road and the same two Irishmen running towards the corner of Quarry-lane; the man in the middle of the road had a hat in his hand; I observed dirt upon his clothes as if he had had a fall; he said to the two men. "Come on; I'm not afraid of you if the other is; I'm not going to run; come on;" he stood there for a minute or two; I begged him to go on, for I told him that the two men might raise a mob, and that he might be murdered; he said to the other men, "why did you strike us for? we never insulted you." I called after the two men and said "there's a policeman coming; I'll give you in charge;" They threw back a stone at me and my sister, calling me some name, and then ran away; I saw no policeman at the time; the other man crossed towards Union-street, calling out "BILL" or "Jack," or some other name - I cannot exactly say what; I did not notice anything in the hand of either of the two men who ran away; after they had got into the back lane, I heard them kicking very hard at some door. - It being now half-past eleven o'clock, the Inquest was adjourned to four o'clock on Monday.
The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquiry, before the Coroner and Jury was resumed at the Plymouth Guildhall, at half-past four o'clock on Monday. So great was the excitement that the Hall was filled some time before 4 o'clock, and some hundreds who made application to the persons in charge of the Hall, were refused admission. The Court having been formally opened, the Jury having answered to their names, The Coroner, addressing William Thomas, said, if you like to be examined on this Inquiry, you may do so - but if you are examined it must be on your oath - and what you say will be taken down and may be used for or against you at any future time. - William Thomas said, he would like to give what information on the matter might be in his power. - The Coroner: Well then, after the caution I have given you, you may take the book and be sworn. - Thomas was then sworn, and said he had known the deceased about 9 or 10 months. He then proceeded with his statement much to the effect as that he made before the magistrates on Thursday. In reply to a question from the Coroner, he said that he had not made any appointment with AMBROSE or Ann Stevens to meet them on the occasion of his visiting Central-street, on the night of Saturday week; he should say at the time of his arrival in Central-street, he was three parts drunk. His only motive in asking the deceased to see him a part of the way home was that he had done so before, and he preferred company to walking alone. Deceased was a taller man than witness. It was the deceased who proposed to go to Bustins. He did this in reply to a proposal from witness that they should have something to drink. When deceased and witness left Stevens' house they first went towards Union-street, as far as the Exmouth Arms. While in Bustins' house he heard some persons talking, but did not see anyone. On leaving Stevens' house on Saturday night he observed a sixpence on the top of ninepence standing on the mantel piece. AMBROSE said "Annie, I shall take the 6d.," and Witness said and I shall take the 9d." Ann Stevens said "I shall want that to buy some four in the morning, it is all the money in the house." After he was knocked down he did not know how long he remained insensible, but when he rose up he heard footsteps going up the lane. After returning to Stevens' house AMBROSE said "after receiving the blow - I put my fingers to the place and called out police or murder." Witness did not hear this - but for what reason he could not say. The reason for witness searching for money before leaving the house in Central-street on Sunday morning was some mention being made about the money which had been taken from the mantel-piece. - By Mr Seaman: Was AMBROSE'S hat injured? - Thomas: Did not see the hat. - By the Foreman: On the Sunday morning before the 17th, I breakfasted at Stevens' in the presence of AMBROSE. On the Saturday evening previous, I saw Stevens, and she went with me to the Exmouth Arms. On the day she went to Devonport with me, I saw Stevens at Central-street, and had some conversation with her; this was in the presence of AMBROSE. I am quite sure that I did not fall asleep at Bustin's - Mr Bustin was perfectly sober. I did not see any woman at the time of the assault. I remember I went along the road with my hat in my hand. - Mr Morrish, Mr May and Mr White also put some questions, but nothing material was elicited. - In reply to Mr White, Thomas said that AMBROSE appeared quite sane and sensible, and he believed if on the Tuesday he had been questioned he would have been able to answer as to the assault. - Mr White said he had asked this question, because he thought it very unfortunate in the case of an assault of so serious a nature information should not have been given to the police. It was very kind of Mr Whipple to come forward to the rescue of his brother medical man, and very kind of Mr Morrish to come forward so readily with his fact as to the probability of the man not being able to recollect anything. It was a pit that it should go forth to the world that a man who had been struck on the head could not recollect anything which occurred. - In reply to Mr T. J. Stevens, witness said he did not know whether the policeman he spoke to at the Baths was a Plymouth policeman of a Railway policeman. - At this point of the proceedings, the Court adjourned for 20 minutes, and on resuming, William Smith was called and corroborated the evidence of Thomas, as to being at the Stoke Inn with Thomas; when he left he was rather the worse for liquor - he had not a stick or anything of the kind in his hand. - Prudence Ash, a servant to Mr Bastin, deposed that on Saturday evening, she went to bed at about 3 o'clock. She went to bed, and did not get up until the next day. She did not hear anything of a noise in the house. - In reply to questions by the Foreman and Jurymen, this witness said she had heard her master say he had gone to bed, and got up again to let in Thomas and AMBROSE. There were lodgers in the house. Her master generally closed the house at 10 minutes before 12 on Saturday night. - Elizabeth Manning was called and deposed: I did not know either AMBROSE or Thomas; on Saturday fortnight I was at Stonehouse Lane with my sister Hannah Nicholson; I came home at a quarter to two o'clock. When near the Halfway House, we saw three men and two women near the Hospital wall, on the right hand side. The two men were showing fight to the one man and the two women were trying to get one of the men towards Stonehouse. This witness then proceeded to corroborate the evidence of her sister. Was quite sure that the people who ran up Quarry Lane were Irish. One of them had light trousers on, and one of them was taller than the other. She thought she should know them again. In reply to Thomas she said the man with the two women appeared to be an Englishman. In reply to a question from a Juryman, she said that she had every reason to believe that Thomas was the man who was standing in the road with his hat in his hand, and that he cried police and murder, but she could not say that he was the man who was speaking to the men in the road. - Mary Pethick, wife of William Pethick, builder, Eldad, deposed she had known Thomas about three years, he supplied her husband with sand. On Saturday fortnight, he called at our house I said to him, you are too late tonight, my husband is gone to bed; oh, then I wish you good night; he appeared as if he had been drinking. On the following evening Thomas and his wife called at our house, and said on the preceding evening he had been knocked down, and robbed of some money, and their bill for £1 18s., which he requested they would not pay to anybody. - Ann Stevens, recalled, said that AMBROSE, when he went out on Saturday night, wore a black hat, black trousers, and black waistcoat, when AMBROSE came back, he brought a bottle of gin and peppermint. Thomas was tipsy when he came to her house. - On reply to the Foreman, she said that she did not go out to try to get drink. - By Mr White: If any person had been called in to take his evidence before Tuesday, he was quite competent to answer any question, which might have been put to him by any persons. - By Thomas: I do not recollect your saying anything about being robbed on Sunday, it was on Tuesday the conversation about the robbery took place; I do not recollect your ever having any angry words with AMBROSE, but I have reason to believe you indulged in angry feelings towards him; I never put it into his head to suspect you; on the Sunday morning before leaving, you said you must have been robbed; but AMBROSE replied, he did not think you could have lost much, and you had spent so and so, mentioning the glasses of rum, the gin and peppermint, and the breaking of the glass, and the wine, at Bustin's. - The Coroner, in summing up, expressed a regret that anything of personal feeling should have grown up between any members of the Jury during the progress of the Inquiry, but even that, he believed, arose out of the anxiety of each to arrive at the truth. It was with regret too, he felt called upon to animadvert or complain of the conduct of any parties mixed up with this most painful and distressing case; but it must have been evident to all, in the course of the Inquiry, that much valuable evidence, as throwing light upon the cause of this unfortunate man's death, might probably have been secured, had information been given to the police and magistrates at an early period after the attack. In this particular, then, he could not but complain of the course which had been taken by the deceased himself, who appeared to have been led away with the notion that he was not much hurt, and therefore, would not say anything about the attack to the proper authorities, or consent to its being done; and of the woman Ann Stevens, there was reason to complain, so far as she had been a consenting party, to withhold information; and to Thomas blame must also be attached, for not taking steps to make the circumstance known. They knew that his answer to this was that he did not believe anything serious would have come of it, and, therefore, did not mention the matter. It was not for him to interpose his opinion as to whether the man could have given evidence individually after he was struck in the head, or whether he could do so up to the Tuesday following, when his symptoms became worse; but he believed they could all see that if the statement of the dying man had been taken by a Magistrate, it would have become evidence, and would have proved of the utmost importance to this Enquiry. they must, however, deal with the evidence as they found it. If, then, they were satisfied that a brutal assault had been committed upon the deceased, and that he was struck on the head with some sharp instrument, from the effects of which he died, and of this there could hardly be a doubt, he supposed, that the man had been murdered, and if they were satisfied that deceased was murdered, it would be for them, if possible, to say by whom. If, looking at all the circumstances and evidence, they should be of opinion that the man in custody either committed, attacked the deceased, or was privy to the attack, then their verdict must be that of wilful murder against him. But, if they should be of opinion that the attack was designed and made by some parties at present not known, then they would return what was called an open verdict - that is, their verdict would be, that the deceased was wilfully murdered by some person or persons unknown. Now what were the facts; in looking at them, he could not but feel but that this was a case full of vice and iniquity from beginning to end - but it must be borne in mind, however, much the parties might have been sunk in guilt and sin, they were still entitled to the protection and safeguards of the law. It would seem that Thomas and the deceased were very particular friends, and that, on the night in question, they went out together, from the house in which the deceased resided with the young woman Stevens, who, he was bound to say, had given her evidence with the greatest propriety; that, when so out, Thomas with the intention of returning to his home at Devonport asked AMBROSE to accompany him part of the way; a proposal was made to have something to drink, and they went to a certain public-house and knocked at the door - it being then midnight, and very soon - much too soon for any victualler - they seemed to have been admitted to this house. After drinking for some time they left, still being, apparently good friends, and as they were walking, they were presently attacked. Thomas was knocked down, and so was the deceased. It was to be remembered, that Thomas, on rising up went back to the house in Central-street, and there saw the deceased with his head bleeding - that he lay down, fell asleep, and in that state continued until he was awoke by the deceased at seven o'clock in the morning. The Coroner pointed out other features of the case, and said, if the Jury desired it, he would read the evidence, and repeated, that if, after consideration, they should think that the deceased died from the effects of the brutal attack upon him, and that Thomas either inflicted the blow on the head of the deceased or was a party to the attack upon him, they would find a verdict of wilful murder against him; but, if they should think he knew nothing about it until he was attacked, then their verdict would be that of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown. If they should come to this conclusion, although they might regret that the real offender, or offenders, had not been brought to justice, yet, they might assure themselves that "Murder, though it hath no tongue, will speak, With most miraculous organ;" and that, although delayed, it will eventually be made manifest. - The Jury, after an absence from the court of about a half an hour, returned to the hall, and their names having been called over, Mr Joseph Wills, in reply to the coroner, said the Jury were unanimous in their verdict "that WILLIAM BROWN AMBROSE had been Wilfully Murdered by being struck on the head with a sharp instrument, by some person or persons unknown;" and we are bound to request that the Coroner would append to that verdict the following statement which had also been unanimously agreed to:- "The Jury deeply regret that public houses should be opened after the usual hours allowed by law, and as, during the progress of this painful investigation, it clearly appears that the Earl Howe, in Stonehouse lane, was opened after twelve o'clock on Saturday night the 16th day of Nov. last, and until an early hour on the Sunday morning, and wine and spirit supplied to the deceased and Mr Thomas, the latter of whom was then tipsy, they trust the magistrates will endeavour by all means in their power, to check or prevent such evils in future. - By this time it was nearly twelve o'clock. In consequence of the number of persons within the hall, some little confusion arose, from time to time, so as to render it necessary for the Coroner to make a pause on the proceedings. And throughout the evening, considerable noise was made by the scores of people who vainly sought admission at the Guildhall doors. - We understand that much interest has been excited as to the young woman, Ann Stevens, who is stated to have conducted herself throughout the sickness of the deceased man, to whom she was to have been wedded in the course of another fortnight, and whose manner of giving her evidence, showed her to be a person of considerable ability and attainments. Her story is a melancholy one - of seduction, want and prostitution, but there is reason to hope its sequel will be more cheering, as we learn that the means taken to restore her to her parents, and the society of her friends are likely to be successful.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 December 1850
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Military Officer. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Monday at three o'clock, to Enquire into the cause of the death of GEORGE DUNN, Esq., Paymaster of the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and the following gentlemen as a Jury, viz:- Major Edwarde Trevor, William Aldridge Cooper, Captain Charles Connelly, Thos. G. Pearse, Lieutenant Francis Turvey, Lieutenant Cornelius Sutton, George Tyerman, John Tope, Lieutenant Sir Wm. Young, Walter Boddy, George E. Adams, Ensign Peter Breton, Thomas Adams, John Henwood, John Smith, and Thomas Vivian. - The Coroner and Jury, who having viewed the body, they returned to the Guildhall, and the first witness examined was, Charles Colville, a private in the 23rd Regiment said, he was servant to the deceased, whom he had known for 13 years; he was paymaster of the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers; the state of his health had been indifferent for some time past, and for the last three days he had been so bad that he was obliged to watch him; he lived at No. 6, Mulgrave-street; I had removed his razors, knives and everything which I thought might do him an injury. I sat up with him last night; he did not undress; in the morning about seven o'clock he asked for a knife, and, afterwards, as I thought, fell asleep, shortly before eight I had occasion to go to the water closet, and left the room for that purpose; on my return to the room, I found Mr Hawkey, the master of the house, in the bedroom, and saw the body of the deceased in his arms, he was then dead; my master was generally of a milk temper, and had latterly complained of an overflow of blood to the head; I am sure he was insane at the time he committed suicide; deceased was about 60 years of age. - Ann Lewis: I have been a servant with the deceased five months, this morning at about eight o'clock, I went upstairs and found my master's room door closed, on trying it, I found it was locked on the inside; I looked at the key-hole, and part of the key had been taken out. After trying to unlock it with the key of the drawing room door, I forced it open, and saw the deceased hanging by the bed-post; I called for Mr Hawkey, and he come and took him down. The deceased has had an overflow of blood to the head for some time, and has not been sensible for several days. Colville watched, and Mrs Dann and myself by day. He was taken worse on Friday at his office; mistress, the man, and myself were afraid to trust him with a knife, or anything with which we thought he could commit self-destruction. - By Major Trevor: Master said he was starving, and that he could not live in the place, and other strange things: I have no doubt he was insane. - Thomas Hawkey deposed: I reside at No. 6, Mulgrave-street; the deceased has lodged with me since last June. His health was indifferent, still more so for the last month, but more particularly since Friday last. About eight o'clock this morning, I heard a cry from Ann Lewis, and at once jumped out of bed, and ran to the room of deceased whom I found suspended by a pocket-handkerchief to the bed-post. One end of the handkerchief was twisted round the top of the bed-post, and the other end was round his neck. I lifted the body up, and the handkerchief loosened and came off. Colville then came into the room, and we lifted the body on the bed. He was then dead, there was no pulsation, and the heart did not vibrate. Colville ran for a surgeon, and shortly after Mr Stevens came, and looked at the body; he asked if I had put any liquid to the mouth; I said no, for he was quite dead when I lifted him down. After looking at the body, Mr Stevens, said "there is no doubt he is quite dead," and then left. I have heard conversation with the deceased lately when he was reasonable, and he was much excited about the Catholics, whom he hated; but I do not think that was the cause of his committing suicide. He had complained of a pain in the head, and, when at all excited, I have noticed that he became very red in the face. I think he suffered immensely for the last few days. I know he has been watched, with a view of preventing his committing any act of self-destruction. I am confident he was insane at the time he committed suicide. - George Godfrey Watt: I am Assistant Surgeon in the 28th Regiment; have known the deceased for four years, he has been very desponding and nervous. In the beginning of November he became worse, and on Friday last he became much worse whilst in his office in the Citadel. I understand he took up a knife, and was about to commit an act of self-destruction. I afterwards saw him in the Adjutant's room, and ordered some leeches to be put to his head. He was then very much excited. He was much depressed, and his mind was altogether wrong. I gave instructions for his removal, and directed that everything with which he could injure himself, should be placed out of his reach. I did this because I thought he was in such a state, that he might attempt to commit suicide. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Died by Hanging himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 1 January 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - On Thursday evening last, an Inquest was held in the Devonport Workhouse, on the body of ELIZABETH SALMON, an inmate of the Workhouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq. It appears, from the evidence, that on Wednesday last, the deceased, who was a person of intemperate habits, left the Workhouse about ten o'clock, in the morning, to spend the day. During the morning she called at Mr Bonney's, cabinet-maker, Pembroke-street, where she took dinner and had two glasses of beer; she then left Mr Bonney's and went further down the street, to the house of Mrs Biss. On entering the house, she appeared to be in a very exhausted state; she was laid on a bed, and in about half-an-hour afterwards got out again, went down into the court, and while there fell down; a young woman in the house, named Clark, went down to look for her, and found her lying about the court; she lifted her up on her feet, and the deceased then ascended the stairs. In going up the second flight she fell, and was taken into one of the neighbours' rooms, and a doctor was immediately sent for; but, by the time he arrived, life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased's death was accelerated by habitual drunkenness.

