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Help and advice for Inquests 1865 - 1874

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and the Western Daily Mercury

[printed in Plymouth.]

1865 - 1874

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living. .

 


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Ackland; Adams(2); Alford; Allen(5); Allery; Alley; Andrewartha; Andrews(3); Anstice; Arnold; Arthur; Ash; Ashford; Atwill; Austin(2); Avery(4); Axworthy; Ayres; Bailey(2); Baker(4); Balkwill; Barber(2); Barker; Barnes(2); Barratt; Barrett; Bassett; Bastin; Bate(2); Bathurst; Batten; Bawker; Beattie; Beck; Beer(2); Belworthy; Bennett(3); Berryman; Bevens; Bickle(2); Bird; Blackmore(2); Blackwell; Blake; Blatchford(2); Blower; Bloye; Blunt; Boice; Bolt; Boulton; Bourlace; Bovey; Bowden; Bowring; Boyce; Boyse; Bradford(2); Bradley; Braund; Brewer(3); Brimley; Briton; Bromhead; Bromley; Brown(3); Brownlow; Bryant; Buchan; Budworth; Buffett; Bullock; Buncehall; Bunter; Burdwood; Burgess; Burley; Burn; Burnard; Burnett(3); Burns; Burrows(2); Burt; Butchers; Butfield; Campbell; Campion; Cann(3); Cannaford; Cape; Carew; Carl; Carter; Casey; Cawes; Chaffe; Chapman(2); Chappell; Chapple(4); Chattey; Cheetham; Cherry; Ching; Chope; Chown; Chubb(2); Chugg; Clampitt; Clapp; Clark; Clarke(2) ; Cleave; Cleak; Clemens; Clements; Cload; Cloke; Cole(4); Coles; Collacott; Collins; Cook(2); Coolyn; Coombe(2); Coomer; Cooper(2); Cottery; Courtenay; Cousens; Cove; Crabbe; Creber; Crispin; Crocker(2); Cross(2); Crossman; Crowdy(2); Crump; Cruze; Cuddington; Culverwell(2); Cumming; Curno; Currethers; Cusden; Cutts; Daimond; Daniel; Dare; Dark; Dart; Davenport(2); Davey(3); Davidge; Davis(2); Davy(2); Dawe(2); Dedley; Denley; Dennis; Devonshen; Dewdney; Dicker; Dinham; Dirks; Dockett; Dodge; Dommett; Down(3); Drake; Drew; Drewe; Drury; Dumble; Dunn(3); Dunning; Duperier; DuPre; Dyer; Dziengielowski; Eakins; Eales; Easterbrook; Eastmond; Eddy; Edgecombe; Edmonds(2); Edwards; Edworthy; Elliott(3); Ellis(7); Endicott; Evely; Evens; Ewins; Exell(2); Exworthy(2); Fairweather; Farley; Fewings; Fey; Field; Finn; Finnemore; Fitzgerald; Floud; Fogwill; Folley; Fooks; Ford(3); Forester(2); Forquhar; Foster; Foxworthy; Fradd; Francis; Franks; French(4); Frewin; Friend(2); Frome; Frost(3); Fry; Gale; Gammon; Gearing; Geddy; Gee(2); Gibbs; Gillieham; Glanville(2); Gordon; Goss; Gould(2); Graham; Grant; Green(2); Greenslade; Greet; Gregory; Gribble; Grigg; Guest; Gunhouse; Gunnell; Guscott; Guswell; Haar; Hake; Hall(4); Hallett; Ham; Hamlyn(3); Hammond; Hancock(3); Hannaford; Harding(3); Harford(2); Harington; Harrington; Harris(7); Harrison; Harvey(2); Hatto; Hawke; Hawkins; Haydon(3); Hayman; Heaney; Hearn; Hearne; Heath(2); Helmore; Henry; Henwood; Hensman; Hey; Heybeard; Heysitt; Hicks(2); Highmore; Hill(7); Hilton; Himvest; Hoar; Hoblin; Hobson; Hockaday; Hocking(2); Hodder; Hodge(2); Holberton; Hole; Holland; Holmes; Honeywill(2); Hooker; Hooper(3); Hoople; Horne; Horner; Horrell; Horton; Horwell; Horwill; Hosking; Hoskins(2); House; Houston; Howell; Hoyton; Hughes; Humphries; Hunt(2); Hunting; Hutchings; Hyne; Ife; Ingram; Inkester; Isaac; Jackman(2); Jackson(3); James; Jarvis; Jeffery; Jess; Johns(2); Johnson(2); Joint; Jolly; Jones(7); Jordan; Jorgensen; Keast(2); Keen; Kemp; Kendall; Kenson; Kent; Kerswill; Key; Keynes; King; Kingdom; Kingwell; Kitt; Labbett; Lake(2); Lamble; Lampen; Lander; Lane(2); Lang; Langdom; Langdon(3); Langman; Langworthy; Lapidge; Lappage; Lapthorne(2); Lashbrook; Latimer; Launder; Lavers; Lawrence; Lear; Lee(6); Leech; Leggett; Leigh; Leivre; Leonards; Lethbridge; Lewis; Ley; Lillicrap; Lime; Limebeard; Lindeman; Lintern; Livingstone; Llewellyn; Llewillyn; Lockyer; Long; Loram; Lord; Loveridge; Loving; Luke(2); Lumbard; Lyne; Mackenzie; Mackerel; Mackintosh; MacVitty; Maddock; Mahoney; Mallett; Mann; Marles; Marsh(2); Marshall; Martin(9); Mason; Matthews(2); Maunder; May(3); Maynard; Mayne; Mays; McCardell; McCarthy(2); Medland(3); Menheniot; Meredith; Merrifield; Metherell; Michell; Michelmore; Middleton; Mildon; Milford; Miller(2); Mills; Minifie; Mitchell(4); Moles; Molland; Mollard; Moore(3); Morgan; Morris; Morrish; Mortimer(2); Mould; Mullings; Munday; Murch; Napper; Narramore; Neate; Nelder; Nelson; Netherton; Newberry(2); Nicholls; Nichols; Noble; Norman; Norris; Norsworthy; Northcote; Northway; Norton; Noyes; Nugent; Odgers; Oldham; Oldridge; Osborne; Oxenham; Packer; Paddon; Page; Pain; Palfrey; Palmer(6); Parkhouse; Parkin(2); Parnall; Parnell(2); Parsons(2); Pascoe; Pearce; Pearse(3); Pederick; Pedgeon; Peek; Pellow; Penberthy; Pengelly(3); Pepperell; Perham; Perkins; Perrin; Perring; Perry; Peters(2); Pethebridge; Petherbridge; Pethrick; Petts; Phillimore; Phillips; Philp; Pickard(2); Pidsley(2); Pike; Pile; Pinhay; Plackett; Playdon; Poll; Pond; Potter(4); Powers; Priestley; Proctor; Puddicombe; Quaintance; Quick(2); Rawlinson; Read; Reddaway; Redwood; Reed(3); Rendle; Reynolds; Riblen; Rice; Richardson; Rider; Roberts(2); Robins; Rodwell; Rogers; Rose; Row; Rowe(6); Rowett; Rowland; Rowse; Rowsell; Rugg; Rundle; Ryall; Ryan; Ryder(3); Rymes; Sable; Salter; Sambells; Sampson; Sanders(2); Sandon; Sansom; Sarah; Saunders(3); Scobble; Scott(2); Searle; Sercombe; Seymour; Shattock; Shaw; Shead; Shepheard; Shepherd; Sherrard; Sherriff; Shillabeer; Short; Shrimpton; Skeggel; Skelley; Skelton; Skinner(3); Skullin; Slader; Sleeman; Small(2); Smith(10); Snell; Sobey(2); Sollick; Solomon; Soper; Southcott(2); Spicer; Spiller; Spry; Spurr; Squires; Stamp; Stanbury; Standlake; Stanning; Stanswood; Stark; Staton; Statt; Stear; Stentiford; Stephens(3); Stevens(3); Stewart; Stibbs; Stidworthy; Stiggings; Stirling; Stocker; Stockman; Stoddart; Stokes; Stone(5); Stoneman(2); Stookes; Stoyles; Stratford(2); Strawbridge; Street(2); Sullivan(2); Swanston; Sweet; Sweetland; Symons(2); Tabb; Tamlin; Tancock; Tapper; Tarr(3); Tarrington; Taylor(3); Templeton; Thomas(10); Thorne; Tipper; Tomkins; Tonkin; Tovey; Townshend; Tozer(4); Travers; Treloar; Tremills; Trevelor; Trewin; Tripe; Troake; Truscott; Tucker(5); Turner(2); Turpin(2); Uffen; Underhill(2); Vaughan; Veale(2); Venning; Venton; Vicary; Vickery; Vincent; Vivian; Voden; Vote; Wakeham(2); Walk; Walke; Wall; Wallis; Walters; Ware; Warren(4); Watt; Watts(2); Way; Webber; Weightman; Welsh(2); Were; Westaway; Western; Wheaton(2); Wheeler; White(4); Whiteway; Whittle(2); Wickett; Widecombe; Wilcock; Wilcocks; Wilcox; Wildy; Willcocks; Williams(11); Willis(2); Wills(2); Wilson(3); Wilton; Winnacott; Winsor; Winstanley; Witick; Wollocott(2); Wood; Woodrow; Woodward; Wotton(2); Wright; Wyatt; Wyndham; Yelland(2); Yeo(2); Zeller

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 January 1865
PLYMOUTH - John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, on view of the body of JOHN FORD. The deceased was a policeman, belonging to the County Constabulary, stationed at Staddon Heights. On Monday, the 17th October, he was riding with another man in a truck which was being drawn up an incline by a stationary engine, and when about twelve yards from the signal-house he jumped from the truck and fell against the signal wire. This having thrown his right leg on the rail, a second truck which was coming up passed over it, and smashed his foot to pieces. He was at once brought to Plymouth and placed in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where his leg was amputated the same day. From loss of blood he became very weak, and after lingering until Wednesday last death relieved him from the great sufferings his wound caused. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased was a single man, and about 32 years of age.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 January 1865
DAWLISH - Child Murder At Dawlish. - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Mount Pleasant Inn, Dawlish, on the body of a full grown female child found at the residence of M. Strickland, Esq., at the Warren. HARRIET VOTE, a servant in the house, being taken ill, medical assistance was sent for, and on the arrival of Dr Cann it was discovered that she had been recently confined. A search was then made, and the body of the deceased found in her box. A piece of tape was tied round the neck of the child, and the medical evidence, resulting from a post mortem examination, was that the child was born alive. A verdict of Wilful Murder was returned against the unfortunate mother. Mr Strickland gave her an excellent character, and the other servants declared that they had not observed anything the matter with her.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Falling Down Stairs. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, at the Dock Hotel, Millbay, Plymouth, on the body of ANN PERRY, aged 66, wife of JOHN PERRY, the old ticket porter in the Railway Station-yard. The deceased resided at Cove-cottage, Bound's-place, Millbay, where she kept a lodging-house. On the evening of the 5th inst., she fell over a flight of stairs, and died from the effects of the fall on Thursday evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 January 1865
TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Railway Accident At Tavistock. - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., county Coroner, on the body of JOHN PEARCE, the young man who was killed at the railway station on Saturday, by the train going over him immediately after he had connected the coupling chain of some trucks with the carriages of the train. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Suspicious Death Of A Drunkard At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Black Dog Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named GEORGE BEER, who was found dead in his bed that morning. The deceased was formerly an attorney's clerk, then enlisted, and was about five years in the Plymouth division of the Royal Marines, and subsequently bought his discharge. He cohabited with a woman named Ellen Davell, residing in North-street. On Saturday night deceased went to visit her, when he found a marine with her. The door was locked, but he burst it open, and a disturbance ensued, which resulted in the deceased being, according to his own statement, "chucked over the stairs" by four men. Deceased on the occasion was drunk, and had not been sober for some time. After the fracas he went to Newton St. Cyres and on his return put up at the Black Dog, where he slept. During the night he complained of pain in his head, and the following day was found dead in his bed. The Jury adjourned the Inquest for a post mortem examination, and for further information as to the part the men had taken in the row during which the deceased was said to have been thrown over.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 January 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Starvation At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at Newport, Barnstaple, on Saturday, on the body of MRS HUNT, aged about 60 years, who had been living with her daughter. It appeared that the deceased and her daughter, who have seen better days, have for a long time past been in great poverty. A gold watch, feather bed, and other valuables, belonging to the deceased were pledged, and but very few articles of furniture were left in the house, but rather than ask for relief from the parish the deceased denied herself food and died on Friday night. Mr Cook, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, and said that he found but a very small amount of food in the stomach, and it was his opinion the deceased had died from want of proper nourishment. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

ASHBURTON - Intoxication And Death At Ashburton. - On Tuesday the 27th of December, GEORGE FRENCH, a mason, aged 44, was knocked down by a horse in North-street, Ashburton. he came out of a Mr Wills's beer-house tipsy, and went into the middle of the road, when a young horse, ridden by Mr Meatherall of the Town Mills, shied at some wood and came in contact with FRENCH, who was afterwards picked up insensible and bleeding from the head. He was so much better two days after as to be able t walk about, though in pain. He took to his bed on Friday last, and, after remaining in a comatose state, died on Saturday morning. On Monday, at an Inquest held before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, these facts were related in the evidence of George Pomeroy, Sarah Tapper, and John Meatherall, and the surgeon who attended deceased stated that he knew the deceased to be addicted to drinking. The blow described might have caused death, but not to a person of regular habits. He considered that death was caused by apoplexy, accelerated by drinking. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 January 1865
EXETER - Death While Drunk. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter before the City Coroner concerning the death of ELLEN LINTERN, who was killed by falling down stairs and fracturing her skull while in a state of intoxication. The Coroner commented on the conduct of the persons living in the house with deceased, who did not call in medical aid until five hours after the accident.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 January 1865
BRAUNTON - Sudden Death At Braunton. - An Inquest was held by Mr Richard Bremridge, County Coroner, on Thursday at Braunton, on the body of WM. BRIMLEY, of Wrafton-lane, Braunton, carpenter, aged about 50. The deceased was last seen alive on the Monday evening previously, when he appeared the worse for drink. The wife of the deceased deposed that she had for some days before his death been nursing a sick person. She went home on the Sunday and made his bed. On Wednesday a neighbour went into his house, and found the deceased laying on his back across the bed in an upper room; he had his clothes on, but was quite dead. - A medical man, who was called in, said the deceased had been dead nearly two days, and considered he died from an apoplectic fit.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 January 1865
BISHOPS TAWTON - Killed By The Fall Of A Horse. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Bishop's Tawton, near Barnstaple, on the body of ROBERT MILDON, age 22, who had just completed his apprenticeship as a draper. John Walters, farmer, of Chittlehampton, said that he was returning on horseback with the deceased from Barnstaple market in the evening, and when near Codden-hill the horse slipped and fell, and deceased and himself were thrown to the ground. Witness on getting up called to his friend, but received no answer, and on going back a few yards found him lying on his face in the road insensible. Witness fetched assistance, and the deceased was carried to a house. Mr Gamble, surgeon, of Barnstaple, said he found the deceased in a very precarious condition, beyond hopes of recovery. he had a contused and lacerated wound on the right temple. Deceased died the following morning, in his opinion from the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 January 1865
TIVERTON - Suicide Of A Boy In Tiverton Cemetery. - On Monday evening F. Mackinson, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the sexton's house in the cemetery of Tiverton, on the body of JOHN FEWINGS, son of the gravedigger, who committed suicide under extra ordinary circumstances. On Saturday the deceased, who is but 13 years of age, left his brother, with whom he had been at play, in anger, and went nobody knew whither. His parents having noticed his absence a short time afterwards instituted a search of their premises, which are situated within the cemetery, but could not find him. His father finding that he had not returned up to a late hour, made search in the town and communicated with the police, but no tidings could be obtained. All day Sunday the father with several friends and the police carried their search into the towns and villages near, but in vain. On returning from their fruitless mission shortly after dark on Sunday evening, P.C. Cavill suggested that a search should be made in the cemetery, including both chapels. The distracted father replied that every place had been searched, but the Dissenters' Chapel, and it was no use to go there as the door was locked, and there was the key on the dresser, where it had been since Friday night. However, at the request of the constable, FEWINGS caught up the key and went to the chapel and before Cavill could obtain a light he heard a loud cry, and on hurrying to the spot the boy was seen suspended by the neck by a sash-line fastened to the top staple bolt behind the chapel door, dead and cold, with a stool lying on the floor, evidently kicked from under him. Cavill immediately cut down the body and carried it to the house. the most remarkable part of the story is the singularly ingenious and deliberate manner in which the wretched boy must have committed the act. After parting from his little brother, he must have gone into the house to possess himself of the key, and having unlocked the chapel door, replaced it where it was usually kept to avoid suspicion. He must then have procured a ladder from an open grave, and, having taken a sash-line from one of the chapel windows, returned the ladder to the grave and then come back to complete the fatal deed. - The Jury unanimously recorded a verdict of Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind, with an addendum fully exonerating the parents from any blame in the matter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 January 1865
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - J. Edmonds, Esq., Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the No Place Inn, on the body of ALBERT HENRY DOMMETT, aged three months. The deceased was a delicate child, and went to bed with his mother on Tuesday, the 24th instant, at 4 North-road. At three in the morning the child was all right, but between eight and nine it was found to be dead. An Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 January 1865
BRIXHAM - Suicide At Brixham. - An Inquest was held at the Burton Inn, Brixham, on Saturday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, relative to the death of SAMUEL BOICE, a labourer, who committed suicide the day previous by cutting his throat. Several witnesses were examined, but nothing of importance was elicited beyond the facts already published. The Jury returned as their verdict, "That the deceased destroyed himself by cutting his throat whilst of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 January 1865
EXETER - Sudden Death In Exeter. - MR JOHN SOUTHCOTT, a builder, of Lower Southernhay, Exeter, who had formerly kept the Moreton Inn, St. Thomas, and was 71 years of age, died suddenly on Saturday night, about 10 o'clock. Deceased had been out collecting his rents during the day, and had retired to bed. A verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God" was returned at the Inquest held yesterday afternoon before the City Coroner.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 February 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Through Scalding. - Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at a house near Bladderley-lane, Milehouse, on the body of MARGARET ANN MORRISH, aged three and a half years. It appeared that on Saturday week the deceased was standing upon a chair near the fire, and fell, striking a kettle containing boiling water which was upon one of the hobs. The right arm of the child was severely scalded by some of the boiling water thus upset. Medical attendance was not obtained at once; but ultimately Mr Swain, of Stoke, saw the deceased, although not before Thursday last. The child died on Tuesday morning. Verdict, - "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Mine Accident Near Tavistock. - On Monday afternoon a miner named JOHN STEPHENS, employed at the Wackham and Poldice Mines, about two miles from Tavistock, was killed by falling from a ladder in the shaft. He and his comrade were nailing a plank in the shaft, and were standing on the ladder about two fathoms below the 26 fathom level. Instead of placing one hand around the ladder and nailing with the other, it is supposed that he merely trusted to his feet on the ladder without taking any other precaution from falling. His feet slipped and he fell to the 38 fathom level, a distance of 10 fathoms. He did not speak after he was taken up and died in a few minutes. He was subsequently taken to his home at Tavistock, where an Inquest was yesterday held before A. B. Bone, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Captain Lean, manager of the mines, attended the Inquest, and stated that there was a good footway in the shaft, which was in first-rate condition, so that to the poor fellow's own carelessness alone is to be attributed the accident, and his death has been the penalty. The Jury kindly gave their fees to the widow and entered into a subscription for her.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 February 1865
EXETER - Infant Mortality. - At Exeter yesterday afternoon, Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest concerning the death of the illegitimate infant child of ELIZA QUAINTANCE, a poor girl not seventeen years of age, who was confined six weeks ago of a male child, who had been subject to convulsions from its birth, and died of them, according to the medical evidence, during Tuesday night. The unhappy mother had left her offspring daily with her aunt while she went out to work. Both her parents are dead: her father died in Derbyshire, and the girl was removed thence by the parish authorities to Exeter Workhouse. The Coroner feelingly cautioned the girl as to her future conduct.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 February 1865
TEIGNMOUTH - The Singular Accident Near Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Teignmouth, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOS. COUSENS, the unfortunate man who met with his death in such a singular manner while working on the South Devon Railway on Saturday last, the particulars being as follows:- On Saturday last Mr Philip Cann, timekeeper and clerk for Mr Blinkhorne, and employed upon the works on the South Devon Railway between Newton and Teignmouth, went to Newton by the 1.52 train to get some horse-shoe nails, and also some fuse. Having procured these articles, he left Newton by the 4.39 up-express, another timekeeper (James Pinwell) going with him. Mr Parsons, a solicitor's articled clerk, was the only other person in the compartment. On nearing the works Pinwell said, "We may as well pitch out these parcels when we get to the office; it will save us the trouble of carrying them." The train was then going at the rate of from 25 to 35 miles an hour, and while it was passing the works near Shaldon Bridge, Cann and Pinwell both stood up, the latter taking the parcel of nails (which weighed 18lbs.) in both hands, and the former that of fuse. On coming abreast of a sand-heap near the gas-house they both threw their parcels out, and Pinwell then said, "One of our parcels has knocked down a man (deceased), but I don't know who it is. I am afraid it has broken his leg, for I think it struck him on the calf." Deceased had crossed the line in company with a man named George Baker to get out of the way of the train. He was looking at the water when the parcels were thrown, and that containing nails being carried by the velocity communicated to it by the train 10 feet before it reached the deceased. It struck him in the right side, and he immediately fell to the ground. He was assisted to get to Teignmouth, and at nine that evening was visited by Mr Richard Bealy Sullock, surgeon, who examined him, but could find no exterior marks of a blow. Mr Pearse, the stationmaster of Teignmouth Station, produced the bye-laws of the company at the Inquest, but there was none prohibiting the throwing of any article from the window of a carriage in motion. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It is to be hoped that measures will be taken to prevent further resort to what has thus fatally proved to be a most dangerous practice.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 February 1865
EXETER - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday at the Globe Inn, Newtown, Exeter, before Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, on the body of CHARLES GOVER ROBERTS, aged 10 months, the infant son of MR JAMES ROBERTS, of John-street, Newtown, who died on Saturday afternoon in the arms of his nurse. Mr Perkins, the family medical attendant, stated that the child died from spasm of the glottis. A verdict was returned accordingly

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 February 1865
EXETER - A little child, the infant son of MR FRANK TURNER, of Princess-road, Exeter, has been choked by a small piece of bacon, which had been given it to suck by its father while he was at breakfast. A few minutes afterwards the mother went to the child, which was lying on the bed, and found it black in the face. Medical aid was called in, but it was then too late. An Inquest had been held, and a verdict to the above effect returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 February 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - Child Killed By Being Ridden Over In Stonehouse. Inquest Adjourned. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., jun., Deputy Coroner, on the body of SUSAN MARTIN, a little girl 10 years of age, whose death was caused by her having been run over by a dray, supposed to belong to Messrs. Shepheard and Hambly, ale merchants, Union-street, Plymouth. Mr T. C. Brian attended on behalf of John Pinney, supposed to be the driver of the dray. - Stephen Toope stated that on Thursday evening he was passing through Union-street, Stonehouse. His attention was attracted by hearing a noise, and on looking round he saw a waggon driven at a very fast pace. In the road a child (deceased) was lying. He ran forward and picked up the child, who appeared to be very much injured. He called out as loudly as he could to the man who was driving the waggon to stop, but he did not take any notice, and drove on as fast as he could. he then again called out to him, "Stop the waggon, for you have killed the child;" but still the man did not stop. He, with assistance, carried deceased into the shop of Mr Martin, chemist, Union-street. She was sensible, and told him her name and residence, and also said "I have lost my shoe." When he called out to the driver of the cart to stop he called out sufficiently loud for anyone to hear. He was not more than 20 yards distant from the waggon when he first called to the driver, who, he was quite satisfied, must have heard him. - Matilda Morrison saw the deceased crossing the road, when she was knocked down by a brewer's dray, drawn by one horse, the wheels passing over her body. The driver of the cart did not call out to the child to get out of the way. She could not tell who the man was. He was dressed in a white smock, and had a large apron in front of him. The horse was dark brown, and the body of the cart was painted dark blue. - Quintin Hext, a cabman, gave corroborative evidence, and added that he saw the face of the driver and should know him if he were to see him. Pinney, who was present, was confronted with witness, who said he was not the man. The driver was a much taller, slighter man, and had not so much whiskers as Pinney. - Pinney, after having been cautioned by the Coroner, was then examined. He said he went with the dray to Devonport on Thursday evening and left the stores at five o'clock. He stopped at the Raglan Barracks and delivered some beer at the canteen. He also went to the Country House Inn, Cumberland-street, a beer-shop in Dock-wall-street, a beer-shop in James-street, and to the house of Mr Lampen in James-street-ope East, delivering beer at each place. When he left the house of Mr Lampen it was half-past six. He drove straight to the stores in Union-street and arrived there at about ten minutes to seven. He drove through Union-street, but never heard anyone calling to him. He knew nothing of the accident until after his arrival at the stores. The horse which he drove was a dark brown one. The wheels of the cart were painted red and the body of the cart dark blue. Mr Shepherd had four drays, and all of them were alike, but the dray he drove was the only one that went to Devonport and Stonehouse that night. - At this stage of the proceedings, Pinney, by the advice of his solicitor declined to answer any more questions. The Coroner said he did not think the evidence that had been adduced had in any way pointed out the man who drove the cart over the body of deceased, but at the same time it contained a curious combination of circumstances. He thought any verdict that might be then found would be both indefinite and unsatisfactory; and he therefore deemed it advisable to adjourn the Inquiry. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Friday, the 24th inst., instructions being given to Pinney to attend.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 February 1865
KINGSTEIGNTON - The Fatal Clay Mine Accident At Kingsteignton. - An Inquest was held at Kingsteignton, on Saturday by Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of THOMAS WARREN, aged 52 years, who died on Thursday last from injuries received at the late accident at the clay mine, at Prestow, near Kingsteignton, belonging to Messrs. Watts, Blake, Bearne, and others. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The man, Joslin, who was also injured at the same time, lies in a very precarious state.

EXETER - Death From Neglect To Vaccinate. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Windsor Castle Inn, Exeter, before Mr H. W. Hooper, city Coroner, on the body of a child, aged six months, named THOMAS J. FLOUD, whose parents reside at Hill's-court. The child, who had always been delicate from its birth, was taken ill of the small-pox about ten days since, and as he was doing well, the mother neglected to send for medical aid. On Friday morning a young woman named Sarah Northam, who lives in the same house, was requested to look at the child, supposed to be asleep in the cot, and it was found to be dead. The mother said she had not had the child vaccinated owing to its delicate health. The Coroner censured the parents for their conduct, and regretted that it was not in his power to punish them. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 February 1865
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death in Plymouth. - J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at the Dock Hotel, Millbay, on view of the body of JOHN TRELOAR. The deceased was a journeyman soap boiler, in the employ of the Millbay Soap and Alkali Works company (limited). Although 64 years of age, his state of health was generally good. On the previous morning the deceased went to his work apparently well, but suddenly became faint, and at his wish some water was given him, and his right temple was bathed. Almost immediately the deceased became speechless, and he was at once carried to his home, 7 Bounds-place, where he died about ten minutes afterwards. The Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Hewlett was chosen Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased had died by the Visitation of God.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 February 1865
PLYMOUTH - Death From An Explosion Of Gas In An Oven. - An Inquest was held last evening, at the Plymouth Guildhall, before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, concerning the death of THOMAS NOBLE, a journeyman baker, in the employ of Mr Matthews, confectioner, High-street. On Saturday afternoon, about four o'clock, deceased came into the bake-house, on the ground floor, and asked William Ireland, also in the employ of Mr Matthews, who had just finished work, if he could bake some cake in the oven. Ireland said he could, and left the bake-house. Deceased put the cake into the oven and resumed his work upstairs. John Osborne saw the deceased go downstairs with a piece of lighted paper in his hand, and almost immediately afterwards heard an explosion. He went into the bake-house and saw the deceased, who was very much burnt. Nearly all his hair was burnt off and his right arm, shoulder and back were severely burnt. Some oil was applied to the burns, and deceased was conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where he died on Sunday morning. It is supposed that deceased when he put the cake into the oven left the gas turned on. On opening the oven to see if the cake was done the piece of lighted paper which he held in his hand caused an immediate explosion and inflicted the injuries from which he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr J. Edmonds, and a Jury assembled at the Black Lion Inn, Exeter-street, yesterday, concerning the death of WILLIAM JAMES JONES, the infant son of a marine of H.M.S. Indus. On Sunday morning, at half-past one, the mother and the child went to bed and previous to her going to sleep she suckled the deceased. She slept until half-past eight that morning, and on awaking she discovered that deceased was lying dead in her arms. There were no marks of violence on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 February 1865
ASHBURTON - Death By A Fall At Ashburton. - On Tuesday a Coroner's Inquest was held at Ashburton before F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of W. JOINT, mason, 74 years, who died the previous day from the effects of a fall. Deceased had fetched some coal, which was distributed to the poor at a reduced rate, and on his way through Browse's Court fell. He was taken to his lodgings, and appeared to be shaken very much, and subsequently died, in spite of medical assistance. A verdict in accordance with these facts was returned.