Another Inquest was held at the same time and place, and before the same Jury, on the body of ANN SMITH, formerly a dealer in poultry, &c., in the Devonport Market, who was found in the Devonport Leat, Magazine-lane, on Thursday morning last. Several witnesses were examined, from whose evidence it appeared she had been in a very depressed state for some time; and, on the morning before she was found, the deceased appeared to be in an insane state. The Jury, after consulting together, returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 January 1851
PLYMOUTH - On Monday last, the 27th January, an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, in the citadel, on the body of a child, aged 2 months, son of colour sergeant JOHN LAUGHLIN, of the 23rd Regiment, who had been found dead in bed. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God." The Jury was composed of nine non-commissioned officers of the regiment, and six civilians.

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest took place at Arnold's Point, Laira, being the easternmost part of the Borough of Plymouth, on Monday, the 27th inst., before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a full and respectable Jury, touching the death of JOSEPH ANTHONY, 67, formerly a yeoman, occupying land near the town, who was found by his son and his female servant, at the Duck Hunting Pool, near Tothill. Deceased had been in a low state of mind for some time, and arose from his bed at two o'clock on Sunday, when his wife and servant induced him to return, but he got up a second time at half past three o'clock, and rushed out of the house, followed by the servant; he, however, escaped, owing to the darkness which prevailed, but his wife found him afterwards near a gate at Tothill, when he made some incoherent expressions, and running into a field, escaped a second time. In the interim, the servant having called the son, THOMAS, who lives at a different house, they together searched for him, and eventually tracked his steps to the Duck Hunting Pool, where they found him drowned, and the girl courageously remained alone an hour by the body, while the son was obtaining a vehicle to carry it away. The coroner and Jury were patiently engaged nearly three hours, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity was unanimously returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 February 1851
TOTNES - A Fatal Accident. - On Sunday morning, the 26th ult., THOMAS BEER, a lad 16 years of age, in the service of Mr G. Turpin, of Weston Farm, Berry Pomeroy, went to visit his parents at Bunker's-hill, and took with him a loaded gun. Before reaching his parents' house, he hid the gun in the hedge. He stayed at Bunker's-hill but a short time, and his brother accompanied him on his return. When they came t the place where the gun was hid, he took it by the muzzle to draw it out, and in so doing the trigger was caught in something, the charge exploded, and the shots entered his abdomen. He died five hours afterwards. An Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, the following day, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 February 1851
NEWTON ABBOT - A Man Drowned. - On Thursday last, the body of MR JOHN PETHERBRIDGE, was found in the river, near the lower Canal works. MR PETHERBRIDGE was brother-in-law to Mr Hamlyn, who is committed for trial on a charge of stealing sheep from Mr Vicary, as stated in a former week's Conservative, and the last time he was seen alive was on the day in which Mr Hamlyn was apprehended. An Inquest was held on the body by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on Friday, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 February 1851
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., on the body of JUSTINIAN PARTRIDGE, age 30. It appeared that deceased had been employed on board the vessel Adelaide, of London, and that, on the 29th January, he fell from the mast-head, and was taken to the South Devon Hospital, with a fractured skull. He died on Tuesday night last. The ship having left the port with all her crew, no satisfactory evidence could be presented to the Jury, who returned an Open Verdict, "That deceased died from the effects of a fracture of the skull."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 February 1851
DIPTFORD - Melancholy Suicide. - On Sunday morning, the 16th instant, MRS FOSS, of Larcombe Farm, in this parish, was found by her son hanging in the kitchen. She had been in a desponding state some time, and was seldom suffered to be alone for a minute. Her son was with her this morning, and merely went outside the door, when she shut the door and bolted it. The lad sprung to the door and broke it open, when he saw his mother suspended by a halter, which she must have secreted for the purpose. He called his father who was near, and he cut down the hapless woman, but she breathed but once before she expired. She has left a family of eight children, several of them of tender age. An Inquest has been held on the body and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 5 March 1851
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest. - On the 3rd instant, at the Lord High Admiral, in East Stonehouse, an Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child called WILLIAM JOHN ROGERS, of the age of about eighteen months, who came by his death from the effect of an Accidental Scald.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 March 1851
BRIXTON - Suspected Murder - Considerable excitement was created in the village of Brixton on Friday lat, by a report that a young man in the employ of Mr Henry Rowe, of Halwell Farm, in that parish, had been found hung to an apple tree in an orchard belonging to his master, about four miles from Plymouth, on the Kingsbridge Road. Rumours were speedily circulated that he had been murdered under circumstances of the most revolting character. A Coroner's Inquest on view of the body was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., at Halwell Farm, on Saturday, and the evidence then adduced not being satisfactory as to the cause of death, the Enquiry was adjourned to yesterday, when, The Adjourned Inquest was held at the Fox Hound Inn, Brixton. The Jury were: Captain Ed. Young, (Foreman), and Messrs. Wotton, Pearce, Warcomb, Buncer, Wright, Colman, Andrews, Kendel, Scoble, Coram, Taprell, and Cook. - The first witness called was John Lavers, a youth about 14 years of age, and the statement he made on Saturday was read over to him, the whole of which he stated to be true; it was to the effect that on Friday morning he met the deceased, JOHN BUNKER, going to Elburton for lime, and that he was in good health and spirits. - Thomas Froude, police-constable of Plympton St. Mary, stated that in consequence of information he received, he went to Halwell Farm, on Friday, and saw Wm. Rowe, and charged him with committing an unnatural crime, and also on suspicion of having murdered JOHN BUNKER. He replied "What! they don't say that?" I said they did; he asked who could prove it? I told him I could bring witnesses forward, and he must consider himself my prisoner. He afterwards said he had seen deceased since his death on a bed. I asked him "if he had been in the orchard since the body was found." He said he had not been in the orchard for a long time. He afterwards said "I can prove that I know nothing about it, for I can bring witness to prove that I was home all the morning." He then went to his father's house, and said he could prove himself to be innocent, a boy called Vincent, could prove that BUNKER carried the rope out of the court. I then went with Wm. Rowe upstairs, where the body was lying on a bed; the rope I now produce was lying on the bed, not attached to the body, but by its side. I saw marks of blood on the right hand, on the back of the left, and on the left temple; blood was also oozing from the nose, and blood of a fresher appearance, and froth about the mouth. I then went with Rowe to the orchard; we went to the tree where the boy had been hung; other parties went with us; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock. After a short time I went round the orchard, and by the side of the hedge, at the higher part of the orchard leading to a ploughed field, I saw a footmark; I saw the marks of the toe-plate, and five rows of nails with round heads; the toe was towards the ploughed field. I called Police-constable Lavers' attention to it; we, in company with Mr T. Kelly (solicitor), saw another footmark on the hedge, and two in the ploughed field; the front part of the marks were very plain. I saw Lavers compare a boot he had with him, with the three footmarks, and they corresponded exactly. Lavers tried both the right and the left boots. I afterwards examined some footmarks leading down to the gate of the orchard. I saw five rows of nails with round heads, and a plate: the toe of the marks appeared to point towards the orchard-gate. I then left, and about 20 minutes after I overtook William Rowe, Lavers and Mr Kelly on their way to the village of Brixton. I said "I have found more footmarks leading down the hedge in the orchard, which correspond with those I found at the corner of the orchard." He said, "Yes, I was there on Wednesday night, and went out of the orchard gate: and, after some time, I went back again through the orchard-gate, and went out over where I saw you tracking." When I came to Brixton, I went back to Halwell, and his sister gave me his clothes; she gave me a coat, waistcoat, knee-breeches, leggings, and a handkerchief. I brought them to the prisoner. - The Coroner here desired the witnesses not to call him a prisoner, as, although in custody, they were at present merely Inquiring into the case of the boy's death. - Re-examined: I asked Wm. Rowe if it was his clothes, and he said yes, and that he had worn them yesterday. I observed marks of blood on the handkerchief I now produce; there are six or seven. I also observed three spots on the waistcoat, which I believe to be marks of blood. At the same time I examined the coat, but saw nothing on it. I have since discovered at the back of the coat, what I believe to be marks of blood, there are four. Last night, understanding he had been writing, I told him I must see it: he said "you can have it, I have only just been scribbling." He gave me the pocket book and papers now produced. I said "there are four papers and the book". He replied "yes." - The Coroner here examined the four papers, among which was a half-sheet of paper filled with writing, and signed "William Rowe." - Re-examined: After Rowe had retired to the inside cell to the bed, I searched his coat, and found the other papers now produced. As we were about to come this morning, about a quarter after nine, Rowe said "I can have my letters can't I?" I said no, not without a Magistrates, or the Coroner's order. - William Patterston Mould sworn: I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and had known deceased and his family for some years. On Friday last, Mr John Rowe, and elder brother of Wm. Rowe came to me between nine and ten, and asked me to go to Halwell to see the body of a boy who had been found hung. I accordingly went, and in an upstairs room saw the body lying on a bed with its clothes on, covered with a sheet; there was a quantity of bloody fluid running from the mouth upon the bed, the body was cold and stiff. I then examined the neck, and found a mark as of a ligature round the neck, as high up as could be, and a mark as of a knot under the angle of the right jaw, the face was much suffused with blood. I observed on the back of the knuckle of the middle finger of the right hand, a small streak of blood an inch long, and on the back of the left hand, just over the bone of the wrist, I saw three or four spots of blood; the marks were such as might be produced by chapped hands; the whole of the backs of the hands were apparently dried and in small splits; the back of the right hand was dirty, the left hand was perfectly clean; the hands were semi-bent, - not closed. I particularly noticed the nails; there was no evidence of a recent fracture on them, or no fresh mud on them. I also examined the boots on the feet of the deceased, they were not particularly dirty; on the soles of one of them I saw some blades of grass between the nails. There was a mark as of a blow, about one inch above the middle of the left eye brow, I could see no other marks, as the clothes were on. There was a small clot of blood, immediately under the septum, or division of the nostrils, and a streak of dry blood, about 1 ½ inch in length, extending from the angle of the mouth along the cheek. I was shown a piece of rope, about five feet in length, with a bowline knot at one end. The mark I saw round the neck was such as might be produced by the rope shown me. I had the body stripped, and the hair taken off the head. I looked the body over carefully, and saw no marks of violence, except the ones I have mentioned, with the exception of a slight mark of blood, under the right ear, which proceeded from a small chap, and the lobe of the ear was slightly bruised. On wiping away the blood under the nose, and at the left angle of the mouth, there were neither wounds or scratches, but the blood had evidently escaped from the nostril and mouth. The upper part of the cheeks were swollen: there were no marks of violence on the face, and no indentations of the teeth on the lips; the eyes were closed, and the whites of the eyes were not suffused with blood. - The Coroner: It appeared to me when I saw the body, there were three or four marks about the neck, do you think they were caused by the rope. - Witness: I observed no marks but what might be caused by the rope. I did not see the appearance of any blow on the head, other than that already mentioned, and the appearance of that was of a slight blow, and it was a fine, well formed frame, for a boy of his age, and about five feet 3 inches in height; I found no fracture or mark of dislocation in the body. - By the Coroner: There was no mark about the neck to indicate more than one pressure; the greatest pressure appearing to be on the left side on the neck; and on the right side near the marks before mentioned, as being produced by a knot, a mark would be produced all around the neck. - By the Foreman: If I wished to produce suffocation quickly, I should apply the pressure to the windpipe; death may occur in my opinion, without any blood flowing. - Examination resumed: I then proceeded to examine the body internally. On removing the scalp, the whole of the top of the head was covered with extravasations of blood. I proceeded to examine the body internally, but found no marks of violence on any part of it - it appeared in a healthy state. - Mary Rowe sworn: I live at Halwell; the deceased JOHN BUNKER was a servant of my father, and had been so about a year and a half. At about seven in the morning, I saw my brother going with some hay to some colts in a field to the right of the house, the orchard is to the left; my brother was alone; he never expressed any feeling to me with regard to JOHN BUNKER. I saw my brother about a quarter of an hour afterwards, when he came to take his breakfast. When deceased went for lime, he used to take his breakfasts earlier than the others, generally about quarter past six o'clock. - Anna Couch said, I have lived at Halwill nearly two years. On Friday morning, deceased had his breakfast a little after six o'clock, he had some tea kettle broth, and barley bread, and also some bread and cheese, for breakfast, he seemed poorly and "whisht," and pale. Mistress told me I was to come here and speak the truth, I have told my mistress the boy was looking pale and poorly when he came in; he did not complain of being unwell, and eat his breakfast as usual. I have had no conversation with anyone as to what I was to say here. Deceased took his breakfast alone, and said, "he was going to lime." I had never seen him look ill before that time, I am fifteen years of age next May. The lime kiln is at Elburton. Deceased never appeared unhappy before; I told my mistress he looked ill the same day. - The Coroner to Miss Rowe: Is what the girl has stated correct? Miss Rowe: Oh! yes sir, it is quite right. - The Coroner: As I shall have to examine that witness on this point, I think you had better retire Miss Rowe. - Miss Rowe then left the room. - Examination resumed: He eat part of his breakfast and gave the rest to a boy called Stevens, and said "don't say I haven't giv'd e nort." I did not see BUNKER go out of the yard; when I saw him he had nothing in his hand. Mr Rowe afterwards went out, and I did not see him again till between one an two, when he returned to dinner. I observed no difference in his appearance. I could have heard a cry from the orchard, but heard no cry or groan. I have never heard him found fault with for smoking tobacco. - William Goad sworn. I live at Brixton Torr, and am a quarryman. About six o'clock on Friday morning, I was in Mr Scoble's field at Chittleburn; the Pond orchard gate is between a quarter and a half mile from where I was. I heard cries for about half a minute; the voice appeared to me like the voice of a youngster. It appeared to be the voice of a person being ill used. The cries seemed to come from the woods, which was between the orchard and myself; it was about five or ten minutes after six when I heard the cries; I only heard one voice. I saw two young men called Scoble, who were about 20 landyards nearer towards the sound than I was; one was running and the other riding. I made a stand for about a minute, and then