HENNOCK - Fatal Accident At Chudleigh Knighton. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon, at Chudleigh Knighton, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM HEATH, a labourer, aged about 40 years, who was found in the river Teign on Monday evening. The deceased, on Monday, had attended the sale at [?] Mills, and on returning home in the evening, in crossing a small bridge over the Teign, fell into the water, of a depth of about ten feet. A man named Steer, who had been at a short distance from the deceased, at the hearing of a splash proceeded to the spot, and saw deceased in about eighteen inches of water. - Help having been procured, the deceased was conveyed home at Bradley Ford, where he died shortly after. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased leaves a wife and seven children.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 February 1865
WOODBURY - The Death From Assault At Woodbury. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at Barratt's Globe Inn, Woodbury, before S. Cox, Esq., Coroner for the District, and a Jury of whom Mr White was chosen Foreman, to Inquire into the death of WM. MOORE, who was murdered on Thursday last by Wm. Tucker. Mr Floud, of Exeter, appeared to watch the case on behalf of the prisoner. - Wm. Henry Hutchings said: I am a wheelwright living at Woodbury, and have known the deceased for 20 years. He lived at East Budleigh, and had a horse and cart for drawing timber, by which means he procured his livelihood. I believe the deceased was about 34 years of age. I have known the prisoner, Wm. Tucker, about 15 years. he is a coal dealer living at Woodbury. On Thursday last, about half-past two in the afternoon, I was at the house of Mr Foster, who lives directly opposite to me, and I was called by my apprentice, who said I was wanted. I went over to my shop and saw the deceased there, who said he had come to know about the boy's clothes. I had a conversation with him, and went into my back-yard, which adjoins the prisoner's yard. Deceased then called Mr Tucker, who was in his coal shed shovelling coals, and he replied, "What do you want?" Deceased said "I want to speak to you." Tucker again said, "What do you want?" and deceased said, "I wish you would not harbour my boy in your house." Prisoner said, "I will;" on which deceased said, "I won't have my boy go to your house." Prisoner said, "He shall come, and I won't order him out." MOORE said, "I want to know about the clothes you have of my boy's". Prisoner said, "I have not got any clothes of your boy's". I said to Tucker, "You have some of the boy's clothes in your possession, unless you have destroyed them." I called deceased's son to me, and said, "BILL, here are your father, Tucker and I. Speak the truth, and say what you have done with the clothes, if you have or have not given them to Tucker." The boy replied, "I gived it to him." Tucker then came towards me with the shovel in his hand pointing to me, and said "It's that little b....'s rising." I said, "It is not," and the prisoner then held the shovel over the wall, and said, "You little b....., I will cleave your skull in." The shovel was held in a threatening manner, and I believed that he would have struck me. Tucker appeared very angry. I stepped back, and deceased said to Tucker, "If I were sure you were slocking clothes from my boy, I would slock your head for you," and whilst saying so deceased went towards the wall. Angry words passed from the deceased to the prisoner as deceased was going towards the wall. MOORE got over the all into Tucker's yard, and as he was getting over the wall prisoner came towards the deceased with the same shovel as he threatened to strike me with. There is a saw pit outside the wall in the prisoner's premises. In getting over the wall the deceased had to lay his body on the wall, and before he had time to get from under the saw pit and stand upright, the prisoner struck him a blow with the shovel with all his might. The blow was struck with the iron part of the shovel. I cannot say the blow was struck with the shovel now produced; it was with one like it. I did not notice that the shovel was broken. I don't remember either of them speaking when the blow was struck. As soon as deceased was struck he staggered. Whilst he was staggering Tucker struck him again. The accused appeared to swing the shovel with all his might. I cannot say whether the second bow fell upon the head of the deceased. I don't remember that anything was spoke after the second blow. Tucker struck the deceased a third violent blow with the shovel on the left side of the head. I heard the blows distinctly. Deceased was on the ground, and someone called for assistance. After the third blow I was going towards the wall to assist the deceased, but my wife caught me by the leg. Tucker seeing me endeavour to get over the all flew towards me, and, swinging the shovel at me, said, "You little b...., I will kill you too." I made no answer, but ran for the police. The deceased's son, who is my apprentice, was in the yard at the time the blows were struck; but I cannot tell whether Bawden, my other apprentice was present. Benjamin West and John Ekers were on the other side of the yard and witnessed the blows. On my return with P.C. Watts deceased was in my house. Dr Brent was sent for, and came. He directed that the deceased should be taken to his father's house - about 100 yards from my house. Deceased died the same night. - Cross-examined by Mr Floud: Tucker's yard is lower than mine. I don't think MOORE pulled out any of the bricks from the wall, but I did when my wife was pulling me back. When the deceased threatened to slock Tucker's head he was standing about six feet from the wall. I was not laughing whilst deceased and prisoner were quarrelling. I did not, beyond what I have said, use any irritating words to the prisoner. Deceased did not jeer at all. I can't say if Bawden went from my shop into Tucker's yard and threatened MOORE. I heard no one say "I will kill the b......" - John Ekers, carpenter, residing at Woodbury, who had known deceased and prisoner 20 years, described the commencement of the conversation much as previously stated, and added - I heard deceased say something about "slocking" his (Tucker's) head. The next I saw of MOORE was when he was standing in Tucker's yard and then I saw Tucker strike the deceased one blow with the shovel on the head. It was a violent bow, and inflicted with the flat part of the shovel. That was the only blow I saw. Deceased immediately fell towards Tucker on his face and hands. The deceased had no weapon of any description in his hand. After deceased was down Tucker went away immediately. I don't recollect seeing Hutchings come over the wall, or having heard the prisoner threaten Hutchings that he would kill him. After the last blow was struck deceased lay on the ground about a minute and a half. I then jumped over the wall and lifted him up, and with his son's help took him into Hutchings' house. Deceased knew me, but could not speak. There was a wound on the left temple about 1 ½ inches long, and two others on the head further to the crown. There was a little blood flowing from the wound. Deceased could walk with our help. - By a Juror: I can't say if the deceased had his hat on when the blow was struck. One of the wounds looked like a bruise, but the other appeared to be a cut. The head was not swollen. I did not see the prisoner attempt to strike Hutchings when he pointed at him. I was not in a position to see if it occurred. Tucker was on higher ground than deceased. - By Mr Floud: Deceased had no hat on when I picked him up. After deceased fell, he did not move until I picked him up. Tucker, when MOORE fell, went towards the "drangway" where the door of his house is situated. - WM. MOORE: I am the son of the deceased. My age is 15. I gave Mrs Tucker, a week or two ago, two pairs of trousers, a coat and a smock. The prisoner was present. Mrs Tucker afterwards gave me 4d. for them. I don't think Tucker knew she gave me the money. Tucker asked if the clothes were mine, and I said "Yes." On Thursday last my father came and saw me. My master sent for me into the yard. My father and Mrs Hutchings were there. Tucker was in his yard and my father said "Tucker, I want to speak to you, please." Tucker replied "What is it." My father said "What are you encouraging my boy to slock away his clothes for." I don't remember what Tucker said, but my father said "If you continue it I will put a stop to it." Tucker replied, " He shall come when he likes, I won't order him out." My father said "If I were sure you slocked away the clothes of my boy's I would slock your head for you." I don't know if Tucker replied to that. My father went over the wall and Tucker said "If you come in here I will serve you the same as I would serve that shuffling little b....., " meaning Hutchings. When father was just over the wall, Tucker struck him with a shovel; he struck him before he was quite upright. I saw the blow aimed, and my father staggered. Tucker immediately struck a second and third blow on the head. The latter blow felled my father to the ground. He fell on his hands and face. My master went to get over the wall, and the prisoner said "now you little b....., I will serve you the same." I don't recollect Tucker saying to master "'l'll kill you too." My mistress pulled my master back by the leg. Tucker went towards the drangway. I went over the wall and Mr Ekers helped me to take father into master's house. - By a Juror: My father had his hat on when he was going over the wall; but don't know if he had it on when he was struck. - Cross-examined by Mr Floud: My father staggered towards the middle of the yard after the first blow, which was struck close to the wall, and after the third blow my father fell on his face and hands. Tucker then turned round and said to my master "Now, you little b....., I will serve you the same." He went to the wall and aimed a blow at my master, but my mistress pulled master back, and he avoided the blow. - Ann Hutchings, wife of Wm. Henry Hutchings, corroborated the evidence given by her husband, Ekers, and the boy MOORE. After MOORE'S threatening to slock Tucker's head off something was said about one of them putting the other in the brook. When Tucker threatened to crack her husband's skull, she said, "You would have done that before now Tucker, as you have threatened, if it was not for the law." Witness then proceeded to describe the manner in which Tucker struck two of the blows, which she said were very severe and heavy ones. When her husband went towards MOORE to assist him, the prisoner said, "You little b.... I will serve you the same." - Dr Robert Brent, M.D., said he was called on Thursday, about a quarter to three, to William Hutchings's house to see the deceased. He was sitting on a chair leaning forward, supported by John Ekers. MOORE'S head was on his breast. He was moaning, and in an unconscious and depressed state. Witness examined him, and found a small wound on the front of the left temple about one inch in length. Further back he found a mass of contusions on the scalp. There was a fracture of the bone of the skull on the left side. The man's pulse was very low, and laboured paralysis had set in on the left side, and there was a tendency to vomit. He was only conscious when aroused. At his request a messenger went to the deceased's father's house, who said he would accommodate him with a bed. Witness saw him after he was in bed, but he continued to get worse; at half-past five, when witness last saw him alive, he was sinking fast, and witness left him in charge of Mr Haynes; about 7 o'clock he died. Witness had that day made a post-mortem examination, and he found as he had anticipated, that there was a transverse fracture from the upper portion of the skull down to the left ear. On removing the skull he found 12 ounces of blood. The pressure upon the brain had been so much that it had been pushed aside. The brain itself, and the membranes were not injured. The injury received was sufficient to cause death. - Sergeant J. Ryall proved giving directions for the prisoner's apprehension, and subsequently found two shovels in the prisoner's coal yard. He found bricks down from the wall between Hutchings's and Tucker's yard. Witness took the shovels to prisoner's cell and said, "Wm. Tucker, I charge you with the Wilful Murder of MOORE this afternoon with one of these shovels." Prisoner replied "It's a bad job." Witness cautioned him and prisoner then said, "The man came over the wall and threatened to twist my neck and throw me over the wall. I was in the yard; I had the shovel in my hand, and I gave him a jab with it." - The Coroner, in summing up, said the present case was a very painful one, and the Jury would have a very painful duty to perform for it appeared clear to him they must bring in a verdict against Tucker. The question would then arise whether that verdict should be one of manslaughter or murder. Before he directed their attention to any of the recorded cases on the point, it would be better that he should read over the evidence of the witnesses, and he would ask the Jury while he was doing so to remember the points which they would have to determine. Of course it was not for him to dictate to them what verdict they should return, and it would if they saw fit be open to them not to find an incriminating verdict, but in the face of the evidence he did not see how they could see their way to such a course. The Coroner in commenting on the evidence, said that Tucker was at work when he was called to at the beginning of this affair, and this, he thought, was a circumstance in his favour. The question which led to the dispute about the son's clothes appeared to be a very reasonable one, and Tucker was certainly guilty of telling a story when he replied that he had not had the clothes. Tucker it was shown had the shovel in his hand, and the fact that he had been using his shovel, and did not go to fetch it was also a circumstance in his favour, and it was also a point for their consideration that deceased had notice not to go over the wall. The deceased, no matter what had been said, had no right to enter Tucker's yard, and his doing so was a trespass. Deceased was committing an unlawful act, and Tucker would be right in using a certain amount of resistance to keep the deceased from going into his premises. But the Jury must also bear in mind that the blows were not struck while the deceased was getting over the wall, but after he was in the prisoner's yard. After going through the evidence, the Coroner called the attention of the Jury to the difference between the crime of murder and manslaughter. He read the ruling laid down in Archbold, where it was held that homicide would not resolve itself into manslaughter unless there were shown to be an absence of malice or premeditation, or a great amount of provocation; and in the latter case, the provocation must bear a reasonable proportion to the amount of violence used. If the Jury found that the violence used did not bear this reasonable proportion - and in judging of this they must take into consideration the weapon used - they would find a verdict of wilful murder; but if, on the other hand, there was such reasonable proportion, it would resolve itself into a case of manslaughter. - The Jury retired, and after about ten minutes' deliberation returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against William Tucker." - The Coroner said the Jury had taken a merciful view of the case. - Mr Floud applied for bail for the prisoner, but the Coroner replied, "Certainly not." - The warrant for the committal of the prisoner for Manslaughter was made out and handed to Sergeant Ryall.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 February 1865
TORQUAY - The Child Murder At Torquay. - The Inquest was resumed yesterday as to the death of THOMAS EDWIN GIBSON HARRIS, an infant supposed to be nearly four months old, which was found on the 15th inst. in the turnpike-road near Torquay. the evidence at the previous examination has been already given. MARY HARRIS, the mother of the child, and Charlotte Winsor, the nurse with whom it was put out, were in custody. - The evidence of Charlotte Pratt, the little grand-daughter of the prisoner Winsor, set forth that some night she could not recollect, but it was after the disappearance of the baby, she and her grandmother took a walk towards Torquay. Winsor had a carpet-bag. After passing the turnpike-gate she told the little girl to stop, and then went on a little way, and close to the hedge. Afterwards she came back, and they both went into the town. It was subsequently shown that this identical spot was where the body had been found. The Jury, after a prolonged Enquiry, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against both HARRIS and Winsor.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 March 1865
PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Suicide At Compton. - An Inquest concerning the death of GEORGE MITCHELL was held on Monday, at Compton, before Mr Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, 24 in number, Mr W. Luscombe, magistrate, being Foreman. - James Rendell, coachman to Mr Holland Coham, of "The Tower", Compton, said that at a quarter to four on Saturday afternoon he was sent by one of Mr Coham's family to look for the deceased, who was the gardener. He was wanted to show some ladies round the greenhouse. The witness, not seeing deceased in the kitchen garden, called out "MITCHELL," but receiving no reply went to the greenhouse, and there found the deceased lying on the stone walk on his back. His coat was burning, his hat off and lying a short distance away. A single-barrelled percussion gun was near him. He was alive, but did not speak. Witness left the deceased in the care of another servant of Mr Coham's and went into Plymouth for medical assistance. Some panes of glass in the skylight of the greenhouse had been broken. The deceased was a sober, reserved man. He occasionally fired the gun at birds. - George Hockridge, servant to Mr Coham, was left by the last witness in charge of the deceased in the greenhouse. He found him in a pool of blood. The gun was between his legs, the butt end on the gravel, and the ramrod on his right hand side. It was understood that the deceased was "paying his respects" to the cook, Sarah Hammett. A piece of paper had been found near the deceased which contained the following words - "Fair Well Sarah But Lee Was So Willing As Mee." Had heard that the deceased had received a valentine, which had very much annoyed him, as he believed that it came from one of the servants. This fact induced witness to believe the deceased to be of weak intellect. - Mary Ann Lee, housemaid, said she had never been too friendly with the deceased, nor given any occasion for the use of her name by him as previously stated. He had not seemed comfortable since he received the valentine. - Mary Ann Hockridge stated that the deceased lodged with her, and had done so for eight months. He was a very reserved man at all times, but there was a little difference in him for the last few days. He told witness last week that he had not slept well for a month. - Sarah Hammett, cook at "The Tower", was engaged to be married to the deceased; had never quarrelled with him; could not explain the words on the paper. - The Coroner said he wished to adjourn the Inquest in order that the relatives of the deceased man might be present, as he was afraid that with the present evidence only before them, the Jury had no alternative but to return a verdict of felo de se. - The Jury, however, having expressed a desire to proceed with the Inquest, the Deputy Coroner said that there would be two pointes for their careful consideration; one was whether the deceased shot himself, or whether his death was caused by accident. Assuming that he shot himself, was the deceased at the time in a right state of mind, or was he temporarily insane? He thought that there was nothing like sufficient evidence to decide on that last point, but of course the verdict must be that of the Jury not of the Coroner. - The Court was then cleared, and after half-an-hour's deliberation on the part of the Jury, it was re-opened, when the Foreman stated that 19 out of the 24 Jurymen had agreed to a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." - The Deputy Coroner: Then am I to understand, gentlemen, that your verdict is - "That the deceased, GEORGE MITCHELL, died on the 25th of February, at the parish of Compton Gifford, from a wound produced by his shooting himself with a gun while in a state of Temporary Insanity." - The Foreman: Yes. - The Deputy Coroner: Then, gentlemen, I must tell you, that though I take your verdict, I do not concur in it, as I am of opinion that there is not sufficient evidence to show that the deceased was not at the time of a sound mind.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 March 1865
BIDEFORD - Suffocation At A Lime Kiln. - At Bideford last evening an Inquest was held concerning the death of THOMAS HARVEY, a labourer of North Hill, Launceston, who while under the influence of drink on Sunday lay down by the lime kiln below the Bideford Railway Station, and being suffocated with the fumes given off. slept the sleep of death.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 March 1865
CREDITON - The Late Suicide At Crediton. - A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" has been returned by a Coroner's Jury at Crediton in the case of MR WM. WOLLOCOTT, who committed suicide by lacerating his head and arms with a razor, as already reported. Mr Holman, surgeon, had attended the deceased professionally for the last eighteen months, and believed that he was not accountable for his actions. He was 40 years of age, and leaves a widow, but no family.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 March 1865
ILSINGTON - Suspicious Death At Ilsington. - An Inquiry was held last evening by Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, at the New Inn, in the parish of Ilsington, near Bovey Tracey, concerning the death of MR JOHN WILLS, aged 67 years, who was found dead in bed at the above inn, on Wednesday morning last. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased, who was in easy circumstances, resided with his daughter, Mrs Bearne, landlady of the inn. For several weeks past the deceased had kept his bed, and was seen alive the last time on Tuesday evening. The following morning his grandson, on taking in his breakfast, found his grandfather on the bed dead. Dr Haydon, of Bovey Tracey, was sent for, and on examining the deceased found a number of bruises and wounds on various parts of the body, which presented a most shocking sight. Mr Haydon, who had since made a post mortem examination, said the body appeared to be well nourished, and generally healthy, and he could not account for the deceased's death, as he could not discover any traces of disease in the body. Witness, in answer to the Coroner, said there were marks about the deceased's stomach which he could not account for. He could not undertake to say what was the cause of death. He had often made post mortem examinations, but never had seen such a case as that of the deceased's in his life. The deceased's kidney was in that state known as "Bright's Disease". In such cases circumstances might arise that would cause sudden death, but it was in extreme cases. - The Coroner said he was not satisfied with the case, and after the evidence of Mr Haydon the Jury could not say that the deceased had died from natural causes. He should therefore order that the contents of the deceased's stomach be forwarded to Professor Herapath, to be analysed, and should adjourn the Inquiry in the meantime. The Inquiry was accordingly adjourned until Thursday, the 6th day of April. Mr C. H. Monro, County magistrate, was present during the Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 March 1865
PLYMOUTH - Four Children Suffocated In Plymouth. - A Coroner's Inquest on the bodies of the four children who were suffocated on Saturday morning in a lodging-house in King-street West, Plymouth, was held on Saturday afternoon by Mr John Edmonds, Borough Coroner, at the Octagon Cellars Inn, Octagon-street. The particulars of the occurrence were given in a portion only of our impression of Saturday. - The Coroner in opening the proceedings, said that during twenty-five years' experience as Coroner he had witnessed many distressing sights; but he did not recollect one more distressing than that involved in the present case, where a father who had lost his wife, was now bereft of his whole family of four children at one fell swoop. The children were left by their father, who travelled from place to place to earn a livelihood, at a lodging-house in King-street, and mostly in the care of the eldest, CHARLOTTE, though it appeared a woman, a lodger in the house, attended to them occasionally, for she made their bed on Friday night, and left them apparently safe, with no fire or candle. All was quiet until about four the next morning, when the neighbourhood was alarmed by P.C. Shepheard, who saw smoke proceeding from the room where the children "had slept the sleep of death." He could not speak in too high terms of the policeman's exertions on that occasion. The four bodies were with great difficulty found by the policeman stretched out dead upon the bed in the room, and taken downstairs. The fire seemed to have originated in the cupboard of the room, and might have been occasioned by the eldest little maid getting out of bed for something to quiet the youngest, or from necessity, and in striking a match - for it did not appear there was any candle - dropped a spark, which fell upon some material that smouldered, and filled the room gradually with smoke, that at length stifled the little sleepers. - Mary McList, a married woman, was then called, and stated that she lodged at Solomon's lodgings, 129 King-street West. She had seen the father of the children in the house, and believed he was an itinerant seller of fruits and sweetmeats. She heard he went away on Saturday. CHARLOTTE KEYNES was about 12 years of age, WILLIAM about 10 years, BESSIE 4 ½ years, and EMMA, the youngest, about one year and eight months. The mother of the children was dead. Witness made their bed on the previous night for them, the room being upstairs. She saw three of them in bed, and CHARLOTTE, the eldest, locked the door when witness came out of the room, where at that time there was neither fire nor lights. This was just before nine o'clock, and soon after witness went to bed, directly under the room where the children were sleeping. Witness did not hear any noise in the night. P.C. Shepheard woke her shortly after four o'clock that morning. She and her two children got out of the window. There was much smoke in her room. - By the Foreman: Did not know whether a frying pan or the like was used by the children, but believed there was not. The father was very kind and attentive to his children. - William Solomon, coke dealer, who keeps the house where the children were killed, stated that it was a common lodging house. The greatest part of the furniture was his own, but he was not insured against fire. He had known the father of the children for three or four months. He saw two of the children in the evening, and believed they had no fire. In the corner of the room where the children were sleeping was the coal hole. He believed that 22 persons slept in his house on that night. He went to bed between 10 and 11 o'clock, and looked out at the back door at that time, but saw no fire nor light, nor smelt fire. He did not hear any disturbance in the night, but was awoke by P.C. Shepheard. The place was then full of smoke. He assisted the policeman in breaking into the children's room. He saw the fire at once, and threw a bucket of water on it. - By the Foreman: No one was wholly left in charge of the children. - The Coroner: the probability is that the eldest went to get something for the youngest, and dropped a spark, which must have ignited some materials that smouldered away with a great smoke. - P.C. Shepheard, who was on duty in King-street West on Friday night, stated that shortly after four o'clock on Saturday morning his attention was attracted to Solomon's lodging-house by the smell of fire and of smoke. Previously to that he had passed several times, but neither saw nor smelt anything of fire. He proceeded to the back of the premises, but could not get to the spot, and returned to the front of the house, knocking at several doors, when someone on the opposite side of the street cried out, "Policeman, I think the fire is at Solomon's house, I see smoke." On getting into the back court witness saw where the fire was. He knocked at the two doors inside, but could get no answer, and rushed upstairs alone. Mr Solomon came up shortly after, and said there were children in the room. The room was full of smoke, no candle would burn in it, and no one could stop there. After many attempts witness succeeded in finding the bedpost, and discovered the children in the bed. Witness shouted as well as he could, "I have the children," and one by one handed the bodies out to someone, but could not see for the smoke. He had frequently to get out into the fresh air, and was nearly overcome once or twice. Witness soon afterwards went downstairs, and fetched Dr Pearce, who pronounced the children dead. He believed the fire originated in the cupboard at the corner of the room. It was his opinion the children were stifled by the smoke while asleep. - The Coroner smoke very highly of the conduct of the policeman, and intimated that he should bring Shepheard's commendable exertions in the affair under the notice of the Mayor. The Jury also unanimously expressed a wish that such steps should be taken. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the children were suffocated by smoke occasioned by a fire in a cupboard in their room while they were asleep, but there was no evidence to show the origin or nature of the fire." - The father of the children had been sent for, but did not arrive in time to be present at the Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 March 1865
STOKE FLEMING - Suicide Of A Clergyman At Stoke Fleming. - An Inquest was held at Hilfield House, Stokefleming, on Saturday afternoon, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, concerning the death of the REV. A. W. HOBSON, who committed suicide on Thursday by shooting himself. - Ann Ferris, who lived as servant with deceased, said that on Thursday morning about half-past 9 o'clock, MRS HOBSON left home, and about an hour afterwards witness saw deceased in his bedroom dressed. He took breakfast, and told her not to come to him until he rung. He did not then appear excited. At 11 o'clock witness heard a noise, apparently in the part of the house where deceased's bedroom was, like the report of a pistol. About 12 o'clock she went up and knocked at the door, but received no answer. The door was not locked. There was no one in the house but herself. About three o'clock she again went, knocked, and opened the door. Not seeing deceased, she felt alarmed, and called assistance. A Mrs Allen came, and then witness opened the dressing-room door and saw deceased lying on the floor on his right side. - This evidence was corroborated by Mrs Mary Ann Allen, who also said she found in deceased's right hand a pistol, which appeared to have been recently discharged. - Mr S. N. Elliott, surgeon, of Dartmouth, said he had known deceased for about nine months, and had attended him professionally. He was called to see him on Thursday evening, and found him quite dead. There was a pistol wound on the right temple sufficient to cause death. He considered that the wound was inflicted by deceased himself. Deceased had been in a desponding state ever since he had known him, and at times his mind was affected. Witness's belief was that deceased destroyed himself while in an Unsound state of mind. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Friday 31 March 1865
ST MARYCHURCH - An Inquest was held before Mr F. B. Cuming, at the Palk Arms Inn, Mary Church, yesterday, on the body of a sawyer named WILLIAM TARR. It appeared that on Monday night he came home drunk at 12 o'clock and made a noise in the stairs. As this was not unusual no notice was taken, but at three o'clock in the morning a man living in the house came downstairs and found the man with his head against the door and his feet on the stairs, and quite dead. The supposition was that he had fallen downstairs. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

TORQUAY - An Inquest has also been held on the body of a child named HARRIS, aged five years, a cripple, who was rode over by a timber waggon and terribly injured. The child was taken to the Infirmary, and died on Friday. It was stated that the mishap was purely Accidental.

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 April 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Poison At Barnstaple. - At Barnstaple, on Wednesday, an Inquest was held at Lock's Railway Hotel, before Mr Bencraft, coroner, as to the death of PERCY VICTOR HILL. The deceased, who was about five weeks old, was the son of MR W. HILL, hairdresser, High-street. On Saturday night last the child appeared to be unwell, and his mother requested the nurse, Mrs Elizabeth Parkin, to give him some "Infants' Cordial." By mistake, a bottle containing laudanum, and which was labelled "Poison," was taken from the mantelpiece and some of its contents administered to the child. As soon as the error was discovered various remedies were applied, but the child died on the following day. The laundanum was used by Mrs Hill for the purpose of being applied to her gums when they ached. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had been Accidentally Poisoned; and a rider was appended to the effect that Mrs Parkin and the mother of the child had been guilty of carelessness; the former in administering a potion from a bottle the contents of which she had not made herself acquainted with; and the latter for causing to be left in so exposed a place a bottle containing poison.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 April 1865
HARBERTON - Suicide At Harberton. - EDWARD PARNELL, aged 53, who had suffered from diseased kidneys and great mental depression for the past six months, committed suicide on Friday at his house at Harberton by taking laudanum. At the Coroner's Inquest held on Saturday, Mr Owen, surgeon, gave evidence which led the Jury to return a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Inquest On An Exhumed Body At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Townsend Inn, Mutley, by A. B. Bone, Esq., to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MARGARET SNELL, alias MARGARET RICHARDSON, who was removed from the Barley House Home to the Plymouth Workhouse in a cab, and died on the 20th March, 33 hours after her admission. The Jury consisted of Mr S. N. Usticke (Foreman), Messrs. R. Baskerville, T. Luke, Michael Frost, R. Bridgland, W. H. Lidstone, Sanders Stevens, J. A. Page, Octavius Phillpotts, W. H. Molesworth, W. Cripe, C. F. Burnard, and John Johns. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said that some circumstances had been reported to him which had induced him to think that he should best discharge his duty by holding an Inquest upon the body of the deceased young woman, MARGARET SNELL, otherwise MARGARET RICHARDSON, who it appeared died in the Plymouth Workhouse on the 20th of last month and was buried on the 22nd in the Plymouth Cemetery. On the 30th of that month, 10 days after the death, a report had been made to him, which, upon consideration, had induced him to hold the present Inquest. He confessed that he thought it was to be regretted that so much delay should have taken place between the death and the making of the report. He considered it would have been better if the Inquest had been held as soon after the death as possible, and within the jurisdiction of the borough, before the burial had taken place. The body was in the county of Devon, however, and within the tithing in which the Jurors resided. In speaking of the delay he did not wish to impute blame to anyone, but he certainly regretted it. They would have to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death and accompany him to the Plymouth Cemetery to view the body, which had been exhumed by his orders. - The Coroner and Jury then proceeded to the Cemetery and viewed the body. On the coffin being opened it was found that but little change had taken place in the state of the body, and the features were such as might have belonged to a refined and attractive person. - Mr J. Beer, of Devonport, watched the proceedings on behalf of the authorities of the Barley House Home, several gentlemen connected with which were present. Mr Matthews, clerk to the Plymouth guardians, attended on behalf of that body. - Thomas Tippett, a messenger to Wm. Clements, relieving officer, stated that on Saturday afternoon, March 18th, he went to a cab which was near the entrance to the relieving office, in Princess'-street, and when he opened the door he saw deceased, who was then alone, sitting and leaning towards the back of the cab. Witness asked her a few questions and shut the door of the cab and then communicated with the relieving-officer. She wore a striped frock and a light-coloured bonnet. - By Mr Matthews: He did not see any blankets or wrappers. He saw deceased's dress down to the feet; she wore boots or shoes, and looked exceedingly ill. - Martha Marks was called and stated that she was the person who came after the Court order; and, in reply to Mr Beer, said she was sure deceased had nothing on over the striped gown. - At this stage of the proceedings a Juror suggested that it would be better that no member of the Board of Guardians should be on the Jury; and Mr T. Luke, being a Guardian, at once, with the Coroner's permission, retired. - Mr e. Clements, relieving officer, stated that on Saturday afternoon, March 18th, he remembered Marks coming to him from the Barley House Home, and applying for an order for MARTHA SNELL to go into the house. Marks said the deceased was very ill, and that she believed she would not live until she reached the workhouse. Witness gave an order, but did not go down to the cab. - By Mr Beer: Marks gave the name of MARTHA SNELL. He was busy at the time. Marks was at the office but a very short time, and the other cases were set aside to attend to that of the deceased. - William Pool, porter at the Plymouth Workhouse, stated that on the afternoon of March 18th he received deceased at the door of the workhouse. Another woman and the cabman assisted deceased up the pathway. She appeared exceedingly ill, and he believed her to be in a dying state. He saw no outer wrappings over the striped gown. witness at once sent for Eliza Denness, who assisted the matron, and deceased was taken to the infirmary by Denness and two Workhouse men. The deceased remained in the lodge from ten minutes to a quarter of an hour. Denness put one of the house rugs round her. She shivered several times and gave her name as MARGARET RICHARDSON. - By Mr Beer: Marks did not remain. No conversation to his knowledge took place. He did not hear deceased say to Marks, "This cloak belongs to the Home." - By Mr Matthews: Could not swear whether deceased wore a cloak when coming up the path to the house. - By the Coroner: Deceased appeared very thinly clad, and he did not think she had many under clothes on. - Eliza Denness stated that she assisted the matron in the Plymouth Workhouse. On Saturday afternoon, 18th ult., about 4 o'clock, she went to the porter's lodge, and there saw deceased. No one was with her except Pool. She appeared thinly clad, especially as the weather was very cold, and in her opinion she was in a dying state. Witness wrapped a quilt around her, and she was removed at once to the hospital of the House. The nurse of the hospital was immediately in attendance, and the surgeon was at once sent for. Deceased had on a jacket (a body), two skirts, a change, a pair of white cotton stockings, a pair of very heavy broken boots, and a bonnet. One skirt was blue, the other a brown linsey wolsey. The jacket or body was made of stuff. Witness then identified the clothes. - Sarah Dustin, head nurse at the Plymouth Workhouse, stated that on the 18th March, about five o'clock, the deceased was brought to the sick ward in a chair by two men and three women. Denness was present at the time. Deceased appeared in a most exhausted state and as "ill as could be and alive." She was put to bed immediately, and the surgeon sent for, who arrived about half an hour afterwards. Witness gave deceased port wine soon after her admittance. The clothes produced, "neither more nor less," were those she saw lying at the bed of the deceased. - Eliza Hearn, a single woman assisting the nurse in the sick ward of the Workhouse, stated that she took off the clothes from deceased described by the former witness, consisting of a jacket, two skirts, a chemise, a pair of stockings, pair of boots, and a bonnet. Deceased wore no stays. The mouth of deceased was in a bad state, her teeth being covered with something black, which arose, witness believed, through want of drink. Deceased did not say anything about the cause of her death, but spoke up to her last moment, and died at two o'clock the following Monday morning. Witness gave deceased beef tea, wine and raw milk and some medicine. - No striped dress being among the clothes produced, Tippett was recalled and said he could not speak positively whether deceased wore one or not. Pool was also recalled and said he must have been mistaken about it. He was busy with his books at the time. - In reply to Mr Beer, Hearn said she gave deceased castor oil - about two dessert spoonsful - on the Sunday, by order of the head nurse. Dustin, however, stated that she had not ordered nearly half-an-ounce - about a dessert spoonful. - Mr J. N. Stevens, surgeon of the Plymouth Workhouse, stated that on Saturday afternoon, March 18th, he saw the deceased, about five o'clock, in the infirmary. He went to the house directly he received the notice. When he saw the deceased her eyes were sunk and her features inexpressive, her tongue dry and brown, her teeth covered with a black substance - sordes - her pulse low and the surface of her body generally cold and of a purplish appearance. He considered it a case of typhus fever, with extreme exhaustion and ordered deceased 8 ozs of port wine, beef tea, and new milk, to be administered at short intervals, and such medicine as he considered necessary. He saw deceased on the following morning, when her state was slightly altered for the better, as there was a little accession of animal heat; the pulse remained the same. He ordered the wine and nourishment to be continued and four ounces of brandy in addition to the wine. He considered deceased then in a dying state, and she gradually sunk and died on the following day. - By Mr Matthews: Deceased was in an unfit state for removal on the Saturday from the Barley House, in King-street, to the workhouse, which was about a mile. The weather was severe that day, wind blowing strong from the east, and it was frosty. From the evidence given by the witnesses as to the clothing which deceased wore on her detailed by the witnesses, he thought her removal tended to accelerate her death. Deceased must have been very ill during the whole of that day from her appearance as he saw her. Those appearances on the teeth did not collect in a day. - By the Coroner: He had never known sordes come on at once, but gradually. Deceased, he should think, must have been seriously ill for several days. He judged so from the state of the countenance, the state of the teeth and tongue and from the very low state of the pulse and the extreme exhaustion. - By Mr Baker: He did not order the oil. He was giving deceased medicine to increase the animal heat. The use of castor oil would tend to reduce animal heat, but not materially. It was one of the class of aperients not calculated to diminish animal heat in the quantity in which it was administered to the deceased. The result depended on the effect produced by the castor oil. He did not know until after the death that castor oil had been given. Deceased could not possibly have died so early had she not been removed, unless some accident had happened, such as haemorrhage from the bowels. Did not know at what time the oil was administered. He believed it was on the Sunday morning, before he saw her. He should not have ordered castor oil himself under any condition in which he saw deceased. - By Mr Matthews: He did not think that a dessert-spoonful of castor oil could have injured her. - By a Juror: He believed when he first saw deceased that it was a very critical case, and did not look forward to her recovery. - Another Juror asked whether if deceased received proper medical treatment and nourishment at the Home before her removal, the removal would accelerate her death? Mr Stevens replied that in the state in which he found her certainly it would. - By Mr Matthews: Her removal in a cot would have been better than in a cab. An upright position was injurious to the deceased. - Mr Beer said that from the evidence the question now narrowed to a focus, was whether the removal of the deceased in the manner described by the witnesses had been the means of accelerating her death, and also whether the deceased had proper attendance given he before her removal. He had asked the house surgeon respecting the castor oil, and found it was given without his knowledge, though he did not wish to impute anything further than a mistake in judgment in the matter. Sometimes it would appear, as in the present case, that people in their good intentions made mistakes, and did that which was the worst they could do. It would be very hard if it was thought that the ladies who managed that benevolent and philanthropic institution had sent the girl away with a knowledge that she was dying, or that the removal would be attended with serious consequences. They well knew the general character of the Home, that the inmates came, remained and left of their own free will, and that there was no compulsion in the matter. Any of those unfortunate creatures who might seek the shelter of that Home received all the attention they required, but the Home was not a hospital for the sick, nor was the place suited for that purpose. If in the present case those who had the management of the institution had done their best, and it had not proved to be the best course, they were more to be pitied than blamed. Mr Beer then sketched, as far as could be gleaned, a history of the unfortunate deceased. In November 1863 she applied to become an inmate of the establishment and remained in the Home for a considerable period. Her state of health was however such that she was sent to the Lock Hospital, and she had also been in the Plymouth Penitentiary, and it was believed that the disease had affected her brain. In Jan. last she again appeared at the Home, almost "skin and bone." The clothes of those who became inmates were put by, and returned when they left the Home, they being clothes while there with the things belonging to the establishment. Mr Beer spoke of the general rules of the Home and the treatment of the deceased while there. She had not complained of fever, nor did the authorities of the Home have the slightest idea there was any fever about deceased. Mr Beer referred to gratuitous services of Dr Rendle, and the interest taken in the Home by many ladies and gentlemen, and inquired what motive could any of the officials at the institution have other than the good and well-being of the poor creatures who came under their notice? He could not help remarking on the curious fact relative to a striped gown spoken of by several witnesses, and which gown had not been produced. No doubt they all wished that prior to the removal of deceased Dr Rendle had been consulted, and they all must regret, and none more deeply than the officials at Barley House, the results that had followed, but he denied that they were in the slightest degree responsible for them. - Rose Alston, superintendent of the Barley House Home, said she knew the deceased, who was received into that establishment on the 16th January last for the second time. She had been previously admitted November 30th, 1863, and was removed to the Lock Hospital in January, 1864, and subsequently sent to the Penitentiary. On her second application deceased was extremely attenuated and emaciated and dirty. She continued in the Home until SAturday, 18th March, being employed during that time simply at needlework; but might have possibly assisted to clean out her own room. To use the expression of the other girls, deceased "picked up her crumbs wonderfully" a week before her departure, and greatly improved in health. On the Monday previous to the removal witness was informed that deceased was ill, and wished to remain in her bed. She slept in a room with five others, and complained simply of headache. She seemed to make light of her illness, saying that she had been similarly ill in the Penitentiary, and that it would pass off. witness directed her to keep her bed, and gave her two grains of calomel, and senna tea, which relieved her. Deceased did not care for food that day; tea, bread and butter and gruel were three times ordered. On the Tuesday she appeared better; but on Wednesday complained of not being so well and of headache. Witness gave her two more grains of calomel, which afforded immediate relief. There was no dryness of the skin. Deceased was under the direct care of the housekeeper, Mrs Berry. On the Thursday she was much better, so much so that witness thought active work would be suitable for her. On the Friday she wished to get up and on Saturday was better. The diet during the week was beef tea strong as jelly, tea and fresh bread and butter, cut as for an invalid, eggs, arrowroot, gruel, and coffee. Shortly after noon on Saturday a plate of hot meat was taken up to deceased by the housekeeper, who shortly returned, and then witness went to see deceased, and found her incoherent in her answers. Having no room in the house for invalids, witness determined, according to general rule, to send deceased to the workhouse. Witness saw her after she was dressed in a room downstairs waiting for the cab. There were no complaints from any of the inmates respecting the conduct or health of the deceased during the week. She should not have sent deceased if she had thought her to have been exceedingly ill. It was not customary to send patients away without consulting the medical man. She did not consider deceased able to walk at the time, but did not think her seriously ill. Deceased said she was bilious and as Sunday was coming the object was to send her away so as to get special care. The clothing of inmates was taken to a room and kept while they remained in the Home, and fresh clothing given to them. It was the duty of the housekeeper to see that when an inmate left the Home she was properly clad. Deceased had on the cloak produced when she was waiting to go in the cab. witness did not see deceased leave the Home. Two days previous to her illness she behaved boisterously, and on one occasion could not be stopped from swearing, and was quarrelsome with the other girls. On some occasions she would go out on the cold stones without shoes or stockings. Many of the girls would rather go without any than wear them. On no occasion were the girls required to leave off their shoes or stockings. Deceased did not make any objection to leave the Home. Miss Alston stated that she had made herself acquainted with the use of medicines, and produced a book to show the nature of her practice amongst the poor. French sabots were used in the Home, because formerly many girls pawned their boots. - By Mr Matthews: Did not see deceased from Monday until Saturday. The second dose of calomel was given on Wednesday. Saw deceased for about ten minutes on the Monday and for a few minutes on the Saturday. - Ann Berry, housekeeper at Barley Home, gave evidence generally corroborative of that of the former witness. Medicine was given to deceased on the Monday, and on Wednesday also, and afterwards, on each occasion, salts and senna. - Dr Rendle said he should decidedly not administer two doses of calomel without seeing a patient. On the supposition that the case was a bilious attack there was, however, nothing inconsistent in such treatment. - Ann Berry added that deceased was better after the second dose of calomel, and that she frequently administered medicines. On Saturday morning deceased had tea and bread and butter and wished to get up. Witness took her up some hashed mutton at dinner time, but found her then worse and complaining of a severe headache. Witness saw about the clothes of the deceased, and as her chemise and petticoat were bad, gave her those articles from the Home. When deceased got into the cab she had on a calico chemise, dark gray flannel petticoat, blue check skirt, light-gray or drab skirt over, a light-brown jacket and bonnet, and also a cloak, a pair of stockings and pair of large boots which she wore into the Home. When deceased went into the cab she walked down the front steps with assistance, and thence to a side door, about 25 feet distant. Witness said the clothes produced were the same that deceased wore, but that a striped skirt, something of a woollen kind, which she also had on was missing. Only the cloak was returned from the cab. - By Mr Matthews: The striped skirt was deceased's own. The upper part of deceased was covered with her chemise and the jacket [which was very thin]. There was no fire in the room where deceased was waiting for the cab. She did not tell deceased to call her if worse, but one of the girls said so to her. Deceased had bread and butter taken to her on Monday, and gruel and bread and butter on Tuesday and Wednesday. On Thursday and Friday she took her food well. The great change for the worse took place on the Saturday morning. She gave Mrs Marks the money to pay for the cab. Witness's own impression when deceased left the House was that she was sufficiently clad; and if she had thought the deceased had required more clothing she would have given it to her. - Mr Stevens said that the two doses of calomel, followed by salts and senna, administered would not have been injurious if deceased had been suffering on the Monday, as was supposed, from bilious derangement; but the doses were not at all applicable to the case of the deceased. Mr Stevens, in reply to a Juror, said that the appearance of the mouth might possibly arise in two or three hours if there were an exudation of blood from the gums. - Martha Marks, laundry woman at the Home, said she engaged the cab. It was a closed one, and the window was up. Deceased had on a cloak belonging to the Home over her dress, and when witness was coming away from the Workhouse deceased reminded witness not to leave the cloak behind. Deceased was about 21 years of age. - Mr Stevens said that, considering the weather, the clothing for the upper part of the body was very insufficient - The Jury expressed themselves satisfied with the evidence as far as it had gone, and said that they did not consider it necessary to call other witnesses from the Home. - Mr Matthews briefly referred to the facts that led to the institution of the Inquiry on the part of the Court of Guardians, who felt they were justified from the report of the house surgeon in bringing the case forward. He certainly must say he did not consider that proper caution had been exercised in the case on the part of the superintendent of the Home, and whatever attendance had been previously given, it was a case of gross neglect - and he spoke advisedly - to send the poor unhappy woman away in such a state of clothing as described, and on such a cold day. He hoped that ever in future the medical officer would be consulted prior to the removal of a sick inmate. - Dr Rendle said he hoped Mr Matthews would retract the statement that it was a case of culpable or gross neglect. He thought the charge a harsh one, especially as the deceased complained only of headache, and said she was similarly ill before, and was treated as if only bilious. - The Coroner said, as there was not any evidence to lay a criminal charge against any person, he should not be necessitated to read over the evidence and go carefully through it with the Jury. It appeared that the deceased had been an inmate of the Barley House Home, an institution for the support of the poor and destitute - a most noble object for any institution. The death might have been occasioned as they had heard by the removal, and it did certainly appear that it would have been better if the removal had not taken place. But they, with him, he thought, would at once agree that if those persons who had the management of that benevolent institution had had any idea that the deceased was seriously ill she would not have been removed. for to behave unkindly or so as to injure the girl would be in opposition to the spirit of the promoters, whose care was for the good of the inmates and not their injury. He believed there had been an error of judgment on the part of the authorities of the Home. The symptoms appeared to have been such as to mislead the superintendent and housekeeper. It appeared in this case the rule of sending for Dr Rendle - whose services were gratuitous to the Home - prior to the removal was departed from. The clothing worn by deceased on her removal was slight when they remembered the coldness of the weather on the day in question. He regretted more clothes had not been supplied; but he thought it arose from errors in judgment, for which the parties were not responsible. - The room was then cleared, and after about twenty minutes'' deliberation the Jury returned their verdict - "That the deceased died a Natural Death from, Typhus Fever, but that such death was accelerated by her removal from the Barley House Home to the Plymouth Workhouse in inclement weather with insufficient clothing; that we attach no further blame to the authorities of the Home than want of judgment, as the deceased was most kindly treated whilst there; that we cannot separate without condemning the unauthorised administration of medicine which we find to be the practice both at the Home and at the Workhouse." - The Inquiry ended about six o'clock.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 April 1865
MALBOROUGH - Death From A Fall At Malborough, Salcombe. - An Inquest has been held at Malborough, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of GEORGE EVANS RYDER. Deceased was at the Victoria Inn, Malborough, which is situate on an embankment about three feet higher than the road, and on leaving the house, fell off it and died a few minutes afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and recommended that the fence around the place where the accident occurred should be raised forthwith.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 April 1865
BROADHEMPSTON - An Inquest was held before Mr Cuming, Coroner, on Monday, at Broadhempston, concerning the death of CHARLOTTE JANE MURCH, aged 8 months, who had died suddenly. The evidence of Mr Manley, surgeon, of Ipplepen, convinced the Jury that there had been no neglect but that the child had died from purely Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 April 1865
ILSINGTON - The Suspicious Death At Ilsington. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of MR JOHN WILLS, who was found dead in bed at his daughter's house at Ilsington under suspicious circumstances, was held last evening before Mr F. B. Cuming, the County Coroner, at the New Inn, Ilsington. A reply had been received from Mr Herapath, in reference to the analysis of the deceased's stomach; but it was thought necessary for the ends of justice that the proceedings should not be made public.

TOTNES - The Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. Further Details: Another Death. - No occurrence in the neighbourhood has excited such great and anxious interest as the accident on the South Devon Railway, at Totnes, on Wednesday night, of which we yesterday gave an imperfect, and in some respects inaccurate account. Several facts conspire to give special interest to the catastrophe - the loss of life involved, to which the record of another death must now be added; the fact that on the South Devon Railway no previous disaster of the kind had ever occurred; the imminence of the peril of other trains; and the unexplained origin of the affair. Minute and careful inquiries on the spot throughout yesterday enable us to give the following reliable statements as to the facts. - At a quarter-past eight on Wednesday night a goods train consisting of engine, tender, two break vans, and 23 trucks left the Plymouth Station for Exeter. The train contained a very miscellaneous assortment of goods; but chiefly merchandise, several trucks being laden with goods from Messrs. Pickford and Co., one with oil of vitriol in glass jars; and a truck with paper, valued at some £300, from Messrs. Allen and Co.'s Mills, Ivybridge, was taken up in transit. The train was in charge of WM. CROSSING and WILLIAM CROCKER, guards, JAMES HIGHMORE, aged 36, engine-driver, and GEORGE BARRATT, 23, fireman. The train proceeded 24 miles all well, and shortly after ten o'clock passed through Totnes Station, at which it had not to make a stoppage. About a quarter of a mile beyond the station is a bridge over the River Dart, and the train passed this river in safety. A few yards beyond, however, a portion of the train left the line, and after running along the tramway on which the rails are fixed for about fifty yards, shattering the woodwork in places and partly displacing the rails, the engine darted across the permanent way, turned over upon the down line, and plunged down the side of an embankment 18 feet high, landing, wheels upwards, in a ditch at the bottom. The chimney and other projections from the boiler were knocked off in the fall, and on reaching the ditch such was the momentum of the ponderous mass that the large cylinder or water casing of the boiler, weighing some tons, was thrown forward over a hedge into an adjoining meadow, one end being deeply embedded in the turf. The remainder of the train parted from the tender before the latter left the embankment and the foremost trucks swerved to the contrary side of the line, and shattered by the collision, piled themselves up one upon the other in fanciful and dangerous confusion. Before the engine turned over it would appear that the driver jumped off it on to the metals, but the leap was a fatal one, for he received blows producing concussion of the brain and injuries to the spine, from which, and the general shock to the system, he died at noon yesterday. BARRATT, the fireman, from the position of the bodies, appears to have held on a second longer than his companion, and was hideously crushed when the engine made its frantic somersault. his chief injuries were a deep hole in the forehead, one leg cut entirely off, a gash in the abdomen, and the left arm and shoulder flattened. Half the train only was off the line, and the guards, who were in their vans at the middle and rear of the train respectively, were thrown to the floor with some force by the sudden stoppage, but were not seriously hurt. As soon as they could these mercifully preserved men alighted and went forward, but seeing the mangled bodies of their companions, and the utter wreck of the fore part of the train, they returned towards the Totnes Station. Meanwhile a policeman of the county constabulary, who was standing on a bridge just below the station when the goods train passed, and had watched its lights, saw that those lights did not disappear in the distance as usual, and after the lapse of some minutes, went to the station and mentioned the fact. Those in charge went out towards the train and met the guards bringing back the sad tidings. Consternation soon gave place to action. Mr Langlar, of the adjacent Railway Inn, sent into Totnes on horseback for Mr Owen, surgeon, and that gentleman, with his assistant, and others, were very soon at the scene. Among the earliest to collect were Messrs. C. J. Michelmore, W. Sawyer, Eggins, and R. Harris, with Mr James, the stationmaster, and other railway officials. The first thought naturally was concerning the safety of approaching trains. There is a down luggage train which is timed to leave Exeter every night at 7.35, and which is usually a few minutes late, and almost always crosses the up goods train near where the accident occurred. Most fortunately, however, on Wednesday night this train was quite punctual, and had passed through Totnes, where it does not stop, a few minutes prior to the occurrence. This source of danger was removed, but the down express, leaving Exeter at 10.10 would soon be due. In the general crash, the telegraph wires were snapped, and instantaneous communication with Newton being thus cut off, a messenger was despatched to gallop thither on horseback to stop the express. He arrived too late, however - the train had passed on. But another precaution proved more serviceable. A pointsman detached a red light from the rear of the smashed goods train and ran with it a mile up the line. The signal was seen by the driver of the express, who, although descending an incline, was thus enabled to pull up a hundred yards before the scene of disaster, and then advance slowly on. - What was done during the night can neither be depicted by those who were absent nor forgotten by those who were present. The bodies of the dead and dying men were conveyed to the station and Railway Inn respectively. A special train from Plymouth brought up Mr Compton, traffic superintendent, and Mr Avery, goods manager, with other officials, and a staff of porters and packers. From Newton other men and appliances came, and from Dawlish, Mr Margary, chief engineer. The passengers by the midnight express and the early mail had to alight above the wreck and walk to special trains, which brought them on. To clear and relay the line the men strenuously, judiciously, and heartily worked. A painful accident happened during the night. A packer named Cook was sent with a lamp and fog signals half a mile up the line to signal the numerous special trains. He got across the metal, and a passing train cut off one of his feet at the instep. He was found about four o'clock, and brought into Totnes, where his leg was amputated below the knee, he being placed under the influence of chloroform. He stated that he tripped in the telegraph wire when the express train was backing to Newton. It is supposed that he has received other injuries than the severance of his leg, and at eleven o'clock last night he lay in a very dangerous state. HIGHMORE, the driver, on his removal to the inn, frequently expressed a wish to see his wife. She was telegraphed for, and arrived by the first train yesterday morning, remaining with him until his death. Although suffering great agony, especially in his back, he was enabled to converse calmly and rationally with his wife until the last. He leaves four fatherless children. BARRETT, the stoker, was unmarried. His mother, formerly keeper of the Newton Refreshment Room, arrived at Totnes at eleven o'clock yesterday morning, accompanied by a brother of the young woman to whom BARRETT was to have been married in the course of two or three weeks. - The scene early yesterday morning on the site of the accident was one of singular and painful interest. The most prominent object was a great and ghastly pile of shattered carriages, turned and twisted in all imaginable ways and directions, with here and there a curious fragment, chewing the tremendous force exerted. These were piled chiefly upon and near the down line, the up rails being in process of clearance. Of this remarkable wreck a photograph was taken by Mr Davis of Dawlish, who had been telegraphed for early in the morning by Mr Margary to bring his instrument for the purpose. The down line was wholly torn up for the space of 70 or 80 yards, the injured portions extending double that distance, and the up line for almost as far. The thick bosses of timber were rent and split, and shivered in a way to realize which sight is essential; and the twisted bars of iron which lay about, and the great pit dug in the hard ballast of the line, testified to the fearful violence before which these stubborn materials had given way. The most remarkable sight, however, was the engine and tender in the meadow below, as previously stated. That any force short of gunpowder could have done with iron plates what had been done, seemed impossible. Yet, piercing the thick iron casing of the boiler, there was a huge splinter of wood from the sleepers of the line, wedged in as though thrust by Hercules. By the aid of a strong and well-arranged staff the telegraphic communication was restored to Newton by 1.30 a.m., and the rest of the lines were temporarily refixed by 8 a.m., Mr Webber, of Exeter, superintending. By two p.m. yesterday the down line was cleared, and by ten o'clock both lines were re-opened for traffic, although some parts of the work will have to be renewed. - The extent of the damage done is not so great as a casual observer would imagine. Of the twenty-five trucks comprising the train ten or eleven were not off the rails. Of the remainder, five or six were not permanently injured, and some parts of the others will be utilised. These trucks when new cost on an average £100 each. The truck load of vitriol was destroyed, which would involve no great loss had not the burning fluid deluged the cargo of costly paper, which was carried in the next truck. Other trucks contained fish, boxes and a miscellaneous goods, and were not materially injured. The engine, the June, was a new and powerful one, and cost £3,000 only three months ago. A careful inspection of it which was made yesterday by Mr Wright, shows that it has not suffered in the more valuable portions to the extent as first supposed, and that £150 will restore it. - The last, and practically the most important, subject of Inquiry relates to the cause of the disaster. On this head very few facts can be obtained, and no hypothesis satisfactorily established. It was not caused by the bursting of the boiler, for the boiler is still sound. It was not that the line had got out of gauge, for the line without repair was used by properly gauged trucks all day yesterday. It was not that an axletree broke, for every axletree of every truck is still sound. - There are signs tending to shew that one of the forward trucks first got off, and was dragged along and bumped upon the sleepers for some 60 yards before the engine left the line. The whole catastrophe, however, must have begun and ended within the space of one minute. The driver said, soon after the occurrence, that "the engine jumped just as we got over the bridge." The only plausible supposition is that in descending the long and steep incline from Brent to Totnes, the momentum of the train became too great, and that this increased, and excessive speed caused the train to get off the rails. The line is straight and level at the place where the train first got off, and has only a slight curve beyond, where the engine appears to have quitted the rail. Against this theory come the statements of the two guards, who affirm that the rate was only 30 or 35 miles an hour - a usual pace. The driver shortly before he died said he had the steam shut off. The most experienced travellers are often deceived as to speed, however, and the guards were not favourably situated for judging. We believe that at the adjourned Inquest some further evidence on the point will be produced, and that, if no other discoveries are made, the opinion will prevail that too great speed was the cause of the disaster. It is only fair to the management to add that the accident does not in any degree reflect on the general traffic arrangements, on the contrary, the system of signals employed on the South Devon line seems to be as nearly perfect as possible. - The Coroner's Inquest was opened yesterday afternoon in the first-class waiting-room of the Totnes station before the District Coroner, Mr F. B. Cuming, and a Jury, of which Mr Alfred Bickford was chosen Foreman. Amongst those present were Mr Seargeant, secretary of the South Devon Railway; Mr Margary, engineer; Mr W. Wright, of Dawlish; and Mr Kellock, solicitor, of Totnes. The Coroner having opened the Court, the Jury inspected the bodies of the two deceased, and the spot where the accident occurred. - William Crossing was called and said that he was a guard in the employ of the South Devon Railway Company, and lived in Exeter. On Wednesday night he was in charge of the luggage train which left Plymouth at 8.16 p.m., consisting of 25 carriages, with engine and tender. All was right until they passed the Totnes Station, which they did at 10.5. Just after they passed the railway bridge over the Dart the train suddenly stopped. He was in the last carriage, and felt nothing until the train stopped. He was taking off the break at the time the train stopped, and the jerk knocked him down. He was not injured and got out and went up the line, and saw that the carriages were thrown up and broken, and the engine lying in the marsh below the bridge. The deceased men BARRATT and HIGHMORE were both lying between the metals on the down line. - A Juror: Both together? - Witness: No; ten feet apart. He saw GEORGE BARRATT draw a breath and lift up his hand once, and he then died directly. Witness had no idea how the accident occurred. BARRATT was the fireman, and HIGHMORE the engineer. The train was going at the rate of 30 to 35 miles per hour, and was not timed to stop at the Totnes station. The train was not going faster than usual. - The Foreman: did the engine explode? - Witness: I think not. - William Crocker, the second guard of the train, also living at Exeter, said that on Wednesday night he was in the goods train from Plymouth. He occupied a van in the middle of the train. Shortly after passing the bridge over the Dart he felt a sudden jerk, which knocked him down. As soon as he could get upon his legs for the purpose of catching hold of the door, the train was at a stand-still. He immediately jumped out, and searched for the driver and fireman. The carriage he was in was in was off the rails. The train was travelling about 30 miles per hour - not faster than usual. - The Coroner: What are your instructions about the rate of going? - Mr Margary: I have them printed, and you can see them when you require. - Witness: I have no idea how the accident occurred. Both of the deceased were perfectly sober to the best of my knowledge. I was in the act of taking off the break when I felt the jerk. - At this stage of the Inquiry, at the suggestion of the Coroner, the proceedings were adjourned until Monday next.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 April 1865
PLYMOUTH - Death By Hanging In Plymouth. - The Inquest on the body of EDWIN HOOKER, who hung himself in a field at the back of Torrington-place, was held yesterday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall. The evidence merely confirmed the facts already stated in the Western Morning News, and the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

ILSINGTON - The Mysterious Death At Ilsington. - Although, for prudential reasons, the proceedings at the Inquest on the body of MR JOHN WILLS, found dead in his daughter's house at Ilsington, have not been allowed to be made public, we are permitted to state that Dr Herapath, having made an analysis of the contents of the deceased's stomach, has detected the presence of oxalic acid. The Inquest is further adjourned until Thursday next.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 April 1865
TOTNES - The Late Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. Conclusion Of The Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday the Inquest concerning the deaths of JAMES HIGHMORE, engine driver, and GEORGE BARRETT, fireman, who were killed by the recent accident at Totnes, was resumed before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, in the first-class waiting-room of the Railway Station, Totnes. Besides the Jury there were in attendance Mr L. J. Seargeant, secretary of the South Devon Company; Mr P. J. Margary, the chief engineer of the line; Mr c. E. Compton, the newly appointed superintendent; Mr Cockshott, the late traffic manager; and Mr Wright, locomotive engineer. When the Jury had assembled they proceeded to view the scene of the accident. Most of the debris had been removed, the engine was lying as it was found after the sad catastrophe, but a number of workmen were engaged in removing it. The Jury having returned to the station. - Mr Seargeant said that he wished to state, on behalf of the South Devon Railway Company, that since the unfortunate accident the officers of the company had busily engaged themselves in endeavouring to ascertain the cause of it. He assumed that the Jury would have no hesitation in coming to the conclusion that both the deceased men came to their death accidentally, but the directors were very desirous that, if possible, the occasion of their death should be definitely arrived at. The trucks of the train that left the line had been examined, and it had been discovered that one of the axles of a "foreign" truck was broken in two or three places close to the bus of the wheel, and this, in the opinion of the company's officers, was the cause of the accident. - Mr Compton said he had visited the Rattray incline in order to see whether the rules of the company had been strictly observed by the persons in charge of the train. A regulation of the company provided that the luggage trains should stop at the top of the incline. The foreign truck belonged to the Bristol and Exeter Company, but the identical truck could not be pointed out with certainty, because as several wheels had been broken off trucks it could not be ascertained to which truck the axle belonged. The rules of the company, which the two deceased men had signed, enjoined on the engine drivers of luggage trains that they should stop their engines before descending the incline for not less than a minute. He had endeavoured to find out whether the regulation was carried out or not, and he found that the steam was shut off at the top of the incline, and there was no doubt that the train came almost to a standstill there. The signalman at the incline had stated that the train passed with the breaks down, engine breaks included. He had learnt from other sources that the train occupied 21 minutes in travelling from Kingsbridge Road to the place where the accident occurred - ten miles - so that the train had travelled scarcely more than thirty miles an hour. - William Crossing said: On the night of the accident the luggage train left Kingsbridge-road at 9.44, and arrived at the place where the accident occurred - nine and three-quarter miles - at 10.15, making twenty-one minutes. The train left the top of the Rattray incline at 9.54, or eleven minutes before the accident occurred - the distance being four and a half miles. It is a rule of the service that every up goods train stays for one minute at the top of Rattray incline. On the night in question the driver slackened speed, but did not stop the train. For all practical purposes the train might be considered stopped. There was no way on, and steam was shut off. Witness heard nothing before the sudden stoppage. - By a Juror: Mr Seargeant said there were three heavy breaks on, and that would be sufficient to control the train. The trucks were regularly examined. They could not tell which truck was the cause of the accident; they fancied it was the 478 truck - the second from the engine, and the one that was most demolished. It was loaded to the extent of four tons. - Mr Peter John Margery, engineer of the company, said he thought from the marks upon the rails that a truck first got off the line. He traced indentations of the timber five yards east of the bridge. The indentations then became deeper, and the timbers more cut. At a distance of about eighty-five yards from the bridge the permanent way was cut through, apparently by the heavy weight of an engine, and at about 160 yards on the eastern side of the bridge, the engine rolled down the embankment on the southern side of the line. Several of the trucks were heaped together on the northern side of the line, and all the other trucks were more or less thrown off the rails, excepting the last break van. Witness was upon the ground soon after the accident - at half-past one - having been fetched by a special engine and he examined thoroughly the state of the line and the works. He found the axle which the Jury had examined broken at both ends, and lying upon the embankment a few yards on the western side of the place where the trucks were principally thrown off the line. His opinion of the cause of the accident was that the axle of the truck first broken, that the train ran on a few yards, and that the wheel or axle caused a sudden impediment to the train which occasioned the jerking off of the engine, or that the axle might have been entangled in some way with the trucks, and thus threw the train off. Witness made a point of examining the line, and found it to be in perfect gauge, and in perfect order. The best proof of the truth of this was that trains had since passed over the line without its being altered, and without accident. The engine driver said he had no steam on at the time. The boiler had not burst, and it was not true that the engine driver was subjected to a fine if the train stopped on coming down the incline. - Mr John Wright, locomotive superintendent of the company, said the engine called the "Juno" commenced working on the 28th December, 1864, and had been running regularly, and was at the time of the accident in good order. He had examined the engine since, and found the wheels in proper order, and no defect that could have caused the accident. He coincided entirely with Mr Margary's evidence. The engineer, HIGHMORE, came on first as engine-turner to the South Devon Company on the 24th April 1860. He was promoted to be a driver on Nov. 1st, 1861, and had continued on ever since, being the oldest "goods" driver they had. he was a very steady man indeed. Each engineman examined his engine when entering the shed, and there was a book in which any reports were written. On the Monday preceding the accident it was reported that the Juno engine required new blocks, and these were supplied. It was a new engine, and left the yard after the blocks were put on in a fit state of repair. - The Coroner said that he did not think it necessary to call any further evidence, although he would of course do so if the Jury considered that the cause of the accident had not been explained. He saw no difficulty about deciding the question. Frequently in cases of accident upon railways blame was attachable in some quarter or other, but the evidence of the scientific gentlemen showed that the unfortunate occurrence was unavoidable. The engine and carriages were properly examined, and it should be remarked that they had travelled from Plymouth, a distance of twenty miles, before the accident. He had never heard of an occurrence that seemed to be more purely accidental. - The Jury decided that further evidence was unnecessary, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - It was stated that HIGHMORE was 33 years of age, and BARRETT was aged 24. - Mr Seargeant stated, in reply to the Foreman of the Jury, that HIGHMORE had left a widow, who would receive a sum of money from the Engineers' Insurance Company, a provident society attached to the locomotive department. The Jury gave up their fee for attendance for the benefit of the deceased HIGHMORE'S widow. On Inquiry at the Railway Hotel our reporter ascertained that Cook, the signalman whose leg was amputated had passed a bad night, but was considered on the whole to be getting on favourably.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 April 1865
GWITHIAN - A Clergyman Found Drowned At Gwithian. - Great gloom has been cast over Gwithian and the adjoining parishes by the melancholy death of the REV. S. B. DRURY, curate of Gwithian. From what we can gather, it appears that the rev. gentleman, after his afternoon service on Sunday, when he delivered an excellent address on the proper observance of the approaching Good Friday, left his lodgings, carrying a book in his hand, and accompanied by his dog. It is believed that he intended to take a walk on the cliffs, where he was accustomed to read on a Sunday evening. About six o'clock the dog returned, unaccompanied by his master; but as MR DRURY occasionally attended evening service either at St John's, Hayle, or Camborne Church, his landlady thought he might have stopped at one of those places, and was not anxious about him. Finding, however, that he did not return on Monday morning, and that he was last seen walking towards the cliffs, a search was made; and at about 12 o'clock on Monday morning his body was found by one of the coastguardmen on the shore near the cliffs opposite Godrevy Island. These are all the facts known at present. An Inquest was to be held yesterday afternoon, but too late to allow of the report to appear today. The rev. gentleman is a native of the North of Devon. For two years before he went to Gwithian he was curate of Gwennap. In both parishes he won the esteem and respect of his parishioners, and the affectionate regard of his clerical brethren.

TOTNES - The Late Accident On The South Devon Railway. Death Of A Third Man. - WILLIAM COOK, signalman, who was injured on the occasion of the late accident on the South Devon Railway died yesterday afternoon. He was a married man, and leaves a family. - An Inquest on the body was opened last evening at the Railway Hotel, Totnes, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr A. S. Distin was Foreman. - The Jury having viewed the body, William Harris, a ganger on the line, stated that about half-past one on the morning of the 6th April, after the accident to the goods train, he sent the deceased up the line to relieve another signalman named Reynolds, who had been previously sent up signalling. Deceased appeared to be quite sober at the time, and witness had no idea how the accident to him occurred. The express train was down before the deceased left. There were no other signalmen out at the time except a few men near the remains of the goods train. Deceased had first been put to work clearing the telegraphic wires, but having strained one of his feet, he was put to signal. - By a Juror: There was no intoxicating drink on the line during the night. - John Reynolds, a labourer on the line, said he was sent up the line about eleven o'clock on the night the accident happened to the goods train to signal the down trains, the telegraph communication being stopped. He had fog signals with him, and was the means of stopping the down express. He remained until between one and two o'clock, when deceased came to relieve him. On his coming witness gave him the signals; deceased appeared sober. Witness instructed him what he was to do and then left. He afterwards heard of deceased having been injured, and went up to him. When he came up he found deceased lying in the dyke on the downside of the line. The empties of the express had passed back before witness left. After he got back, and before deceased was brought in, a special train came down. The first person that gave notice of deceased's injury was a man who was on his way to Dainton. - William Batt, ganger, deposed that on the morning after the accident he found deceased lying in the dyke on the right side of the down line. It was then about a quarter past three o'clock. He heard a low moaning noise, and he went on the cutting, and in the bottom found deceased. Witness said, "Holloa, my man, how came you here; have you been drinking." Deceased kept moaning. witness put his hand down and found some clotted blood or dirt about his face. He passed his hand down the body and legs, and found one leg to be broken. Deceased was lying on his lamp, which was extinguished. Deceased said "Help me out, Batt." Witness did so, and with assistance brought deceased in. He was talking as they brought him back; he appeared in great agony, but he did not explain the accident. Deceased had signalled the special train down all right; that special returned back towards Newton. There were two carriages and a carriage truck in the train. He believed the engine was in charge of Edward Sweeney. To catch the notice of the driver of the special train it was proper to stand on the side of the down line, where the deceased was found. - The Coroner remarked that he thought the evidence of the driver Sweeney should be taken. He felt there was not the least evidence before them to show how the unfortunate deceased had met his death. The matter was wrapped in mystery. He might have been run over by the train, or he might have stepped back out of the way, and fallen and broken his leg. At present he (the Coroner) did not feel in a position to charge the Jury. - A Juror thought that if the medical testimony were taken it would shew whether deceased had been run over by the train, or whether he broke his leg by a fall. - The Coroner said deceased had a signal lamp, which was found under him. It was his place to signal the train. Did the engine driver see the signal? He thought that without the evidence of the driver they could not come to any verdict. - The Inquiry was then adjourned to this evening in order that Sweeney, the engine driver of the special train, might be present.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 April 1865
TOTNES - The Late Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. - Last evening the Inquest on COOK, the signalman, who was killed on the South Devon Railway on Friday last, was resumed at Totnes; and the evidence of several witnesses having been taken, a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerating the railway officials from all blame was returned. The medical evidence showed that deceased's leg was frightfully crushed, as if a train had slowly passed over the limb, but Sweeney, the driver of the special train which must have caused the accident, did not see the deceased or any signals at the spot, and was unconscious of any jolt to the engine. The train was properly provided with lights and every precaution appears to have been taken. How COOK came on the line remains unaccountable.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 April 1865
ILSINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, at the house of MR JOHN TARR, baker, Ilsington, on the body of SUSAN TARR, his daughter. The deceased was about 27 years of age, was of weak intellect, and subject to fits. Last Tuesday three weeks she fell down in a fit, with her face amongst red hot ashes. Medical assistance was obtained, and deceased lingered until Thursday, when, after convulsive fits, she died. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