went on to work. - Richard Scoble: I live at Chittleburn. On Friday morning, about half-past six, I was in a field, about a quarter of a mile from Pond orchard, and heard a loud screeching noise; it sounded like a person crying loudly; I only heard it once. - The Court was then adjourned for 10 minutes, on its re-opening, John Lavers was recalled, and his evidence, again read over to him. In answer to the Coroner he said, the last time he had seen the rope was on Thursday, in the cow linhay. - Richard Vincent, another boy, in the employ of Mr Rowe, having been cautioned, and sworn, stated: on Friday morning I got up about a quarter before six, Mr John Rowe, went down first and BUNKER followed, when BUNKER went to the cart linhay the cart was tied up and he untied it from the post and told me to go to the stable again, and I saw nothing more of him. When he went away he had a whip in his right hand, and a rope in his left hand. Wm. Rowe was giving the horses some corn, when BUNKER left. - Henry Rowe sworn: the deceased was my servant; he has lately been very cross with the horses. He has always been attentive to his work, and never appeared afraid of anybody, nor did he appear at all uncomfortable in mind. - James Ellis stated: I met BUNKER in one of Mr Rowe's fields, and he asked me if I had heard of any charge against another person, and other circumstances took place. He said he had been offered money to say nothing about it, but would not take it, for fear he would be punished. - Harriet Blatchford stated that she lived at Fordbrook, and on Friday, about one o'clock, she had had a conversation with Wm. Rowe, in the course of which he told her a curious story was being spread about him, and that he intended to see himself righted, and send the boy to Bridewell; she told him the boy had hung himself, at which he seemed very much frightened, and said, "You don't mean that;" and would scarcely believe it. He said he had told the boy BUNKER that he would put him to Bridewell if he could. He did not say he was clear of the boy's death, but he meant to clear himself of some other crime. - Robert Scoble stated that William Rowe had been paying attention to one of his daughters, which he had put stop to, on account of the report which had been spread about him, and on Friday morning, about ¼ past 8, Rowe came to his house and said, he was come to clear his character of what had been said about him. He left there at about half-past ten. - SAMUEL BUNKER, the father of the deceased was sworn: My son was 17 years old last April; a fortnight ago on Sunday, he came to my house and said he did not think he should stay at Mr Rowe's longer from day to day; he had seen plenty there since last hay harvest and attended to some crime committed by somebody, but did not appear to be in fear of anybody. - By the Foreman: He said he had told John Rowe about it, who said he would not do it for the world. - The Coroner here said as he had thought it probable something might have come out in evidence against Wm. Rowe, he had thought it right he should be present, and if he liked to say anything he would hear him, and as he observed a legal gentleman present, whom he supposed attended at the request of his family, he could speak to him if he wished. - In answer to the Coroner, Wm. Rowe stated that he knew nothing about the matter whatever. - Thomas Barber deposed to seeing a horse and cart in the road with the horse's head towards Elbuton, going to the gate of Rowes' orchard, and seeing the body hanging to a tree quite dead, cold and stiff, the right side of the body was towards the tree, the rope was pressing on the windpipe; a cap was lying about 8 or 9 feet from the body, which was about 3 or 4 landyards from the gate. - Thomas Kelly, the Magistrates Clerk, deposed t William Rowe applying to him on Friday, the 7th March instant, between 11 and 12 o'clock, for a summons against BUNKER, for having raised a report of criminal nature against him. He did not grant a summons, but wrote a letter to BUNKER which Rowe took with him. - John Lavers, P.C., corroborated the evidence of P.C. Froude. - Mr Mould said it was his opinion the deceased had come to his death by suffocation, and not by previous violence. - The Coroner read the letter written by Wm. Rowe, which was merely a denial of his knowledge of the boy's death. - The depositions of the witnesses having been read over the Jury retired, and about quarter after nine returned a verdict, "That deceased died from Suffocation, caused by some person or persons unknown." Great excitement prevailed throughout the day, in the vicinity of the inn. - The Magistrates of the district have, it was stated, taken cognizance of the crime alluded to, there will be an investigation on Friday next, at a Special Sessions to be held at Ridgeway.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 March 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of a child, born of MARY BUNKER. - The Jury having been sworn, the body was brought in. The first witness sworn was, ANN BUNKER: I live at No. 9 William Lane, I am a single woman, and sister of MARY BUNKER; she is a single woman, and lives in the same place as myself; she had a child about 15 months ago; that child was taken out of the privy and lived a month. On Friday night last I went to bed about eleven o'clock; my sister was in the same bed; about a quarter to four I awoke; my sister said she wanted to go to the privy, and I told her to bring me up some water; she was absent about an hour; when she went down I heard someone ask her what the clock was; she went into an under room, and I heard her say ten minutes to four. When my sister returned she asked me if I wanted the water; I said no; she came up with the candle extinguished. It was not daylight when she got into bed, her arm was near me, and I told her not to put it so close as she was very cold. My sister never intimated anything that had taken place during her absence. My father and mother slept in another bed in the same room. The beds are about two feet apart. At half-past seven I was awoke by my father or mother to get up; my sister was then in bed; she was awake; I said to her "you will dress yourself and come down, and we will have breakfast together," to which she replied "yes." When I came down, I saw my father and mother; my father was nearly faint. About twenty minutes to eight my mother brought in the body of a child; she wrapped it up. I shortly afterwards went to work and did not see my sister until about nine in the evening; she was then in bed. I said to her "it was very foolish of you to say nothing about it." She made no answer; It was present when Inspector Thomas, came on Sunday morning. I have slept with my sister for twelve months, but never knew she was pregnant; she had no baby-linen prepared. I did fancy once or twice that she was pregnant. My mother and me talked together once or twice about our suspicions of my sisters pregnancy. The fire was just out when I went to bed on Friday night, and to my knowledge there was none lit during the night. There are six neighbours living in the courtlage and the privy is common to all. - ANN BUNKER: I am the mother of the last witness and MARY BUNKER. My daughter MARY is twenty-one years of age; she washes the linen of our family, and has done so for the last six months. I never had any suspicion that my daughter was pregnant. - The Coroner: Will you swear to that. Now consider over what you are about to say. - The Witness: Not to my knowledge. - The Coroner: Have you never talked about it to your daughter. - The Witness: I have talked to my daughter ANN about MARY being pregnant; I taxed my daughter MARY with it about a month since, and she denied it; she had not prepared any baby linen. I went to bed about the same time as my daughters, there was scarcely any fire in when I went to bed. I was awake at ten minutes before four, when my daughter went down, she was absent nearly an hour. I went down about a quarter before seven; there was no fire in. [The witness here described certain marks on the floor, and the finding of the body of a full grown female child in the privy.] It was between half-past seven and eight o'clock when I found the child. I went to my daughter and told her I had found a child; she covered over her face and would not speak to me at first. About nine o'clock I again spoke to her, and she said the child was hers. she also said "I slept in the privy." I am sure she was absent about an hour. She did not come back to the bedroom from the time she first went down until she returned to bed. I did not give any information of the body being found until Inspector Thomas came on Sunday morning, about one o'clock. My daughter had a child in the same privy about twelve months since; she then made an alarm; and I took the child out, and it lived a month; that child had not been in the soil above two minutes. - Inspector Wm. Thomas said about half-past 12 o'clock on Sunday morning I went to the house of MR BUNKER; on entering I found the father, mother and ANN BUNKER; I told them my business and what I had heard; the father said it was true, and appeared desirous of giving every information. I went upstairs and saw MARY BUNKER in bed; I saw the child, and asked if there were any marks of violence on it and was told there was not. The mother said she found the child in the closet with the soil in its face. [The witness related a conversation with MARY BUNKER as to the birth of the child, but the details are unfit for publication]. She did not expect to be delivered for six weeks or two months; she said she neither heard the child cry, nor put her hand to it; she delivered herself. Witness then said "I have one duty to perform, that is to leave an officer in charge, and you are to consider yourself in custody." She said she had made no provisions for the child. Witness afterwards informed Mr Freeman of what had taken place. - John Prisk: I had occasion to go to the privy on Saturday morning; it was dark at the time; before I went I saw MARY BUNKER go into the privy; I saw her from my window; it was about four o'clock. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour I went into the privy; there was no one there. [The witness described the condition of the privy and the approach to it.] - MRS BUNKER was recalled, and stated she saw no marks of blood on the floor of the room. - Mr Richard Freeman, surgeon, stated that he examined the body of the child; it was perfectly formed, and had breathed; its death was, I believe, caused by suffocation, I think the child if it had dropped from the mother, would have lived for some few minutes, and if taken out within two minutes would have recovered with prompt assistance. It is my opinion she was not too ill to have made an alarm, but she might have been. - Police constable Marsh was sworn, and corroborated the evidence of Inspector Thomas. - The Coroner then addressed the Jury, and the Court was cleared. - The Jury, not being able to agree, were locked up at a quarter to twelve, and at four o'clock on Tuesday morning, being still undecided, they were dismissed. - A double Jury was ordered to be summoned, and the investigation was proceeded with last evening at six o'clock. The witnesses having heard their depositions read over, stated them to be correct, and the Court was cleared, but at nine o'clock, they also being unable to agree, the Inquest was adjourned to this day week.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 April 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. Verdict of Manslaughter Against MARY BUNKER. - On Wednesday evening last, the adjourned Inquest on the body of the new-born child of MARY BUNKER, was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall. - The Jury which had been empanelled, although a double one, was unable to give a verdict, and another Jury, consisting of 23 persons, was summoned to investigate the matter, but no further evidence of importance was elicited. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that the question for the consideration of the Jury was, whether the child came to its death with the knowledge of the mother, she at the time being in a state capable of giving alarm before life was extinct; or, whether she was in such a state as to render it impossible for her to attempt to save its life, and that its death was occasioned through means which she could not avoid. Seeing how continually such acts as the present were being committed, and the great number of infants wilfully deprived of life, it behoved them deliberately to investigate the case. In many instances the law did not reach the offender, yet he thought it would reach the mother in this case. He brought under their notice the fact of her having been delivered of a child about twelve months before, at which time she was capable of making an alarm, as appeared in a former number of the 'Conservative', and concluded by saying, that if the Jury thought she was delivered without a knowledge of her situation, and was unable to give an alarm, and it was possible she might have been, in that case, she was not guilty of any crime; but if, on the other hand, they considered that she, having had a child before in the water-closet, went there, fully knowing what she was about, with the intention of being delivered, and so avoiding detection, then she was guilty of the crime of manslaughter. - The Court was then cleared, and, after being so for nearly an hour, it was announced that the Jury had come to a decision. - The Coroner having put the usual questions, the Foreman said the Jury found a verdict of Manslaughter against MARY BUNKER.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 April 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. The Effects Of Drink. - An Inquest was held on Saturday morning, at Mr Pearn's Pear Tree Inn, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, and a respectable Jury, to Inquire as to the cause of the death of NATHANIEL THOMAS LEAN. The deceased was a young man, late a seaman on board H.M.S. Kingfisher, and was paid off at this port about a month since. From the time of his coming on shore, he appears to have indulged in a continued series of acts of intemperance - and, on Friday morning, he effected his own destruction by cutting his throat, at the house of his sister, in Tavistock-street, Stoke. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of, "Died from Cutting his Throat, he being in a state of Temporary Insanity at the time, brought on by excessive drinking."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. Before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Monday night, to Inquire into the cause of the death of a child named WM. HENRY THORNE, who was found dead in bed, beside its parents, at their house in Stoke Lane, on Sunday morning. The child was about eight months old, and appears to have died from natural causes. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 April 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Monday evening, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough, to Enquire as to the death of HENRY ELSTON BRAY, a pensioner of the Royal Marines, who had died on Sunday at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The Jury having been sworn and viewed the body, ELLEN HOLLAND deposed that deceased was her father; he was a pensioner of the Royal Marines and 75 years of age; that she lived in Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, she was married, and that her father resided with her. On Saturday the 5th, the deceased went out into the yard at the back of her house for the purpose of going to the water-closet, and shortly after he had gone out, she heard him call as if in pain: on going out she saw the deceased with his leg back under him, and he said he had broken his thigh. He was taken up and on the following day conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died a week afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 April 1851
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Assault. Verdict of Manslaughter. - On the evening of yesterday (Tuesday) week, a man named TIMOTHY LIANS, was received into the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, when it was found that he was labouring from the effects of a wound in the front part of the leg, which he had received some days previously from a man named Wm. Moles. The assault took place at the livery stables of Mr Ward, in Princess-street, Plymouth, in whose service LIANS had been for some time as a groom. After his admission, fears being entertained of his recovery, G. Coryndon, Esq., and colonel Dunsterville, two of the magistrates, who had been made acquainted with the circumstance, proceeded to the Hospital on Wednesday accompanied by their clerk, and there took the depositions of the sick man, who continued to get worse, and symptoms of lock-jaw made their appearance. The medical officers of the Hospital began to entertain fears of the man's life, and on Saturday morning, death put an end to the poor man's suffering. The deceased was an Irishman, apparently about five feet ten inches in height, of a strong muscular frame; and the man, Moles, about five feet seven or eight inches; and altogether a much smaller man. Police-constable Woolcocks, took him into custody on Wednesday and on Friday was examined before the Magistrates; since which time a Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body of LIANS, and the evidence taken by the magistrates, and also that before the Coroner, is given below:- [There then followed the details of the examination at the Guildhall before the Magistrates.]
The Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest commenced immediately after the case was adjourned by the magistrates, before J. Edmonds, Esq., who briefly stated the facts of the case to the Jury, which consisted of the following gentlemen:- Mr Edward Cridland, Foreman; Messrs. J. E. Deacon, John Lee, John Short, James Woodman, James Westaway, Edward Hughes, John Shepherd, George Creed, Wm. Prowse, Edward McLoughlin, Frank Harry Goulding, Ambrose Hodge Marshall, Henry Maynard, Thomas Holman, Walter Prowse, Edward Anthony Pike, Robert Hooper Snow, John Cross, Wm. Quiller Barrett, John Mitchell, Josias Steer, and Alfred Millman. - On the names of those summoned on the Jury being called over, before the oath was administered, two were found to be absent, and the Coroner fined them 30s. each; but, in consequence of one of them arriving shortly afterwards, his fine was not enforced. - Having viewed the body at the hospital, and the wound on the leg, which is not larger than a shilling, the Jury returned to the Guildhall, and the following witnesses were examined. - Samuel Barnes sworn: I am about twelve years of age, and know the deceased TIMOTHY LIANS; I also know Wm. Moles. A fortnight ago last Friday or Saturday, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Princess-place, in Messrs. Hex and Ward's yard; there I saw Wm. Moles, and the deceased in the yard together. I saw Moles collar the deceased, and kick him about the shin; the deceased fell, and on getting up, Moles collared him again, but the deceased got away from him, and ran into the stable for a prong, which he brought out, and Moles took it away from him, and beat him about the hips and sides with the handle of it, Mr Sanders was present all the time I was there. Moles was tipsy, but the deceased was sober. I was in a stable at Hex and Ward's the next morning, and saw him show one of his legs to Mr Eccles, the surgeon, there was a piece cut out in front, near the shin. I left Plymouth this day week, and went to reside in Buckfastleigh. Moles kicked the deceased outside the harness-room. After the kicking I heard Moles say to some other men in the yard, that he was sent by Mr Hex from Mr Raddall's stable, for some cow dung to stop the horses feet. When Moles first came into the yard, he staggered and fell down, and, in about ten minutes after, he went where the deceased was, and collared him. When the deceased brought out the prong, he held the sharp point of it towards the person of Moles. - Mr Samuel Derry, M.R.C.S. stated that the deceased was brought to the hospital on Tuesday evening, the 16th April. I saw the deceased on Wednesday the 17th; he was then suffering from lock-jaw. I examined his person. There was a small wound on the shin of his left leg; the deceased was treated for the disease which he was suffering from; he was seen by all the medical officers of the hospital. He continued to grow worse, and died on Saturday morning, at 10 o'clock. I made a post mortem examination of the body; the whole of the organs appeared healthy. I believe the deceased died from the effect of the wound in his left leg, which produced tetanus, or what is commonly called lock jaw. I should think the deceased was between 45 and 50 years of age. - Police constable Woolcock was sworn, and gave similar evidence to that given by him before the magistrates, in the former part of the day. - Charles Smith Ward, was then sworn: The deceased has been in my employ about twelve months; I know William Moles, he is not in my employ. On Friday fortnight, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my house, adjoining the yard, and hearing a noise I went out, and saw Moles and deceased; they both appeared very much excited and out of breath; the deceased told me that Moles had been ill-using him. Moles said he had asked deceased for stopping, and that he had taken the prong for him. LIANS did not contradict this statement. I said to Moles, "I do not think LIANS would have done it without some provocation." I then ordered Moles out of the yard; and TIM into the stable. A few minutes after I went into the stable, where TIM was, and he showed me his leg. I saw the appearance of a severe kick, and the blood was running down. I told him to go home but he did not go. Just after this Moles returned, and said he had no animosity against TIM, and he would treat him to a pint of beer. I directed TIM not to go to a public-house and he did not go. Deceased came to work the two following days; and on the Monday morning, he complained of being ill. I recommended him to go home; before he went, he again showed me his leg; there was the appearance of blood on it, as if it had bled recently. He continued to work until Tuesday the 22nd, when he complained of being ill all over, and I sent him home. I noticed that he had sores about the face, and that the lower jaw was stiffened. He was a healthy man before this quarrel and was always very civil. - Harriet May, wife of Edward May: I live in Notte-street; my husband is a groom, and works for Messrs. Hex and Ward. I have known the deceased for several months, and also know William Moles. On Friday evening, the 11th of April, William Moles came into my house; he had been drinking; it was about a quarter past nine; when he came in, he asked whether my husband was home, and I said he was not. He said, "I have been into the yard, and had a skirmish with TIM." He said nothing more to me on the subject. - Thomas Phillips, the elder, sworn: I am Magistrates' Clerk for the Borough of Plymouth. On the 23rd inst., I was at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. G. Coryndon, and James Henderson Dunsterville, Esqrs., two Magistrates of the Borough of Plymouth, were also there; and TIMOTHY LIANS was examined and cross examined by William Moles; I produce the depositions of the deceased TIMOTHY LIANS that were then taken. I read over the depositions to TIMOTHY LIANS, before he put his mark on them; he perfectly understood it; but was very ill; he was quite sensible. - The Coroner then read over the depositions of the deceased, which were as follows:- TIMOTHY LIANS: I have been in the employ of Mr Ward, at his Livery Stables in Princess Street, in this borough. About eight days ago, I was in the yard attending to my horses. William Moles came in and caught me by my neck , and kicked me in my left leg, below the knee, and threw me down. I then went in for a pike, and brought it out, he took it away from me, and beat me about the head. I went in for the pike, but I did not want to beat him. After he had beaten me with the pike, he offered me half-a-pint of porter. I had said nothing to him, and done nothing to him, before he beat me. I had no quarrel with him before he kicked me; he called me a d--d b--, caught me by the neck, and kicked me, as before stated. Mr Ward came out, and there were two or three men in the yard, at the time he kicked me, a man called Sanders, and another man who is the porter of the coach, I walked home, but, before I left the yard, my leg was bleeding very much. When I got home, I washed it, and put a poultice to it. I have been to work every day since, until yesterday at ten o'clock, when I found myself getting bad all over, I went home, and went to bed, and in the evening, I sent to Mr Ward, and saw the doctor; it was about 10 o'clock, he examined my leg, and sent me here in a fly. I saw that gentleman here last night, and again this morning. I cannot tell whether I shall get better or not. Mr Square is the first gentleman I saw last night. Prisoner was not in Mr Ward's employ, but I have seen him two or three times before, as I came down Princess Street. Prisoner was tipsy; I was in my sober senses, and never had a quarrel with him. - Cross-examined by the Prisoner: The prisoner came after some cow-dung, to fill Mr Ward's horses feet, and he fell as he came into the stable. I told the prisoner I had no cow-dung. He then caught me by the throat, outside the stable door, which was a long time before I brought out the pike, After he kicked me, I went into my own stable for the pike. I went after the prisoner with it to keep him from beating my feet; he then took away the pike and beat me enough with it. It was not Sanders that took away the fork, but it was the prisoner. He kicked me and threw me down, before I went for the fork. I have never drank with the prisoner since he kicked me. - Mr Phillips stated that these were the depositions taken by him from the deceased, at the hospital. - Israel Sanders was sworn, and gave similar testimony as that given by him before the magistrates. - By the Jury: I did not notice any kicking take place before the prong was brought out by LIANS. I have seen the deceased run at a man with a prong before; he missed the man then; but the prong struck the wall. I had no business in Mr Ward's stables. Moles had kicks on his legs as well as LIANS. I did not see Moles strike LIANS with the prong. - The Jury stated that they should put no faith in the evidence of this witness, from the manner in which he gave his evidence, as they could not believe the deceased would have attempted to strike the prisoner with the prong, without some greater provocation than that which the witness stated he received. - The Coroner said, he considered the facts of the case were quite clear to the minds of the Jury, and requested them to consider their verdict. - The Jury having retired, in a few minutes returned into court and the Jury said they found a verdict of "Manslaughter against William Moles." - We hear the deceased has left a wife and children to feel the want of a father's support and protection, and they are now thrown on the world in helpless poverty. Their case has been taken up by some benevolent persons, who are endeavouring, my means of a subscription, to afford assistance to them: and we hope their efforts will be attended with success, and their appeals liberally responded to by those who are blessed with the means to help the poor and needy.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 May 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fight At Morice Town. - Last week, an exhibition of unusually brutal ferocity, attended with a fatal result, took place at Morice Town. The parties principally concerned were Isaac Axworthy and WILLIAM DYER, two men well known as porters or lumpers, on the quays at Morice Town. It appears that WILLIAM DYER had either worked a vessel - that is, discharged the cargo of a vessel- under the regular price, or was supposed by Axworthy and some others of the men similarly employed to have done so, and that in consequence, no opportunity for insulting and seeking to annoy him had been allowed to pass unembraced, and the inhabitants of the houses in the neighbourhood of the quays and all who had occasion to be in that locality, have, from time to time, since Monday week, been compelled to witness outrages upon public peace and public decency. On Thursday DYER having gone on board the Ringdove for the purpose of working out her cargo of stone, was again assaulted by Axworthy who declined to listen to his declaration that he would not fight, dragged him on shore, and, by striking him several blows, at last got the poor fellow to say he would fight, and to leave the quay side and go out into field on the Saltash road for that purpose; where - after fighting for nearly an hour, and having upwards of 40 severe rounds, DYER fell to the ground in a senseless state, from which he never recovered. Axworthy was apprehended by the Police on Thursday night. These circumstances will be found fully explained in the evidence before the Coroner. It will be in the recollection of some of our readers that Axworthy and some of the other persons mixed up in this most painful and melancholy affair, were some time since before the public in connection with the death of a soldier, who was found dead in Tamar Canal. The deceased DYER is represented to have been a very quiet, inoffensive person, of small size and apparently in delicate health, while Axworthy is a well-grown, robust young man. That the deceased knew how to use his fists appears not only in the fact of his contending so long against a man of so much greater weight and muscular power, but from the very severe blows which he contrived to inflict upon his opponent. The circumstance has naturally created very great excitement in the neighbourhood, and during the sittings of the Coroner's Inquest, the house was surrounded by hundreds of persons; multitudes also followed the prisoners to and from the prison.
[There followed four columns of evidence resulting in:-]
After an hour's consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Isaac Axworthy, Thomas Trigger, John Monaghan and James Hawkey. That Axworthy did inflict blows upon the deceased, from the effects of which he lingered and died; and that Trigger, Monaghan and Hawkey, did severally aid and abet in the fight, in which the blows were inflicted. Axworthy, Monaghan, and Trigger were then directed by the Coroner to be committed for trial on the charge of Manslaughter. Hawkey has not yet been apprehended. The Enquiry concluded about half-past five o'clock.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 May 1851
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Union Returns. - A case has recently occurred which shows the great scrutiny necessary in regard to returns of the inmates in Unions. For several years an inmate in the Plympton Union Workhouse, named WILLIAM KEEP, was constantly returned as "partially disabled." But a few weeks ago he was brought to the Exminster Lunatic Asylum dangerously ill, having cut his throat, and being certified to be "insane." Of his insanity there could be no doubt; and independent of the frightful wound in his throat, dividing the upper part of the windpipe, one inch in depth and an inch and a half in length, his whole appearance, from his great emaciation and other causes, was of the most distressing description. It was stated he had refused to take food. He died on Tuesday morning, last week, and on the Thursday following, an Inquest was held at the Asylum before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner at which Dr Bucknill stated that he thought death had been accelerated by the removal of the deceased from the Union to the Asylum after the injury. The Jury found that the deceased was Insane at the time of his committing the act. There is no doubt also that he was insane for a long time previous, and had been placed in the Asylum, as he would have been had his malady been duly reported in the Union return, the catastrophe would have been averted, and perhaps a cure of the insanity effected.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 June 1851
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Wheat Sheaf, King-street, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner on the body of JOHANNA REEBY, woman, 85 years of age. The deceased had retired to bed on Tuesday night quite well, and on Wednesday morning was found dead in her bed. Verdict - "Died of Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Death From Drowning. - On Saturday morning last the body of WILLIAM EDWIN ROGERS was found by a labourer, about half-past five o'clock, under the Hoe, in a little creek called Two Coves, whose attention was attracted by seeing the clothes of a man lying on the beach, but no owner near, upon which he raised the alarm, and ultimately discovered the body of the deceased. It is supposed that he must have fallen into one of the pits that abound there, and being but an indifferent swimmer death was the result. An Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death while Bathing" returned. ROGERS was the Secretary of the Stonehouse Temperance Festival the Saturday afternoon. The deceased is supposed to have been in the water about three-quarters of an hour.

BRIDGETOWN - A Child Burnt. - A Caution To Mothers, &c. - On Wednesday last, a girl, 4 ½ years old, named SERCOMBE, was left by its mother with no one else in the house but an infant in the cradle, for a short time. On the mother's return the girl was enveloped in flames, and she died shortly afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body by W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The Coroner imputed much culpable neglect to the mother.