ILSINGTON - Supposed Murder By Poison Near Newton. - A very important Inquiry relative to the death of MR JOHN WILLS, terminated on Thursday. The Inquiry had extended over two days, but the details were withheld at the earnest desire of the Coroner by every newspaper represented, except by one Plymouth paper, in order that justice might not be frustrated. The deceased had at one time been in good circumstances, but by extravagant living he lost his property, and has been for the past two years maintained by his son-in-law and daughter, the landlord and landlady of the New Inn, Ilsington. The deceased was found dead in bed, and a post mortem examination made by Dr Haydon by direction of Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, resulted in it being declared that death did not, in the doctor's judgment, proceed from natural causes, but from the action of a powerful irritant. Professor Herapath next examined the stomach and intestines, and he has since stated that he found therein a black mucous, which led him to suspect that oxalic acid had been taken by deceased, and he found in the duodenum white matter, having the character of milk, and the coats of the stomach were exceedingly inflamed. The stomach presented an appearance similar to what he had observed in the stomachs of persons who were known to have been poisoned by oxalic acid. He added that he had failed to discover oxalic acid, which he was not surprised at, as in many instances of poisoning by oxalic acid, the poison had not been discovered, although it was known to have been administered, for it passed into the blood, decomposed the lime salts, and formed oxalate of lime. He had no doubt that the deceased died from inflammation of the stomach and intestines, produced by an irritant which, although he could not produce it, he was certain was oxalic acid. - The Inquest was resumed on Thursday evening, at the Jolly Sailor Inn, Bickington. - Mr Carter, solicitor, of Torquay, said he was present to watch the proceedings for the family of the deceased, who were as anxious as the Jury could be to have any mystery attending the death of the deceased cleared up if possible. He would direct attention to the fact that the late MR JOHN WILLS had formerly been given to drinking ardent spirits; and they would have to say whether a persistent habit of drinking would not account for the appearances observed by Professor Herapath. MR WILLS had lost the use of his limbs; and he should ask them whether they were satisfied that the cause which produced deceased's loss of the use of his extremities was not also a cause which might have ultimately occasioned his death. One of his kidneys too, was much diseased. It was true that inasmuch as MR WILLS was bed-ridden the poison, if he had taken any, must have been conveyed to him. it was a grave difficulty for the Jury to take upon themselves to declare in such a case who in that household administered it. The medical evidence went to prove that oxalic acid had been administered. Oxalic acid could not have been taken without occasioning intense pain the moment it was taken into the mouth; and if it were administered in the beer, which was the only way, for it could not have been swallowed as it was, then deceased, after suffering as he must have done if poisoned by that means, could not have been found in the morning lying as calm and quiet as he was left at night, as would be proved to have been the case. The beer, too, was given at 10 o'clock, and at 11 o'clock deceased quietly bade the servant, Grace Osborne, "Good night." In the morning the body was found lying placidly, and the bed was unruffled. There was no sign of deceased having vomited, which was to have been expected if he were poisoned as suggested. Professor Herapath did not speak conclusively as to the poisoning; he merely gave an opinion, and had not been informed of the habits of the deceased before he did give it. He was not asked whether the coats of the stomach would not have been destroyed by constant drinking, coupled with sedentary habits. The old man was incapacitated, was accustomed to tumble, and had lost the use of his limbs, and at last he died. From what? From his ailments. He (Mr Carter) was present because in the house salts of lemon had been found, which contained oxalic acid. That it came into Mr Bearn's house at all was because the nurse which Mrs Bearn had to attend her suggested its being got, the wife suggested it to the husband, and he procured it. It was to take stains out of linen. It was obtained months ago, and no more notice had been taken of it until it was discovered by Sergeant Coles. Mr Bearn's little boy was in the habit of drawing beer and taking it to his grandfather in the evening, and he did so the night before deceased's death, his father having nothing whatever to do with it. He should watch the examination in the assurance that the Jury would justify discharge their duty. - The Coroner said he was glad that Mr and Mrs Bearn had secured professional assistance. He (the Coroner) had exercised his duties without prejudice. After hearing the evidence, however, of Professor Herapath, he had arrived at the opinion that deceased died from poison. If his opinion were altered he would express it. The Coroner then read over the whole of the evidence that had been taken at the previous Inquiry, after which the following evidence was taken:- Dr Haydon said he had analysed the powder labelled salts of lemon. It contained oxalate of potass, which was an irritant poison, with about the same poisonous force as oxalic acid, and would produce in the stomach the same appearances. - By Mr Carter: Had not seen deceased prior to his death. Had heard that he walked very badly, totteringly; that there was a difficulty in getting out of bed - not that it was impossible. Did not carry his investigation to the spinal marrow, but there was nothing in the brain to account for his loss of the use of his limbs. It was stated by Mrs Bearn that the deceased had been confined to his room because of his insanity, and she had intended to send to her brother on the day the deceased died to have him removed to an asylum. The brain was in a condition, as regards disease of the arteries, to affect volition, but could not say whether it would affect locomotion. The coats of the stomach per se were sound, but there was a deposition of blood between the mucous and muscular coats. There was a copious effusion of blood in spots and patches. His conviction was that the deposit of blood was caused by an irritant taken very shortly before death. Death was not occasioned by dram drinking. It was not a case of a "drunkard's stomach," but the result of a single dose. There had been instances where death had been attended with intense pain, but there were cases in which no pain had been felt. The ordinary effect of taking oxalic acid would be great pain, a burning sensation, sickness, convulsion and insensible sleepiness, from which the person affected could not be roused. Ordinarily should not expect to find the poisoned person in a quiet, placid state in the morning if death had resulted from oxalic acid. Could not account for the bruises on the body. The body was well nourished and well fed. Could not speak positively upon the cause of debility in his extremities. Was informed that the poor man had had rheumatic gout, which would produce a difficulty of locomotion. One of the kidneys was very much diseased. The stomach bore the closest resemblance to death from oxalic acid. As much as an ounce of oxalic acid had been taken into the body, and after death no trace of it had been seen. - Ann Kirton, wife of Thomas Kirton, labourer, Bickington, said she last saw deceased alive about five weeks ago. She washed after his death deceased's sheets, pillow case, and shirt. Took them from the bed herself. There were no marks on them of any kind; no bloody spots nor stains. Witness attended Mrs Bearn in her confinement in Nov., 1863. Whilst there and before her confinement witness was ironing some clothes when she observed iron mould on a night dress, and said to Mrs Bearne, "If you will buy some salts of lemon I'll take it out." She said, "Will you, nurse? I'll send for some." Mr Bearn was going to Newton the same day, and his wife asked him to fetch it. In the evening Mr Bearn returned with the salts of lemon produced; and witness took out some and used it, and put the rest in a watchcase on a mantelpiece in a front room upstairs. Witness knew that it was poison. - By the Coroner: Believed she took out about a quarter of what was in the packet. - By a Juror: Saw the body at nine o'clock on the morning of MR WILLS' death There was no appearance of his having been sick. - Mr John Bearn was then called. he said he kept the New Inn, Ilsington. Deceased was his wife's father. Deceased had lived at the New Inn about two years and a quarter. He had been confined to his room about five weeks before death. His meals were always taken to him by the servant and witness's son, a little boy. Deceased was in the habit of taking half a pint of beer during the evening. He did not eat anything at the time or afterwards. On the night previous to deceased's death witness was coming from his workshop on the second floor, when he met his own little boy on the staircase. The boy said he was going to bed as soon as he had given his grandfather his half-pint of beer. Witness said he would go up with the boy, and take away his candle when deceased should have got into bed. He went into the room. The boy held the cup to deceased's lips as he lay down, and deceased drank. Witness did not touch the cup, or put anything into the beer. The little boy placed the cup on a small table as usual. Witness said "Good night, MR WILLS," as he had always said, and deceased replied "Good night, John." Witness saw his son go to bed, and brought the candle below stairs. Went then to bed without going into kitchen. Did not see deceased until his son came down to say that his grandfather was dead. Mrs Bearn sent up the breakfast. Witness and she left the breakfast table, and rushed up stairs. The bedclothes of deceased's bed were just in the same state as they were the night before. His coat was still thrown about his shoulders. His body was not distorted and there was no vomit in the room. Deceased was lying on his left side, as he had been left. Witness then corroborated the evidence of the nurse as to the salts of lemon having been bought to take out ironmould. He bought an ounce of Mr Godfrey, druggist, of Newton. He gave the powder to the nurse, and had not seen or heard of it since until the police-sergeant showed it to him. He did not before then know that it was in his house. - By the Coroner: John Pearse frequently went up to see him. He never complained of ill-treatment from him. Deceased got the bruises on his body by falling down, a fortnight before his death. Deceased was sliding himself down the stairs upon his back. Witness asked him where he was going, and he said "going home, John." Witness and his son carried deceased up to his room and put him into bed. He carried him bodily, the boy carrying his legs; he had nothing but his night-dress on. Witness carried on the business of a tailor. Deceased could not generally retain his urine. He could not get into bed after getting out without assistance. - By a Juror: No "quacks" brought him anything. Deceased did not take any spirits after he took to his room. - William Henry Bearn, aged 10 years, said when he took up the beer to his grandfather, he was also going to bed. He met his father on the landing. He carried the beer, and his father the candle. His father took the cup from witness's hand and carried it into witness's room until he got into bed, when his father went downstairs. - By the Coroner: Since deceased's last confinement to his room, he never slid downstairs, and witness never helped his father to carry him back to bed. The deceased never complained of his sores nor of anything. - By Mr Carter: Was positive that his father took the cup from him after witness had given the beer to his grandfather; heard his father go down to the kitchen and not to his bedroom. - Mrs Mary Susannah Bearn, mother of the last witness, corroborated the evidence of her husband and of the nurse. She had washed deceased's sores which were caused by falls and urine which he could not retain. He never complained of being in pain. She never went near the beer that he drank the night before his death; never put anything into it. After his death there was no vomit upon the sheets, blankets or the floor. On the alarm of his death the doctor and nurse were both sent for. Deceased was weak and had long been in the habit of falling. His intellect was very much impaired latterly. He was treated kindly by all in the house. She paid a lodger named Pearse, for attending to deceased at night. - Mr Frederick Godfrey, druggist, Newton, proved that the packet labelled "salts of lemon - poison" was in the handwriting of his wife, who was ill. He did not know of the packet having been sold to Mr and Mrs Bearn. - Mr Shilston, saddler, Newton Bushel, said that the deceased was his brother-in-law. Deceased derived his income from property at Shaldon, which belonged to his late wife and came to him at her decease. After his death the property belonged equally between his children. - By Mr Carter: Deceased and his wife did not live together. MRS WILLS died in November. Mr and Mrs Bearn supported deceased for two years without having received a penny. After November he, as trustee, had to pay Mr and Mrs Bearn £16 a year. They had this interest in deceased's life. They had been kind to deceased, and he had acknowledged their kindness. - Mr Carter then addressed the Jury. He referred to deceased's infirmities, and stated that Dr Herapath's evidence was coupled with a doubt, although on the whole he was of opinion that oxalic acid had been taken. The evidence went to prove that an ounce of the poison had been purchased, that a quarter of an ounce had been taken out by the washerwoman, and there was then the fact that three-quarters of an ounce was found. How could that powder then have occasioned deceased's death? Such crimes were not committed without a motive, which was not supplied in this case. Mr and Mrs Bearn had supported their parent for two years for nothing, and they were not likely to have put an end to his life when they were just getting paid for maintaining him. It should lastly be recollected that the deceased was in the house of his own daughter, and when the facts were weighed he had no doubt they would feel that there were none that warranted an accusation against Mr and Mrs Bearn. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that this investigation was the most serious and most difficult one which he had been concerned with since he held office, and he believed that the case was as difficult as any that had ever attracted attention in the country. They must be guided, however, by the evidence, and take care that a verdict inculpating any persons should not be given on simple suspicion pointing t those persons. If JOHN WILLS died from natural causes the Inquiry would terminate. Was it the case? It would seem as if the little boy when he saw his grandfather was dead did not think much of it, for he returned carefully downstairs with the breakfast tray. And then the doctor was sent for; but it was notable that it was considered necessary to send for the nurse that she might straighten the dead man's limbs before the doctor should come. It appeared to be the opinion in the house that as soon as the body could be put in a state to be seen the better. When Dr Haydon turned the body round, the Jury must have observed the marks as of violence, and that whether they were bruises or not, they extended from his shoulders to his feet. Dr Haydon had stated in his first examination that his attention was attracted by seeing blood on the sheet, and blood was flowing from a wound; yet it should be noticed that haste was made to have the body laid out and cleaned before he saw it. Dr Haydon had shown that deceased was well nourished and healthy enough not to have died without unnatural treatment. It was for them to decide whether this was the case. Mr Carter did not appear able to assign any disease that would account for the death. The medical evidence gave no support to the idea of death from diseased kidneys. Professor Herapath had no object to serve, or local bias, and he declared his belief that MR WILLS was poisoned by oxalic acid, and that the inflammation of the stomach and intestines must have proceeded from an irritant. The doctors did not believe that death was caused by what was known as the drunkard's stomach. Then they had the fact that the old man could not have got at anything except what was brought to him. Who brought the poison, then, if poisoned he was? As to his being poisoned, if they could come to any other conclusion then the medical men did, in God's name let them do so. It was admitted that if deceased were poisoned the poison must have been administered. The difficulty was, how did the poison, if poison it were, get into the stomach? There was no absolute proof of its administration; it was not necessary that there should be actual proof. In Palmer's case there was no proof of who administered the poison or that strychnine was the poison. Strychnine was not produced, as in this case the oxalic acid had not been produced. But there must be something more than mere suspicion against anyone, even to send that person for trial. It was repugnant to the best feelings to suppose that a son-in-law and daughter should be parties to their father's death; but there were others in the house. They must decide who, if any, had poisoned MR WILLS. The Coroner then read over the evidence. If, he added, they believed the washerwoman spoke the truth as to the sheets being unstained he should be glad; he did not believe her. There appeared to have been a great hurry to have the things washed. He had called the little boy in the hope that he would corroborate the statement of his father as to his never having touched the cup at all, and as to his assisting his father to remove the old man to his room some time before his death, but the boy stated with the utmost clearness, that his father took away the cup the night before deceased died, that he took it downstairs, and that he had never assisted his father as stated. One or the other could not have given the right version. The boy was exceedingly intelligent and how he could have forgotten the removal of the old man if it occurred, he was at a loss to understand. The whole theory of deceased having died from partaking of ardent spirits had been done away with, for he had taken none. A great ingredient in crimes was motive. It was far from his hear to suggest as a motive that Mr and Mrs Bearn would gain a few pounds. It had been urged, however, that they had an interest in the old man's life. Now the fact was that the old man it was stated was to have been taken to the Asylum, and unless he went there as a pauper the £16 a year they had for his maintenance would not have sufficed for his support there. By his death they were rid of an old man who gave great trouble, and their share whatever it was would come to them as an uncumbered share. The question then was - was there a degree of motive that might have caused either parties to take away life. He (the Coroner) was inclined to believe that the poison was not given in the beer at night, as he was of opinion that it would have exhibited itself sooner. Professor Herapath said there was a substance of a milky character in the stomach. There was no trace of beer. Was therefore beer the last thing taken. Professor Herapath believed that milk had been taken by the old man in his agony. some hand might have given milk in the night, someone might have watched that death during the night and washed up all traces of the cause of it. It was extraordinary, if true, that an old man like deceased, who was restless and tumbled about the floor at night, should through all the night in question have laid still, for he did not die until morning, because the body was warm and pliable when found. He, as holding the scales fairly between the Crown and the public, would enjoin them not to act upon mere suspicion. They must have more than suspicion, although they were not bound to entertain nonsensical doubts. First, did MR WILLS die by poison? Secondly, did he administer it to himself? Thirdly, if poisoned, and he did not administer it to himself, who gave it to him? These three points they must determine. They must give the benefit of any doubt they could fairly have. He (the Coroner) should be able to receive a verdict that deceased was poisoned, and by whom they could not say; or if the evidence pointed to anyone, that deceased was poisoned by that person or persons; also that deceased destroyed himself. If they could, looking at the facts, say that deceased was not poisoned, he should be delighted to receive such a verdict. - The Jury then retired, and shortly afterwards gave their verdict as follows:- "That deceased died from Poison, not administered by his own hands; that the person or persons who did administer it were unknown." - The Inquiry occupied about six hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 April 1865
TORQUAY - An Inquest has been held at the Torquay Infirmary before the Deputy Coroner, Mr Windeatt, on the body of RICHARD WILLIAMS, who was killed by falling from a house in Belgrave-road on Tuesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 April 1865
DAWLISH - The Mysterious Death Of A Woman At Dawlish. - Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the York Hotel, Dawlish, to Inquire as to the cause of the death of ELLEN WILLIAMS, thirty-four years of age, who was found dead in bed on Tuesday morning. Captain Ferreira was Foreman of the Jury, and the following evidence was taken:- Caroline Stocks said her husband kept the York Hotel at Dawlish. On Monday night last the deceased came to her house and asked for a bedroom, stating that she had been walking all day and was tired. At the deceased's request eight pennyworth of brandy was given to her, which she drank, and afterwards went to bed. About half-past two o'clock the following morning she rang the bell three times and witness went up and found the deceased in bed. There was a candle burning in the room. She told the deceased that she supposed she could not sleep because there was such a noise downstairs. Deceased replied, "I have not slept very much," and then asked what time it was. She told her, and deceased advised her to go to bed. Witness said she should as soon as the house was cleared, but the fair, which only came once a year, had taken place on the previous day, and the night would be nearly over before they could go to bed. Deceased then said she would take a drop of brandy, and she accordingly took up another eight pennyworth, which was mixed with hot water. The words "Good night" having been exchanged, witness left the room. - By a Juryman: When she left the deceased she appeared bright and cheerful, and she observed nothing strange in her conduct. - The Coroner: When the deceased arrived at your house did you ask her where she had come from? - A.: Yes, and she told me she had come from Paddington, and that luggage was at the station. She had a black bag with her. The only thing she ate after her arrival was part of a biscuit. When deceased went to bed she asked what time they get up in the morning, and witness told her that they were not very early risers. Deceased said when she was at home she got up at 5 o'clock, and she should like to get up in the morning to have a bath, as she had come there for the benefit of her health. - Q.: Did she engage the room for any length of time? - A.: No; only for the night, as she was going to look for lodgings the next day. About eight o'clock the same morning her niece brought her a cup of tea, and she told her she had heard nothing of the lady. At 10 o'clock the deceased's bell had not rung, and she directed her niece not to call her, as she considered she must be very tired. At 11 o'clock witness thought it was most extraordinary that the bell had not been rung, and she accordingly went to the deceased's bedroom door, but she found it locked. She knocked several times, but receiving no answer she went into the smoking-room and asked Mr Tuck, a constable, and others, to come up and burst open the door, as she believed there was something wrong. Before, however, the door could be forced open Mr Holman got to the window by a ladder and entered the room, when he saw the deceased lying dead in bed. there was no blood or anything issuing from her mouth, and the deceased appeared exactly as if she were asleep. The brandy and water was consumed, and the tumbler was on the floor by the side of the bed. Dr Baker was called in, and he directed the glass to be taken downstairs. There were papers in the room, but she did not examine them. - Sergeant Mashford here complained of the liberties taken by those persons who entered the bedroom and searched the deceased's pocket. - John Holman, a mason, said that on Tuesday morning, between 11 and 12 o'clock, he was at the York Hotel. At the request of Mrs Stocks he got a ladder, by which he obtained access to the front room, where he found the deceased dead in bed. The bed was not tumbled, and there was not the least signs of any violence having been used. The window through which he entered was not fastened. The room was not in a confused state. He saw some papers on the floor, which Toogood picked up (these papers were produced), on which were printed directions for the use of Simpson's rat poison, and Battle's and Barber's vermin killer. A bottle of Barber's phosphor paste which was found in deceased's bag was produced, but it had not been opened. - MARTIN WILLIAMS, the deceased's husband said he was an engineer of one of her Majesty's tug-boats, but carried on the business of a stationer at Devonport. The deceased left her house about 11 o'clock on Monday. He was not at home at the time; and she did not leave word where she had gone. She had been suffering from a spinal complaint for many years and had frequently shown symptoms of derangement, but had never been placed under restraint. The disease affected the back part of her head, and at times she used to have paroxysms. The deceased never had fits. - By a Juryman: Deceased attempted to drown herself in a water tank about four years ago. Immediately prior to the deceased's leaving home no medical gentleman was attending her. - By the Coroner: It was about half-past 12 o'clock in the afternoon when he returned home, and he anticipated from what his eldest child told him that the deceased had gone to Plymouth to see some of his friends. She seemed to be cheerful in the morning when he left home. He had been told by a doctor who operated on the deceased in America that the complaint would end in self-destruction. - The Coroner: Did you not under these circumstances have someone to look after her? - A.: It was only at certain intervals that she was so bad, and he looked after her then. The deceased did not return home on Monday night; but he was not uneasy about her, as he thought some friends had prevailed on her to stop with them. His friends thought of coming on Tuesday to spend a long day with him, and he considered she would return with them. But neither of them came; and he asked a friend on that day (Tuesday) to go to Plymouth to look for her, but he was met by a person who took him away in another direction on business. He did not anticipate that his wife was going to kill herself; and he was not aware of the fact until a notice of her decease was shown to him in a newspaper on the previous day. - By a Juryman: The bruise on her left cheek was caused by a fall in the parlour last week. The deceased was subject to dizziness in the head. His house was infested with mice, and he had used the poisons mentioned in those papers to kill them, but not lately. Never kept any of those powders in stock. The deceased attended to the stationery business. On the same evening he heard of her death he was going into Cornwall to see if she were visiting any of her friends in that county. - The Coroner: It is a wonder you had not gone to Plymouth to see if she were there. - A Juryman remarked that every chemist ought to put his name on such papers as those produced, so as to ascertain the shop from which they were bought. - Albert Baker, a doctor of medicine, said a little after 12 o'clock on Tuesday he was called to see the deceased. She was quite dead. The appearance of the body indicated that she had not died a natural death. He found the deceased lying on her back, with her head thrown backwards, the arms drawn up towards the head, and the fingers drawn forcibly towards the palms of the hands. There was a general appearance of great pallor and extreme rigidity of the whole body. He observed the face to be drawn, thin, and pallid, especially the gums and mouth. She wore a false tooth in the front, set in a gold plate, and between the teeth, which were partially closed, he found an almond in two pieces, which he removed and gave to the policeman. The eyelids were closed, but the pupil of the eye was very much dilated. On examining the trunk of the body he found the spine completely curved - in fact, the two extremes of the spine were drawn in a concavity. The legs were perfectly extended and the toes drawn towards the sole of the foot. The whole of the upper surface of the body was extremely pallid. It appeared well nourished throughout. The whole of the lower surface of the body had a very tinged and congested appearance. On the left jaw was the mark of a bruise, which appeared to be of some days' standing. It did not look extensive enough to have been done with a blow from the fist. Fluid had oozed from the mouth and run over the right cheek, which was tinged with a bluish colour. He next examined the articles in the room. The bedclothes were in a very disordered state. There were two white pocket handkerchiefs lying on the floor, and on them were distinct traces of a blue powder. The initials or name had been carefully picked out or destroyed. There were also two or three papers handed to him, which had contained a blue powder. The papers were marked "Rat poison." He examined the rummer, but, finding no traces of any discolouration or fluid, he told the landlord that he might remove it, together with a jug of pure water which stood beside it. Among the articles found in the room was a broken silver ladle, such as was used for tea or sugar, and there were evident marks of some dark material having been mixed in it. He had since purchased a packet of Battle's vermin killer, which he now produced. It was cautiously labelled, and contained about two scruples of blue powder. He then proceeded to wash some of it carefully, and on adding nitric acid he produced several distinct red-coloured grains, which he concluded to be strychnine. These powders he believed had been analysed and it had been stated that they all contained four grains of strychnine, which was sufficient to cause death. Strychnine was insoluble in brandy and water. - The Coroner said there was no evidence to lead to the supposition that any violence had been used, or that any person had administered poison but herself. He thought there was sufficient evidence to suggest that the death of the deceased was caused by poisoning, and the question to decide was what state of mind she was in at the time. - The Jury expressed a wish to have a post mortem examination on the body made, and for that purpose the Inquest was adjourned until Monday.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 April 1865
DAWLISH - The Suicide Of A Devonport Tradeswoman At Dawlish. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest by Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of MRS ELLEN WILLIAMS took place yesterday in the York Hotel, Dawlish, the Inquiry having been adjourned from Thursday in order to ascertain the result of a post mortem examination of the body. Capt. Ferreira was Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner read over the evidence previously given, when he said that the steps Dr Baker had taken in sending the viscera for analysis to Professor Herapath, F.R.S., Bristol, were such as if allowed in every case would incur heavy expenses to the county. In a case where some doubts existed whether the deceased had been murdered or there were suspicious circumstances in the case, as at Ilsington lately, it was necessary to send the stomach for analysis; but in the present case he did not think it necessary. - In answer to a question from the Foreman of the Jury, the Coroner replied that it was not necessary to send many cases to an analytical chemist. - Mr Baker said he understood the Coroner at the former Enquiry had empowered him to act as he had done. In many cases country practitioners incurred great censure when taking such matters entirely into their own hands, as required a man specially qualified for it to conduct an analysis. - The Coroner said he thought that the Jury could at their last meeting have arrived at the conclusion that deceased died from poison; and the circumstances pointed to the fact that no one administered it to her but herself. - After some further conversation relative to the expense incurred by the analysis of the stomach, the Coroner took the following evidence:- Albert Baker, M.D., stated that he had by order of the Coroner made an examination of the body, and found that decomposition had taken place. The face was very pallid, and the body, after the last Inquest, was left lying in "the eye of the sun." Venous blood was exuding from the mouth. The eyes were prominent, with the pupils dilated. He found great tumidity of the abdomen and marked congestion of the venous circulation in the shoulders, arms and back. The muscles of the body were very rigid, the fingers being drawn and unyielding. The feet were drawn inwards. On opening the abdomen there was a large escape of intensely offensive gas. In the chest he found the posterior and inferior lobes of the lungs much congested, and spots of partial emphysema (blisters) and on being pressed much serum exuded. The heart was flabby, empty and collapsed, but otherwise healthy. The intestines were removed for analysis. The brain was congested, especially towards the posterior, extending to the spinal cord. On removing the dura mater, there were evident traces of old inflammatory action. [?]osition of lymph had taken place all along the course of the superficial veins running up from the spinal cord and cerebellum. The hard part of the brain was rather dark and soft, but he could not detect any clot of blood in any part so as to account for sudden death. He found no internal marks of violence. There was nothing to indicate disease in the organs he had examined, and he believed deceased died from poison. - ELLEN WILLIAMS, daughter of deceased, stated that she saw her mother last on Monday morning in their shop at Devonport, dressed ready to go out, and when she left she did not say when she should come back or where she was going. Her mother appeared rather excited at the time. Her parents lived upon good terms with each other. - The Coroner read a letter from Mr May, surgeon, of Devonport, which stated that deceased suffered much from [?]atal irritation, and had often spoken of destroying herself and attempted to do so a few years ago. The Jury at once returned a verdict that the deceased Destroyed Herself while in an Unsound State of Mind. - Evidence of the result of Professor Herapath's analysis was not taken, but that gentleman was present, and it was understood that large traces of arsenic and white arsenic had been found in the stomach, but not of strychnine. Professor Herapath most readily waived all claim to remuneration in the matter. - Coincidentally the Coroner mentioned that "troubles seldom come alone," and that the husband of deceased had a child nearly burnt to death on the previous day. MR WILLIAMS was present at the conclusion of the Inquiry, and had one of his hands bandaged in consequence of severe burns he received while endeavouring to save his child. - We learn that the deceased woman, who conducted the business of a stationer at Devonport, her husband being generally absent on his naval duties, was in business on the day on which she went away and displayed no symptoms of mental derangement to cursory observers.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 April 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Child Drowned At Stonehouse. - Mr Allan B. Bone, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Commercial Inn, Newport-street, Stonehouse, as to the circumstances attending the death of a boy named WILLIAM HOSKING. On Monday evening the deceased, who was between five and six years of age, left his home to go out to lay. He was afterwards seen on Stonehouse Quay alone, and yesterday morning he was found dead on the mud in Stonehouse Pool. Crabs had eaten portions of the face, but there were no visible marks of violence on the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead, but how the deceased came to his death there was no evidence to show."

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 April 1865
YEALMPTON - The Death By The Fall Of A Tree At Newton Ferrers. - An Inquest was held at Yealmpton on Thursday evening, before Mr Alan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS LAPTHORNE, an old man, who met with his death by the fall of a tree on Saturday last. It will be remembered that the deceased, with his son and William Dunn, was cutting down a tree at Torre, in Newton Ferrers, when they all sat down to tea, and the tree, which had been partially cut through, fell upon the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased met with his death by the Accidental falling of a tree upon him."

Western Morning News, Monday 1 May 1865
PLYMOUTH - Death By Drowning In The Sound. - On Friday night MR GEORGE GIBSON BROWN, a clerk in the storekeeper's department of the Royal William Victualling Yard, Stonehouse, was drowned in Plymouth Sound through the upsetting of a boat. Shortly after six, he left the yard in a four-oared gig with two other young men, Mr F. Gibson, a merchant's clerk, and John Purdy, apprentice in the bakery of the Victualling-yard. After rowing as far as Devil's Point they set three sails on the boat, and sailed out round the Breakwater. On their return across the Sound squalls came on, as the result of which the boat was filled with water, and she was capsized. Gibson and Purdey hung to the boat and were picked up about three-quarters of an hour after the accident by a boat's crew of the Queen's Harbour Master's tender and the body of BROWN was also picked up, clinging to an oar as the boat was returning to the tender. An Inquest was held at the Victualling-yard on Saturday afternoon. - Verdict - "Accidental Death." - The deceased was 27 years of age, unmarried. He was accustomed to the sea and was the inventor of a trigging hook for facilitating the handling of boat's leg of mutton sails.

Western Morning News. - Tuesday 2 May 1865
TORQUAY - The Fatal Accident At Babbicombe - An Inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, Babbicombe, on Saturday evening, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of a child aged four years and three months named TOM ADAMS BOVEY. From the evidence, it appeared that the child, who was fond of flowers, was on the cliff on Thursday evening in search of cowslips, and in his endeavour to reach some below the edge of the cliff he fell over. The height of the cliff above the beach where he fell is nearly 300 feet. The body rolled from rock to rock, down 150 feet, and was caught at last by a furze bush. Coastguardsman Perry climbed up from the beach, picked up the child, who was still alive, and carried him home, where he died about half an hour afterwards. The skull was fractured in several places. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - A Mulatto Drowned At Sutton Pool Through Drunkenness. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM WITICK, a mulatto, was held last evening, before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner. Deceased was a vendor of wood and lodged with Joseph Williams, a shoemaker, in Southside-street. He left his lodgings on Saturday morning, and was not heard of during the day. About eleven o'clock on the same night John A. Lavers, landlord of the Harbour Avenue Inn, saw the deceased pass his house in a beastly state of intoxication in the direction of the North quay; and early on Sunday morning he was found lying dead in the mud of Sutton Pool, very near the Harbour Avenue Inn. On being searched, 1s. 2 ½d. was found on his person. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 May 1865
SLAPTON - Death From Stabbing At Slapton, near Kingsbridge. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at Slapton, a village about six miles from Kingsbridge, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr John Huxham was Foreman, on the body of MR PHILLIMORE, who was stabbed by one of his workmen on the 28th April. - James Cole said: I lived in the house with deceased, MR PHILLIMORE. My master kept a fishing boat, of which William Ellis, Robert Knowles and myself formed part of the crew. On Friday, the 28th of April, my master went to the house of Robert Knowles to ascertain the reason that he had not been fishing. Knowles was not home, but hearing that MR PHILLIMORE had called, he came to see him. MR PHILLIMORE asked the reason he had not been fishing, to which he replied in an abusive manner, and said he was owed 2s. already, which his master paid him. He then asked for some cider, which was refused, and he left the house and went home. He afterwards returned, when MR PHILLIMORE attempted to put him out of the house, and blows were exchanged. William Ellis and I, hearing the noise, came to master's assistance, and after a scuffle, we got Knowles down, with the intention of keeping him down until the police came. At that time I felt a knife cutting me, when I said "I'm cut," and looking towards MR PHILLIMORE I saw that he had been cut also, when we let go our hold on Knowles. - William Ellis gave evidence to the same effect. his trousers had also been cut. - P.C. Courtney deposed: Having received information of the occurrence, I immediately went to the house, and found MR PHILLIMORE seated in a chair, bleeding very much. I said, "MR PHILLIMORE, what is the matter?" He said, "I have been boxing with Knowles, and he has cut me." MR PHILLIMORE was bathing the wound with water. I said, "Will you give Knowles into custody?" He replied, "Oh, yes." I went to the Rev. J. S. Vaughan, and asked him to go to MR PHILLIMORE'S house. He immediately went, and after a short time he stopped the bleeding. He told me he feared the wound would be fatal. I went to Knowles's house and found him with nothing but his trousers on. I said, "MR PHILLIMORE has given me orders to take you into custody for stabbing him." He made use of some abusive language, saying he would have MR PHILLIMORE brought before him. I immediately caught hold of him and got him outside of his house, when he attempted to strike me. I got him down and hand-bolted him. I gave him in charge of the parish constable, and went and searched about the place for a knife, but did not find one. - The Coroner, having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 May 1865
TAUNTON - Alleged Manslaughter Of An Exeter Man By A Taunton Auctioneer. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Taunton, on the body of MR JOSEPH WEBBER, a fly proprietor of Exeter, who died on Sunday last from injuries received through a collision on the 21st of March. It appeared that Mr White, of Bridgwater, had driven to Taunton, accompanied by two friends, named Wilkins and Kenway, Mr White's business being to procure an auctioneer's license. They arrived in Taunton in the afternoon, and having partaken of some champagne at the George Hotel, they visited another inn and a "private house," where they obtained several glasses of brandy and gin. They returned to the George about 8 in the evening, and then, in a "spreeish" state, as one of the witnesses described them, they commenced the journey homeward. The horse set off at a good pace, and two witnesses deposed that Mr White drove with great speed from the George Hotel into Fore street, where the dog-cart swerved from side to side, till it came into violent collision with a fly driven by the deceased. A terrible smash ensued, both vehicles becoming in an instant complete wrecks. The deceased had driven two women, of Torquay, from Ilminster, and they escaped unhurt, but deceased himself, who fell on the ground, pitched on his head, and sustained a severe scalp wound. He was removed to the hospital, where he lingered till Sunday, when he died of inflammation of the brain. A few days after his admission he made a deposition before a magistrate, in which he stated that Mr White endeavoured to prevent a collision. The Jury, however, returned a verdict to the effect that there had been culpable carelessness on the part of Mr White, and he was then committed by the Coroner on a charge of Manslaughter, but admitted to bail. The investigation lasted eight hours.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 May 1865
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - On Wednesday evening, an old man named THOMAS WILLCOCKS, a retired master carpenter, residing with his daughter, Mrs Robins, at 27 Buckwell-street, was seen to go upstairs about half past five o'clock to put on an overcoat for the purpose of going out for a walk. Two hours afterwards his hat was observed by the servant to be in the kitchen; and suspicion being thus aroused, Mrs Robins hastened to the deceased's room, where he was found on the ground, speechless. At an Inquest held at the Guildhall yesterday, before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, a verdict of "Sudden Death" was returned. Mr J. Joseph was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 May 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Of A Lunatic At The Plympton Asylum. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Cross Keys Inn, Tavistock-street, Stoke, upon the body of CAROLINE AVERY. Deceased had been for about a month an inmate of the Plympton Lunatic Asylum, where she died on the 3rd inst. On that day deceased's husband, who resides at Stoke, had determined to have her brought home. Every arrangement was made for the purpose, when a messenger arrived from the Asylum with the message that MRS AVERY had died suddenly, hinting, however, that she had been in a declining condition for about the previous fortnight. Some bruises were also found about her face and eyes, and owing to these circumstances a representation of the facts was made to Mr Bone, the Coroner, who decided upon holding an Inquest. - Mary Warren said that she had been an attendant at the Plympton Lunatic Asylum between one and two years.  Mr R. Langworthy was the master and Mr Rumming the surgeon of the institution. Deceased was brought to the Asylum about a month ago. She slept in the bedroom with witness, and in the daytime occupied a sitting-room with other females. She was in a very bad condition, being quite insane; her chief delusion was that Satan was after her, and was going to cut her up and burn her, but that she should not die; that she would be always burning and being cut into pieces, yet would never die, but would always be suffering. Deceased was very restless, being continually troubled with delusions night and day. From the first it was difficult to get her to take any food; but she would drink water, ale, or brandy and water. She always had what she wanted. About a week before her death she refused all food. Witness did not notice any material change in her, however, until the day of her death, when she became very faint. Various artificial means had to be used to inject food into the stomach of deceased. Deceased was so violent that it became necessary to tie her hands behind her back to prevent her doing mischief to herself, and this would produce slight marks upon her wrists; but her hands were not tied tightly; only slight pressure was observable. She was accustomed to go into the garden morning and evening up to the day of her death. When deceased appeared faint Dr Rumming was called to her, and brandy and water was administered, but she did not revive. There were marks by the side of her face near the chin; but no violence had ever been used towards her, and most certainly she was never struck. Deceased might have struck herself against the sofa, which would have produced the bruises; but witness was prepared to swear that deceased was treated with every care, attention and kindness. Deceased threatened to drown herself if she could find any water. The brandy and water was administered by order of Dr Rumming; but deceased apparently died without a struggle. Witness had told deceased's relatives that they were compelled to tie her hands behind her back to prevent her tearing her face and otherwise injuring herself; but witness did not remember seeing any marks on the eye of deceased. - Georgiana Richmond said she was a niece of the deceased, and that on Friday week last she first went to see her aunt at Plympton, and then saw her coming up from the garden into the house. Her hands were strapped and buckled; observed that her hands and wrists were swollen very much; witness also saw marks on her face. She mentioned it to the previous witness, who said that they were obliged to fasten the bandages tightly, or the deceased would get her hands through. Witness asked deceased how she came with the black mark near her eye, but she made no answer. Witness then mentioned it to the matron, but no satisfactory answer was given. After some incoherent conversation with the deceased the matron told witness that deceased had been strapped to the bed. - Mary Warren, the previous witness, said she had intended to have stated to the Jury that deceased had been strapped to the bed, but had forgotten it. Deceased was sometimes so violent at night that it was absolutely necessary to adopt that course. - Considerable cross-examination ensued, in which it was evident that the relatives of deceased did not think the deceased had been kindly treated. - Mary Ann Holman, the sister of deceased, was next examined, and corroborated the evidence of her niece, Richmond. - Mr J. R. Laity, surgeon, deposed to having attended deceased at her residence at Stoke. He had suggested her being removed to the Lunatic Asylum. He considered the marks on deceased might have been caused in the way described by the first witness, Warren; and without any ill-treatment on the part of the officers of the institution. - Mr Rumming, surgeon of the Asylum, also gave evidence of the treatment deceased had received, and stated that on the previous Thursday, after some brandy and water had been administered to deceased, she fainted away, and died almost instantaneously. - The Coroner minutely summed up the evidence, and the Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from Natural Causes, and exonerating the managers of the Asylum from any blame in the matter.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 May 1865
PLYMOUTH - A Girl Burnt To Death At Plymouth. - An Inquiry into the cause of the death of FANNY BLOWER, a girl aged 13, was made last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, by Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner. Deceased had been a cripple, and afflicted with paralysis since her birth, and the unfortunate girl was unable to put the slightest check upon the flames when her clothes first became ignited. Deceased lived with her father, who is a journeyman currier, in Looe-street, and on the morning of the 6th of May was left alone in the room, her father, who is a widower, having gone to his work. Not long afterwards the neighbours in the house were alarmed by loud screams, and on going to the room found the deceased enveloped in flames. She was immediately wrapped in a large rug, and the flames were soon extinguished. Deceased's whole body was badly burnt, but more especially the face, neck, arms, chest and back. Oil and lime water were instantly applied, and medical assistance procured; but all efforts to save life were unavailing, although the deceased lingered in great agony until Sunday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 May 1865
PLYMOUTH - Death Without A Warning. - Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Shaftesbury Working Men's Reading Room, Plymouth, on Wednesday evening, on the body of SARAH WAKEHAM, a single woman, aged 39. The deceased, formerly a domestic servant and who had been subject to fits, had come over from jersey to stay with a friend named Mr Patton, living in Providence-street, and on Tuesday evening, after eating a hearty supper of eggs and bacon, retired to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, with Mr Patton's daughter. Mr and Mrs Patton shortly afterwards passed through the room to go to bed, and wished them both good night. On the following morning when Mr Patton passed through the room, shortly before six o'clock, he noticed that the deceased looked very white, and directly fetched his wife, when it was discovered that SARAH WAKEHAM was dead by the side of their daughter, who was asleep. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. On going to bed the deceased appeared in perfect health and was very cheerful.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 May 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - A Man Killed At Devonport. - Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Devonport Guildhall, as to the cause of the death of a man named RICHARD KEAST, who lived in James-street, in that borough. On Tuesday week last the deceased, who was 80 years old, was crossing St. Aubyn-street, when a two-wheeled trap which was being driven by a baker named Granger knocked him down in passing, and one of the wheels went over his leg. He afterwards died from the injuries he then received. It seems that on the day in question Granger, together with three other men, named respectively Bone, Wheeler and Snell, drove to Roborough Races, and were on their way to Torpoint, where they all reside, when the accident occurred. Granger was said to have called out to the deceased when the vehicle was approaching him, but before the horse could be pulled up the shaft had knocked the old man down, and the wheel had injured one of his legs. George Webb and John Lambell, two youths, together with a young girl named Lavinia Cann, deposed that Granger was driving at a "pretty fast rate" at the time of the accident; but Bone, Wheeler, Snell and a shipwright named Davis, who is employed by Mr Shilson at Plymouth, swore that the horse was not going more than five miles an hour. Bone, in reply to the Coroner, said they were not driving fast in order to save the steamer from Newpassage to Torpoint, because they had ample time to catch it. They drank nothing but cider during the day, and they were perfectly sober, as they only had three quarts between four of them. The deceased's daughter, HARRIETT PERKINS, said her father had enjoyed good health. He was not at all deaf, and his sight was clear. He had a cold on the day in question, and that might have affected his hearing. On the night of the 9th he had been to a club, where he had transacted his duties as steward, and was returning home when he met with the accident. After he was brought home he told her that he had come home to die. On the following day he appeared uncertain as to whether he should die or not, and he then said that he remembered the trap coming about twelve miles an hour, and he tried to clear it, but failed to do so. - Mr Delarne, surgeon, said that on Friday, the 12th instant, he saw the deceased at his house and found him in a state of great prostration and suffering. The sight of the right eye was entirely destroyed, from severe inflammation, and the parts around it were much contused. The leg was much swollen, and very painful. He improved for a day or two, but erysipelas affected the leg, and he became delirious. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said the shock which the deceased received was too severe for a man of his age to overcome. - The Coroner had partly summed up, when he was informed that some further evidence might be obtained as to the rate at which Granger drove up St. Aubyn-street on the night of the 9th instant. The Inquiry was then adjourned until Monday afternoon for the production of important witnesses. - Mr G. H. E. Rundle was present and watched the proceedings on behalf of the deceased's family.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 May 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Of A Prisoner In The Devonport Prisons. - On Saturday afternoon Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Prisons, touching the death of a prisoner named JAMES FORESTER. Deceased, who was about twenty-tree years of age, was convicted at the Christmas Borough Quarter Sessions on a charge of participating in a highway robbery, and was sentenced to eighteen months' imprisonment. About four days previous to his death deceased complained of severe pain in his throat and Mr Edwards, the Governor of the prison, gave orders for his admission into the prison infirmary, where he received every attention. Deceased, getting worse, medical assistance was procured, and it was proved that he was suffering from inflammation of the windpipe, and he died on Friday. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased died from Natural Causes," and expressed themselves of opinion that he had received every attention from the hands of the prison authorities.