EXETER - Heavitree. - Fatal Occurrence. An Inquest was held, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on Wednesday, at the Ship Inn, Heavitree, near Exeter, on a lad, named WILLIAM JOB EVELEIGH, who had been shot through the head by his companion, George Henry Channon, on Monday afternoon. The deceased resided in Oakfield-place, with a shoemaker, named Golsworthy, and the other lad, about twelve years old, was the son of a labourer. They went out together on Monday afternoon, to pick rabbits meat, in a field, occupied by Mr Dennis, near the path fields, leading from the Barrack-lane in the direction of Wonford. Shortly after they had left the village, Channon ran back and told Golsworthy that his companion was dead. A young woman, named Maria Rickard, being in the house, immediately repaired to the spot, in company with the lad. On their way, he told her that he left the deceased in the Church Yard, and when he was in the field, he saw two men running through it, in sleeves, and one of them had a pistol in his hand. To Mr Madden, Surgeon, of Heavitree, who examined the body - (and found that the charge from a gun had entered his head, by the side of the right ear, taking an oblique direction, carrying away the top of the skull, and scattering the brains in every direction) he said that he saw the deceased in a hedge, and when he went up to him, he was dead - that he heard a shot, and saw two men, one of them into custody by Woodberry, the constable, to a man named with a pistol in his hand. He told a similar tale on being taken Thomas Richards. On going to the place with the lad Woodberry told him that it was impossible that he could see the men from the position in which he said he was standing, because the hedges intercepted the view. The boy, however, persisted in his story, and pointed out to the constable a gun in a linhay, on the top of some planks, where a bag containing a flask with powder and shot was found. This bag and the gun had been left there by Dennis, who was in the habit of shooting rooks; but he said it was more concealed from sight than when it was found. On the boy being brought in before the Jury, he said - "I didn't try to do it." Having been sworn, he stated that he went with the deceased to pick "milkey dashels." The deceased said he knew where there was a bird's nest with nine eggs in it, in the thatch of the linhay. He got up to look for it, and then said, "I've found a gun." He got down from the planks, and ran after Channon with the gun in his hand, who succeeded, after a while, in taking it away from him. although he put the ramrod into the gun, he didn't know that it was loaded. Seeing a sparrow in the hedge, he pointed the gun at it, and deceased ran close before the muzzle, just as he pulled the trigger. It went off, and killed EVELEIGH. Then he ran away to call Mr Golsworthy. In answer to a question from a Juror, the boy declared that neither of them were angry with each other, and that he didn't know the gun was loaded. The Coroner having explained the law relating to cases of this kind, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attributing blame to Dennis for allowing the gun to remain in the linhay.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 2 July 1851
PETER TAVY - On the 23rd of June instant, an Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at Peter Tavy, near Tavistock, on the bodies of PETER GARLAND BRAY, mason and JOHN BRAYLEY, an apprentice to Isaiah Craze, carpenter, of Peter Tavy. It appeared in evidence that on Friday afternoon last, about half-past five o'clock, they, after having left their work, went down by a chain on the lower side of East Friendship Mine, to the river Tavy to wash or bathe. They went into the river and near the spot there was a deep pool which they got into, and were both drowned. A verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 9 July 1851
TOTNES - Inquest On MR CHRISTOPHER BIDLAKE. - The Inquest on the mutilated remains of this lamented gentleman, whose melancholy death was reported in the conservative last week, was held at Whitley farm, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Wednesday last. Timothy Dickinson, an engine driver on the South Devon Railway, deposed: On Monday last I drove the express train from Plymouth to Exeter; when about 150 yards from Whitley Bridge I saw a man walking on the line; he came from one of the recesses of the bridge, and put his right foot either on the metal or the timber; I used the alarm whistle, and shut off the steam, and the brakes were applied; the man did not look towards the train. At the place where I first saw him there is a slight curve, so that I saw the bridge before I saw him. I could not have stopped the train before I came to the bridge; the man had sufficient time to go out of the way, but he stood still; probably the buffer of the engine struck him first, but I am certain he did not get under the wheels, as there were no marks of blood about them; the first thing I saw belonging to the man was his hat which was jerked upon the engine. I communicated with the guard, who dispatched several men who were working on the line, to render assistance. - William Cook, labourer on the South Devon Railway, deposed: I was desired by the guard of the express train on Monday to go and see what had happened; I did so, and about a quarter of a mile from the place where the train had stopped, I saw a man's head, and twenty yards further on I saw his body. I recognised the remains as those of MR CHRISTOPHER BIDLAKE, who was well-known to me. - MR A. D. BIDLAKE, a nephew of the deceased, deposed: My uncle had long been in a very low state of mind, and had for many years been subject to epileptic seizures. He had one of these attacks about a fortnight ago, when he was quite unconscious for two hours. I last saw him alive on Monday morning at seven o'clock, when he appeared much as usual; he was not in the habit of walking out alone, but did so that morning; he had never made any attempt on his life, nor did I suspect he would do so; he left the house after ten o'clock on Monday morning, and just before going out gave orders to the servant respecting some linen which he wished to be got ready for him by the next morning. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that no fault was attached to the engine driver. The Jury, after a few minutes deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 16 July 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of RICHARD LANE, a shoemaker, residing in Geake's Alley, Devonport, who, early on the preceding day, was found to have committed suicide by hanging himself. His body was found suspended to an iron crook, fixed in the ceiling of the passage, which conducted to the courtlage. When discovered by Richard Baker, a fellow lodger, the body was quite stiff and the feet nearly reached the ground. The evidence showed that the deceased destroyed himself in a fit of temporary insanity, superinduced by intoxication; and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect. It would seem that for some time past the unhappy man had given way to habits of intemperance and while suffering from the excitement or depression resulting from excessive indulgence, was continually threatening to put an end to his existence. Sometimes he said that he would hang himself, at others that he would drown himself, and it also appeared from a person named William Smith, that about eight weeks ago the deceased made a similar attempt upon his life, but was discovered in time to frustrate his suicidal intentions, and when in the morning he was told what he had done, he appeared quite unconscious of it. It is not a singular that a brother of the deceased committed suicide a short time ago, by his cutting his throat.

EAST STONEHOUSE - On the same day another Inquest was held before Mr Bone, at the Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, on the body of a seaman named ALEXANDER WILSON, lately belonging to H.M.S. Stag. From the facts adduced in evidence at the Inquest, it would appear that the unfortunate man was on duty in a boat laying alongside that vessel, and while so employed, he, by some means, accidentally fell over into the water. He was, however, immediately rescued from his perilous position and taken on board, when every assistance was rendered. Congestion of brain and lungs, however, would appear to have resulted in some way from the immersion, in consequence of which the poor fellow died on the following day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BROADHEMPSTON - Suicide. - In the evening of the 26th ult., WILLIAM DART, footman to the Rev. John Pitman, in whose service he had lived seventeen years, was found hanging in an outhouse. He was quite dead. He had for some time displayed aberration of intellect, and had said he should destroy himself. An Inquest was held next day before W. A. Cockey, Esq., when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. He has left a widow and a large family.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 23 July 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest In Plymouth. - On Wednesday evening last an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on view of the body of a man named THEODORE PARKER, who rented a house in Clarence-street, Plymouth. It appeared he had been in a desponding state of health for some little time past, in consequence, it was stated, of pecuniary embarrassments. Not the least apprehension was entertained, however, on this account, and his friends, although sympathising with him, did not for a moment conceive that the poor fellow's reason was in any way affected. He was bordering on 62 and had previously enjoyed tolerably robust health. On Wednesday morning the unhappy man arose at about seven o'clock, and went downstairs as he had been in the habit of doing. Shortly afterwards his wife followed, when, on entering the kitchen to her horror, she saw her unfortunate husband hanging by a piece of rope to a hook in the wall. She immediately cut him down, raised an alarm, and several neighbours were shortly in attendance to render every assistance in their power. Mr Harper, the surgeon, was called in, but life appeared to be already extinct, every effort to restore animation on being utterly unavailing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Charge of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, on Friday evening last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, called HENRY COSTELLO, an army pensioner, and lately working as a shoemaker, in Boot-lane, Devonport, who met his death at a low lodging-house in How-street, Plymouth, under the circumstances which will be found detailed in the evidence. - Grace Ann Phillips being sworn said: I live at No. 12, How-street; I knew HENRY COSTELLO - he was I have heard a pensioner from the 3rd Buffs, at £28 a year; I have also heard he was a married man, and lived in Boot-lane, Devonport; he lodged with me about three months since - his wife came for him, and as he refused to quite my house, I procured a policeman who put him out; my lodgings will accommodate persons in about four beds and a half; deceased came to my house on Wednesday last, about three o'clock in the afternoon; he wanted lodgings and to bring his tools, (he was a shoemaker); I refused to take him in; he was very tipsy then - he went away and returned about nine the same evening, he still wanted to lodge with me, and was then very tipsy; I said to him "you might sleep here tonight as you are so tipsy, but you must leave in the morning," he did not answer me, but went away, he was so tipsy he could hardly stand; the next time I saw the deceased was the following yesterday (Thursday) morning; I saw him come into my kitchen, I said "What do you do here MR COSTELLO, you shall not lodge here," he then abused me very much and called me very bad names; at this time a person calling himself Frederick De Bazon, now present was there - he was a stranger to me, and had come in to see one of my lodgers; whilst the deceased was abusing me, I heard De Bazon say "I will not be called a b....y thing," addressing himself to the deceased, and he then rose from a settle to put the deceased out; he took him gently by the shoulders and pushed him out, and whilst pushing him, deceased slipped and fell on the ground, at that time he did not receive any injury; deceased got up and tried to break the door in, De Bazon still sitting on the settle; the deceased said to De Bazon, I will make you pay for this; I went for a policeman, leaving De Bazon still sitting on the settle, and the deceased close to my door, he was abusing the people, and was then very tipsy; I was absent about ten minutes, and on my return with the policeman, I found the deceased lying in the passage in a reclining position with his head resting against a beam; at this time De Bazon was still sitting in the settle; shortly afterwards deceased was removed to the kitchen - he was insensible; he afterwards became a little sick, and about half-past three yesterday afternoon, when deceased was about to be removed to the police-station on a stretcher, he was found dead; when the police constable came with me about eleven o'clock, and saw deceased, he asked De Bazon who did it, and he said "I," he was then apprehended; the body which the Jury and Coroner have this day viewed in my presence at my house is the body of the deceased. - Edward Fullerton of 12 How-street, naval pensioner, was sworn, he said: I lodge with Mrs Phillips: yesterday morning about ten o'clock, I went into the kitchen and saw Frederick De Bazon there, and in about ten minutes afterwards the deceased came in; Mrs Phillips was there, De Bazon asked two young men that were in the kitchen if they would go down and take a glass of beer with him, and he also asked me to go; we all met at the Royal Exchange at the bottom of the street; deceased was there also - he was very tipsy; I drank two small glasses of beer and returned to my lodgings; about a quarter of an hour after the deceased, De Bazon, the two young men and others returned to 12 How-street; the deceased then began to abuse Mrs Phillips very much; whilst doing so De Bazon got up and said "You ought not to call the woman such a name as that - I will put you out of doors," and then De Bazon put his flat hands on the shoulders of the deceased pushed him out from the kitchen into the passage, and there the deceased fell; he got up directly, and De Bazon went back and sat in the settle, the deceased then came back inside the kitchen door, and said to De Bazon "If you will come out, I will give you something," the deceased there called De Bason "a b.....y thing," he said he "would not stand being called that by any person," and De Bazon passed me, and I instantly heard a fall and saw deceased lying on his back in the passage, I head a blow just as De Bazon passed me, but I did not see him struck; I said to De Bazon "it is a shame to shove an old man like that" he did not reply to it, and went and sat down in the settle; deceased was lying flat on his back in the passage, he did not speak - shortly afterwards Mrs Phillips returned with a policeman; after that I went out and returned about two o'clock, when I observed a change in the deceased, and he died about quarter past two. - By the Jury: Deceased was capable of standing; I cannot say whether his fall was caused by a blow or a shove. - Eliza Searle, who, with her husband, Samuel Searle, a carpenter, was lodging with Mrs Phillips, gave similar evidence to the last witness, with reference to the going to the public-house, and said: I was in How-street about quarter-past nine, and saw deceased rambling, and he fell against a window - shortly after that he came to Mrs Phillips's; at that time De Bazon was in the kitchen, I made him tea; deceased came into the kitchen and abused Mrs Phillips; De Bazon then said, "It is not a fit thing for you to call a woman by such names, and if you do not go out I will put you out," and he then put the flat of his hands upon deceased's shoulders, and pushed him out; the deceased fell, but got up directly and put one hand against the wall, and the other against the door, and said to De Bazon, "If you will come outside, I will fight you like a man," and called him a b....y thing; De Bazon then got up off his seat, and said, "I'll not be called that by my own father," and De Bazon pushed the deceased, with his flat hand, into the passage; he fell - his head knocked with great force against the stone wall of the passage, and he fell on his back; he was quite insensible; the witness Fullerton came and lifted him up; De Bazon went back and sat down. - By the Jury: When De Bazon pushed the deceased, he pushed him backwards; the deceased remained insensible until his death. - Mr Richard Freeman, surgeon, was then examined: He said - I made a post mortem examination of deceased at No. 12 How-street this morning; there were no external marks of violence; on removing the cranium, the dura mater was very vasculine, the right longitudinal sinus was distended by coagulated blood, and on raising the dura mater from the right hemisphere of the brain, nearly a pound of extravasated blood was found underneath, making fatal pressure on the brain, and the cause of the death of the deceased; this extravasation was occasion, in my opinion, from a rupture of vessels, occasioned by violence; I have heard the testimony of Eliza Searle, and I think the blow described by her, which the deceased had received against the stone wall of the passage, would produce the above effects; I do not think that the deceased being tipsy, was the cause of the rupture of the blood-vessel. - Police-constable Thomas Murch deposed that the body of the deceased had been in his custody from the time of his death, and that the body examined by the Jury and coroner was that of COSTELLO. - The Coroner briefly explained the law bearing on the case. The Jury then retired, and, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against Frederick De Bazon." - The Inquest was then adjourned until Monday evening at six, to await the result of the proceedings before the Magistrates, when the prisoner was again brought up, and formally committed to take his trial at the next Assizes. - The wife of the deceased- who was present on Friday evening - stated her inability to bury him; his burial was therefore ordered to take place at the expense of the parish. - De Bazon is a Peruvian, about 28 or 30 years of age, and has been acting as an equestrian. He speaks the English language fluently, and his unfortunate position was generally commiserated; for certainly his looks do not at all indicate any great degree of savageness or ferocity.
Effects of Intemperance. -

Immediately after the close of the Inquest on the death of HENRY COSTELLO, an Inquiry was held before the Coroner and Jury on the death of MR YELLAND, a painter, who resided in Exeter-street, and who hanged himself on Thursday last, between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, to a door in a bedroom. From the evidence given, it was shewn that the deceased had been in liquor for upwards of a fortnight; and that about a fortnight ago while under its influence, he fell and cut his eye, from which time he appears to have been very incoherent in his talk, childish in manner and very nervous. Upon this evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 30 July 1851
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Bull Point. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening last, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE PEARD, a labourer, employed on the new Powder Works at Bull Point. The following evidence as to the cause of death was taken:- William Blampey deposed: I am a stone mason, and live at King's Tamerton; I have worked at the new Works at Bull Point about three months, and during that time have known the deceased; I believe he worked there before I went there, and was employed driving the waggons; he was about twenty-five years of age, and lived with his father at St Budeaux. On the 16th inst., about one o'clock in the afternoon, deceased was employed driving a horse and waggon containing dirt on a railway; I was about three land yards from him; he was in front of the waggon and unfastened the horse to let the waggon pass down an incline; exactly as he did it he fell down; and the waggon went over his bowels, and broke one of his arms; he was very much injured; assistance was procured, and the deceased was placed on a board and carried to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital; I was the nearest person to him when he fell; what he was doing was in the ordinary discharge of his duty, and he was acting from his own judgment; my opinion is that it was purely accidental; he had been discharging similar duties for the last three months; I never knew him meet with any accident before. - By a Juror: He was quite sober at the time to the best of my belief. - John Sheppard sworn: I live at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital; at about half past four o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of July, the deceased was brought to the Hospital; his right arm was broken, and the other was cut a good deal; he was very much bruised about the bowels, and was in a very bad state; every attention was paid to him by the surgeons, but he continued to get worse; and died this morning at about two o'clock. I never heard him blame any person about the accident. - This was the whole of the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Instance of Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday last at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN MARTIN, the wife of MR STEPHEN MARTIN, a retired foreman from the Brewery of Messrs. King and Co., who died suddenly on the previous day in Hoe Street, Plymouth. - John Dickenson, an accountant, residing in the same house with the deceased, stated that he was her son-in-law; she was 59 years of age; witness had known the deceased for five years; he married one of her daughters upwards of two years since, and for the last month his wife and himself had lived in the same house with her; she generally enjoyed good health; witness only knew of her having a doctor on one occasion, and that was about six months since, for a slight cold. MR MARTIN has been ill for about 18 months and very much confined to his room; witness saw the deceased yesterday morning at eight o'clock, she was then apparently in excellent health; witness was engaged writing during the forenoon, and saw her several times, but did not notice any change; she went to market about 11 o'clock, and returned shortly after 12; she was then apparently quite well; the family dined at about a quarter to two - witness with MR MARTIN to keep him company, and the deceased and others in an adjoining room; after the witness had dined, he went into the room where MRS MARTIN was with her daughters and sisters quite comfortable - indeed there was not an angry word passed; if there had witness must have heard it. At about half past two, whilst they were all in conversation, the deceased, who was standing by a table, suddenly fell on the floor; some of the family picked her up, and witness went for a doctor; he was absent about ten minutes, and returned with Dr Fuge, who pronounced the deceased dead, and said she had died instantly. The deceased was a sober, quiet, and abstemious woman, and witness was aware of nothing to hasten her death. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

STOKE DAMEREL - Boy Drowned. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Tamar Inn, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of NICHOLAS RABBIDGE, a lad between 13 and 14 years of age, who had been employed for some time past in heating rivets for the men working on the caisson now in course of construction, at the Steam Yard. His body was found on Saturday near the mouth of the Tamar Canal, by some men who were on their way to a barge lying off the seawall. There being no evidence as to the manner in which the deceased met with his death, the Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Suicide. - We are pained to have to record the death, by suicide, of a respectable yeoman, MR GEORGE WHITE, who has for some time occupied the farm of Smithaleigh, in the parish of Plympton St. Mary. Deceased hanged himself to an apple tree, on his estate on Wednesday last; he has left a widow and three or four young children. He was the son of MR GEORGE WHITE, who for many years kept the George Inn, at Ridgway, a house of considerable celebrity in the time of the Quicksilver Mail. The Inquest on his remains has been held, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned. It is said that the heavy depression under which agriculturists have been, and are still labouring, has recently much affected him, and his farm has lately been let to another person, from Ladyday next.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 6 August 1851
PLYMOUTH - A Fisherman Drowned. - On Thursday last, while at sea. T. BRATT, fisherman, of Lambhay-hill, was dragged overboard by the trawl rope and unfortunately drowned. The body was picked up, after having been two hours in the water, and was brought on shore on Friday morning. An Inquest was held on it by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Extraordinary Depravity. - On Sunday morning last a female infant, about 8 weeks old, met with its death in Fore Street, Stonehouse, under circumstances of the most disgusting depravity. The mother of the child, who had been for a considerable time in the habit of cohabiting with a marine, and who lived in one of the public-houses in Fore Street, which would seem to be more of a brothel than a house of refreshment, on Saturday last (her child being then 8 weeks old), got intoxicated in the company of a married man, of about 25 years of age, named Frederick Campbell, the father of two children, a plumber and painter in Stonehouse. At about half-past 11 she went to her bedroom, in company with this man; both very drunk, and after an hysterical fit of half an hour's duration, she went and took her baby to her bed, and on Sunday morning she was found in bed, as was also the child, and the man lying on the bed, with his elbow resting heavily between the child's shoulder and its neck. A few minutes after the poor innocent was released from this position, it died, before either the mother or her companion could be made quite conscious of what had happened. The Inspector of Police was sent for, and a Coroner's Inquest was called. - The Inquest was held on Monday at Pike's Queen's Head Inn, Edgcumbe Street, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the County Coroner. The Jury having seen the body, the following witnesses were examined. - A seaman, of the name of Dyer, deposed that he had resided in the George Inn, in Fore Street, for some time; that he was not married, but lived there with a young woman. On the night of Saturday his young woman had charge of the deceased baby; that she often took care of it. On Saturday night, about 9, the young woman went out, and in the meantime he took care of the baby; it was a very fine infant, and appeared perfectly healthy. About eleven o'clock the mother of the child, with the man Campbell, whom he had not seen before, came into his room, had some supper and some beer there; they were both drunk - the man was worse than the woman; her name is SARAH MURRAY. After some time she left for her own bedroom, with the man; the infant was then in his bed, it having been washed, and its bed-gown put on by his young woman. After MURRAY had gone to her own room she had an hysterical fit, which continued for nearly half an hour; he, with his companion, went in to attend her; Campbell was then sitting in a chair, quite drunk; after she got better, she came into his room and took the baby; she left the room, and he heard nothing more about the parties until about half-past 6 the next morning, when one of the young women living in the house brought the child into his room; witness then saw some blood on the child's mouth, and about the breast of its nightdress; it breathed after it was brought in; his young woman took it on her lap, and the child died; the child was always healthy, and the mother seemed generally fond of it - it was 8 weeks old; he had seen the mother under the influence of drink before, but not often; he did not know Campbell, and could not say how many girls lived in the George, but knew there were several there. - Mary Ann Emmett said, I am a single woman; I have lived at the "George" ever since Christmas last; the George is a public-house, and there are 6 or 7 girls in the house; I saw SARAH MURRAY about 9 on Saturday evening; she was living at the George when I came; the child was born 8 weeks ago yesterday. On Sunday morning I went into the room where MURRAY and Campbell were; I did so because some woman enquired for her husband - meaning Campbell; the man was lying on his face and hands on the bed, with his trousers on; the woman was undressed, and in bed; they were both fast asleep; the child was between them, and the man's elbow was resting on the baby, between the neck and the shoulder; I saw some blood on the child's face, and on the breast of MURRAY, which was close to the face of the child, and some on the baby's bed clothes; the child was quite still, but it breathed twice after I saw it; I awoke the mother and the man; she turned herself to try to take the child in her arms, but she could not clear the child on account of the man's elbow; the man turned round towards the wall, as if to go to sleep again, and she took the child up; the man had not then recovered from his intoxication; I took the child into the other room, where Dyer was in bed; it lived about 6 minutes and died in the lap of another young woman; it was a very fine child, and had been very healthy; the mother came into the room, and appeared in great distress; she was very fond of the child; I never saw the man before; the wife came into Dyer's room; she then left and went to the street, but afterwards came back to the room where her husband was; Campbell had only his trousers on; his coat, waistcoat, hat and shoes were off. - By a Juror: The woman did not appear to have any knowledge of the death of the child, when I first saw it; when she knew it, she was very distressed, and cried very much. - Mr Nathan, the Superintendent of the Stonehouse Police, knew the George Inn, in Fore-street; it was a very bad neighbourhood - many brothels on both sides of the street; he went there on Sunday morning, and saw the body of the baby, it was not then cold - took possession of the infant's nightdress, the woman's chemise, and the bed-sheet, the whole of which he now produced, and the whole of which were marked with blood, such as would be produced from the child's bleeding at the nose and mouth; he detained the prisoners; the woman appeared very distressed, and the man was hardly recovered from the effects of his intoxication. - Warren J. Isbell, Esq., surgeon, deposed that he examined the body of the deceased child on Sunday; externally, there were various appearances of venous congestion generally over the body; from the nostrils there exuded some dark blood, usual in cases of suffocation; internally, there were appearances of extravasation; on opening the chest, the veins over the whole of the interior were full of blood of a dark colour, and the lungs were gorged with the same character of blood; the cavity on the right side of the heart was extended with dark blood, and the general venous system was in the same state; in the left side of the heart there was a small portion of the same coloured blood; these appearances would arise from suffocation; he believed the child died from suffocation, which probably arose from pressure; he was satisfied these appearances did not arise from natural causes: this he explained by reference to the system, of the aer-relization of the blood, in its passage through the lungs; the prevalence of dark or venous blood, proved that its aer-relisation, by the action of the lungs, had been interfered with; the child had been healthy, and was a fine child. - Elizabeth Scantlebury, the young woman who was with Dyer, corroborated his evidence; she had lived at the George for about twelve months; MURRAY had lived there some time - had seen her intoxicated before, but could not say that she was often in that state; had seen Campbell there with her before on one occasion; had seen Campbell and MURRAY together at the Crown, on the evening of Saturday, about ten o'clock - they were tipsy then; when they came to the George, the man was more intoxicated than the woman; MURRAY was very fond of the child; she had known her have fits before Saturday night; the child was a fine healthy baby, and was eight weeks old. - After the usual caution from the Coroner, Campbell and MURRAY - both of whom appeared to have a strong sense of the painful position in which they had placed themselves, and who were evidently suffering extreme anguish of mind - said they knew nothing more about what had taken place, than they had heard from the witnesses; MURRAY said she did not know the man was in the room until she was awoke by Emmett. - The Coroner addressed the Jury at considerable length, pointing out to them, that if a person by negligence, produced the death of another, that person was guilty of manslaughter; if a person having the care of a child, should so neglect it, that its death should be the consequence, that person would be guilty of manslaughter; and if a person who had no such charge, should do anything by which its death were caused, such an act would amount to manslaughter; they would have to apply these principles to the present case, and say from the evidence whether they considered the woman, or the man, or both, had been guilty of manslaughter; if, on the other hand, they should be of opinion that there had been no wilful negligence in the case, but that the child had come to its death by an accidental pressure, they would return verdict accordingly. - The room was then cleared and on its re-opening, after a space of about ten minutes, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect, "That the child had died from Suffocation, from Accidental Pressure while in bed between Frederick Campbell and SARAH MURRAY." - The Coroner then addressed the man and the woman on their conduct; and, in so doing, he spoke in such strong terms of reprehension of the conduct of the man, as to produce strong effects upon the feelings of that individual, and all who listened to him. With the poor wretched woman he was much milder, but still very earnest, and for ourselves, we hope the result of his well-timed, and really able address, may be the reformation to which he alluded, on concluding. So deeply affected was the man under the remarks of the Coroner, that he sobbed aloud, and when he left the room, lay down on the floor, buried his face in his handkerchief, and cried bitterly. - This altogether was one of the most painful Inquiries it was ever our misfortune to attend; and now, with the painful emotions it has produced, we would ask, in all sincerity, can nothing be done for remedying the frightful state of vice which it has revealed? Shall the mother be permitted to resume her path of guilt? Are the brothels of Fore-street, Stonehouse, to continue an untouched, and a festering mass of sin and misery?

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 20 August 1851
BISHOPSTEIGNTON - Mysterious Death Of A Young Lady. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at Bishopsteignton, on the body of a young lady, MISS JANE EMILY WYSE, who was found dead in her room at the house of a Mr and Mrs Hele, on her return from an archery meeting, as long ago as the 14th of May last. It having been supposed that she died in a fit, no Inquest was held. Since that time suspicions having arisen that she died from the effects of poison, and her uncle, Major Ellison, of Boulton Hall, Lincolnshire, having written a letter to Mr Hele, declining to receive that gentleman and his lady as visitors at his house, Mr Hele, to remove any suspicions, thought it desirable that an Inquest should be held. The body was consequently exhumed and Mr Herapath, of Bristol, gave it as his opinion at the Inquest, that the death of the young lady was occasioned by prussic acid. Witnesses were examined to show that she had been in the habit of using essential oil of almonds, and a letter, which was found in her desk after her decease, was put in evidence, in which were the words, "I have thought it not improbable that I might die suddenly," and requesting certain trifles to be distributed to her friends. The Jury returned a verdict that she came to her death by taking essential oil of almonds, but whether with the intention of putting an end to her life or not they could not say.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 17 September 1851
DUNSFORD - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Royal Oak, Dunsford, before R. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR RICHARD ASH, of Langley Farm, Dunsford, who met with his death on the Friday night previous, by the upsetting of his horse and cart, as he was returning from Exeter market. The deceased was found by Mr Crispin, wheelwright, lying in the road, between the front of the cart and the horse, quite dead, near the late Mr Froom's residence, at the top of Dunsford town. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of a boy named SAMUEL CAIRNES, who was found drowned in the Sound on Monday last, and identified as one of the party who were capsized off the Mewstone, while fishing on the 3rd instant, when CAIRNES and another met their untimely fate. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 September 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Enquiry took place at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Monday evening last, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Benjamin Call, junr., was Foreman, touching the death of THOMAS JONES, a native of Llanelly, one of the crew of the brig Alexander Stewart, 173 tons, of that port, William Davies, master. It appears that deceased, with others, had been working hard in the discharge of the cargo, and that they ate rather freely of crab, drinking cold beer at the same time. The consequence was, that all became afflicted with diarrhoea. The master went to Mr Parrott, druggist, in Buckwell-street, and procured some medicine which acted beneficially on the others, but deceased getting worse, Mr T. Harper was called in, too late, however, to render any effectual assistance. The medical evidence tended to shew that the "offensive effluvia from Sutton Pool" was likely to accelerate death and the Jury, after a short deliberation, brought in a verdict of "Died from English Cholera after twenty-six hours illness." Deceased was a widower and has left three orphans.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 8 October 1851
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN ELLIOTT, late a leading man of shipwrights in the Devonport dockyard, whose death was occasioned by a fit of apoplexy, caused by a blow accidentally received by him, by knocking his head against a beam in a shifting shed in the dockyard. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of JOHN DAVIDSON. The deceased belonged to a pilot boat, Stibbs, Master, and on Wednesday last, when about two miles from the Mewstone, he accidentally fell overboard, and was not found until Saturday, when he was picked up in a trawl and brought into this port. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning." We regret to add the deceased, who was about 31 years of age, was the only support of an aged mother.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 15 October 1851