KINGSBRIDGE - the body of the man named HUTCHINGS was picked up off Salcombe on Saturday. He was one of the four men accidentally drowned three weeks ago in that locality, and the bodies of all have now been recovered. The Inquest was held before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, the same day. The verdict, of course, was "Accidental Death."

LONDON - Shocking Death Of A Native Of Devonport. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Cannon-street-road, London, on Friday evening, respecting the death of MRS HANNAH HANCOCK, aged 54 years. - Mr T. Overton said that the deceased was found dead in a room at 37 Betts-street, St George's-in-the-East, on Tuesday last, and from documents which were found stitched up in her bustle, it appeared that she had been born in Devonport in 1811, and she inherited £900 in the Three per Cent. Consols, and £500 in the Three and a Half per Cents. In 1844 she was married in Plymouth to a gentleman named FREDERICK HANCOCK. Witness had received a letter from Mr Vallance, of Exeter, stating that deceased had been very badly treated by her husband, who, after taking nearly all her property, deserted her, went abroad, and never after was heard of. She procured an annuity of £22 per annum by the sale of part of her stock, and she lived upon that sum. - Anna Kink said that MRS HANCOCK lodged with her, and paid 2s. a week rent. She would often get drunk, and would consume a pint of gin in a day. She always kept herself locked up in her own room. Letters would come to her at times, and she would go and return with money and drink, and lock herself in as before. Last Tuesday, as she did not make her appearance nor answer when called, witness fetched P.C. Fuller 133 H., who broke in the door and found her dead. Dr H. H. Adam said that he was called in to the deceased and found her lying along the floor with her head under the grate, and her throat resting on the edge of the fender. On the table were a gin bottle and a cup containing gin. It was evidence that she had drunk until she fell from her chair, and that she was too intoxicated to rise. The pressure of her throat on the edge of the fender produced death by suffocation, and in her struggles her tongue was protruded, and the surface of it was covered with cinders and ashes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by a fall while in a state of Intoxication."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 May 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - The Man Killed At Devonport. The Adjourned Inquest. - The Inquiry as to the cause of the death of RICHARD KEAST, an old man, who was killed by being ridden over at Devonport a short time since, was resumed yesterday at the Devonport Guildhall, before Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner. It will be remembered that on the night of Tuesday week last the deceased was crossing St. Aubyn-street, when he was knocked down by a two-wheeled trap driven by a baker named Granger, who lives at Torpoint, and from the injuries he received he afterwards died. The Inquest had been adjourned in order that witnesses might be procured who would speak impartially as to the speed at which the horse was being driven at the time of the accident. Richard Cook, an elderly man, gave it as his opinion that Granger was driving about six miles an hour, while a postman named Pearse, said the horse was going eight or nine miles an hour. - The Coroner said the simple question for the Jury to decide was whether there had been any culpable negligence on the part of Granger, who was driving. If a man drove a horse and carriage at a furious pace through a street where several people were standing, and thereby occasioned the death of one of them, he would be undoubtedly guilty of manslaughter. And if the evidence satisfied them that Granger was driving at a furious or very rapid pace, so as to be calculated to bring persons into danger, and he drove over a person and was the cause of his death, he would be guilty of the offence before named. The law required that ordinary care should be used so as to avoid the probability of accident. Supposing they found the evidence conflicting as to the pace at which the horse was being driven, they would most likely feel that it was a doubtful matter as to whether the person in charge of the animal was driving it in such a manner as to make him criminally responsible. With regard to the other men in the carriage, they did not seem to have taken any part in the driving, or to have incited the driver to drive at a rapid pace, so that the responsibility, whatever it might amount to, appeared to be confined to Granger. If after considering the whole evidence they thought it was a case of suspicion merely, they would not return a verdict of manslaughter, but if they had no doubt whatever that the horse was being driven at a furious pace, it would then be their duty to return such a verdict. - The Jury then retired, and after an absence of three-quarters of an hour returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a recommendation that the Coroner would admonish the driver of the trap. Granger was then called forward and Mr Bone told him that he had had a very narrow escape and under all the circumstances he might rather congratulate himself that no more serious verdict had been returned. He then desired Granger to be more careful for the future when driving through the public streets. - Mr g. H. E. Rundle again attended and watched the proceedings on behalf of the deceased's family.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - The Coroner's Jury empanelled to Inquire concerning the death of MICHAEL JOSEPH MCCARDELL, a little boy who was run over and killed on Saturday last at Charles-place, Plymouth, last evening returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the circumstances as stated yesterday being fully confirmed.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 May 1865
TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at the London Hotel yesterday before F. B. Cuming, Esq., on the body of MARY DAIMOND, who had committed suicide on the previous day by hanging herself. The only evidence given was that of Mrs Haywood, the person who last saw her alive on Monday night at ten o'clock, and Mr Coleridge, who broke open the door of her room on Tuesday morning and found her hanging to her bed dead. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide by Hanging herself whist in a state of Unsound Mind."

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Wednesday, on the body of JOHN HAYDON, who was killed by the wheel of a cart passing over him, as described in the Morning News of yesterday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 May 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - Mr Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, on the body of a man between 60 and 70 years, named JOHN COOLYN, who on Tuesday last accidentally fell out of a cart near Torpoint, and sustained injuries which caused his death. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 May 1865
Sudden Death At Newhouse. - An inquest was held at Newhouse yesterday afternoon, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of JAMES BLATCHFORD, a child between three and four years old, who died suddenly on the previous day. He had been unwell for some days before his death, and on Sunday got worse. The father went to Modbury to obtain medical assistance, but before his return with a doctor the child was dead. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Death In The Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse on Saturday night on the body of a pauper named WILLIAM ROWETT, aged 56 years, who had been an inmate of the house for some time, and was in the last stage of consumption. The deceased cut his throat on Friday night with a razor and died about two hours afterwards. The razor must have been concealed carefully, as no person knew the man possessed one. Death was accelerated by the act, although it was not the entire cause, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 May 1865
TORQUAY - Well-To-Do Paupers At Torquay. - An Inquest held yesterday disclosed a disgraceful state of affairs, which few could have believed existed in the fashionable town of Torquay. An infant named ELLEN ROWE, six months old, was found dead by the side of its mother on Sunday morning. The family consisted of the father, a working jeweller, who, according to his own statement, reluctantly made, earns not less than £1 a week; the mother; the eldest boy, 19 years old, who earns 14s. or 15s. a week; two younger boys, a little girl about 3 years old, and the deceased. All these sleep in one room, about 10 feet square - the father, mother, little girl and baby in one bed three feet by six, and the boys sleep on the floor. With admitted earnings of 35s. per week, the family appeared to be in a state of destitution, and had recourse to the relieving officer and parish doctor. The Jury returned the following verdict - "That ELLEN ROWE was Accidentally Suffocated in bed on the morning of Sunday last, the 28th day of May instant, at Torquay, and the Jurors desire to express their disgust at the negligence and disgraceful conduct of the parents of the said deceased in not providing better accommodation and proper provision for their children, considering the wages that the father admits he can and does earn." A Juryman named Williams was fined 10s. for having neglected to attend in time.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 June 1865
DREWSTEIGNTON - An Inquiry was held on Thursday by Mr Vallack, Coroner for Devon, on WILLIAM BEVANS, mason, aged 56 years, who committed suicide by drowning himself. The deceased complained of pains in his head on Sunday last, and remained in bed the whole of that day, and on Monday his master observed that he was in an excited state. No cause can be assigned for his committing the act, and the Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 June 1865
PLYMOUTH - Remarkable Death Of A Child. - Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of MARY JANE CHAPPELL, a child two years of age, and daughter of a seaman on board Her Majesty'[s ship Phoebe. - On Thursday last the child was running across the room, when she fell, and struck her eye on a mat that was lying on the floor. No apparent injury had been caused, and the blow was taken no more notice of that day. On Friday the eye appeared red, and the child's mother, believing it to be inflamed, applied elder water to it. On Sunday morning the eye was very much swollen, and the child seemed in great pain throughout the day. In the evening Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, was sent for, and by his direction a leech was applied to the eye. Deceased suffered great agony throughout the night, and died early on Monday morning. - Mr May, in reply to the Coroner, said that in his opinion the death of deceased was caused by the blow on the left eye producing inflammation, which extended to the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 June 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - A Child Killed While Asleep. - An Inquest has been held by Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, at the Devonport Guildhall, touching the death of JAMES FIELD, the infant son of a shoemaker residing in Jessamine-lane. Evidence was adduced which clearly proved the child to have been Accidentally Suffocated between his parents while in bed, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 June 1865
EXETER - Suspicious Death Of "A Living Skeleton." - Mr H. W. Hooper, Exeter City Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday evening concerning the death of ROBERT GREEN, a lad about 14 years old, who it was believed had been exhibited as "a living skeleton." - Ann Dunsford, a widow, in the employ of Mrs Newquit, who is the proprietress of an exhibition now travelling in Cornwall, sand in whose service the deceased had also been, said the deceased had for fourteen days been an inmate in the Cornwall Infirmary at Truro, and on Wednesday last, at the request of the house surgeon (Dr Bassett), he was discharged, that Mrs Newquite might send him to Bath to some of his relatives - his parents being dead. Witness was employed by Mrs Newquite to take the boy home, and she left Truro on Thursday afternoon, but finding on arriving at Exeter that the deceased was in too weak a state to proceed on the journey, she procured a cart and took him to Emery's lodging-house in Frog-street. She had not given the deceased any solid food since they left Truro. - The Coroner: Why did you not offer him some meat? - Witness: He was only in my charge on Thursday. - Coroner: Why did you not do it then? - Witness: I gave him a bit of mackerel in the evening, he could not eat anything. I gave him tea with an egg beat in it, also some wine and water. Soon after eight o'clock in the evening she left the deceased in care of some fire-screen makers, in order to get a letter written to Mrs Newquit, to the effect that she was immediately to come up from Cornwall, as GREEN was very ill. - Thomas Emery, a lad about 11 years of age, son of a lodging-house keeper, said he was told by his youngest brother that there was a "little thin boy upstairs almost a skeleton." He got a candle and went up to the bedroom, but found that the deceased was dead. - Mr John S. Perkins, surgeon, said he was sent for on Thursday night about 11 o'clock to attend the deceased. He found the body very much emaciated, but was of opinion that the deceased died from exhaustion, although he could not say without further examination, that exhaustion was not natural. - The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until today and gave Mr Perkins orders to make a post mortem examination, and requested that the attendance of Mrs Newquit should be procured.

PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Seaman. - On Friday morning a seaman belonging to the barque Southern Bell, then lying in Catwater, named ALEXANDER SANDON, a native of Chilli, in South America, about 37 years of age, was sent aloft with the end of the tape line to measure some new rigging. He had hold of the main truss with one hand, but let go to place the other higher up. Deceased then slipped, and fell to the deck, fracturing his skull. He was immediately conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where he died on the afternoon of the same day, never having spoken a word from the time of his fall. At an Inquiry into the circumstances held on Saturday, before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - Mr F. B. Cuming, the District coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday afternoon at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, into the death of GEORGE BREWER, aged 38. From the evidence of Mary Hutton, Sarah Martin, and Jane Sedgmond (with the latter deceased had been living), it appeared that he had been ill for some weeks, and that he went to bed on Friday morning suffering excruciating pain. In the afternoon, at three o'clock, when his friends left him for about a quarter of an hour, he seized the opportunity their absence offered by hanging himself to the bedpost. When cut down he breathed once, but all the attempts of the women to restore him were unavailing. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Cab Accident At Devonport. - On Friday evening as John Dillon was driving a cab, the property of Mr Doney, of Plymouth, over Millbridge, ALFRED RICHARD POND, a lad about nine years of age, ran after the cab, and catching hold of the axle lifted his feet from the ground in order to ride upon the axle, but one of his legs accidentally caught in the spokes of one of the wheels which dragged him on the ground after the cab. Before the vehicle could be stopped the poor boy was fatally injured. Deceased was conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, and died two hours after the accident. Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Saturday afternoon, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated the cabman Dillon from blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 June 1865
EXETER - The Death Of A Skeleton Boy At Exeter. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ROBERT GREEN was resumed last evening at Exeter, before Mr Hooper, Coroner. It will be remembered that the Inquest was adjourned from Friday evening for the purpose of Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, making a post mortem examination. He reported that deceased died from disease of the heart. The Jury having retired, returned into the room with the following verdict:- "That ROBERT GREEN died suddenly from disease of the heart, but the Jurors cannot separate without an expression of great surprise that Mr N. F. Bassett, the surgeon of the Cornwall Infirmary at Truro, should have permitted the removal of the said ROBERT GREEN from that institution after stating in a written certificate now produced to the Jurors that he was at the time of his removal "extremely ill."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 June 1865
EXETER - Death From Suffocation. - Mr Hooper, Coroner for Exeter, held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Golden Lion, Newtown, on the body of MARY ANN CARTER, an infant. On Monday afternoon the mother gave the child to a girl of the name of Webber, and requested her to take it up to bed, which she did. An hour and a half afterwards the mother, who is a laundress, was in her wash-house, when she heard the baby cry, and asked Webber to go to it. A few minutes elapsed before she went and on going into the room she discovered the baby lying dead on the bed, with blood flowing from her mouth. Mr Perkins, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and it was that gentleman's opinion that death was owing to the rupture of a small blood vessel in the throat and that the blood travelled back to the wind-pipe and chocked the child.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 June 1865
PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Cattedown. - A sad event took place yesterday at Cattedown, which has occasioned great regret throughout the neighbourhood. At about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, George Jarvis, a labourer in the employ of Messrs. Charles Norrington and co., manufacturers of superphosphate of lime at Cattedown, was in the stores, when he heard the report of a gun. He immediately went to the office and asked if MR BURDWOOD (a clerk) was there. He was answered in the negative, and, on mentioning his having heard the report of a gun, was told that it was probably MR BURDWOOD shooting rabbits. Not feeling easy, however, Jarvis went to the seed store, and there found MR JOSEPH BURDWOOD lying on the floor on his back. An alarm being raised Mr Hicks, surgeon, was sent for, who, on arriving, found the deceased to be dead. There was a circular wound about six inches in circumference in his head, which had entirely destroyed the left eye and the orbit, fractured the temporal, frontal and parietal bones. A very large quantity of clotted blood was on the floor under the deceased's head, his face being blackened with fire. Sergeant Giles, who accompanied the surgeon, found deceased's double-barrelled gun near his left side. One of the barrels of the gun had been discharged. Deceased occasionally drank to excess. He was a married man, aged forty-five, and resided at No. 5 Jubilee-place, having been in Messrs. Norrington's employ for many years. On Saturday afternoon two other clerks had arranged with him that they should leave for town and that he should stay at the office, but on his leaving, as he said, for a short time to go into Cattedown, they agreed that he was not fit to mind the office, having been drinking even more than usual during the week, and consequently a Mr Shearm stayed in his stead, but deceased did not return as he had promised. he was last seen alive yesterday morning by Mr B. Sparrow, clerk in the firm of Messrs. Sparrow, Brothers and Scott, when he seemed to be in a desponding state of mind. An Inquest was held last evening before Mr Edmonds, Coroner, when Mr Hicks having stated his conviction that the deceased committed suicide whilst in temporary insanity caused by delirium tremens, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXETER - Manslaughter Of A Wife At Exeter. - Last evening a Coroner's Jury at Exeter returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against an old man named TAYLOR for having caused the death of his wife, also an aged person. The evidence shewed that the couple, who had lived in the almshouses near St Thomas Church, were of drunken habits, that on the 5th of November last during a quarrel, the man, who was intoxicated, struck his wife with an oak stick used for cracking stones. One of her legs was thus broken and other injuries inflicted. She was taken to the hospital and amputation had to be resorted to, from which ultimately she died on Sunday last. TAYLOR was committed for trial.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 July 1865
EXETER - Fatal Accident To A Stonehouse Lad. - CHARLES GEORGE THOMAS, a lad from Stonehouse, has died at the Exeter Hospital under peculiar circumstances. In March last a small piece of wood got into his ear, and another lad while endeavouring to extract the wood with a piece of slate pencil accidentally broke the tip of the pencil off in the ear. The wood was extracted, and many attempts were made to take out the pencil, but the lad eventually succumbed to the effects of the injury and died. A post mortem examination was made, and the brain was found to be much inflamed, but no pencil could be found. The Jury at the Inquest returned a verdict "That deceased died from Inflammation of the Brain, the result of a foreign body in the ear, and the want of necessary surgical steps being taken for its removal."

TORQUAY - Death At Torquay Through Jumping From A Train. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at the Torbay Infirmary on the body of WILLIAM SPICER, who died on Thursday morning from the effects of a broken leg caused by jumping from a train while travelling at the rate of seven miles an hour. Deceased was a farm labourer living at the engine-house, about a mile above the Torre railway station. On Wednesday night, at half-past ten, he came to the station, and, contrary to the orders of the railway porter on duty, he got into the goods train, with the intention of jumping off as it passed the place where he lived. It was only when the train was in motion that the guard observed him in the van. When the train came near Lower Bridge the deceased jumped off. When the express train came down a few minutes after the guard observed someone lying by the rails and Mr Yeo, a builder, who was returning from Newton on horseback, hearing someone shouting out to him inquired the cause, and the deceased called out to him that his leg was broken. Assistance was then obtained, but it was not until half-past ten in the morning that the poor fellow reached the Infirmary, and he was then in a state of collapse, from which he never rallied. Deceased had sustained a compound comminuted fracture of the left leg and foot. The limb was amputated by Mr Stabb, but the man died in the course of the forenoon. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 July 1865
TEIGNMOUTH - Death Of A Child By Drowning. - On Friday an Inquest was held at Teignmouth on the body of a child between three and four years of age, the son of a fisherman named SKEGGEL, who fell into the water at the beach where the water was so shallow as not to cover his body. The child could have made no noise as his mother was but a few yards off buying fish, and she and those around her did not know of his death until a lad called attention to it. Every exertion was used to restore the child, but without avail. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 July 1865
BOVEY TRACEY - Fatal Accident On The Moretonhampstead Railway. - An Inquest was held at the Bell Inn, Bovey, before Mr F. B. Cuming, concerning the death of MR JOHN DAVIS, who was killed while at work the previous day. He was hauling a clay bank about seven feet deep, when John Sowden, who was at work with him, saw the earth crack. He called out, but deceased was unable to get out of the way, and was nearly buried; on his being taken out, deceased said his back was broken. He expired in about an hour. He was 67 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, made an Inquiry concerning the death of ELIZABETH CLOKE, the wife of a gardener, last evening, at the Prince of Wales Hotel, Plymouth. Deceased sent her little daughter of an errand, and the child on returning found the door of the room locked. She cried out to her mother several times, but receiving no answer, called some neighbours, who effected an entrance into the room. Deceased was found dead, hanging to the bed-post by a scarf. The husband of deceased and several neighbours gave evidence to the effect that she had been low spirited, and for several weeks had complained of violent pains in her head. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 July 1865
LITTLHEMPSTON - Death From A Fall From A Horse. - An Inquest has been held at the New Bridge Inn, Littlehempston, before F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of CHARLES CLEAVE, who was killed by a fall from a horse. A witness named Manning deposed to having met a horse in the road without a rider, and about 30 yards further off saw the deceased lying on the ground. He took him into his waggon. Deceased never breathed after. A brother-in-law of deceased said he was subject to fits. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 July 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Stonehouse Tragedy. - Mr Allan B. Bone was occupied for some hours yesterday in considering the circumstances of the death of EDWARD BUNTER, who attempted to murder Detective Inspector Annis on Saturday last, and on Wednesday cut his own throat and arms with a piece of a basin in which his breakfast had been supplied. The first portion of the evidence related to the crime which deceased had committed, and with the circumstances of which our readers are familiar. It was elicited that the police had been in BUNTER'S house for two hours, searching for government property, when the murderous attack was made. Annis, when stabbed, said to P.C. Goodyear, "He has done it," and BUNTER said "You have got it now," and subsequently added, "I have done a grand thing - a noble act," and expressed regret that he had not served Goodyear the same, and that he had not shoved it right through Annis. To Police-Sergeant Phillips deceased said, when in his cell, "Oh that my arm had been stronger; I would have put it into you if it had not broken off." He added, "Don't think I did it in a passion, I have been meditating on it all day;" & again said, "I am satisfied, he must die & I don't care what become of me." P.C. Hobbs, who attended deceased in the cell, proved that on the morning of his suicide he said, when told that there were no hopes of Annis's recovery, "I am very glad to hear it." That morning he complained that his appetite had failed, and he could not eat his breakfast, but said he possibly might do so presently. The basin was, therefore, left with him, which he subsequently broke, and with the pieces cut his throat and opened the arteries of his arms. Evidence was given of finding the deceased in his cell, bleeding from deep cuts on his neck and arms and of his receiving medical attention, and subsequent death, previous to which he had recovered consciousness and endeavoured to tear open the wound in his throat. Witnesses were called to prove that some years ago deceased attempted to strangle himself, and had once before cut his throat, and that his father was for 21 years a lunatic. Mr Brian, his solicitor, spoke to his excitability and despondency while in the cells; he had promised Mr Brian that he would not lay violent hands on himself. After additional evidence of an indecisive character, the Coroner summed up at great length, and the Jury, by a majority of 17 to 6, returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane. Annis is recovering.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 August 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Inexplicable Suicide By A Colour-Sergeant At Devonport. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke-road, Devonport, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of Colour-Sergeant JAMES JOLLY, of the 28th Regiment, stationed at Raglan Barracks. The evidence of the several witnesses sworn embodied the following facts:- On Monday morning last, about half-past eight, deceased desired a private named Upton, of his Company, who was in the habit of cleaning his accoutrements, to bring him his belts and firelock, because "he was going sick." Upton took the things to deceased's room, in the barrack-room, and observed that he was lying on his bed partially dressed, and looking pale and ill. That morning Upton had cleaned the firelock, and was positive it was not loaded when it was taken to deceased. Soon after this it was found that deceased had not presented the defaulter's book of the Company that morning, and inquiries were made for him. He had been absent from parade, and it being thought he was sick a messenger was sent to the Military Hospital to see him, and to get the key of the door of his room, which had been found to be locked. He could not be found, and a private named Stringer obtained another key and entered the room. Stringer stated that immediately after he had unlocked the door he was startled by the discharge of a rifle in deceased's room. He thrust open the door instantly, and saw that deceased had shot himself. He was lying on his bed, holding rifle in his left hand near the muzzle, which was close to his throat. To his right foot was tied a handkerchief, one end of which was attached to the trigger of the rifle. The room was full of smoke. There was a wound in deceased's throat, and his shirt collar was on fire. Blood was rushing from the wound in the throat, and from another wound at the back of the head. Deceased was quite dead; his eyes were closed and he did not move. The bullet had entered the throat, passed out at the back of the head, penetrated a sheet of iron at the back of the bed, and then lodged about an inch deep in a wooden partition. No cause was assigned for deceased committing suicide: he was stated to be of a usually cheerful disposition and none of the witnesses had observed anything remarkable in deceased's manner, nor had heard him make any complaint. private Stringer stated that he saw him about 10 o'clock on Sunday night when he came into barracks. He then appeared to be sulky, and not in his usually merry mood; he was, however, perfectly sober. It had been rumoured that deceased committed suicide through being disappointed in love, but nothing was adduced in support of this theory. Shortly after he came home with his regiment from India, where he had been many years, he formed the acquaintance of a young woman in Devonport named Sarah Widger. She was examined, and stated that deceased engaged a room for her at Fore-street, Devonport, and he took his meals with her. She had never seen anything remarkable in him, and she never had any reason to believe that he would do harm to himself. He had never complained to her of her keeping company with a bandsman in the same regiment, nor that his [?] were wrong. On Sunday deceased had promised to come home to dinner at one o'clock, but he did not come home until past two. This made her angry, and she told him "It would be the last dinner he should have with her, for that one had been spoiled." At supper time he told her he had not forgotten those words. he had a half-pint of beer before he left for barracks, and went away perfectly sober. Deceased six weeks ago had wished her to get married, but she had delayed it; they intended, however, to have got married. Before leaving on Sunday night deceased made her promise that she would go on Mount W[?] to see the guard trooped on the following morning and it was his duty to be present. On Monday morning she was cleaned to go, when she heard deceased had shot himself. - Lieut. Emerson stated that it was deceased's duty to pay the company, but that nothing wrong had been found in his accounts. Each of the witnesses examined had given him an excellent character for perseverance and sobriety. He had been in the service eleven years, was very much respected in his regiment, and was 29 years of age. On his person nearly a sovereign in silver and coopers was found, and the key of the door of his room, which deceased must have locked the door on the inside and put the key into his pocket. He had charge of the [?] of the company to which he belonged. The Coroner having explained the law of homicide to the Jury, he observed that there was no evidence of [?]. The Jury deliberated a few minutes, and the majority of the Jury gave a verdict of "Temporary Insanity, the remainder for a verdict of Felo de se. The Colonel of the 28th Regt. was present during the Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 August 1865
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Clerk At Plymouth. - yesterday morning JOHN CURTIS MAY, aged 61, clerk to Mr W. R. Saunders, slate merchant, Sutton-road, Plymouth, committed suicide by hanging himself by a rope from a beam in the wash-house of his residence, No. 4, Bedford-villas, where he lived with his father, who is a man 96 years of age, his brother and his sister. Deceased had been giving way to drink lately, and yesterday morning got up at six o'clock. His brother who slept with deceased rose at about seven o'clock and on going into the wash-house for some coals, found his brother hanging as described. In his fright he forgot to cut deceased down, and when that was ultimately done life was extinct. There was nothing wrong in deceased's accounts. The Jury, at the Inquest last evening, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 August 1865
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Death Of A Lady. - The deepest regret was felt at Plymouth yesterday upon its becoming known that a lady whose family was held in the highest respect had committed suicide. The event took place at Byfield House, Mannamead, where MISS LOUISA MARY SCOTT, about forty-two years of age, was discovered in her bedroom shortly after eight o'clock in the morning suspended by a cord previously used to fasten one of her trunks. The deceased, who was a highly accomplished lady, had spent a considerable time in Dr Fox's Lunatic Asylum, near Bristol, and had always written of it in terms of praise, but whilst there she frequently entreated to be permitted to visit her friends. Her importunities were yielded to from a natural feeling of attachment, and three months ago she arrived at Byfield House. She was, however, in an exceedingly despondent state, and appeared to have a great dread f having to return to the Asylum. About six weeks ago - according to the evidence adduced at the Inquest, held yesterday at deceased's residence, before Mr Bone, Coroner - she desired that Emma Bauce, a domestic servant in the house, should bring her some poison, mentioning Battley's Vermin Powder, which the maid purchased, but she informed deceased's sister of it, and the poison of course was withheld. Evidence was also given as to the deceased having sought death in other ways. Soon after eight o'clock yesterday morning, Ann Bauce, another servant, was brought up by her sister - (who had preceded her, and who raised the alarm) to deceased's bedroom, which is upstairs, at the left corner of the house. The two sisters then discovered that deceased was hanging by a cord to the tester of her bed. She wore her night clothes, but some of her day clothes were underneath, so that it seemed that she had partially dressed. Her feet were tied closely together, and her hands were also tightly bound. Her body and feet were warm. Medical assistance was sent for, and rubbing was resorted to, in order to restore animation, but without avail, and on Mr Square's arrival he pronounced the deceased to have been dead fully an hour and a half. The Coroner's Jury agreed without hesitation to a verdict of "Death by Suicide during Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 August 1865
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon by Mr W. F. Windeatt, Deputy Coroner, at Newton, on the body of JOSEPH MEDLAND, who was accidentally killed on the previous day by the upsetting of a cart. Deceased, who was about 14 years of age, was in the employ of Mr J. Eggbeer, contractor to the Devon and Courtenay Clay Company for conveying their clay from the pits to the wharf, for the purpose of being shipped. On Tuesday morning the deceased was proceeding with a horse and empty cart, in company with Eggbeer, who had also a horse and cart, to the Decoy. On their way they met a cart laden with clay, and deceased, who was in the rear and riding, on passing it, drove against the other cart, and that of deceased turned over on him, seriously fracturing his skull. He was taken to his home and attended to by Mr Gillard and Mr Gaye, surgeons, but he died a few hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". They also requested the Coroner to write to Mr Eggbeer requesting him not to engage boys so young for that kind of work for the future.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 August 1865
EXETER - The Fatal Railway Accident At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Pack Horse Inn, Exeter, on the body of THOMAS COURTENAY, aged twenty-three years, who was killed by an engine passing over him on Tuesday evening at the Queen-street station of the London and South-Western Railway. Evidence was given clearly shewing that the deceased met his death by his own act, in jumping off a train on to an adjoining line of rails, along which an engine was coming. He looked up the line instead of down it, and jumped off just in front of the engine. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 August 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Man Drowned At Stonehouse. - As a party of Marines were pulling a boat down Stonehouse Creek yesterday morning, when passing off the Government emigration depot, one of them, James Dodd, discovered the body of a man in the water. On pulling near it, it was found to be partially immersed in the mud, from whence it was extricated and placed in the naval boathouse near the spot. P.C. Watts, the Devon County Constable on duty, was then sent for, who had the body removed to the dead-house in the Stonehouse Workhouse. Subsequently the body was identified as that of SAMUEL MEDDLETON, a young man about 25 years of age, employed as a labourer at the Keyham steam factory. The deceased resided at Wilcove, but had been missing since Sunday evening last, when he accompanied his wife to the Plymouth railway station to see her off for Torquay, where she went to stay with her friends during her approaching confinement. The deceased was afterwards seen between seven and eight o'clock that evening, making his way through Union-street, Plymouth, apparently on his return to his home, by a man called Thomas Kevill. The deceased was not drunk, but he had been drinking. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday afternoon, by the County Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., who adjourned the Inquest to Monday, to obtain the evidence of a man who is aid to have seen the deceased after nine o'clock on Sunday night, nearly two hours later than when Kevill did.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 August 1865
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Woman At Plymouth. - On Saturday morning a deplorable result of drunkenness and profligacy occurred at Plymouth. A Woman named CURNO had for three years been cohabiting with George Wyatt, a seaman on board the merchant schooner Alberta, of Plymouth, at Oreston. Since Wyatt had been away on his last voyage from which he returned on Wednesday, CURNO had had the portrait of another man put in her brooch, which on Friday she shewed to Wyatt. This so enraged him that he told her he would have nothing more to do with her. They had previously been intending to be married. They then separated and drank at various beershops during the day, and in the evening both drank, although separate, in the Painters' Arms, Higher [?] street. Wyatt left a little before midnight with a [?] John Dorgan, and CURNO followed them. They were all the worse for drink. On arriving on the North Quay, Wyatt said he was going home. CURNO said "Do you mean to say that, George?" Wyatt said "Yes," and the woman then said, "Good-bye George, goodbye Jack; good-bye all," and jumped off the Quay into Sutton Pool. An alarm was raised, but the body had sunk before assistance could be procured, though Dorgan plunged in after her, but on rising to the surface about half an hour afterwards it was observed and secured. Deceased's mother resides in Exeter. The water was ten or twelve feet deep where she jumped. At the Inquest held on Saturday afternoon, before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, it was stated that deceased was of a very excitable temperament. A few days before she had threatened to drown herself. She resided at No. 19 Looe-street. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 August 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Man Found Drowned At Stonehouse. - The Inquest upon the body of SAMUEL MIDDLETON, a labourer in the Keyham Yard, whose body it will be remembered was picked up by a party of Marines in Stonehouse Lake on Friday last, was resumed yesterday before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner. The Inquest was adjourned for the production of a witness who it was stated had last seen the deceased alive. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 August 1865
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, by Mr R. J. Bencraft, Coroner of Barnstaple, on the body of JAMES LIMEBEARD, aged 3 years, who came to his death on the previous day by falling into the River Yeo, and drifting into a water-wheel, which carried him around two or three times, fearfully bruising and lacerating his body in several places, and, as the result, he only lived a few hours. The mother stated that the child had been from home but a very short time. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 25 August 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At The Plymouth Regatta. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Model Room of the Gunwharf, at Devonport, by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of MR J. E. CHEETHAM, aged 35 years, a commissioned officer in the Military Store Staff, doing duty at the Devonport Gunwharf, who was drowned in the Sound on the previous day. The body had been brought from a Prussian war vessel in the Sound, where the deceased died. The following evidence was adduced:- Thomas William Courtenay said he was a clerk in the office of a merchant in London, and was stopping at the house of Mr Whippel, in Plymouth. On Wednesday morning, in company with Mr Edward Pridham, Mr Whippel, Mr Glinn, and the waterman, Burt, he started in a boat, the "Royal Mail" from the Hoe. The boat measured about nine tons. They cruised about inside the breakwater and subsequently outside. They then returned and landed Mr Edward Pridham, and were joined by Mr Fredk. Pridham and deceased. They cruised about as before, and proceeded outside the breakwater, as far as the boat mark which had to be rounded by the yachts competing at the regatta, and then turned to go inside the breakwater again. In answer to a question from the Coroner the witness stated that he was not acquainted to any extent with nautical matters, and a better account of the accident could be given by Mr Pridham, who accordingly was then called. - Mr Fredk. Pridham said he was a commissioned officer in the military store staff, holding the same rank as the deceased. Mr Pridham corroborated the former portion of the last witness's statement and added that at the time they were returning from their cruise outside the breakwater, they were on a wind under mainsail, jib, and gaff-topsail, the mizen, which had been up while outside, having been brailed up. The wind was blowing from the S.W. roughly, and they were going in the direction of Millbay, when they saw a boat in distress about fifty yards from them. They agreed to bear down and give assistance, and passed to windward of the boat close to her, and in passing Burt threw a rope to the men that were in the boat, but it was missed. They attempted to wear round, and in doing so the mainsail "jibed," the water rushed in over the gunwale and the boat sunk like a stone. He did not see the deceased alive afterwards. The last he saw of him before the sail "jibbed" was when he was standing on the weather side of the boat, holding on by the gunwale. The boat was being steered by Burt, the waterman, who he considered was an experienced seaman. It had been stated in one of the newspapers that Burt was requested to take in the topsail, and refused to do so. He did not hear Burt asked to go anything of the kind, and was sure that he never refused. He had sailed with Burt on various occasions, and had always considered him to be a most prudent and competent man. - By the Coroner: There was a "half hitch" attached to the boat, through which the mainsheet rope was run. - The Coroner: I suppose if you had had more time you could have prevented the accident by loosing the mainsail? - Witness: Perhaps so. - The Coroner: In your opinion was there more sail than she could fairly carry in such weather? - Witness: No, I think not; she had been carrying more sail than that four miles outside the Breakwater. - The Coroner: Did it appear to you that there was a want of caution on the part of anyone in the boat? - Witness: I should not like to pass any opinion on that subject, as the whole affair was so sudden. - A Juror: What ballast had you in the boat? - Witness: About a ton and a half. - By the Coroner: He did not know whether Burt had time to loosen the mainsheet while the boat was wearing round, nor could he say whether Burt had the sheet rope in his hand at the time. He swam to a revenue cutter, and soon afterwards the cutter also picked up Burt, who was partially under water. - Mr Courtenay was recalled, and said that when the boat was capsized he was thrown into the water close to the deceased, who was clinging to an oar, and had not apparently enough strength to keep the water from his mouth. On being taken into a boat he was perfectly insensible. - Mr Connell Whippel, a surgeon, practising in Plymouth, said the party were about ten minutes in the water after the boat capsized. The deceased on being taken out of the water was perfectly insensible, and in his opinion he was then dead. He endeavoured to restore animation, but without effect. After the body had been taken on board the Prussian ship in the Sound various processes were resorted to for the purpose of restoring animation, but all efforts were futile. - The Coroner: Do you think there was any negligence on the part of anyone in the boat? - Witness: I think not. - Did you hear that Burt had been requested to shortensail? - Witness: I have heard so. - Mr Glinn, C.E., who was present, said that three quarters of an hour before the boat was upset he said to Burt "That topsail is not doing us any good now, we may as well take it down." He did not hear Burt make any reply. He did not make the remark from any impression of danger. When the boat was heaving around he said, "let go the foresail," but he did not hear Burt make any reply. - This being the whole of the evidence the Coroner briefly summed up. Having recapitulated the principal points, he commented upon the apparent accidental nature of the occurrence. If the Jury thought there had been any negligence on the part of the man Burt the Inquest should be adjourned for his attendance, although he would not be compelled to make any statement that would criminate himself. - The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time expressing their warm approval of the conduct of Mr Pridham and his companions, for their strenuous exertions to render assistance to a distressed boat. - The gentlemen who were endangered by the accident are anxious publicly, and in the most cordial manner, to acknowledge the assiduous attention and great kindness received by all of them from the officers of His Prussian Majesty's ships in the Sound, on board which they were conveyed. Everything which experience could suggest or disinterested kindness could dictate was done for those who survived and for the unfortunate deceased. The waterman, Burt, is still very ill, although danger to life has passed.