TOTNES - Melancholy Fatal Accident. - On Monday night, the 6th inst., MR and MRS BOVEY, of the Plymouth Inn, were retiring to rest, when MR BOVEY returned to see if the fires were extinguished and the premises secured, and MRS B. proceeded to ascend the stairs. MR B., hearing his wife fall, ran to the foot of the stairs, where he found her lying, quite speechless, insensible and bleeding profusely from the head. Mr Thompson, surgeon, was immediately called and found her skull fractured. She lingered until noon the next day, when she ceased to breathe. An Inquest was held on the body on Wednesday before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner. MRS BOVEY was much respected. She was about 70 years of age.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 22 October 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the Tamar Inn, Morice Town, on the body of HANNAH WHITE, who was found drowned in the Tamar Canal by William Oliver, of H.M.S. St George, about 7 o'clock on Friday morning. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was unfortunately addicted to habits of intemperance, and on Thursday evening last, when she met her death, she was partly intoxicated. From the fact of a tincan, belonging to the deceased, being found in the canal, it would seem she went there under the influence of drink for the purpose of obtaining some water and must then have fallen in. She was the widow of a warrant officer and has left two young children. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 29 October 1851
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide In Prison. - On Saturday, a most melancholy case of suicide was perpetrated in one of the cells of the Devonport prisons. The unfortunate victim, is a married female, of about 44 years of age, the wife of a shipwright in Her Majesty's dockyard, named JOHN BARRY, a man much respected in his sphere in life, both by his fellow artisans, and by the officers under whom he works. On Saturday morning she got up as usual, and had breakfast with her husband, who left shortly before seven for the Dockyard. At about half past 8 o'clock we find her at the Lord Hood, Public House in King Street, at no great distance from which she resided, partaking of two glasses, or a half-pint of 4d. beer; in the course of the forenoon she was there again, and had another glass of beer, and before leaving, she was observed to come from the direction of a meat safe, apparently with something under her shawl. On quitting the house, a female servant whose suspicion had been aroused, went to the safe and found that a piece of roasted pork, stuffed with sage and onions, had been taken from it. The servant acquainted her master and mistress - Mr Frost, and his wife - who at once sent for a police officer. The woman was described, her person being well known from her habit of coming into the Lord Hood two or three times a week, and taking a glass of beer about 8 o'clock in the morning. Her husband came home at 12 o'clock, and took his dinner with his wife and two children - girls, one 10 and the other 12 years of age. He did not then observe anything remarkable in her conduct, and left her, on returning to the Dockyard, washing the plates, &c., which had been used for the dinner. She observed to her husband that she must make haste, as she wanted to go to market. The children went out before their father, and after him his unfortunate wife, would seem to have left and gone to the market; calling at a beer shop on her way, and taking a glass of beer. She was seen in the market walking quick, as was her practice, carrying a basket; and at about three, the servant at the Lord Hood pointed her out to her master, as she was passing up the street. She was called in, and taxed with stealing the pork. At first she denied the theft, but subsequently acknowledged it, and said she would pay Mrs Frost for the pork. In her basket was found two pounds of butter, some apples, and at the bottom some onions and sage stuffing similar to that in the stolen pork. In her pocket some more of the same kind was found and in the house a small piece of pork similar to that lost. When put in charge of the police she appeared distressed mostly because her "poor husband would know it." She was taken before the Mayor and remanded to Monday. She named persons who would bail her, but was placed in the cell in order that they might be seen. After having been there about half an hour her little girls came with some tea for her. The tea was taken to the door by Policeman Tozer, who as she did not answer when called put his face to the grating in the door to see where she was; and on so doing he was not a little startled to find the face of the woman close to his own. She had taken off a scarf which she had on inside her dress when placed in the cell, and having placed one end of it round one of the bars of the grating, and the other with a half tie round her neck, had in some extraordinary way contrived to hang herself; the place where the scarf was attached to the grating, being about four feet two from the ground, and her body from her feet to her neck measuring four feet four inches. The scarf was fastened to the upper part of the bar by simply placing the end under the part where the strain would come on the bar, and around her neck a simple half-tie, and as she hung her chin rested on the ledge at the bottom of the grating, the face being turned as though looking through the grating. From the position in which she was found it is evident that after adjusting the scarf she must have voluntarily have drawn up her feet so as to perpetrate the fatal deed. She was at once cut down when discovered, and Mr De Larue, surgeon, called in, but she was quite dead. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest held by A. B. Bone, Esq., on Monday and yesterday, it appeared that the husband is an abstainer from all intoxicating drinks, and that during the last six or seven years, he had never any article of that sort in his house - that the poor woman, although she was known to take glasses of beer now and then, was never known to be what is termed drunk - that when accused of drinking by her husband her manner was excited and flighty. It was also stated that she was the daughter of MR MARKS, formerly a foreman in the storehouse in the Dockyard, but who, after his superannuation, went to reside at Barnstaple, where he became insane and so continued for months, but subsequently got better. He died at the age of 58. The Inquest was adjourned on Monday to the next day in order to hear the evidence of the persons residing in the house as to the habits and state of mind of the deceased. After a patient and protracted Enquiry and an elaborate summing up by the Coroner, the Jury, of which Mr Peter Jessep Down, was the foreman, found that the deceased had destroyed herself in a fit of Temporary Insanity. The Coroner in his summing up, pointed out to the Jury that in order to prove that a person who had committed suicide was insane, it must be shown that he or she was incapable of distinguishing right from wrong - and that he or she was unable to see the consequences of the act contemplated - and that it was contrary to the law of God and of man. In reply to questions from Jurors, Mr De Larue admitted that although it was not the usual history of such cases, yet it was possible that a person might become suddenly insane.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 12 November 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, before J. Edmonds, Esq., at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of a woman, LOUISA TOWNSEND, who met her death under singular circumstances. On Saturday week, the deceased in company with a woman named ford, who both resided at No. 2, Middle-lane, went to a public-house in the locality, and partook of some beer, after which deceased returned home, and went to an upstairs window to take in some clothes which she put out of the window on two lines, which were kept out by a long pole; while doing so, she overbalanced herself and fell down into the road below. Some young women shortly after saw her and raised an alarm, when her husband who was tipsy ran out, and having got deceased into the house, procured medical assistance. She lingered till Sunday last, when death ended her sufferings. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest it appears the witness ford, who is an elderly woman with a child at the breast, was so drunk at the time as to know of nothing that took place, and was incapable of taking charge of her child. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, caused by deceased falling from a window."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 19 November 1851
TOTNES - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, in Bridgetown, on Wednesday last, upon the body of a child named SCREECH. The facts of the case appear as follows, the parents of the child being poor, and knowing the Rev. J. Shore (of Bridgetown Chapel notoriety) had long been an apostle of homeopathic treatment for disorders, applied to him and he took the child under his care for some time, but on its getting worse a surgeon was called in (a few days before its death), this gentleman then stated that at this stage of the disorder he could not save the child, which he could have done if sent for earlier. An information of the case having been laid before the Coroner, an Inquest was ordered. The parents then stated they had, upon the recommendation of other persons, procured and administered other medicine to the child between the time of the rev. gentleman's leaving and the surgeon being called in. The Jury then ordered a post mortem examination to be made by Mr Bowden, surgeon, to be assisted by Mr J. Derry, and adjourned the case till Friday, the 14th inst., for the result. When the case was gone into, and the medical gentlemen appointed to conduct the post mortem examination gave their opinion in accordance with which, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died of congestion of the brain, arising from natural causes, and that there is not the slightest imputation against the Rev. J. Shore. A great deal of interest was manifested in this matter from the beginning to the end.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 26 November 1851
EXETER - The Fifth Of November. At an Inquest held at Exeter, upon view of the body of WILLIAM FENWICK, the Jury found a verdict of Accidental Death, adding to their presentment the following:- "The Jury upon the Inquest on the body of WILLIAM FENWICK, who came to his death by the explosion of a rocket upon the 5th day of November instant, beg to represent to the Mayor and Magistrates of the City of Exeter, the lamentable consequences which result from the dangerous practice of allowing rockets and fire-works to be let off in the Cathedral yard of this City, whereby death is occasioned in one or more cases as invariably as the practice is observed. This is the second death that has happened from the discharge of rockets in the Cathedral yard in the present year, and the Jury respectfully request the Mayor and Magistrates not to permit this illegal and dangerous practice to be carried on in future."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held last evening (Tuesday) at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN JOHNSON, who came by his death under the following circumstances:- On Monday the 24th instant, the deceased in company with two other persons went into the Sound, and on their returning in the evening, they landed at the canal inside the pier at Millbay. The deceased took his way towards the arch leading to the water, and the others went up the steps at the same time, warning him of his danger. He, however, still persisted in his way, and presently his friends heard a splash in the water, and heard deceased call out "oh, oh." They immediately proceeded to the spot from which the sound came, but saw nothing of him; he was afterwards picked up in the water, leaving no doubt that he accidentally walked over the quay, and being unable to swim was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, by Drowning.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 December 1851
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of GEORGINA GLANVILLE, a child 6 years of age. The parents of the child live in Basket Street, and according to the statement of another child who was left in the room with her, the deceased was standing in front of the mantle piece when her clothes caught fire, and she was so seriously burnt as to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Burning."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 24 December 1851
PLYMOUTH - Horrible And Fatal Accident. - A very shocking accident occurred on board the Lady Sale, steamer, whilst lying at Millbay Pier, on the 1st inst., the subject of which was a young man named DANIEL HART, a stoker of the vessel. On that day Mr H. J. Waring, the agent for the steamer, was on board, and being near the engine room, looked down the stoke hole, and saw the water running out of the bottom of the boiler; the water was boiling. There was a grating near partly covered with tarpaulin. HART came towards Mr Waring, and reached beyond him with his right hand resting on the tarpaulin, which unfortunately gave way, and HART was precipitated into the stoke hole, falling into about two or three feet of boiling water. The speediest assistance was procured and he was hoisted out and laid on his back on the deck and his clothes were cut off from him by Mr Waring. The lower part of his body and the right side of his face were much scalded, - from the right foot the skin was completely gone. He was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where the poor fellow lingered until Wednesday last, when death terminated his sufferings. On Thursday an Inquest was held on the body before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 31 December 1851
DODBROOKE - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, the 20th inst., on the body of MRS GAY, who put a period to her existence on the previous Thursday, by hanging herself in her bedroom. No reason whatever could be assigned for the rash act, except temporary insanity; a verdict to which effect was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 7 January 1852
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Suicide. - One of those lamentable incidents - which sometimes occur in Society, made yesterday a deep impression on the people of Devonport and the vicinity. For some time past midnight robberies have been so frequent in this town, that a sense of insecurity was naturally felt by most persons, and it may reasonably be supposed that the apprehension of four individuals on strong grounds of suspicion, as being the perpetrators of these robberies, was an event which gave general satisfaction. And although it was a matter of regret that the whole of these four were natives of the town, and sons of two of its tradesmen, mere youths too, the eldest of them, numbering in age but 20 years, the fact that their conviction - if guilty - would be the means not only of removing them from the possibility of further depredation, but also inflict upon them a justly deserved punishment, and dispel any doubts that might have arisen in the minds of some as to whether these robberies were all real, or a few of them fabulous, and if they were indeed all real, withdraw the stain of suspicion from innocent parties, it is but natural that considerable interest should have been taken by the public in the recent examinations. One of the persons who had been robbed to a great extent, was MR WILLIAM HARRIS ROW, a jeweller, carrying on business in Fore-street, Devonport, who was much respected and beloved as a tradesman, a neighbour and a man. MR ROW, as it will be seen by our report of the examinations, was called on to take a prominent part in the proceedings. Naturally, as will appear on a perusal of the evidence adduced at the Inquest - of which we shall hereafter speak - a man very much affected by mental excitement, he felt acutely the position in which he was placed as prosecutor, and sundry circumstances that occurred during the investigation in respect to a temporary difficulty in identifying the property. These things caused a depression of spirits, the result of which was that on Tuesday (yesterday) morning, MR ROW, by his own hand, terminated his existence upon earth. A Coroner's Inquest was held last evening on the body, at MR ROW'S late residence, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Borough Coroner, and a Jury of which the following were the members:- Mr D. H. Hainssselin, Foreman; Messrs. J. D. Stevenson, W. Greenwood, jun., T. Greenwood, T. Callard, R. C. Smith, R. Kemp, G. Holland, J. Truscott, T. Reed, W. Mewton, T. Hatch, J. Griffin, J. Babb, C. Dymond, J. D. Stonelake, C. G. Edwards, J. Heydon, W. Beard, R. German, J. A. Boolds, M. Richards, J. Babb, and S. Trend. - After the Coroner had explained the cause of their being assembled, and the Jury had viewed the body, the following witnesses were examined:- Ann Baker, servant to MRS ROW, the widow of the deceased. I have lived with the family about seven months. The deceased was a jeweller, living at 33 fore-street, in Devonport, where his body now lies. I got up at about half-past seven this morning, the deceased was then up as he often was, and while I was lighting the kitchen fire he came in dressed as he is now, he had nothing in his hand. The deceased was, I believe, in the habit of keeping the stick which was used as a gun, in a corner between the shop and parlour. I saw it there on Saturday last. The deceased was in the habit of going out mornings with the children and taking this tick with him. The deceased went through the parlour into the shop; the little girl, 8 years old and the baby were downstairs; MRS ROW was in bed and the other children (three in number) were upstairs. About ten minutes after the deceased came in, and before anyone came downstairs, I heard a report as if of something falling; just after this, I heard a bell ring which I supposed and found to be the man who was usually in the habit of taking down the shutters. I opened the door to him, and he said, there is something fallen in the shop, and I said "Master's there Ellis." The deceased's son WILLIAM, 13 years of age, came down just previously; I said to him your papa's in the shop and he went upstairs again; in a few minutes he heard the report and came down and asked me to go into the shop for he said he heard the gun. I was rather alarmed and did not like going in myself, so I went to the next door neighbour, Mr Beard, the saddler, and his apprentice, William Lishman, came in. I went into the shop with him and found the body of the deceased lying on the floor by the side of the counter. There was a great quantity of blood about the floor, no one else was in the shop. I acquainted MRS ROW of it, and she came down into the parlour, but did not go into the shop. I did not go into the shop after that time. The deceased and MRS ROW went to bed last night about 11 o'clock. I saw him about a quarter of an hour before he went to bed, he appeared quite well then; but since Saturday last he has appeared rather low-spirited. He was quite sober and steady at the time I saw him. I never saw him otherwise. He had a little gruel for supper and has hardly eaten anything for the last week. - By the Foreman: MR ROW was in the constant habit of using the gun mornings. The last morning I saw him go out was in the month of October. - By various Jurymen: The deceased did not speak to me when he came in. He was not in the habit of keeping the gun loaded, nor have I seen him load it lately. When I came down this morning the candle was on the parlour table. I did not hear the deceased come down, and do not know how long he came down before me. When I saw the body of the deceased on the floor, I saw a candle lighted on the glass case on the counter. - By the Coroner: The deceased went out of the house last night about 8 and returned about 10. - William Lishman, apprentice to Mr Beard, was then called and said:- This morning, about 8 o'clock, the girl Ann Baker, called me and I went into MRS ROW'S house with her. I went through the back parlour to the door of the shop and smelt a smell of powder. I did not like to go into the shop, and asked for a light; the servant went and got one and I fetched a neighbour, Mr Howard, when we went in and found the deceased lying on his stomach. I called Mr Swain (Surgeon), and Mr Beard. I saw the deceased on Saturday, he came in and asked for Mr Beard, I told him he was at tea. I noticed nothing unusual about him. - By a Juryman: The deceased was lying with his head towards the door. The gun was under him, between his leg. - Mr Paul W. Swain, Surgeon, then gave the following evidence. (having previously asked whether he was to be regarded as a professional witness, Mr Bone replied the cause of death was so obvious that he did not deem it necessary to obtain the assistance of a professional gentleman, if he had he should have much appreciated that of Mr Swain). I am a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and was sent for this morning. When I came I saw the body of MR ROW lying in the shop on