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 August 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Drowning In Hamoaze. - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Bone, concerning the death of WILLIAM SANDERS, aged 39, who on Monday week was painting the davits of the brig Kingfisher, in Hamoaze, and falling into the water was drowned. Ropes were thrown to him, which he did not seize; and Dennis Sheehan, a seaman of H.M.S. Impregnable, plunged into the water and swam towards him, but did not reach the spot in time. On Monday the body was seen floating near the spot. Deceased, who had lived separately from his wife for five years, was not subject to fits or giddiness. No light was thrown on the cause of the occurrence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 September 1865
EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday night, at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, on the body of MRS MARTHA FINNEMORE, a widow, aged 62 years, who met with an accident on the previous evening by falling over some stairs. From the evidence of Mrs Ann Yelland it appeared that she was in the house which was occupied by the deceased about half-past 11 on Sunday evening. She heard a noise like something falling very heavily down the stairs. She immediately went from her room and saw the deceased lying at the bottom. A surgeon was sent for, but before he arrived MRS FINNEMORE had expired, her neck being broken. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 September 1865
APPLEDORE - On Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN SLADER, of Appledore, master of a small vessel belonging to Mr Cooke, of that town. The deceased, who died from rupture of a blood vessel, has left a widow and nine children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 September 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - THOMAS PEARSE, pensioned seaman, residing at 119, Navy-row, Morice Town, met his death by hanging. He was a very tall man - six feet one in height, - and must have tied the end of a piece of rope round a beam in the back kitchen of the house in the front kitchen of which he lived. The bight of the rope was made into a running noose, and the deceased must have stood on a stool, which was found there subsequently, and putting his head into the noose, swung off. Philip Slee, a seaman, of H.M.S. Indus, was passing the house at 20 minutes after seven yesterday morning, when he was attracted to the house by the screams of Mrs Profit, who resided there. He went in and found the deceased hanging by a rope as described. He immediately cut him down and sent for assistance. Deceased then appeared to be alive, and drew breath once, but when three minutes afterwards Mr Ryder, chemist of Navy-row, arrived, he was dead. An Inquest was held before Mr Bone, Coroner, last evening, when these facts were given in evidence. Mrs Davis, landlady of the house in which deceased lived, stated that he had told her that some years ago, when at sea, he had received a blow at the back of his head, and occasionally felt queer in his head. She knew that drink affected him in his head, but never thought him insane. The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that there was no real evidence of insanity before them, but following the usual and indiscriminating custom, they returned a unanimous verdict, that "The deceased hung himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

CLOVELLY - Suicide Of A Clergyman At Clovelly. - An Inquest was held at Clovelly, North Devon, on Monday, by Mr R. Bremridge, County Coroner, on the body of the REV. JOSIAH RODWELL, of Canterbury, who was on a visit to his brother, the REV. J. M. RODWELL. The latter deposed that for some time past his brother had been very much depressed in spirits, and on Sunday morning, as he did not come down to breakfast at his usual time, witness's son was sent to call his uncle and found him lying in the bed and looking very pale. Assistance was called and the deceased was found to be quite dead, his throat being cut, and a razor lying close by. The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, was in moderate circumstances, but, as it appeared from his brother's evidence, he had overtaxed his mental energies in performing the duties of his parish. The Jury returned a verdict of "Killed himself by cutting his throat, whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 September 1865
BRIDESTOWE - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at Bridestowe, before Mr Vallack, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM COOMBE, aged 44 years, who was on Friday last thrown from his horse, receiving concussion of the brain, from which he died shortly afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 18 September 1865
TAVISTOCK - The Unprotected Mine Shafts. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at Tavistock, before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on the body of BENJAMIN HALL, who was killed by falling into a mine shaft on his return from the Tavistock races last Tuesday, as stated in Saturday's Western Morning News. The Jury viewed the body, and the Coroner gave an order for its interment, but the formal Inquiry was adjourned until next Saturday, when it is understood that there will be a thorough investigation, not only into the immediate causes of the accident, but also into the question as to who is the person on whom the responsibility rests of leaving the public at the mercy of the abandoned and unprotected mind workings.

NEWTON ABBOT - Suicide Through Love At Newton Abbot. - An Inquest was held by Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, at the Jolly Sailor Inn, East-street, Newton Abbot, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of SARAH CAPE, late a domestic servant in the employ of Mr Law, of East-street, and who committed suicide on the previous day by taking a large quantity of oxalic acid. - Miss Elizabeth Bates Law said that SARAH CAPE, the deceased, who was about thirty years of age, was her father's servant, and had resided with them about a year and a half. On the previous day about a quarter after eleven in the morning, witness left her in charge of the house and returned home again at a quarter after one. On entering the house she called but could not get any answer. She then searched for deceased, and on going into the kitchen found she had made no preparations for dinner, the fire being nearly out. Witness went to the bottom of the stairs and called for her, but to no purpose. About half-past one witness's brother came home, and he also called, but getting no reply went upstairs, looked into CAPE'S room, and returned in great haste, saying there was a man on the bed who had white clothes on. Her brother was near sighted, which accounted for his making this mistake. After talking the matter over they called in Mr Wotton, a neighbour, who went to the bedroom, and found the deceased dead. Witness had noticed nothing unusual in her manner in the morning. She was always very eccentric. There was nothing said to annoy her. witness had heard that she had attempted suicide a few years before. - Mr David Law (son of Mr W. Law) confirmed his sister's evidence. - Dr Jane deposed to seeing the deceased lying on the bed, and quite dead. She appeared to have been dead an hour or more. He considered from her general appearance that she had taken some irritant poison. A large quantity of oxalic acid would produce the results. He examined her dress, which was at the foot of the bed, and found on it some wet stains. There was some moisture on the bed quilt, as well as some frothy mucous about the mouth. Oxalic acid would produce similar stains. Deceased did not appear to have been a person of strong intellect. It was possible for her to have walked from the kitchen to the bedroom after taking the poison. - Proof was given of the purchase of oxalic acid by the deceased. - Mr Law said that he had been informed that a young man had promised marriage to the deceased, and that he had since broken his word. He believed this circumstance had preyed upon her mind, and occasioned her to commit the rash act. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporarily Insanity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 September 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Determined Suicide Of An Artillery-Man At Devonport. - An Inquiry was held yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD BAWKER, a bombardier in the 8th Field Battery Royal Artillery, stationed at the Granby Barracks, Devonport, who put an end to his existence early on Monday morning last by shooting himself in the wash-house attached to the barracks. - William Walker, a bombardier in the same corps as the deceased, was the first witness examined. He stated that he had known the deceased for about sixteen months and was in his company on Sunday night. He met deceased at a house in Granby-row, where there were two other young men and two females. Deceased appeared to be in good spirits and quite merry, although not by drink. They drank three quarts of beer between them, after which they left the house for their quarters, at about five minutes to twelve. He bid the deceased good night before he went into his own barrack-room. Deceased said to him, "Won't you shake hands with me?" which he did. Deceased had never spoken to him in that way before. There had been no quarrel at the house on Sunday evening. He had known deceased to be in the hospital a short time since with a chest disease of some kind. He had never known him to have received any punishment. - Henry Ollis, an acting bombardier in the Artillery, stated that he met the deceased in company with Walker at the barrack-gate about midnight on Sunday. He went into the barrack-room with deceased and got into bed, leaving deceased sitting on the edge of his cot. About twenty minutes afterwards he got out of bed for the purpose of getting a drink. Deceased was then sitting on his bed as before, with no other clothes on than his shirt. He said to him, "Why don't you get into bed, you will catch a cold?" to which deceased replied, "It's all right, I will directly; I'm only sitting here to get myself cool." About ten minutes afterwards he heard someone go out of the room, and in about a quarter of an hour heard a loud noise, but did not think at the time that it was the report of a carbine. Shortly afterwards he heard that deceased had shot himself, acting upon which information he went into the wash-house which was situated very near his barrack-room. He saw the body of deceased lying on the floor, bleeding profusely from very extensive wounds in the head. A carbine was lying between his legs. The bullet had apparently passed through his head and through the ceiling of the room. On Sunday afternoon heard the deceased say that it was a shame that the men should be obliged to clean the harness on a Sunday. The Coroner: But cleaning harness was not a part of his duties, I believe? - Witness: No, sir. - The Coroner: Then what difference would that make to him? - Witness: None, sir, but he was a driver himself once. - Sergeant-Major Humphrey Gilbert said that he was called to the wash-house a little after one on Monday morning, where he saw the body of the deceased. He found a paper of percussion caps and nine rounds of ammunition lying on the floor of the wash-house. He also saw a carbine lying close by the body of the deceased. On returning into the barrack-room he discovered that a carbine and some ammunition was missing. He had never known any of the officers speak harshly to the deceased. - Dr J. Wilson deposed to having seen the deceased in the hospital in the early part of August, with a slight attack of dyspepsia. In his opinion dyspepsia was a disease that produced lowness of spirits, although it did not tend to produce insanity. - Wm. Sugars, a driver, deposed to finding the body of deceased in the wash-house. - Major Wm. Andrews said he was the officer commanding the 8th Field Battery. It was the custom for the drivers to clean the harness on Saturday and hang it up in the harness-room. On Sunday it was usual for the commanding officer to inspect the harness after morning service, to ascertain whether the work had been properly executed. It was not often the case that the harness was re-cleaned on the Sabbath-day. On the present occasion he considered the step to have been taken in consequence of the battery having orders to be ready for inspection on the following morning; the work would have taken but a short time to complete. - By a Juror: He did not make the inspection on the day in question; Captain Arbuthnot and Lieutenant Dickon went around in his absence. - Sergeant-Major Gilbert was recalled and examined relative to the subject of the cleaning of harness. He stated that he accompanied Captain Arbuthnot. The work found fault with was seven double sets, and orders were given for their cleaning. - By the Jury: There was plenty of time, in his opinion, for the harness to be cleaned on the Monday morning. The duty of the deceased expired on Sunday at five o'clock. In consequence of one of the sergeants having obtained leave, deceased was ordered to see the harness cleaned, although it did not detain him a minute longer then he otherwise would have been kept. It was necessary that the deceased should keep himself in the immediate vicinity, as on that day he was stable orderly. - Major Andrews said he wished to explain to the Jury that the work was not given to the men to do with any idea of punishment. If the harness was well cleaned, and kept in good condition, the men were often granted extra leave, and in the event of their not having properly done their work they would not have their leave stopped, or be subjected to any other punishment. - Captain Arbuthnot was examined, but gave evidence simply to the fact of his having ordered some of the harness in question to be cleaned. The captain was subjected to a lengthy cross-examination by the Jury, as to the propriety of this act, but the Coroner abruptly concluded the examination by asking the gallant officer whether he issued the order as a matter of punishment, or as a point of duty, to which the captain replied that he did not give the order with the idea of inflicting the slightest punishment upon the men, but because he did not think there would have been time to have cleaned it on the following morning in time for the inspection. - Sergeant William Baker said that on Sunday last he told the deceased to take charge of the stables, as he had got leave. Later in the afternoon he saw deceased again, but had no quarrel with him, nor did he speak harshly to him. - William James, a driver, stated that on Sunday afternoon he was in the barrack-room, when the deceased came into the room, and appeared to be in a great passion. He said, "It's enough to make a man make away with himself, having to turn out and clean harness on a Sunday." In the evening he saw the deceased again in the barrack, when he said that Mr Dickon had spoken to him like a dog, and that he had never been spoken to so before. - The Coroner in summing up, reminded the Jury that all cases of homicide were felonious unless proved the contrary. If a man were to take his life while in a sane condition he need not tell them that the law held him answerable for it; but if, on the other hand, he were to take his own or any other's person's life in a state of insanity, he would not be considered responsible. But he would impress upon their minds that insanity did not consist of any lowness of spirits, attack of dyspepsia, or any similar complaint; but existed when a man was not aware of the nature of the act he was about to commit. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned by eight of the Jury, the remainder being for a verdict of felo de se.

LIFTON Fatal Accident At Lifton. - On Friday evening, JOHN GUSCOTT, aged 66, was with other quarrymen raising and blasting stone in Lifton limestone quarry, when a stone, 25 lbs. weight, was blown up in the air to a considerable distance, and, striking on a rock, glanced in under a bridge where the men had gone for safety, and broke GUSTCOTT'S thigh, from the effects of which injury and the shock he died soon afterwards. Mr Vallack has held an Inquest on the body, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 September 1865
TAVISTOCK - The Unfenced Mine Shaft On Whitchurch Down. - The adjourned Inquest respecting the death of BENJAMIN HOLE, who fell down the shaft of Wheal Surprise Mine, on Whitchurch Down, took place on Saturday, before Mr A. B. Bone, junr., Deputy Coroner, at the Guildhall, Tavistock. Mr Bridgman appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the deceased's friends; Mr John Beer, of Devonport, for Mr Harris, the lord of the manor; and Mr Bater for Mr Bayly, the alleged lessee of Wheal Surprise Mine. - Deceased came by his death in the following manner. On Tuesday, the 12th of September, he went to Tavistock Races, at Whitchurch. While upon the racecourse he met with George Oxenham, a retired farmer, living at Tavistock. Oxenham seems to have been intoxicated, but they went and had some drink together at a booth on the ground. During the afternoon Oxenham pulled out of his pocket seven sovereigns, in the presence of the deceased, and tendered one in payment for the beer which they had drunk. Deceased offered to count the change, but Oxenham told him to leave it alone. About nine o'clock in the evening they left the course and went across Whitchurch Down towards Tavistock. HOLE, it is said, was not so drunk as Oxenham, but while walking across the common the latter fell into a quarry pit, and there remained in a state of stupor. He had no recollection of what became of HOLE, who was afterwards found drowned in some water at the bottom of a shaft at Wheal Surprise Mine. Oxenham's hat was also found in the shaft, and a Juryman asked whether deceased did not fall down the pit in running after the hat. Oxenham, however, said he was too drunk to remember his loss. When he recovered his senses he found himself in the quarry pit he searched for his money, and missed £5. It was not known what money the deceased had when he left home, but after his body was recovered £3 and some odd shillings were found in his pockets. It was stated that there was only a slight fence around the shaft, but a miner named Harris said that two years and a half ago a wall five feet high was built round the shaft. The Rev. R. Sleaman said there were five roads on Whitchurch Down repaired by the parish, and each road was over 200 yards distant from the shaft. The adjoining estates had a right of common over the down. In reply to Mr Bridgman, the rev. gentleman said there were numberless paths on the Down, and where the deceased went was not an extraordinary place for a man to be on returning from the races. - Mr bone explained to the Jury that unless a pit, or mine shaft, or any dangerous hole, was substantially adjacent to the highway, then there was no liability or responsibility on the part of anyone to keep it fenced. The law said that if the public used a place of that kind, they were the proper persons to fence these dangerous pits, and not either the owner or occupier of the pits. There was a case decided some few years ago which had been confirmed by subsequent cases, and that appeared to be the law. Some years ago, too, an Act of Parliament was passed, specially applicable to coal mines, which contained a provision that all abandoned works in coal and iron mines should e properly fenced, but there was no such provision applicable to other mines. He had been informed that in the report of the recent mining commission there was a recommendation that in every legislative enactment which took place on the subject of mines in the kingdom, provision should be made for fencing other mines similar to that which was applicable to coal mines. - Mr Beer said he was anxious that the Jury should know the position in which this shaft was within a few days previous to the accident, because he was afraid that an impression might go abroad that the state in which it was found now by the Jury was the same in which it was a week before the occurrence. He should like them to know from the man who made the fence what state it had been in. He was sure that pains had been taken to make the shaft as secure as any in the neighbourhood. - Mr Bridgman: Do you know on the part of Mr Harris that a presentment was made some time ago at the manor court? - Mr Beer: There was a presentment made at a recent meeting of the court, but that presentment had no reference whatever to this individual shaft. - Mr Bridgman: But had it not reference to the covering of the shafts of Wheal Surprise Mine for the safety of the public? - Mr Beer: It only had reference to a pit which was near Wheal Surprise Mine on Whitchurch Down. - The Coroner said it did seem to him to be rather a public grievance, and a very great grievance in these two western counties, particularly in Cornwall, where there were a greater number of mine shafts than in Devon; but they must recollect that if the owner of that shaft was bound to fence it, all the shafts upon Dartmoor would have to be fenced. Half of Cumberland and nearly the whole of Lancashire was land of the same kind, and was full of pits. - Mr Beer afterwards called John Stanbury, who said that he assisted Daniel Harris in putting a fence around the shaft at Wheal Surprise Mine two years and a half since. The fence was 5 feet 4 inches high in the middle, and at either end 4 feet 6 inches high. Harris and himself passed it on the 2nd Sept., and Harris said to him, "There is the old fence standing now." Since then part of it had been torn down, as he had seen on the previous day. - Daniel Harris was then called, but the Jury said they had heard him already, and the Coroner observed that they had seen the shaft and the thing spoke for itself. A more dangerous place there could not possibly be. - Mr Beer, addressing the Coroner, said: If the Jury and you have made up your minds on the matter, I beg to retire. I don't think Coroners or Juries usually make up their minds until they have heard the whole of a case. - Mr Cater and Mr Beer then declined to call further witnesses and the Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict that the Deceased had been Found Drowned; but how he came to his death there was no evidence to shew. The Jury also expressed an opinion that there was culpable negligence on the part of some persons in leaving the Wheal Surprise and various other shafts so utterly unprotected as they were; and recommended the Coroner to call the attention of the proper authorities to the matter. - It is understood that the friends of the deceased intend taking proceedings against the lessee of Wheal Surprise Mine, to recover damages for the loss they have sustained by the death of MR HOLE.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 October 1865
TOTNES - Fatal Accident At Totnes Quay. - The unfortunate man ALEXANDER WATT, who sustained a fracture of the base of the skull and other serious injuries by falling into the hold of the ship Vesper, while engaged with others in unloading a cargo of coals at the Totnes Quay, on Monday, the 25th ult., died yesterday morning at his residence, at Totnes. An Inquest on the body was opened last evening at the Seven Stars Hotel, Totnes, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr S. Sanders was Foreman. - William Hawkins, a labourer, deposed that on Monday last, about two o'clock p.m., he was in the hold of the vessel called the Vesper, lying at Totnes Quay. WATT suddenly fell down the hold, with his body across the keelson and his face on the bottom of the vessel. Witness went to deceased, and picked him up; he was bleeding at the ears and mouth. Witness procured assistance, and carried deceased home. he was quite unconscious. He was employed tipping the baskets. The ship was laden with coals. Two sailors were at the winch, they were about five feet from deceased. Had seen the deceased about half an hour before the accident happened. Did not notice that deceased was worse for drink. He was standing across the hold on a hatch three feet wide. No one was near enough to have struck him. He did not hear any quarrelling. The basket caught in the hatch upon which deceased was standing, tipped it, and caused the fall. - John Coles, of Totnes, gave corroborative evidence. - Susan Whiddon, wife of Nathaniel Whiddon, labourer, who had attended WATT since Tuesday last, deposed that he had been suffering from concussion of the brain, and fracture of the skull and jaw-bone. He had been conscious sometimes since the accident, but unable to speak. He died yesterday morning at 20 minutes after two. He was forty years of age. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 October 1865
GIDLEIGH - Fatal Accident At Gidleigh. - On Monday last, JAMES HILL, a lad aged 16, son of MR HILL, farmer, whilst riding a horse belonging to the Rev. Owen Owen, the rector, was thrown and killed on the spot. A little brother of deceased was also riding on the same horse, but escaped with some heavy scars. The accident must have happened about five o'clock, and between eleven and twelve at night, after many hours searching, the deceased and the child were found lying together in a hedge trough. An Inquest was held before Mr Vallack, Coroner for Devon. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 October 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Polish Gentleman At Devonport. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner for Devonport, at the Half Moon Inn, touching the death of LOUIS VICTOR DZIENGIELOWSKI, an officer in the Polish Army. The Inquiry lasted a considerable time, and from the evidence, which was exceedingly voluminous, the following facts were gathered. The deceased, who was about three and twenty years of age, was a native of Poland, and served as a lieutenant in the Polish army during the late insurrection in several engagements with the Russians, by whom he was compelled to fly to Austria, and from thence into Prussia and Belgium, and subsequently to England, where he was relieved by the Polish Refugees' Aid Society. Some few months ago it became known to Colonel Szyrma, also a native of Poland, and a Polish ex-officer, of Devonport, that the deceased was in England, and through his instrumentality, MR DZIENGIELOWSKI came to Devonport with the intention of doing something to earn an independent livelihood and for a considerable time he stayed at Colonel Szyrma's house, but removed about two months since to the house of Mrs Broadlick in George-street. The deceased appeared to be of a most lively disposition; but about three weeks since a marked change came over his entire demeanour, and he became very abstracted and confused. Deceased was of a very eccentric nature, so much so, that he has several times left his lodgings and walked up the street in a woman's apparel, and on one occasion, he went to Dr Bennett, who resides in George-street, dressed in the garb of a sailor, stating at the time that he was going to sea in a yacht the next morning, and he had equipped himself accordingly. On Sunday last the alteration in deceased's state became more apparent than before. On Monday morning he seized a kitten and shaved the hair off the animal's tail with a razor. A servant in the employ of Mrs Broadlick, who was in the room at the time, said that if the deceased served the cat so again, she would treat his dog in the same manner, to which he replied, "If you do I will shoot you; I don't value my life a pin." Deceased was indebted to Mrs Broadlick to the amount of about £3, the payment of which she had often sought of him, but not being able to pay, he seldom remained in the house during the day. On Thursday the deceased went to the shop of Mr W. Jeffery, gunsmith, in George-street, Plymouth, and asked for the loan of a pair of pistols, for the purpose of practising with, as he was going out in a yacht early the next morning. Mr Jeffery being acquainted with deceased, consented to lend him the pistols, which, together with thirty bullets and other necessary ammunition [?] to his residence, and given to him. [?]. Deceased was seen twice yesterday afternoon by Mr H. A. Latimer, who stated that he then appeared quite rational. He partook of a pint of milk for supper, and previous to going to bed he played for a quarter of an hour upon the harmonium. Early yesterday morning Elizabeth Dowden, the servant in the house, carried a letter for the deceased to his room. He took the letter, which was not of the slightest interest, or calculated to excite his feelings, and read it. At about nine o'clock the report of a pistol was heard in the house, and on entering the room it was discovered that the deceased had shot himself. Dr Bennett was immediately fetched, but life was found to be entirely extinct. The bullet had entered the deceased's body just below the nipple of the left breast, and lodged behind the right shoulder blade. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Bennett said he had known the deceased some months past. About a fortnight ago deceased complained of weakness and lightness of the head, which he (Dr Bennett) attributed to the want of animal food. Mr Superintendent Lynn, on searching the house, found one of the pistols on the bed by the side of the deceased, and another on the floor by the bed. He found two keys and one of them opened a small workbox which contained a number of letters. One of the letters was from a foreigner, of London, and written in the German language, pressing for the payment of a debt of £3 7s., which deceased had contracted with him while in London. there were a number of photographs and an unpaid bill for clothing had by the deceased, amounting to £5. There were also several pawn tickets for wearing apparel pledged by him, but the money found was only three-halfpence. - The Coroner briefly summed up, and pointed out to the Jury that they were not to return a verdict of temporary insanity merely because they believed the deceased to be suffering from lowness of spirits, or unless they were of opinion that he was in such a state of insanity as would render him unaccountable for his actions. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 9 October 1865
BISHOPSTEIGNTON - A Man Killed On The South Devon Railway. - Early on Saturday morning the dead body of a man was found near the Shaldon Bridge of the South Devon Railway. His head was dreadfully mutilated, and the supposed that he had been run over and crushed by a luggage train which had passed shortly before his remains were discovered. The driver and stoker, however, knew nothing of the occurrence, although they were keeping an extra sharp look-out at that time. Deceased proved to be GEORGE SHEPHEARD, a packer on the line, 66 years of age, who had been many years employed on the line, and leaves a widow and six young children. He lived at Bishopsteignton, and always walked along the line to his work. Mr Cuming held an Inquest on Saturday evening, when a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

ST. BUDEAUX - Suicide By A Farmer Of St. Budeaux. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, at King's Tamerton, in the parish of St. Budeaux, touching the death of WILLIAM PENGELLY, a farmer residing at Wood Vale Farm, in that parish. On Thursday evening deceased went to bed, and appeared to be quite well. Early on Friday morning his wife asked him to light the fire. The deceased refused to do so, and left the room, muttering something to the effect that he should not light any fires again. Very soon afterwards the wife had occasion to go out at the back of the house, and saw her husband suspended to the ceiling of an outhouse by a rope. No cause is assigned for the committal of the rash act; but the Jury returned a verdict that he did it under the effects of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 October 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Occurrence At Morice Town. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, at the Builder's Arms, in Gloucester-street, Morice-town, as to the death of JANE COOPER, a widow seventy-two years of age, who se suicide was yesterday mentioned in our columns. The deceased had been a great sufferer for several months past, and spoke of her illness in a desponding manner. In 1861 deceased possessed £130 in the Devonport Savings Bank, but that sum had dwindled down to about £3, which together with a small quantity of household furniture, was all she now possessed. On Saturday morning, Martha Smith, a neighbour residing in the same house, went into deceased's room, and found her suspended by a rope to a cross-bar at the top of the bed. Mr J. May, surgeon, was immediately fetched, but life was found to be entirely extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 October 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Fatal Accident At Torpoint. - The body of RICHARD LANE, who with his horse and cart accidentally drove over the edge of the submerged projecting pier at Torpoint having been picked up, an Inquest was held yesterday, at Newpassage, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. Mr Bone, Coroner, in the course of the case, remarked that because a body was picked up in Hamoaze there was no reason why the expenses attending the Inquest and burial should be saddled on Devonport; the body should always be taken to the nearest shore. He observed also that the dead-house was not properly ventilated.

Western Morning News, Monday 16 October 1865
PLYMOUTH - The Soldier Drowned In Catwater, Plymouth. - An Inquest was held before Mr Edmonds, Coroner, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Saturday afternoon, at five o'clock, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of EVAN JONES, a corporal of the 66th Regt., who was drowned in Catwater on Wednesday, and whose body was not recovered until about six o'clock on Friday evening. Lord Templetown, General commanding the Western District, was present. Mr Rundle (Beer and Rundle, solicitors) attended to watch the Inquiry on behalf of the War Department. The first witness examined was Sergeant Frederick Oates, 66th Regiment of Foot, quartered at the Raglan Barracks, Devonport, who stated that deceased was a corporal in his regiment. he was about twenty years of age and was single. At about half past six o'clock on Wednesday morning the deceased had charge of a large boat, in which witness and 53 others left the Barbican for Staddon Heights. They landed at Turnchapel at 7 o'clock, and proceeded to the camp to wait for the arrival of General Lord Templetown. When the General came they were marched to the firing ground, and embarked about a quarter to ten o'clock to return to Plymouth. They left shore in a six-oared boat. Nothing had been drunk by any of the men. The wind was blowing across the boat up Catwater very strongly, and there was much sea up. There were a number of windbound vessels at anchor in Catwater. When the boat got half way across they observed a billy-bhoy beating down towards the Citadel on the port tack. The billy-bhoy neared the boat gradually, while the oarsmen endeavoured to pull the boat ahead so as to get beyond her reach. The wind and tide were driving the boat as they listed. There was no vessel within a hundred yards, and the billy-bhoy could have been steered clear of the boat. The billy-bhoy struck the stern of the boat, and five soldiers made a spring to get on board. One fell into the water, but was got out. Don't believe deceased tried to jump, but saw him thrown overboard, and supposed that he was jerked into the water by the collision. The boat was backed in order to save him, and one man jumped overboard to try to rescue him, but before he could get to deceased he sank. The billy-bhoy went on her course, but someone on board threw a life-buoy within ten yards of the drowning man. Believed that the sea was too rough for deceased to see the buoy. The billy-bhoy was laden with stones. After sailing about 300 yards the vessel was anchored, her boats were got out, and the soldiers upon her were landed. None of the oars were unshipped until the vessel struck the boat. The vessel passed the boat on her weather side. The tide and wind were so strong that the boat could not have run under the stern of the vessel, and they were obliged to try to clear her bows. Did not know whether the boat was stove, and did not know what experience deceased had of a vessel. - Samuel Jenkins, boatman, said that he was in Catwater on Wednesday, about fifty yards from the place where the collision occurred. A strong westerly wind was blowing. He saw the soldiers pulling along and making but little progress. The billy-bhoy was within a narrow compass, having two vessels on either side. The boat was slightly ahead of the vessel, rather on the weather side of anything. Just before the boat struck the oarsmen laid down their oars, and the rest stood up. The captain kept the billy-bhoy away as much as he could with safety, but she struck the boat. Some soldiers jumped upon the billy-bhoy. Two got overboard, of whom one was picked up and the other drowned. If the captain of the billy-bhoy had kept away more than he did he would have run into a schooner. There was no room for the billy-bhoy to tack. Four men who understood their work could have pulled the boat clear, or they might have gone under the vessel's stern. The boat was uninjured. The billy-bhoy was filled with a cargo of stone; she was not three feet above water. Her boat was stowed on deck for sea. She had not more way on her than about three miles an hour. - Mr Richard Triplett stated in explanation of the absence of the Captain of the billy-bhoy that he offered to remain ashore, and tendered his address to the magistrates, who informed him he might proceed to London, and if required he would be sent for. - The Foreman said that all nautical men would see that the casualty was occasioned by the inexperience and alarm of the soldiers. The unanimous verdict of the Jury was one of "Accidental Death." - The body of the deceased was carried through the crowded streets of Plymouth and Stonehouse on Saturday evening on a common stretcher, his face and hands being exposed to the view of every passer-by. We need scarcely point out that this was a most injurious and injudicious proceeding.

TOTNES - Death By Drowning At Totnes. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at Totnes, before Mr Cuming, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM POTTER, a navvy, working on the Totnes and Buckfastleigh Railway. - The first witness called was Daniel Peake, who did not put in an appearance, and was fined £1. - John Watson, landlord of the Lord Nelson public-house, Totnes, said that deceased left that house, where he lodged, with a man named Salter about twenty minutes past eight on the night of the accident. P.C. Gill, of Totnes, then deposed that he had summoned Daniel Peake of Dartmouth, lighterman, to attend. - The Coroner said it was one of the most curious cases that he had ever met with. He thought it was one of suspicion, for the Jury could not tell how the man came by his death. - Daniel Peake now came into the room, and on being sworn, said that on the night in question, about eight o'clock, deceased and a man named Salter came into the Steam Packet Inn, Totnes, where witness was. Deceased and witness left together about nine o'clock, and afterwards went to another public-house where they stayed for about one hour. They only drank one quart of cider between them. Deceased was going to sleep on board witness's lighter, and they went towards Bridgetown Quay together. Deceased jumped on the gunwale of the boat. One of the planks was missing, and witness asked deceased to jump out of the boat. Deceased called to witness to catch hold of his hand, and he endeavoured to do so, but deceased fell overboard. Witness saw him in the water, but not being able to swim could not save him, and called for assistance. On the body being picked up, it was found to be quite dead. Deceased was a little the worse for liquor; he was about 25 years of age. The water was about five feet deep. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 October 1865
EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - A travelling hawker named READ, living in West Quarter, Exeter, on Sunday morning, found his wife dead at the bottom of the stairs of his house, she having fallen downstairs the previous night while the couple were both intoxicated. A Coroner's Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 October 1865
EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - An accident which terminated fatally occurred on Monday afternoon to WILLIAM LANGDON, aged 25, who was employed as a labourer to unload a waggon at the stables of the White Hart Inn, South-street. The unfortunate man was subject to fainting fits, and was attacked by one while at work, and in falling he struck his head, and when next observed was bleeding much. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found that his skull was fractured, and he soon afterwards died. An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SHALDON - Yesterday Mr Cuming, Coroner, held an Inquest at Clifford's Arms, Shaldon, on the body of SUSAN MICHELL, aged two months, the illegitimate child of REBECCA MICHELL. The evidence of the mother and of Mrs Ellen Snell, with whom she lived, was to the effect that the infant had from birth been delicate, but was put to bed on Sunday night as well as usual. At five o'clock next morning Mrs Snell was aroused by the mother, who said the child was very ill. Mr Brooks, surgeon, was sent for, and arrived in a few minutes, but the infant was dead before he arrived. Mr Brooks stated that the child had apparently been suffering from thrush, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 October 1865
NEWTON FERRERS - Fatal Accident At Puslinch. - An Inquest was held by Mr Allan Bone, on Monday, on the body of JOHN THOMAS, of the parish of Newton Ferrers, an honest and industrious labourer, who was unfortunately killed on the spot by the sudden falling of the moat of a large tree, at Puslinch. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 6 November 1865
TOTNES - An Inquest was held at the Bridge Inn, Bridgetown, Totnes, on Saturday evening, before Mr F. B. Cuming, Coroner, on the body of the infant illegitimate child of EMMA PETERS It appeared from the evidence of the mother and grandmother that the child, which was one of a twin, and about nine weeks old, slept with the mother on Friday night last, and was apparently well. About seven o'clock on Saturday morning the mother found that it was dead. Mr Harris, surgeon, residing at Bridgetown, said he could not give any opinion as to how the child came to its death without making a post mortem examination, and the Inquiry was accordingly adjourned for that purpose.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 November 1865
TOTNES - A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was yesterday returned in the case of the illegitimate child of EMMA PETERS this being in accordance with the medical evidence of post mortem examination presented at the adjourned Inquest.