his side, rather inclining towards his face, the gun was in his hand, between his knees and a large mass of brain was laying six or eight feet from where the head lay. There was a large pool of blood round the head. I have known the deceased for upwards of 17 or 18 years at least, as his medical man. From his having had a great amount of sickness in his house. I was well acquainted with his character, and knew that he was very excitable under circumstances calculated to depress him. On two occasions when he had lost his children his conduct was almost approaching wild. From many conversations I have had with him, I should say his mind was not of the ordinary cast. There was a tendency to speculation on abstract things which was beyond his station in life, and I think that such a mental constitution would cease to be under the control of the individual. I have seen him several times since the robbery, and must confess I was surprised to notice how calmly he bore it. I have attended him several times on account of illness which I cannot but describe as mental excitement and about three or four years ago he had an illness which but for management and persuasion would have put him in such a condition as to render it necessary to remove him from under his own control. I never knew him otherwise but a sober man, he told me once that a very small quantity of spirit and water which he had taken had much excited him. If he ever drank I do not believe his excitement was caused by his drinking, but rather he was induced to drink from excitement. I always considered his excitement to arise from constitutional formation. I believe this to be an instance of impulsive suicide. I don't think it was premeditated. Suicide arises from several varieties of insanity. - The servant, Ann Baker, was recalled, and in reply to the Coroner, said the door leading to the shop from the parlour was shut, but not locked. This was usually the case. - Mr Swain's examination continued: I believe it to be suicide, because the gun was between his legs and in his hand; it could not have been done by any other party. From what I have seen of the deceased before, one time especially, - when he was to all intents and purposes insane when his eldest daughter died, and I made a post mortem examination, he wound himself up to a great pitch of excitement, and persisted in being present at the examination. I should say, at the time he committed the act of suicide, he was beyond moral self-control. The deceased was very fond of natural history, and used his gun in shooting the specimens which were exhibited in the room. I have frequently met him mornings, in the country, with his gun and often had conversations with him on the subject of the specimens he obtained. - Ann Baker, re-examined: I am satisfied that after I saw the deceased go into the shop, no one went into it until I heard the report. - Mr Samuel T. Oram, Reporter of The Devonport Independent: On the morning of Saturday, the 20th December last, about a quarter to three in the morning, MR ROW came to the Editor's room at the office, to look at a paragraph in reference to the robbery which had been said to have taken place at his shop. I went and got a proof of the paragraph, gave it to him, and read it over, looked at the back of it, and appeared very nervous. He stopped there twenty minutes, and must have read it over five times. From what I saw, I took him to be in such a low way, that I have since, previous to his death, mentioned it to several of my friends. He had no alteration made in the paragraph. - Mr Joseph Elms (Auctioneer): I have known the deceased for the last 15 years, and have been acquainted with him, but not sufficiently to say whether he was a sober man or not. The day after the robbery I had a conversation with him about it: he appeared very much excited, and almost every day since that, I have been more or less in his company. He appeared very much excited in his mind from the loss he sustained. Immediately after the examination on Saturday last, on my pointing out to him the marks in a hunting-watch, he appeared very much annoyed, and said he would not undergo another such examination for all the property he had lost, and he said if he underwent another such at Exeter he should break down under it. From what I saw of him then I thought his mind was prostrate. Last night, at six o'clock, I observed a marked difference in his manner; his countenance appeared vacant; he said he had been much relaxed in his system, and requested me to call in and see him again during the evening. I promised to call again, but was detained elsewhere, and did not see him after that period. All the time after the examination had taken place he appeared different to what I had remarked his demeanour previously. He made a remark that he thought he had made a fool of himself by not identifying the property until the private marks were pointed out. He said his sight was very much affected, and in reply to a question from me, that his age was 40, that he was in his 41st year. - Mr Swain, with the permission of the Coroner, went and examined the body, and on his return said: I find the upper part of the skull broken and quite carried away; the whole of the brain, except the cerebellum, has been cleanly removed. The removed brain in two portions is found laying six feet from where the deceased lay; it is much burnt and affected by the shot, of which there are some in it. The effect of the shot was entirely to remove the cerebrum, and the clenched hands with the absence of splattering lead me to believe that he leant over the muzzle of the gun, applied it to his temples and then with the bent position of one foot pulled the trigger. - Mr Edwards, senr., gunsmith, examined the gun, and said in its present state it was impossible for it to go off. He accounted for this state by supposing that it contained an extra charge of powder which broke it as it was fired. - Nicholas Brent, constable: Last evening about 8 or 9 o'clock, in consequence of information I received, I called on MR ROW, and was with him about two hours. I thought he was in a very strange way; he was very reserved, and scarcely spoke a word, so much so that I mentioned it afterwards. - The Coroner commented on the evidence, explained the law bearing on the case, and instructed the Jury as to the verdict they should return according to any decision they might come to from the evidence which had been laid before them. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, gave a verdict of "Temporary Derangement."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 14 January 1852
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, on Thursday last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES LITTLETON KEYS - a child aged 6 months - of MR KEYS, printer, Bilbury-street. The child was put by its nurse in the cradle in the morning, and shortly afterwards found dead. A verdict was returned "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest was held at the same place, before the same Coroner, on Friday, on the body of RICHARD JAMES, aged 45, who whilst at work on a new house at North Hill, on the previous Saturday, fell from a height of 50 feet to the ground, receiving such injury that he was carried immediately to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died on Thursday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased in falling carried away a scaffolding on which two men were working, they fortunately however succeeded in saving themselves, one by jumping on to the roof of the house and the other by catching hold of the upright spar, thus narrowly escaping serious injury, and possibly death. The scaffoldings used by masons are frequently exceedingly insecure, these accidents should cause them to be more careful in erecting them.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 21 January 1852
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Bull Point. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening last at the Railway Inn, Stoke Lane, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES NICHOLSON, aged 16 years. - William Nott, stone-mason said:- On Thursday, the 15th instant, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was at work at Bull Point, near Devonport; the deceased was at work about ten feet from me; I suddenly heard a crash, and on turning round saw the deceased falling to the ground and a large stone rolling from him; I took him up; he was quite dead. Some other men were lifting a large stone between 14cwt. to 15cwt., by means of a winch, and when they had got it about 21 feet from the ground, it fell on the deceased, struck him on the right side, and cut his bowels open; there was a hole in the centre of the stone in which a peg was fixed, but I cannot say whether the peg slipped or the stone parted, as it was parted when I saw it on the ground. The deceased had not been there above two minutes; he was taken up and removed to his father's house, Stoke Lane. - These being the facts of the case, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Laira. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HAM, aged 35 years. - John Dunn deposed: The deceased was a bargeman, and resided in Lower Street. On the 16th of January I was at Laira, with the deceased and two boys, about two o'clock in the afternoon; we were in a barge dragging sand, and while so engaged, the chain of the drag broke and the deceased fell overboard into about 14 feet of water; he sank sand did not rise again. We picked up the body about five the same day, and brought it to Plymouth. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." We are sorry to add the unfortunate deceased has left a wife and four children who are totally unprovided for.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 28 January 1852
On Thursday morning, GEORGE SHORE, a young man about 20, was in a boat laden with oysters coming down Catwater, when the boat was upset in a sudden squall, and SHORE and his companion, another young man named Perry, son of the owner of the boat, were thrown into the water. Perry managed to swim to Catdown, but SHORE was drowned. His body has been recovered and an Inquest held. His mother is a poor widow residing at Oreston. The boat was bound to Plymouth.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 4 February 1852
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Thursday, the 29th January, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES GILPIN, aged 32, a coal porter, who fell into the engine room of the steam-ship, Warrior, at Millbay, a height of 11 feet, and fractured his skull, the deceased was conveyed by Captain Martin, to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered until the 29th ulto., when he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - On Friday, the 30th, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before the same Coroner, on the body of JAMES COWLEY, aged 60; from the evidence given, it appeared that on the 29th of January, the deceased was standing on the north corner of Sutton Wharf, near the new steps, talking to a man. He turned suddenly and fell over the quay on the new steps and fractured his skull. He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and lingered until the next morning when he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest was held on Saturday, the 31st, at the Guildhall, before the same Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH BENJAMIN LOCOCK, aged 2 years, of 13 Looe Street, who was run over by a cart, on the previous Wednesday, and severely injured, from the effects of which he died on the Friday. A verdict of Accidental Death was recorded.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 18 February 1852
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the "Union Inn," Morice town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of PETER JOHN B. TINNEY, a child, aged 5 years, and 4 months, of JOHN TINNEY, a mason, residing at Morice-town, who met his death on the previous Friday under the following circumstances. It appeared that the mother of the child deposited on a fire place containing no fire a kettle of boiling water for the purpose of making tea, and whilst engaged in preparing for the meal, the child unnoticed by her, endeavoured to drink from the spout of the kettle, inhaling a considerable quantity of steam. On examination of the child's mouth immediately afterwards it appeared but little hurt, and Mr Ryder, druggist of Morice-town, applied some ointment to the lips and gave his mother a mixture of vinegar and honey for the child to drink. He after this appeared better, but a few hours subsequently his breathing was very short and difficult and about six hours after inhaling the steam he died. It was supposed that the steam passed down the mouth without doing any injury, and, reaching the windpipe, caused it to inflame and close up, thereby creating suffocation and death. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the house of Mr Jeffery Hardy, George-street Hotel, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ARTHUR WARING, aged three months, who was found by his mother on Friday morning, dead at her side. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall on Monday, before the same Coroner, on the body of RICHARD CLATWORTHY, aged 81, a ship-builder, residing at 18 Lambhay-street. On Saturday evening, the deceased went to bed in his usual health, and on Sunday morning he was found dead. A similar verdict was returned in this case.

TOTNES - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last at the Oxford Arms, on the body of JOHANNA DODRIDGE, who was found drowned in the Mill Leat. It appeared the unfortunate woman was in her 84th year, and had lived nearly 60 years in the family of the Rev. F. H. Hele, Vicar of Little Hempston, and for the past two years had been living at Little Hempston, with the Rev. Gentleman, who allowed the old lady to roam about at pleasure, 'tis supposed she went down to the (Dart) water side to see the boat-house, building there, when from the immense and angry body of water rushing down in consequence of the late heavy rains, her senses became overpowered and fell into the river, she was borne onwards with the great velocity to where she was found, by Mr S. Evens, and taken to the Oxford Arms; the Jury having viewed the body, and satisfied themselves there were no marks of violence, returned a verdict - "Found Drowned." The Rev. Mr Hele and brother attended the Inquest and appeared deeply affected.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 25 February 1852
BRIXHAM - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday, the 16th inst., an Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MRS CREWS, who was found drowned in the water near Furzeham Common. There being no evidence as to the origin of the catastrophe, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 3 March 1852
STOKE DAMEREL - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday last, at Sheall's Crown Hotel, in Cumberland-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS SEARLE, for upwards of 24 years a warehouseman in the employ of Messrs. Rundle, wine and spirit merchants. MR SEARLE was also for 33 years, a beadle at St. John the Baptist Chapel in Duke Street. He met with his death on the Wednesday previous, at the stores of his employers, in consequence of an attempt on his part to extinguish a fire which had arisen in a funnel-chimney attached to the store. It appears he perceived some smoke issuing from a joint of the funnel, and supposing it arose from some burning soot which had collected there, procured a ladder, and ascended the roof with a pail of water to throw down at the top. This task he accomplished, and was in the act of turning to regain the ladder for the purpose of making his descent, when unfortunately his foot slipped, and being a heavy man, he fell with considerable force to the ground. The shock appears to have affected his senses, and he never recovered, but died from the effects of his injuries on the following day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from the effects of a fall."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening (Tuesday) at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of MARY CORSEY, aged 55, who had committed suicide and was found suspended by a cord to the bed-post by her husband, (who is a cartman, in the employ of Mr Jenkins, builder, of Plymouth), on his going home to his residence in Portland-lane East, to dinner, about one o'clock on that day. There was no reason adduced why the woman was tempted to commit self-destruction, and the Jury, after a full investigation of the circumstances, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser - Wednesday 10 March 1852
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES LEGO, aged 39, late a milkman of Plymouth. The deceased was found dead in a pond, in a field at Tothill; he was a man addicted to drinking, and for the last fortnight had been in a kind of delirium tremens. The man's clothes was found in the field near the pond, hence the discovery of his body. The Jury found that he destroyed himself in a fit of "Temporary Insanity."

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last an accident occurred at Messrs. Distin and Chafe's foundry, in Devonport, where by MR E. C. HERMAN, chief clerk of the establishment, was killed. MR HERMAN had been connected with the foundry almost ever since its establishment, and his business habits had procured him the esteem of his employers; he was also well known in the town, and universally respected. For some years he held the office of Assistant-Secretary of the Devonport Mechanics' Institute, the duties of which he performed in such a manner as to obtain the hearty approval of the members, who, on his retirement, elected him a life member of the Institution. MR HERMAN was about 36 years of age, and he has left a wife and two children. As an instance of the value of Life Insurance, it may be mentioned that he insured his life only about six weeks since in the sum of £100 so that his family fortunately are not without the means of relieving present necessities. The particulars of the accident will be found detailed in the evidence adduced at the Inquest, which was held at the Dock Gates Inn, on Friday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner. The following were on the Jury:- Mr P. J. Down, Foreman; Messrs. S. Hutchings, H. Tregear, J. Welman. J. Hockaday, J. Sowden, E. Bray, W. Ching, T. Reed, M. Jorey, W. Reed, J. Hallett, and G. Luscombe. - Mr John Anthony, manager of the works, had known the deceased for about two years. He was there employed as principal clerk when witness came there. At about 20 minutes after three the previous afternoon (Thursday) whilst in the fitting shop, witness was summoned to the office. He went there and saw deceased lying on the floor of the office bleeding from a wound in the head. The deceased was at that time living, but quite insensible. Witness did not see the accident. He knew the machine called the casting breaker. It is a heavy piece of iron about 14 cwt. attached to an iron chain of about 80 feet in length, and when the machine is required for breaking castings the ball is fitted by a winch. The ball might be lifted 28 feet, the height to which it is lifted depends on the strength of the casting required to be broken. Witness was in the yard about ten minutes before he was called into the office, and saw the machine in work, and about three or four men were in the yard. There were about three men employed in the smiths' shop on the machine. One in the yard was employed in superintending the machine. The others were from twelve to sixteen feet off the ball, working on an hydraulic machine. The men who were at the winch inside were about 40 feet from the ball; there was no screen between them and the ball. The window of the office in which the deceased was, is from 18 to 20 feet distant from the ball; three clerks work in the office, and the window looks out into the yard where the ball is. The desks at which the clerks sit is immediately inside the window. Witness thought the ball would require to be lifted about 18 feet to break the materials which were there. The machine had been at work during the whole time witness had been in the employ of Messrs. Distin and Chafe; he never knew or heard of any serious accident occurring before the present one. Witness had been an engineer 18 years. It never occurred to his mind that it was dangerous to work in the office on account of the machine. It is usual to let the ball fall upon solid material which it is proposed to break by the fall; the material would be unfixed though solid. He never knew an instance of a portion of the material being thrown off in a similar manner. The machine was used every week, sometimes every day of the week. - John Stevens, a labourer in the foundry, was at work on the Thursday afternoon on the casting breaker. The machine was set to work at about half-past two. At about three o'clock there was a round plate - a cover for an hydraulic press - under the ball. The plate was circular, weighed about 4 or 4 ½ cwt., and had a large hole in the middle. It was of the diamete