BROADCLYST - Fatal Accident At Broadclist Railway Station. - Yesterday an Inquest was held before Mr Brent, Deputy Coroner, at Broadclist, on the body of THOMAS SMITH, aged 67, a labourer in the employ of Mr Brewer, of Honiton. Deceased on Friday last was unloading a cart at the railway station, when the express luggage train passed and so frightened the horse that it bolted, knocking deceased on to the line, where he was run over and received such injuries that he died in a few minutes.

CLYST HONITON - Alleged Murder By Poisoning At Honiton Clyst. - At the quiet little village of Honiton Clyst, situated about six miles from Exeter, WILLIAM ASHFORD, a sober, industrious man, about 60 years of age, a master boot and shoe maker, died on Saturday evening, under circumstances which afford grave suspicions that he has been poisoned by his wife. For some time past the deceased had lived unhappily with his wife owing to jealousy. A man named Pratt, who had worked for him as a journeyman for many years, was the cause of the unfortunate strife. Pratt about two years since left the deceased and went to reside at Dawlish, but afterwards returned through the influence of Mrs Ashford, and from that time to the present was believed to be on far too intimate terms with his mistress. They had been frequently seen together, and this so excited the deceased that a quarrel took place. The deceased was, up to the last fortnight, in the enjoyment of good health, but was taken ill on the 29th ult., after having partaken of tea at a friend's house in the village, where he repeatedly expressed his disgust at the conduct of his wife. From the evidence of Mrs Butt, the wife of a police constable stationed in the village and residing two doors from the deceased, the case appears to bear very strongly against MRS ASHFORD and on Saturday P.C. Butt considered, from the knowledge he possessed of the case, he was justified in apprehending her. Shortly after the deceased died on Saturday night he took the wife into custody. While being searched she took from her pocket a packet, which she threw into the fire, and it was destroyed before it could be rescued. Peculiarities were observed in its ignition, and it is supposed to have contained chemicals. An Inquest was opened yesterday before Mr Deputy Coroner Brent, Mr Friend, of Exeter, appearing for the prisoner, and Mr Deputy Superintendent Maxell for the police. The only evidence was that of Mrs butt, who said that on the 3rd inst., she was in the bedroom of the deceased at about five o'clock, when deceased asked for a cup of tea. Mr Chown was in the room at the time MRS ASHFORD brought up to the room the teapot and put water into it from the kettle which was in the bedroom. She then went down and brought up a cup with a little milk at the bottom, not a tablespoonful. There was a knock at the street door, and she went to open it. Witness gave about a table-spoonful of the tea to the deceased, which was all that he would take, the rest she threw into the chamber utensil. Witness subsequently found a cup on the dressing table, which contained some wetted powder, which smelt and looked like some medicine which the deceased had taken. Part of this powder witness preserved. On a second visit to the house witness found another settlement of powder in a wine glass, and that also she preserved. There was no settlement in the bottle of medicine which came from the doctor. Deceased had several fits before death. Dr Roberts, of Exeter, having seen the dying man, and having asked if any of deceased's vomit or secretions had been preserved, was given the utensils and the glass with the sediment. The Coroner's Inquiry was adjourned for a post mortem examination to be made, and the deceased's wife having been taken to Exmouth was last evening brought before a magistrate and remanded. the contents of the utensils and glass has been forwarded to Professor Herapath of Bristol for analysis.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 November 1865
CLIST HONITON - The Alleged Murder By Poisoning At Honiton Clyst. Resumed Inquest Last Night. - The Coroner's Inquest respecting the death of WM. ASHFORD, a master boot and shoemaker, aged 45, who resided at Honiton Clyst, a village about four miles from Exeter, was resumed last evening at the Exeter Inn, Honiton Clyst, before Mr Deputy Coroner Brent and a Jury, of which Mr R. Wish was Foreman. WM. ASHFORD, the deceased, was taken ill a short time ago, and died under circumstances that led to the suspicion that poison had been administered to him; and during his illness he was seized with vomiting, occasional fits, and other symptoms of poisoning. One of the attendants, a Mrs Butt, wife to the police constable stationed in the village, had her suspicions aroused not only by observing the various symptoms, but by finding a sediment in the medicine and some bluish-white powder in a glass. The wife of the deceased was afterwards taken into custody on suspicion of having poisoned her husband. The Inquiry now awaits the result of the chemical analysis of the stomach and other parts of the body to be made by Professor Herapath. On the resumption of the Inquiry last evening, Mr Lionel Roberts, surgeon at Exeter, stated that he attended the deceased, MR ASHFORD for four days. he first went at the request of MARY ANN ASHFORD, deceased's wife, on Tuesday, the 31st ult. She said deceased was suffering from sickness and diarrhoea, and asked for some medicine for him, which witness let her have, and told her to send the following morning to let him know if he was not better. The next morning a boy brought him a verbal message that ASHFORD was not better, and MRS ASHFORD would be glad if witness would come to see him. He did so about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, and found him suffering from vomiting and diarrhoea. Witness sent him some more medicine, and told them to inform him how deceased was on the following morning. that was on the 2nd inst., when witness believed the same boy as before came and said ASHFORD was no better, and witness said he would see the deceased, preferring to do so before ordering any further medicine. Witness saw deceased in the morning, and found him still vomiting, and the discharge from the bowels was still going on. Witness asked the wife if she had given the medicine regularly, and she replied "yes." Witness then asked to see the bottle and box containing the medicine he had prescribed, and found that instead of four pills that ought to have been taken only two had been; whilst all the doses of the mixture had been properly taken. Witness asked the wife why the pills had not been regularly taken, and she replied that she did not understand the label. Witness asked her if she could read, and she replied that she could. Witness said "that label is plain enough for a child to read." The label was printed with the doses and times specified, but on it was written in a bracket "one of the pills." That meant that one pill was to be taken with each dose of medicine. The woman replied, "I don't understand it," and promised to give the medicine regularly for the future. Witness said he spoke a little sharply, as he felt there had been some neglect, and he was not satisfied that the case had not more favourably progressed. Witness desired that the same medicine should be continued, and cautioned the wife to be more careful in the administration of it. Witness, in company with Dr Miles, saw deceased on Friday morning, and found him very prostrated, with no perceptible pulse, the vomiting still continuing, and the bowels still relaxed. Fresh medicine was prescribed for deceased, and witness again saw him in the evening of the same day, and found him in about the same state. When witness saw him deceased was dying, and expired shortly after he arrived. When he first saw deceased he did not see why the deceased should not do well. Witness said he expected that the disease would have yielded from the treatment he gave. His suspicions were not aroused up to a certain period - on the Saturday morning, about 11 o'clock - when P.C. Butt came to his house and asked him if he was aware of anything having been given to the patient except the prescribed medicine. Witness replied no. Butt then produced a paper packet containing a small quantity of bluish-white powder. He had a portion of it still in his possession, but he could not state positively what it was. After the death of ASHFORD, when witness was in the room examining the contents of some of the vessels, he noticed some brandy and water in a glass, and also a glass containing a fluid similar to the prescribed medicine with a sediment of bluish-white powder, similar to that brought by Mr Butt. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said all those facts aroused a certain suspicion in his mind that something had been administered of which he was not aware. He had made a post mortem examination of the body in conjunction with Mr Warren, that day, by order from the Coroner. - Mr Frederick H. Warren, surgeon, of Exeter, stated that he assisted in the post mortem examination that day. The body was well nurtured and had no appearance of a long illness. He noticed the appearance of the face; the brow was contracted, and the whole expression of the countenance was harsh, and far from placid. There was no external mark of violence on any part. The abdomen was sunken. The chest was first opened, and the lungs were found to be perfectly healthy, with the exception of a slight old adhesion on the posterior part of the left lung. In the whole cavity of the chest on both sides there was not more than an ounce and a half of fluid. On opening the pericardium a little extra fluid was found; but the heart was healthy. The cavity of the belly was next opened; the muscular portion was found well supplied with fat, shewing that the deceased had not suffered from a lingering disease. There was no indication of any inflammatory action having existed on the surface of the stomach or the intestines. On a general view some portions of the lesser intestines appeared as if internally inflamed, and in some places the bowels were greatly irritated. The bladder was extremely contracted, and he never saw one so small. The brain was perfectly healthy. He had merely stated the facts and offered no opinions. - The Coroner complimented Mr Warren on the lucid and straightforward manner in which he had given his evidence. - The evidence of Mrs Butt, wife to the policeman, which was given on the previous evening, was read over to her by the Coroner and she signed it after a few additions had been made to it. - Mr Chown, a cooper, residing next door to the deceased, was next examined. He stated that on November 2nd, he went in and saw deceased by his request. Witness remained there about two hours, during which time he frequently complained of illness and vomited. Deceased appeared to suffer acutely; his vomit was very green. Deceased said he suffered in the stomach, and he could not make it out, as he had never suffered so before. The next day witness saw deceased and noticed a great change for the worse. Witness remained there about half-an-hour, when deceased said, "There will be a great change before the morning." Deceased said he was nearly choked, and had a great burning in his throat and stomach,. Deceased's wife, by request, got him some gin and peppermint, after taking which deceased said it had done him good. Deceased had several fits, when the body was stretched out stiff, and the eyes were staring. After recovering from one of the fits deceased said to witness, "I shall never get over it. I hope you'll see my wife taken care of, and try and persuade her to have a sale and give up the business. You know I have given my wife all that I am possessed of." - The Coroner said that in the present case the Police authorities prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, and he should therefore hand over the contents of the stomach, and other portions which had been carefully preserved, to Deputy Chief Constable Maxwell, who attended, for him to hand them over to Mr Herapath for chemical analysis, and there was no doubt that the matter would be thoroughly attended to. It therefore only remained for him to adjourn the Inquest, to as early and convenient a date as possible. He thought if he said the 20th inst., at 2 o'clock, it would give sufficient time for the analysis to be thoroughly made. - After some slight additional evidence, the Inquiry was again adjourned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 November 1865
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of An Officer At Tregantle Fort, Near Plymouth. - At an early hour on Tuesday morning, CAPTAIN W. B. DAVENPORT, of the 62nd Regiment, committed suicide in his quarters at Tregantle Fort, Whitsand Bay, near Plymouth, by shooting himself in the head with a revolver pistol. The deceased was detached on Friday last from Plymouth to form, with two companies of his Regiment, the garrison of that fort, which he commanded. The sad event has cast a gloom over the Regiment, the deceased, both in its official and social circles, having been much respected. He was about 29 years of age, and had been in the army for several years, having distinguished himself as a brave and able officer as far back as during the Crimean war. For some time past he had, however, been subject to depression of spirits. He had expressed a desire to leave the service, but his taking such a step was disapproved of by his friends. When on a recent visit to his relatives, it is said he seemed to have shewn a foreboding of the giving way of his intellect. From his generally very agreeable and sociable manner no apprehension of such a calamity was, however entertained. Between three and four months ago his mother died, and this is believed to have added much to his depression. He made an application on that occasion for three months' leave, but this was refused on account of the short time which had elapsed since his previous leave. Tregantle Fort, in the wilds of Whitsand Bay, in winter, with only two companies of a regiment occupying its long lines of barracks is rather dull quarters, and the deceased had evinced some dread of going there. But between Friday and Tuesday no change was noticed in him, nor did anything unusual appear to be the matter with him either in body or mind. On Monday he visited Plymouth, and transacted business apparently in his usual health, and returned to the fort in the evening and dined at the mess. An Inquest was held on the body at the fort yesterday at noon, before Mr John Jagoe, County Coroner. - Lieut. C. W. Brown, a brother officer of the deceased, whom he had known for the past six years, deposed that they were together for a quarter of an hour late on Monday night in deceased's room, who then seemed well and cheerful. They talked, and at length bade each other good night, and witness went to his room. About two minutes afterwards he heard a report as of a pistol in deceased's room, and on going in found deceased leaving back on the sofa, grasping a revolver in both hands, and blood flowing from his mouth. Five barrels were loaded - one had been discharged. Assistance was called immediately, but life was extinct. Burgess, deceased's servant, gave corroborative evidence, and also deposed that CAPTAIN DAVENPORT for the last four months, since the death of his mother, had been suffering from lowness of spirits. On Sunday last he told Burgess to unpack his revolver and give it to him, which was done. The Jury, after a brief address from the Coroner, and consultation, returned a verdict "That the Deceased Shot himself during a fit of temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 November 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest At Devonport. - An Inquest was opened at the Barnstaple Inn, Princess-street, Devonport, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, on Saturday last, on the body of an infant female child, whose parents are called HENSMAN, the father being an able seaman on board the Cambridge, in Hamoaze. The child had been unwell for some time, but no medical aid had been obtained, and on Thursday morning last when the mother awoke the child was lying dead by her side. The cause of death not being clear, the Inquest was adjourned for the purpose of a post mortem examination, and on the Jury re-assembling on Monday, the medical evidence went to shew that there was congestion of the lungs, and that death was Natural. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 November 1865
DARTMOUTH - Sudden Death At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. M. Puddicombe, Coroner, at Strike's Sun Hotel, on Friday evening, on the body of MR JOHN TOZER, a journeyman mason, of Dartmouth. On the previous day the deceased went to his work as usual, and at breakfast time stooped to pick up a few chips to take home for lighting his fire, when he was seized, blood rushing from his mouth and nose. He was immediately taken to his residence by his fellow workmen, but expired before medical aid could be procured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 November 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Tradesman's Wife At Devonport. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held by Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner for Devonport, at the Black Horse Inn, Cumberland-street, concerning the death of ELIZABETH AYRES, aged 58, wife of a confectioner carrying on business at Devonport, whose painful death has been already recorded. Deceased, who was slightly mentally deranged in consequence of an attack of paralysis, hanged herself in her bed-chamber on Saturday morning. The Jury were unanimous in returning a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The family and friends of deceased are greatly sympathised with, being held in great respect.

PLYMOUTH - Infant Mortality. - On Saturday evening MRS HARRIETT UNDERHILL, wife of a butcher of Bilbury-street, went to bed, taking with her, her child, FREDERICK JAMES UNDERHILL, aged 10 weeks. This child had always been healthy, though a brother suffered from convulsions. In the morning at six o'clock MRS UNDERHILL found the child dead in her arms. The Inquest was held at the Guildhall last evening, before the Coroner, Mr J. Edmonds, senr. It was stated that the deceased appeared to have died from convulsions. A Juror thought it would be a great assistance to the Jury if medical evidence were called in. The Coroner said that if a surgeon were to give evidence he would have to make a post mortem examination, and in cases where there was no suspicion of ill-treatment, and especially in such cases as the present, where every attention seemed to have been paid, the parents were spared the pain of having a post mortem examination on the child. The Jury coincided, and returned a verdict of "Found Dead in Bed."

CLYST HONITON - The Charge Of Poisoning At Clyst Honiton. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - The adjourned Inquisition respecting the death of WM. ASHFORD, a master boot and shoemaker, who resided at Clyst Honiton, near Exeter, was resumed yesterday by Mr Deputy-coroner Brent, in a large room at the Duke of York Inn, Clyst Honiton. MARY ANN ASHFORD, the wife to the deceased, who was in custody charged with having poisoned her husband, was present, and evinced great interest in the proceedings, though she maintained comparative composure. Mr Gerald De Courcy, chief constable, and Mr Maxwell, deputy chief constable, represented the police authorities on the part of the prosecution and Mr Friend, of Exeter, watched the case on behalf of the prisoner. A large number of persons occupied the lower end of the room. The prisoner appeared pale and weak on her entrance and was assisted to her seat. - William Pratt, journeyman shoemaker, who has been pointed out as the paramour of the prisoner, stated that the two letters marked 1 and 2 (these have already been published) were in his handwriting and that of the accused respectively. Witness also stated that No. 3 letter was in his handwriting. It was sent to MRS ASHFORD, and was of the same amusing character as the previous letters. Another letter was handed to witness marked No. 5, which he admitted was sent to him by the prisoner, and was in her handwriting:-
"Clist Honiton. - My Dear Frank, this comes with my keind love to you and I was so glad to hear from you and I hope you will soon get better to come home again. I am almost broken hart. I should like to see you My deer frank. I thought you had quit forgototon me in not wrighting to mee before I have shaed manny tears since you been home then for meney yers and no one to tell my troble to your in my mind all the day long and I hope you will right to me as soon as you cann and tell me how you are Getteing on for I shall want to know I am in so much troble a bout you. My Deer frank when you right to mee derick to Mrs Cowley and I shall be all right. - M. A. ASHFORD. - You will laught at my righten."
The Coroner here cautioned the witness not to criminate himself in his answers, as the Court expected him to answer the questions put to him. - Q.: In letter No. 1 What did you mean by "I hope he will not die, as you were speaking to me about the old man." A.: I do not recollect anything about that, nor do I know what it means. - Q.: Did you ever have any conversation about MR ASHFORD dying? - A.: Yes; a day or two previous to his death I said, in answer to MRS ASHFORD, "If master lives over tonight I think it will recover." MRS ASHFORD replied, "No, Frank, he is very ill indeed." The witness here stated that he had assisted in getting the deceased into bed once or twice during his last illness, having been sent for to do so. On one occasion he said he could not go, as his master looked so fierce, and he did not like to see him. He had had some conversation with a lad aged 14 years, named Blackmore, who said to him when talking about his master, "Oh, he'll never live to die." He did not notice anything particular in the expression. When he heard of MR ASHFORD'S death he was frightened, and stopped work. He was a journeyman shoemaker, not an apprentice, and had worked for the deceased more than four years. His wages were 8s. a week, with board in the house. He went to live at Dawlish at Christmas, 1863, and stopped there for eight months. While staying at Dawlish he visited Clyst Honiton two or three times, and stayed at his late master's house and did so by invitation. Deceased had called upon him three times at Dawlish; was alone once, once with two young men named John Reynolds and Arthur Pearce, and once with MRS ASHFORD. On all occasions witness said deceased asked him to return to Clyst Honiton. MRS ASHFORD also asked him to come back; but witness replied to both that he had a very good situation where he was, and the work was lighter. Witness refused to return as long as MR ASHFORD lived in the same house, when deceased replied he would change houses if witness would go and live with him. On one occasion witness replied he did not like to return, as "things had been said" about him and MRS ASHFORD. Deceased replied "Never mind, Frank, if you come back with me people may say what they like, it shall make no difference to you. You may come with me, and I'll behave as a father to you; and you may live with me for life if you like Frank." [The witness here became affected.] He was always on good terms with the deceased, and never had had three angry words with him during the four years. During the past few months he had not been on such good terms with MRS ASHFORD as he had been some time previously, as she objected to his keeping company with a young woman. (Sensation.) He did not like to name the person. He broke off correspondence with MRS ASHFORD in consequence. MRS ASHFORD had quarrelled with him about his courting, but witness said it did not alter his determination. He had never heard the deceased and the prisoner quarrel about him, but within the past few months he had heard them disagree amongst themselves about a will that was drawn up unknown to MRS ASHFORD, for THOMAS ASHFORD, a brother of his master, and NICHOLAS ASHFORD, the father. He believed each one had a will. Since that time deceased made another will, which was in favour of MRS ASHFORD. He had never heard MR and MRS ASHFORD threaten each other. - By the Jury: Did MRS ASHFORD alone ever visit you at Dawlish? - A.: Never. - By the Coroner: Did you ever visit MRS ASHFORD at Clyst Honiton when her husband was not at home? - A.: Not that I am aware of, sir. - AGNES ASHFORD, widow, sister-in-law to the deceased, described the symptoms of the deceased when suffering from the fits on the 4th inst. His eyes she said appeared wild, his head was thrown back, and his hands were clenched. He took very small quantities of gin and brandy and water to wet his lips. MRS ASHFORD prepared the gin and water in the bedroom. When deceased had no fits he complained of great pain. - Mary Brewer, a widow, employed as a nurse by the prisoner during the deceased's illness, described the symptoms she noticed, which were similar to those noticed by Mrs Butt, related at the previous Inquiry. - Selina Ann Ponsford, a little girl nine years of age, deposed to fetching on two different occasions some jalap for the prisoner about a week before the deceased was taken ill. - The Inquiry was here adjourned for half an hour. - William Herapath, senr., professor of chemistry and toxicology, residing at Bristol, stated that on Nov. 8th, he received portions of the remains of WM. ASHFORD for chemical analysis, which he was instructed to make by the Secretary of State for the Home Department. He found the stomach tied at the two extremities. There was but a small quantity of contents, which were mostly of a bloody character. The stomach itself was in the highest state of inflammation. He cut out a portion of it, washed it, and put in on a piece of glass. The appearance shewed him he had to seek for an irritant poison. He first sought for arsenic by Rienshe's process, and discovered it to be present, a specimen of the deposit he now produced. He described various tests he applied to the solution to prove the presence of the poison. He also tried Marsh's test, which also shewed a deposit of metallic arsenic. Supposing it to be possible that the irritant now more frequently resorted to strychnine, might be present, he tried for strychnia, and by tests which he applied to the fluid contents of the stomach he saw unmistakeable indications of strychnia. He had, therefore, no doubt from the inflamed state of the stomach that the person died from the effects of one or more irritant poisons. (Sensation.) Arsenic and strychnia were the poisons in this case. He could not bring the proofs of the presence of strychnia, owing to the colour of the tests being of a vanishing character. Having found poison in the stomach, he wished to discover whether it had entered the system. He therefore took from jar No. 3 a portion of one of the lobes of the liver. He treated for arsenic, and found undoubted proofs of it. He took a larger portion of the lobe, and treated for strychnia, and found undoubted evidence of that poison. As he therefore had found both poisons in the stomach and in the liver, he did not think it necessary to analyse the smaller intestines or the kidney. He then proceeded to analyse the last vomit, and in the sediment he found arsenic, and on evaporating it down found strychnia. In No. 6, marked Hunter's vermin powder, on which was a printed label describing it as poison, he found starch and strychnia, slightly coloured with Prussian blue. The next packet contained the sediment from a wine glass in deceased's bedroom. The sediment he found to be white arsenic with a small quantity of black colouring matter. The next packet was the bed sheet, which he did not analyse, as he thought it unnecessary. The packet No. 5, contained some powder given to P.C. Butt by Mrs Butt. The powder contained a very small quantity of white arsenic coloured by Prussian blue. Another parcel with no number was composed of white arsenic and Prussian blue. The other packets were numbered in a fresh series. The first was a purse taken from MRS ASHFORD'S pocket by P.C. Butt. Under the catch he saw a little dust, and the microscope shewed him the starch grains of the same character as he afterwards found in the pocket. The next packet contained a pocket and a pocket handkerchief, but nothing could be seen on the surface of either. On introducing each separately into a conical glass containing water, and allowing deposition to take place, he found in the sediments arsenic and strychnia. After describing other articles which had been forwarded to him, but on which he found nothing suspicious, Mr Herapath said that No. 8 contained four pills of about a grain each, in which he found a metal that he could not yet identify, but certainly it was not arsenic. No. 9 was marked, "Found in MRS ASHFORD'S house." In the packet he found a vermin powder, composed of strychnia, starch and a black powder. The other package was sent by post from the police authorities and contained the powder that Mrs Butt found in the room of the deceased on November 10th. It was marked outside by a printed label "poison", and was entirely white arsenic, coloured with Prussian blue. - By the Coroner: did you find enough poison to destroy life? - A.: That is another matter; in all the cases I have had I have not found enough poison to destroy life, but the effects of poison. I am confident that the man died from an irritant poison. The symptoms described by AGNES ASHFORD and Mrs Brewer are those attendant upon poisoning by arsenic and strychnia. - P.C. Butt, who resides at Clyst Honiton, gave evidence of various conversations which he had had with the accused concerning the illness of her husband. - The Coroner having carefully summed up, the Jury retired, and on returning into Court, after a quarter of an hour's consultation, and that they had decided unanimously to return a verdict of "Wilful Murder against MRS ASHFORD." The prisoner on hearing this announcement fainted away. She will be brought up on remand before the magistrates at Exmouth this day.

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 November 1865
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest At Torquay. - On Tuesday Mr R. Cross, coroner of the Callington district, in the absence of Mr F. Cuming, the Coroner for the Torquay District, held two Inquests at the Torbay Infirmary. - The first was on the body of MR RICHARD LANDER, who fell into the harbour and was drowned on Friday night. Mr w. Stebbings stated that the deceased was at the Devon Arms on Friday evening. He was there from half-past five o'clock until half-past seven. During that time LANDER had two glasses of beer. He was the worse for liquor, and must have been drinking before he came to the Devon Arms. Witness at half-past seven accompanied the deceased home. He had known the deceased twenty years. There had been no quarrelling between LANDER and any other person. Mr Beal stated that just before eight o'clock, he was walking along the quay, and when between the two gas lights near the hotels, where it was very dark, he saw a man coming towards him, and when within twelve feet of him the man fell overboard into six feet of water. Witness looked over the quay and saw the man striking out in the act of swimming. He immediately ran to the slip, a few yards beyond, and got a boat, and sculled it up to where he saw the man fall in. When he got there he found that a ladder had been put over the quay, and the man's head and shoulders were out of the water. Within two minutes of his falling overboard the man, who proved to be the deceased, was taken out, and put in a cab and taken to the infirmary. Deceased was insensible. - Mr R. J. Slade, the harbour-master, gave similar evidence. - Dr Powell, the senior house-surgeon, stated that deceased showed no sign of life when admitted into the infirmary, and all attempts to restore animation were fruitless. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and expressed a hope that the authorities would take measures for fencing off that part of the quay, several persons having fallen over at that spot.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 November 1865
CORNWOOD - The Late Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Bone, junr., Coroner, on the body of JOHN ROWSELL, the engine driver, and THOMAS PALMER, the stoker, who were killed on Saturday last by the running from the rails of the 10 a.m. luggage train from Exeter to Plymouth, near the Cornwood-road Station of the South Devon Railway. The Inquest took place at the house of Mr John Sobey, the station master. Amongst the railway officials in attendance were Mr L. J. Seargeant, the secretary of the line; Margary, engineer; and Mr Wright, the locomotive superintendent. The first witness examined was Thomas Mair, who said: I was the first guard in charge of the 10 a.m. fast goods train from Exeter on Saturday last. The train came down safely as far as Ivybridge. JOHN ROWSELL was the driver and THOMAS PALMER the stoker. We started from Ivybridge at 2.25. - I noted the time - and proceeded safely until I heard the driver blow the break whistle on the Exeter side of the Blatchford Viaduct, when between Knott's-lane Bridge and the viaduct. I and the other guard were in separate vans. I applied my break sharply and as tight as I could put it on. I did not discover that the train was off the line until it had nearly come to a standstill, when on lowering the window and looking out I observed that the engine and front trucks were off the line. The van I was in was the last one. I went to the head of the train and found that the engine was upside down. The stoker, PALMER, was walking towards me, and ROWSELL was lying on the embankment where his legs were wedged in by several casks of tallow. The two men were brought into the station and were attended to directly. A strong wind blew that afternoon. We stopped five minutes at Ivybridge, as we waited to cross the 1.45 up-train there. I took out my watch after the accident, and found that it was about 2.35, but I cannot now say accurately. Did not stop between Ivybridge and Cornwood. We stopped five minutes at Kingsbridge. The journey from Ivybridge to Cornwood occupied ten minutes. I had in the van with me another of the company's servants, who was returning from Exeter. - Roger Charles Partridge said: I was the second guard of the train on Saturday, and my van was in the centre of the train. I heard the whistle first when upon the Blatchford viaduct. I kept on screwing down the break, and did not know what had happened until the train stopped. The train consisted of twelve vehicles besides the engine. The first jerk was felt by me on the viaduct. We had almost stopped when there were two jerks, and I found that we were off the line. The train was stopped by the breaks to about half speed just before it came to a standstill. We came at regular speed after leaving Ivybridge, and at the rate of between twenty and thirty miles an hour. The name of the engine was "Hero." - Mr John Wright said: I am locomotive superintendent of the South Devon Railway. I know the engine called Hero, which is the property of the contractors who supply engines, or work the trains for the company. The engine drivers are not under the control of the company's servants, although they are subject to the rules which I produce. I am a servant of the contractors, and I issue the rules with the sanction of the company. The two deceased men received copies of the rules. The rules specify that each driver shall, after each day's work, report the state of his engine. This was not complied with because the purpose of the rule was that defects should be reported, and this was complied with. The Hero came on the line on April 2nd, 1860, and was before the accident as good as any one the line. The responsibility of an engine being kept in good order rests on the engine driver. The best explanation I can give of the accident, after having heard all the circumstances, is that a struck first got off the line on the viaduct and that this threw the engine off. The absence of one of the spring pins of the engine would not tend to throw off the engine. - Mr P. J. Margary said: I am the engineer of the line. I have examined the permanent way from the Cornwood station to beyond Knott's Bridge. I was on the spot about two or three hours after the accident. The distance from the spot at which a spring pin of an engine was found to where there are traces of an engine or vehicle having got off the line is 25 chains 17 feet, and the distance from that spot to where the engine was stopped was 24 chains 14 feet. The permanent way is in very fair, or rather in good working order at the place where the vehicle appears to have left the line. A joint near which has been pointed out as bad, I should consider to be a fair joint. There is a curve in the viaduct of 17 chains radius, and the maximum gradient is about one foot in 152 feet between Knott's-lane Bridge and Cornwood station. The curve is sharp, but the grade is easy. - Mr L. J. Seargeant, secretary of the line, said: The train in question is timed to reach Plymouth at 2 p.m., and the stoppages are timed to occupy fifty minutes, which reduces the rate of speed to slightly below twenty miles an hour. It was called the fast goods train. This train was to cross the 12.40 train, but was late, and had to wait for the next train. The basis on which the speed of this train was taken was twenty miles an hour. The distance between Ivybridge and Cornwood-road is two and a half miles; and if that distance were travelled in ten minutes the speed would be fifteen miles an hour. The speed was under instead of over the average rate. - Mr John Sobey said: I am station-master at Cornwood-road Station. Five trucks were off the line when I was attracted to the spot by the accident. I saw the stoker creep out from under the engine, and I had to dig out with a spade the driver ROWSELL, who was imbedded in the embankment and hemmed in by three tallow casks. I and my wife attended to the men until their deaths. - Mr Seargeant added that ROWSELL stated that he only felt two jumps, and that was all the indication he had of an accident. - Mr Sobey added that the deceased men told him that they could not account for the accident. - Wm. Goff, ganger of packers said: I have the care of the permanent way from a point west of the Cornwood station to a point east of half a mile beyond Woodburne or Knott's Bridge. I go over my portion of the line twice a day. I went as usual on Saturday morning, and walked across the Blatchford viaduct, which I found in order. If I find anything out of order I have it repaired or attended to at once. I did not see any joint on the viaduct in the least foul. What we call a "foul" joint is where any two rails do not meet, are not exactly continuous, and where the end of one rail projects more than the end that meets it. - Richard Stone, inspector of the permanent way, said: During the week prior to the accident I inspected the part of the line in question. I observed the joints on the viaduct, and found them to be fair joints. I consider that a joint is fair until a rail projects about the eighth of an inch from the next rail, when I consider that it needs attention. - Ralph Venning, station master, Ivybridge, said: I produce the "Line clear book." The 10 a.m. down-train left the station at 2.26. I did not converse with them, but merely gave them the signal to start. - The guard, Partridge, recalled, said that all who had charge of the train were perfectly sober. - Mr Seargeant said that an investigation had been made on the part of the company, and the result was that they were of opinion that a truck got off the line. Whether it was the engine or a van would never be known. The most reasonable cause for the accident was the sudden application of the breaks, although the engine might have had a little more rigidity from the breaking of a pin. - The Coroner said that the evidence had not shewn that there was that concussion of trucks which might have been expected from the sudden arrest of momentum. - Mr Seargeant said that experience in shunting within station yards shewed that sudden application of breaks sent trucks off the line. - The Coroner then observed to the Jury that he did not know that they could receive further information. He was afraid that they could not arrive at any definite result as to the cause of the train leaving the rails, although there was no doubt that the death of the two poor men was attributable to the deplorable fact that the train did get off the line. There was nothing to shew what threw the engine off, although it was satisfactory that, whereas the average rate of speed for the train was twenty miles, the train was not proceeding at the time of the accident at a more rapid rate than fifteen miles per hour. - Mr Wright said that no blame was attachable to the driver, for he was a very careful man, and the only complaint against him was that he would not drive fast, and his trains were therefore sometimes late. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" with the addition that there was no evidence to shew how the engine and vans got off the line.

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 November 1865
IVYBRIDGE - The Suspected Death At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at Ivybridge, before Mr Alan B. Bone, Coroner, as deputy of Mr Cuming, of Totnes, whose sudden illness renders him still unable to attend to business, on the body of WILLIAM H. WINSOR, a boy twelve years of age, concerning whose death rumours prejudicial to his master and fellow servants had been spread. The Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Ivybridge. A double Jury was empanelled, which included several influential gentlemen of the neighbourhood. Captain N. F. Edwards was chosen Foreman; and the rest of the Jury were Captain M. E. Eyre, Messrs. W. Abbot, E. Allen, Robert Baker, Thomas Blackmore, W. Conway, M. Crocker, E. Daw, Robert Ford, W. Mallett, J. Methrell, Richard Pooley, F. Robertson, S. Sandover, J. Selden, B. Sherwell, R. Sherwell, G. Thomas, J. Willis, J. Head, R. W. Keep and H. C. Keys. - ROBERT WINSOR, the first witness, said: I am a labourer, and live at Rut farm, the tenant of which is Mr Lang. The deceased, my son, was twelve years old last April. He was an indoor servant of Mr Richard Philip Adams, with whom he had been about five weeks. I last saw deceased alive in my kitchen at ten o'clock on Saturday morning last. He came home to me on the evening before. On Sunday morning, about half-past seven, I found him dead in one of the fat bullock houses. He was hanging by his neck, suspended by the strap produced. The strap was not round his neck, but formed a loop suspended from a chain that hung from a beam overhead. - The Coroner: He might have lifted himself out of the noose, and released himself in a minute. - A Juror: Yes, a person would hang for hours in that way before dying. - The Coroner: As the strap was but a loop, there was nothing round the boy's neck to suffocate him speedily. he could have extricated himself, apparently, by lifting up his hands to the strap or chain. - Witness resumed: Deceased was fully dressed, with his cap on, and his face was towards the door. On Friday night, when my son came home, I was in bed. He knocked at the door, and said that he was outside and had his boots in his hands. I let him in, and he sat down and would have no supper. I asked him why he had left his master's house, and he said "They have been carrying on such tricks with me. They tied me down in a chair, and I have had mustard put upon my face." In consequence of this I went over to Mr Adams's with the boy on Saturday morning. I saw Maddick there, and he said to my boy, "What a pretty fellow you were to go back home last night; you ought to have been flogged all the way back." I told him that he must be a pretty fellow to strike my lad as he had done. My son then told me that Maddick took a cleaver the night before and whirled it over his (deceased's) head; also that he knocked him on the head with it, and shewed me and the servant-maid the injuries he had received. Mr Adams said the boy was an idler and a great liar; but the boy contradicted Mr Adams with regard to several statements that he made. A man named Roach was present. I left the boy in the kitchen at ten o'clock that morning, and never saw him again alive. When the boy came home the night before he had been crying and appeared to be very much frightened. - By Mr Mallett: The boy appeared to be wretched, and he stated that they had been telling lies about him. The boy was not of weak intellect. The brother of the boy's mother is now in the union, being of weak mind. The deceased was a hearty, strong, healthy boy, like others. He had never had a fit. He was by no means a stupid boy. On the Friday night when my boy returned he shewed me his cap and his head. He said his head pained him, and he pointed to a wound upon it. He shewed me his handkerchief, which had upon it mustard, with which he stated that his face had been smeared at Mr Adams's. - James Gorin said: On Sunday morning I went with MR WINSOR to one of the fat bullock house attached to the farm. I there saw hanging by the head the deceased boy, who had a chain and buckled strap under his chin and the chain and strap suspended him by running up from under his chin behind his ears. We took the boy down by lifting him out of the nooses made by the bullock chain and strap. The boy's feet were nearly level with a crib. - At the suggestion of the Coroner, the Jury then went to the fat bullock house referred to, which is a mile distant, and inspected the chain and strap, and premises. On their return, James Gorin was recalled and said: I did not observe that the strap or the chain was twisted. Deceased was quite dead when we found him. The strain was on the leather strap rather than on the chain, and I believe the strap hanged the boy, and that he was not hanged in the chain, which was loose. - By a Juror: Before the boy's death I saw him, and he said he should perhaps leave his place. I advised him not to do so. He appeared unhappy. - Wm. Maddick, a labourer working with Mr Adams, of Broom-hill Farm, having been cautioned that he need not criminate himself, deposed: I last saw deceased on Saturday with his father. I was chopping thin wood against the wall on Friday night with a small cleaver. I asked the boy why he did not go to bed. He made no reply, and I then said to him, "If you don't speak, I'll let into you." I then went way, and that is all that I did. The marks of whiting on the cleaver was done in the course of chopping wood. I never struck the boy at all, or struck the wall just over the boy's head to frighten him. - The Coroner: What then was the sense of his going home and not eating his supper? - A.: Probably it was because he was not going to stay with Mr Adams. - Q.: But what do you say about the mustard? - A.: I never saw any mustard whatever. - Q.: You said you would "let into him" - what did you say? A.: I said I would let into him with the cleaver, but I did not touch him. All I did to the boy at any time was to knock him away from a feeding tub a week before, when he fell down on the pavement. I did it because he was filling in the meat badly. The boy was very hearty, but I should not say that he was very "sharp." The boy one day carried out a gun; it was not loaded, and he said he was taking out the gun to air it. - By a Juror: He probably only took it out to lay with. - John Joynt, labourer, said: I saw the deceased alive at Rut Farm on Saturday, at ten o'clock. He shewed me a wound on his head, and said that Maddick struck him on the head with a cleaver. - The Coroner observed that the deceased's statement was not legal evidence against Maddick, and the statement ought not to e permitted to weigh against him. - By a Juror: He told me nothing about mustard. - Maddick here interposed, and said that deceased had stated that he was hurt by some harness falling on him. - Ellen Goff, a girl in the service of Mr Adams, said she was in the kitchen when Maddick was chopping wood there, and when deceased was also there. Maddick, who had a cleaver in his hand, said to deceased that if he did not answer as to why he did not go to bed he would halve his head with a cleaver. He did not answer, and Maddick struck the wall over the boy's head thrice with the cleaver. He struck the wall about three inches above the deceased's head. Mr Adams came in and the boy then went out, watered a horse, and came in again. Mr Adams sent him to bed, but the deceased said he should not go to bed, but that he would take his clothes and go home, as it was "not proper to go on with him so." Deceased took his clothes and left the house. He was crying when he passed out of doors to go home. I applied mustard to the boy's face. The fact is that on the Wednesday before he died WINSOR in fun daubed my face with blacking, and I told him that when I could I should serve him out. When he fell asleep I put some mustard on his face. He did not take this to heart. On Friday afternoon he said the harness had fallen upon him, and injured his head and nose. His nose bled dreadfully, and he made it bleed more because, as he said, it was healthy for a person to bleed after being struck. - Maddick was here told that the servant girl directly contradicted his statement as to his not striking the wall with the cleaver above deceased's head. Maddick persisted in his statement. - Mr Adams, the deceased's employer said: I was astonished when I heard of deceased's death, because I had seen nothing but innocent play between the servants and the boy. I had only seen that tricks were occasionally played with the boy, for which he in the same spirit apparently retaliated. I gave the boy notice to leave on Friday afternoon, because he invariably declined to do what he was told, and therefore I would not retain him. I met him in the afternoon and asked him what made his forehead bleed. He replied that the harness had fallen upon his head. I said he had better bathe his forehead and come with me. He said "It is not worthwhile, the bleeding has stopped." I did not see him again until the evening, when I called him in the kitchen and found that he was asleep. I then saw that his legs were tied to the hamper on which he sat, and that his coat was tied to the chimney-crook. I thought it was but a practical joke. The boy would not answer me when I spoke to him, so I told him to look after the pony and go to bed. I afterwards found that he went home. I thought the boy was of weak mind, because he ate so ravenously. The boy a short time since, I am told, went into the pond to bring out the ducks. - Dr Holmes said: I am an M.D. residing at Ivybridge. I carefully examined the body of the deceased; externally it has the following marks - an incised wound on the crown of the head, and on the right side of the centre parting, a slight skin wound on the right side of the nose, and a pinch bruise on the right fore-finger. The wound on the head was about a quarter of an inch; it penetrated the outer table of the skull, but I don't consider there was concussion of the brain. I found the lungs healthy, but partially congested. The viscera generally were healthy, but the brain was much congested, and with the state of the lungs was quite sufficient to have caused death. There was a livid mark upon his neck. When I saw the deceased soon after death I observed that there was the evacuation of faeces and fluid which is usual in hanging. There is a mark all round the neck, except about three inches at the back of the neck. The neck was not broken. The boy's fall was only about four inches, and there seems to have been every opportunity for him to have saved himself if he wished. He hung by rather more than his jaw, and if he had jerked his head back he would have fallen to the ground. The circumstances are consistent with the boy's having hanged himself. - Mr John Lang, farmer, said: The boy has lived with me from childhood until five weeks ago. He was healthy, but was passionate - would sometimes stare vacantly, and I believe that he could not be considered of strong intellect. - The Coroner then said that the two points for the Jury were whether deceased hanged himself and if so, whether he was or was not of unsound mind. - The Jury then unanimously returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity." - The whole of the Jurymen gave their fees for attendance to the father of the deceased and Mr Adams also gave his fee, with the addition of a gratuity.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 December 1865
MONKOKEHAMPTON - Sudden Death Of A Farmer. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday by Mr Vallack, Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM HILL, aged 80, a most respectable farmer at Wood Barton, Monkokehampton, who was found dead in his court-yard. He had angrily followed a discharged servant called John Lugg, to see him off the premises, and a quarter of an hour afterwards was discovered a corpse. Lugg was taken into custody on suspicion, but the evidence did not seem to implicate him, and after a long investigation an Open Verdict was returned of "Found Dead." The deceased had a scar on his forehead and some scratches, such as might be expected from an accidental fall.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 December 1865
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr Edmonds, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held an Inquest on Friday evening at Rossi's lodging-house, Summerland-terrace, Plymouth, on the body of JOHN ZELLER. the deceased lodged at Mr Rossi's house and on Thursday evening went to bed apparently in good health. During the night, however, he complained to a fellow lodger of a pain in his stomach, and on Friday morning he was found dead in his bed. the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had died by "The Visitation of God". ZELLER was 76 years of age, and a German birth.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 December 1865
DAWLISH - At the Coroner's Inquest on the body of the eldest son, aged nine years, of MR TRIPE, coal merchant, who was drowned by falling into the brook through the planks under the viaduct, a verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned, but a strong censure was cast upon the persons to whom the planks belonged.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 December 1865
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, before Mr Alan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM SPILLER, late a shipwright in the Devonport Dockyard. The evidence went to shew that on the morning of the 2nd inst., the deceased with others was engaged n repairing H.M.S. Gladiator in the Basin. While at work he accidentally fell from the stage upon which he had been working, and his body coming in contact with the side of the ship, his spine was severely fractured. The doctor of the Dockyard attended to the deceased, but finding that his injuries were of so serious a nature, ordered him to be at once conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, where he lingered until Sunday morning last, and expired after great suffering. - In answer to a question from the Coroner, several witnesses who saw the accident testified as to the security of the stage upon which the deceased was working. On Friday, at the request of the deceased, who was then perfectly sensible, his parents and friends were fetched to him in the hospital, and he then distinctly stated that his injuries were entirely the result of accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased, who is 21 years of age, was much respected for his steady and sober habits, and his sad end is greatly deplored.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 December 1865
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Newly-Born Child. - Mr John Edmonds, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday at the Railway Inn, Zetland-place, Mutley Plain, on the body of a newly-born female child. It seems that a servant named SARAH WHITEWAY, in the employ of Mr Henry Williams, 6 Longfield-terrace, was delivered of a child on Tuesday, and the body was afterwards found in a slop-pail in the wash-house. The medical evidence shewed that there had been partial breathing, but not sufficient to prove that the child was born alive. There were no marks of violence on the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Falling Into The Devonport Military Trench. Dissensions Between Coroner And Jury. - The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM WEBB WALTERS, a bankruptcy messenger, who fell over from the Lower Brickfield, Devonport, into the military trench which skirts it, was held yesterday at the London Inn, Fore-street, before Mr Alan B. Bone, Coroner and a Jury thirteen in number. The Coroner did not arrive until 25 minutes after two o'clock, the Inquest having been appointed for two. The Jury, however, being punctual, nominated Mr Arnold, their Foreman, and held a sort of indignation meeting, and it was resolved that a complaint be made to the Coroner on his arrival as to his lateness. It was remarked that when a Juryman was late the Coroner was in the habit of saying, "I have the power of fining you, sir, and the next time you are late I will do it." Other Jurors said that if they kept the Coroner waiting he would say, "You have detained me, gentlemen;" and that "me" was worth a hundred of them. On the Coroner's arrival the Jury were sworn, stating that they had already chosen a Foreman, who then mentioned the resolution of censure which had been passed. - Mr Bone said he had often had to wait for the Juries, but it was their duty to wait for him. He did not think, however, that it needed any observation, as circumstances would happen to occasion a little delay. - The facts, as elicited from the witnesses, shewed that the deceased, WILLIAM WEBB WALTERS, aged 40 years, was a messenger of the Exeter Bankruptcy court, and was in possession of the premises of Mr William Henry Miller Morgan, bankrupt, late draper of Ross-street, Morice Town. On Sunday morning last he went into Plymouth to spend the day, and in the evening met a friend of his, Hugh Brinstead, in Stonehouse. Together they visited two or three public-houses, having a pint of ale at one place, two three-pennyworths of gin and water at another and a glass of 6d. ale at a third. Brinstead swore that deceased was quite capable of taking himself home when they parted at 11 o'clock. He must have gone straight on towards Morice Town, as a cigar was found near him when he was discovered subsequently, which cigar he was smoking when he parted from Brinstead, and the length of it had been decreased only an inch. The next thing seen of the deceased was on Tuesday morning at eleven o'clock, when two lads, William Smith and Richard Lover, went into the trench under the Brickfields for amusement, but on coming to an angle of the trench, near the spot where the one o'clock gun is fired, they saw a man lying on his left side near the wall of the trench. Seeing that he was apparently dead, they ran for the police, and first Inspector Bryant and then Supt. Lynn, Mr Swain, surgeon and P.C. Schubert arrived. They found deceased quite dead, with a deep wound on the left side of his head corresponding in shape to a stone fixed in the ground under him. Evidence was given of the fact that from the field there was a slope down to the wall of the trench of four feet, two feet of which was at a steep angle, and that there were no railings or fence between the field and the trench. It was further stated that the deceased was a stranger to Devonport and that he had previously wanted to cross the field in question by night, but had been prevented by his companions and that on these occasions he had pointed out a light on the drawbridge at the head of Fore-street as the point which should be made for direct, but which would in reality lead a heedless person right over the trench at the spot where the deceased fell. - The Coroner briefly summed up, pointing out that the Jury should either find a verdict of accidental death or found dead, as there was no evidence to shew how he came by his death, and a total absence of any suspicion of foul play. - Mr W. Greenwood, a Juror, inquired what position the War Department would be placed in if the Jury considered them culpable. - The Coroner said that would not form part of their verdict. They might express that opinion if they liked as an appendage to the verdict, but they must return the latter first, and they might afterwards consult upon the former. - Mr Greenwood: I have read the summings up of coroners - The Coroner: I can't have anything to do with the summings up of other coroners; but you must proceed in a proper form. - Mr Greenwood: but supposing we see fit to return a verdict of manslaughter against the officials? - The Coroner: It would be the most absurd and ridiculous verdict that could be returned. You should accept the law from me, and I tell you that the law will not allow you to return such a verdict. The Jury are to decide on the facts, and the Coroner on the law. Against whom could you return such a verdict? - A Juror: Against the officers of the War Department. - The Coroner: You must excuse my saying so, gentlemen, but this really is simple nonsense. - After some more discussion of a similar kind, the Court was cleared, and in about a quarter of an hour was re-opened, when the Foreman informed the Coroner that seven of the Jury were in favour of a verdict of "Accidental Death," and six in favour of one of "Manslaughter against the War Department." - The Coroner said that a verdict of manslaughter must be returned against some particular individual, A. B., or C.D., but there could not be such a thing against a "Department." - The Foreman said they meant the chief-officer of the War Department. - The Coroner said that 12 must agree before a verdict could be legal, and the court must again be cleared. He had never met with such a difficulty before during 40 years' experience and he could not understand it. There was nothing in the evidence to justify a verdict of "manslaughter". If they could not agree, he must lock them up without food or fire for the night, as he was going out of town; and in the morning he would receive their verdict when he came back. He would give them ten minutes more. He pointed out that it was the peculiar province of the Jury to determine on the facts, and the Coroner on the law, and each should shew deference to the other on those matters. - The Court was again cleared, and on re-opening the Foreman said that twelve gentlemen had agreed upon a verdict of "Manslaughter against Colonel Owen." - The Coroner: Well, gentlemen, I can't receive the verdict, and beg you will reconsider it, as I believe it to be illegal. - P.C. Schubert was then sworn according to the usual form, to keep the Jury "without fire, food, or candle," till they should agree. - The Court was cleared for the third time and on re-opening at six o'clock, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and appended to it the following rider:- The Jury have returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" because the coroner has charged them, or has declared to them, that the evidence does not by law authorise a verdict of manslaughter, and the Jury desire to express their opinion that did the law so permit - and they throw the responsibility of the law on the Coroner - they would have returned a verdict of manslaughter against the officers of the War Department."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 December 1865
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Sad Death Of A Woman At Plympton. - An Inquiry was held before Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, on Thursday, into the decease of MARGARET TURPIN, wife of WILLIAM TURPIN, gardener, Plympton, who died on the 3rd inst. The deceased's husband stated that his wife was confined of her first child - a girl - about a month ago. the birth took place at about half-past ten o'clock at night, and at about half-past six he had sent for Mrs Chard, a midwife, who at once came and attended his wife till the child was born. She went for a doctor shortly before eleven o'clock, but came back without one. witness went to the late Mr Langworthy's, but failed to make anyone hear, and on returned Mrs Chard said that "She was very glad, as no doctor was required." The deceased grew worse four days after, and on Saturday morning Mr Pode, surgeon, was fetched. On Sunday she became worse, but Mr Pode declined to attend, as he had a headache. The services of Mr Bothwell were sought, but he refused because Mr Pode had the case in charge, but Mr Pode having certified that he could not attend, Mr Bothwell went, and attended deceased until her death. - Mrs Margaret Webber, a neighbour, said she fetched Mr Pode on the Saturday, who ordered a bandage and some medicine. He said deceased was in great danger. The placenta did not come away until Thursday, and Mr Pode said when he saw her that he did not believe it had come away then. - Mr G. G. Bothwell, of Ridgeway, said that in accordance with professional etiquette he did not visit deceased until Mr Pode certified that he was very busy and could not attend to her. He found the woman suffering great pain, and relieved her of the retention of urine. He found a portion of the placenta in a decomposed state in the uterus. When such was the case the placenta decomposed, and very often poisoned the blood. He took it away. It should have previously been removed entre. Deceased died from exhaustion consequent on typhoid fever of a puerperal character, induced by absorption of the poisonous matter from the decomposition of the part of the placenta left in the uterus. - Mr S. H. Pode said that when first applied to he told Mrs Chard he was too ill to attend MRS TURPIN. That was on the Thursday after the deceased was confined on Saturday. Mrs Webber asked him to see deceased, and he went and found that she had been confined several days. He understood that she had lost a good deal of blood, and that a portion of the placenta had come away two days before. He ordered a bandage and medicine, but did not examine deceased attentively, as he told the people he was too ill; he promised to see deceased again, but did not do so. On Sunday he was fetched, but he sent for Mr Bothwell. He should have made a minute examination, but was too poorly. The witness admitted that he did attend other patients on the day he saw MRS TURPIN; and that he was on horseback at half-past seven o'clock in the evening. - Mr Bothwell asked Mr P:ode how he could reconcile the statement that he was ill with his visits to other patients. - Mr Pode said he could attend a simple case when he could not attend a midwifery case. - The Coroner said that the poor woman was much indebted to Mr Bothwell for his efficient and ready help. - Mrs Chard's evidence set forth that Mr Simons, a surgeon, when asked to attend said "he could not; he attended so many and never got paid," and told her to go to the parish doctor. She offered the fee. - Mr Simons explained that Mrs Chard asked him to see MRS TURPIN, as she (Mrs Chard) had torn away the placenta, but thought she had left a portion behind. She stated, however, that there was no haemorrhage or bleeding, and therefore he said there was no immediate danger, and directed her to go to the parish doctor, but that if he was not at home, she was to return to him. He waited for a quarter of an hour, but she did not return. He was never offered his fee, but that had nothing to do with his non-attendance. He refused on principle to take the case. - The Jury after a long deliberation returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, adding a regret that deceased had not earlier medical attendance. - The Coroner during the hearing of the case observed that any woman who voluntarily or for pay undertook the duties of midwife was liable to a criminal indictment if death ensued through her neglect or ignorance.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 December 1865
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - Mr W. H. Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Turk's Head, High-street, Exeter, respecting the sudden death of a military pensioner named DAVID EDMONDS, aged 57, and who formerly resided in Summerland-street. The evidence laid before the Jury shewed that the deceased on Friday evening, shortly after eight o'clock, went into the shop of Mr Thomas, hatter, Queen-street, and after speaking a few words complained that he felt ill. Deceased sat down, was seized with two or three slight convulsions, and died almost instantly. Mr Perkins, surgeon, Exeter, stated that deceased had been one of his patients, and from what he knew of him there had never been any indications of heart disease. The deceased was a man on whose life he should have put fifteen or twenty years, though, of course, heart disease might exist where there was not the least apprehension of it. The Jury returned a unanimous verdict that Death resulted from Spasms of the Heart.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 December 1865
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Well-Known Butcher Of Plymouth. - Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Sir Francis Drake, Camden-street, on the body of MR WILLIAM WILCOCK, a butcher, carrying on business in partnership with Mr Samuel Furneaux Hewitt at No. 1 Stall in the Plymouth Market. On Saturday night Mr William Page, a cattle dealer, after the closing of the Plymouth Market, went with the deceased to his home in Gilwell-street, and had supper. At about two o'clock on Sunday morning he saw the deceased in bed. The latter suffered from bronchitis and disease of the heart. He said he was worse than usual, but would neither have a doctor sent for, nor allow Mr Page to stay up the night with him. He was left partly propped up with pillows, and had had all his medicine poured out. Mr Page slept in the house, and in the morning went into the deceased's room, but receiving no answer to an inquiry regarding his health, and not seeing deceased (the room being dark), he concluded that he had gone downstairs. He was not there, however, and Mr Page, thinking he might be out, went to the slaughter house, and returned in about ten minutes. He then went up to the deceased's room, and it being daylight, found him lying across the bed dead, with his trousers partly on. The medicine was gone, and deceased appeared to have been dead about two hours. - Elizabeth Barrett, housekeeper to the deceased, deposed that the medicine in question was prescribed by Dr Hingston and made up by Mr Woods, chemist. - Kate King, who laid out the body of the deceased, stated that it bore no marks of violence. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased was Found Dead without marks of violence, and that it was probable that he died from Disease of the Heart."

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 December 1865
STOKE DAMEREL - Murder By A Soldier At Raglan Barracks, Devonport. - At an early hour yesterday morning, as announced yesterday in a special edition of the Western Morning News, a murder was committed under circumstances of extreme brutality in the guard-room of the Raglan Barracks, Devonport, the unfortunate victim being killed during his sleep. It appears that Thomas Lynch and JOHN THOMAS JOHNSON, privates in the 65th Regt., arrived with their regiment at Plymouth on Friday last in the sailing ship Rob Roy, from Auckland, New Zealand, after a passage of seventy-three days, and were quartered at the Raglan Barracks, Devonport. Lynch and JOHNSON had been served abroad for five years and were of perfectly sound intellect. JOHNSON was servant to Captain Lewis. On Tuesday evening the two men quarrelled in their barrack-room, and as blows passed between them they were removed to the guard room, both being confined in the same room. This took place at about half-past eight o'clock, and at that time both men were under the influence of intoxicating drinks, although it is stated that they were sober when the murder was committed. After a while the two privates commenced quarrelling again, and by order of the corporal of the guard they were separated, and placed at either end of the apartment, which is spacious, and bayonet sentries had charge of them. Both of the men lay upon their beds and slept, but at three o'clock in the morning Thomas Lynch rose from his bed and under an excuse of passing over to the urinal, he was allowed to approach the bed upon which JOHNSON was sleeping, and hastily snatching from the floor the handle of a "scrubber" he dealt a remarkably rapid and violent blow upon JOHNSON'S head. The stroke fell heavily behind the upper part of the ear of the sleeper, and so instantaneously killed him that a comrade who lay beside him was unaware of what had taken place until aroused by a sergeant some minutes afterwards. A corporal was at once despatched for medical officers, and Dr Mackenzie, accompanied by a second doctor, and Adjutant Byam, hurried to the guard room, but found that JOHNSON was lifeless. Handcuffs were placed on Lynch, who uttered no syllable in explanation of his conduct. The body of the deceased was removed at six o'clock in the morning to the Military Hospital. Deceased was 26 years of age, and unmarried. The prisoner is eight years older and also unmarried: he is an Irishman. An Inquest will be held at the Military Hospital Inn, at half-past eleven o'clock this morning. The comrades of the deceased deeply feel the stigma thus cast upon the regiment, and which is to be the more regretted inasmuch as after a service of twenty years in New Zealand, the men of the 65th returned to England with a remarkably good character.

EXETER - Mysterious Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr W. H. Hooper, Coroner, at the Fireman's Arms, Preston-street, Exeter, respecting the death of PHILIP HOLMES, who formerly resided at the Broadstones in St. Mary Major's. HANNAH COOMBE, sister to the deceased, stated that her brother was a tailor and aged 61. He lived in the same house with her, and on Sunday morning last she heard a noise proceeding from his room resembling a person falling heavily on the floor. She at once went to the room, and there saw the deceased lying on his back underneath a man named William Perkins, for whom her brother occasionally made clothes. The deceased was crying out for Perkins to leave him alone, when witness became frightened, and desired to know what was the matter. Perkins replied "He's an old villain, and he has imposed upon me about making a coat I gave him to do." Witness remonstrated with Perkins and urged him to settle the matter quietly, when he said he would, and gave her 2s., the price he said he should pay for the coat. Witness stated that she noticed that the left side of her brother's face was swollen, and that he had received a heavy blow over one of his eyes, and that his nose was bleeding. She believed both men were sober. - Benjamin Manning, a labourer, who lives in the same house, said that he heard the scuffle on Sunday morning, went up into the room and saw Perkins struggling with the deceased, who was lying on his back, and complained of being hurt in one of his legs. Witness at once separated them, and said he would have no fighting there, especially as it was Sunday. Perkins said he would go home, and was about to leave the room, when the deceased placed himself with his back against the door to prevent him from doing so, and said, "He shan't go till he's paid me for the jacket." Perkins replied that he would not pay the 9s. demanded, but was willing to give him 2s. 6d., the usual market price, which he always had paid him. He believed both men were sober. - A Juror: Perkins is a teetotaller. - Maria Manning, wife to last witness, corroborated her husband's evidence, and gave the conversation she heard between Perkins and deceased. Perkins said he was obliged to hold deceased down tight to save himself from being struck. Deceased tore the coat which Perkins wore, and which was the one they were disputing about. - Mary Ann Manning, who also lives in the house, said that on Tuesday, shortly after noon, Mrs Coombe, one of the former witnesses, came into her room and asked her if she would attend to the deceased a little, while she ran for a doctor, as she believed he was dying. Witness did so, and almost immediately after Mrs Coombe left the house, the deceased drew a long breath and died. - Mrs Coombe was recalled and stated that her brother came to her about an hour before on Tuesday morning and asked her for something hot, as he felt very unwell. She gave him three cups of tea, and two small pieces of bread and butter, after which he appeared sleepy. She left him sitting in a chair in charge of Mrs Manning and on her return found him in the same position. - Mr W. R. F. Marchant, M.D., of Exeter, stated that he was fetched to see the deceased on Tuesday morning, and on his arrival found him dead in a sitting posture before the fire, in charge of Mrs Manning. He had examined the body externally and had discovered several abrasions. He could not positively state, without making a post mortem examination, the cause of death, or whether it was in any degree accelerated by the blow deceased had received on the Sunday previous. - The Coroner in briefly addressing the Jury said it was a case in which a post mortem examination was necessary, in order to ascertain the cause of death. The Inquest was then adjourned until Saturday morning.

[No newspapers in the Archive for 1866]

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 January 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Extraordinary Death Of A Child At Devonport. - At the Devonport Guildhall yesterday Mr A. B. Bone, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of MINNIE GEARING, a child about four months old, whose death happened under the following circumstances:- The deceased was the daughter of a married woman, whose husband, a sailor, is at sea. Early in December the deceased was placed by her mother, who has three other children, under the care of Elizabeth Berry, a widow woman, living in Pembroke-street. On the 24th December, Berry took the child to Dr Bennett, stating that it was suffering from a bad ear. On examining it, however, Dr Bennett discovered that the scalp was swollen and red, and that there was a black mark, as if it had been occasioned by a fall or blow. He communicated this suspicion to Berry, but she denied that the child had received any injury of the kind. Later in the week he again saw her, and reiterated his former opinion as to the cause of the illness, but Berry denied strongly the fact. After death, which occurred on Saturday last, Dr Bennett again examined the body, and came to the conclusion that the death of the child had been caused by an effusion of blood under the scalp, produced by a fall or a blow. - The woman Berry was examined, and stated that during the whole of the time the child had been under her care it had never sustained any injuries by a fall or a blow. Not long ago she took the child to Dr Row, who stated his opinion that the child was suffering from a disease of the scalp bone. - At the request of the Coroner one of the officers of the court was sent to Dr Row with reference to the accuracy of this statement, and a message was sent by the doctor to the effect that he had prescribed for the deceased, who was suffering from a disease of the skin. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, but severely reprimanded the woman Berry for her conduct in the matter.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident To A Mason. - Mr Edmonds, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Plymouth Guildhall, touching the death of WILLIAM HAMLYN, who was killed on Monday by falling from a roof. The deceased was a mason's labourer, and was working with many other men at St. James's Church in Citadel-road, which is undergoing extensive repairs. On Monday morning about ten o'clock he was working as usual on the roof, when by some means he fell off. The occurrence was witnessed by a man named Browning, in the employ of Mr Anderson, who found the deceased on the ground insensible. He was immediately taken to the South Devon Hospital, where after lingering for three hours in great agony he expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased was sixty years of age.

Western Morning News - Thursday 3 January 1867
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Politmore Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of CHARLOTTE TROAKE, otherwise GEE, aged 77, who was found dead in bed that morning in the house of Mr Woodman, surgeon, where she had obtained a situation as domestic servant. The deceased, a native of Exeter, went to reside many years ago in London, and remained single until she was 70 years of age, when she married a young shoemaker named TROAKE. Her youthful husband soon spent all her savings and deserted her, when she became chargeable to the parish and removed to Exeter Workhouse, from whence she went to live with Mr Woodman, representing herself to be 59 instead of 77. The medical evidence tended to prove that deceased died from disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXETER - Manslaughter At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, at the Port Royal, Exeter, on the body of ANN FEY, whose husband was a paper maker, working at Trews Weir and residing in Limekiln-lane, St. Leonards. It appears that FEY was out all Thursday night drinking and was found next morning by his son at Pinhoe. He returned with his son, but instead of going home went off to the public-house again. At eight o'clock the same evening the deceased and her stepson found him drunk at the Hour-glass Inn, Holloway-street. She called him outside and desired him to go home, when a quarrel ensued. After considerable altercation FEY left to go home with his wife. High words passed between them on their way, and on their arrival at the door of their house FEY, in an excited manner, swore and said, "If you don't go in and be quiet, I'll knock you down." The deceased replied, "Then do it," and her husband struck her with his fist on the side of the head. The deceased was helped into her house by the neighbours, when she became unconscious, and remained so until she died on Tuesday. The Jury, after considering the evidence, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the husband.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 January 1867
NEWTON ABBOT - Sudden Death. - At Newton, an infant child, only a few weeks old, belonging to a man named FRENCH of Kingsteignton, was found dead in bed by its parents on Saturday morning. It was considered that the child had either been accidentally suffocated or laid on. Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Saturday afternoon, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 January 1867
PLYMSTOCK - The Wreck At Mount Batten. Inquest On The Bodies Washed Ashore. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Castle Inn, Mount Batten, by Mr Alan Bone, the Deputy Coroner, on the bodies of JAMES KENT, the master of the Palmyra, and JOHN BURGESS, a lad of the schooner Teazer, which had been washed ashore under Mount Batten on Tuesday. The first witness examined was:- Ezekiel John Gooding, the only survivor of the Teazer, on board which he had served in the capacity of mate, who said the ship left Sandersfoot, South Wales, on the 26th ult., with a cargo of stone coal, for Southall or Lowestoft, whichever they could make. The crew consisted of himself, the captain, James Austin, and the deceased BURGESS. Last Thursday afternoon they brought up in the Sound, and on Saturday the ship's berth was shifted further out in deeper water. On Monday last about midnight the ship began to drag. There were two anchors down, each of which was about four hundred weight. The chains, especially that of the bower anchor, were strong and substantial. They wore away their chains, sixty fathom on the working anchor and forty-five fathoms on the bower anchor. They then prepared to slip their cables, and to make for the Cattewater, believing that to be the best course to save life. They tried to weather the Cobbler Buoys, but failing to do that, and the vessel dragging all the time, he advised the captain to hoist signals of distress. This was done, and about three o'clock the lifeboat came, but the sea was very rough indeed. About this time he heard the captain tell BURGESS to fetch his pocket-book, watch and money. He (witness) procured a warp and hove it to the lifeboat, but he hove it six times before it was caught. He succeeded in getting on board the boat and the crew of the boat tried several times subsequently to reach the ship for the captain and the lad, but failed in their attempts, which were relinquished at the instance of the coxswain of the boat, who urged the necessity of procuring the assistance of a steamer. - John Sweet, a merchant seaman, was examined, and identified the body of the other deceased as that of the captain of the Palmyra, who was about forty years of age, a native of Bembridge, Isle of Wight, and lived at Freemantle, Southampton. - Nicholas Launder, a waterman, deposed to finding the certificate of registry of the Palmyra on the beach under Mount Batten on Tuesday morning. - William Kellar, who was acting coxswain of the lifeboat on Monday night, said the lifeboat was manned in obedience to a signal from Mount Batten, and proceeded to the scene of the wreck. It was intensely dark, and the weather extremely rough. They had great difficulty in getting alongside the wreck, the boat being filled twice before they could reach her. After they had succeeded in saving the mate, he told the others of the crew to get on the jibboom, but they were unable to get near enough for them to jump into the boat, which he felt touch the rocks, and he thought it was but right to return to the Barbican, because the lives of the crew were entirely in his hands, and death was staring them in the face if he had taken the boat nearer the wreck. Before the boat left, however, the captain threw his pocket-book and papers into the boat. - George Jefferson, chief boatman of the coastguard, deposed to finding the bodies of the deceased in the cove under Mount Batten, near the coastguard station. - Mr Henry Bath, the chief officer of the coastguard station at Mount Batten said on perceiving a signal of distress from a vessel in the South he mustered the hands, and procured the rocket apparatus, which he took down on the beach as soon as possible, but then they could see no sign of the wreck. While standing there, however, he heard a man exclaim "Send a boat," but nothing more was heard, and soon afterwards pieces of wreck were washed ashore. - In summing up, the Deputy Coroner said that as yet no actual evidence had been adduced to shew that the Palmyra really was in the sound. If the Jury were satisfied that she was in the Sound, and that KENT was on board her on Monday night then a verdict might be returned similar to that in the case of the poor lad, but if not a verdict of simply "Found Drowned" should be given. - The Jury, however, expressed themselves satisfied on the point; and returned a verdict that "The deceased were drowned in Plymouth Sound on Monday night last, the ships to which they respectively belonged having been wrecked in a gale on the night aforesaid.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 January 1867
KINGSTEIGNTON - Inquest At Kingsteignton. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, at the Bell Inn, Kingsteignton, on the body of THOMAS STIGGINGS, a pilot of Shaldon. The deceased, who was an elderly man, was on the previous afternoon found at the edge of the Teign, at Hackney, quite dead, apparently having been drowned. In his pocket was found a railway ticket between Teignmouth and Torquay, dated Jan. 8th, 10s. 6d. in silver, a pair of spectacles, and other articles. From the rigid state of the body, he appeared to have been dead some time. The Inquest was adjourned until today in order that the police might make further inquiries into the matter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 January 1867
EXETER - Drowned In The River Exe. - The body of the young woman named SARAH ANN CANN, who was last seen alive at the Quay, Exeter, on the night of the 5th instant, was found on Monday, and an Inquest was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, at the Countess Weir Inn. The deceased, whose parents reside at Shobrooke, lived with a man named GOODING, as his wife. The deceased was seen by Francis Hill, a labourer on the quay, on the night of the 5th near the quay, and when it was raining heavily and the water rising. Deceased said she wanted to see Gooding, who was then at work on board a vessel moored off the quay. Shortly after Hill went away the deceased was missed, and was not again seen until her body was found near the double locks on Monday by a sailor named Scanes, frozen to the ground and decomposed, where it is supposed to have been washed at high water. The supposition was that the deceased, who had been drinking, had mistaken the boundary of the quay, and had walked over into the river. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - A Child Burnt To Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr H. W. Hooper, Exeter Coroner, on the body of WALTER J. SWANSTON, a child aged ten months, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital that morning from the effects of burns. The child's mother, who resides in Harford-place, Bartholomew-street, had occasion to leave her house for a few minutes on the previous day, when she did leave deceased and another child three years of age were in the kitchen. MRS SWANSTON had not been gone long when a neighbour, Mrs Bower, heard screams, and went running in to see what was the matter, she discovered the younger child in flames. Mrs Bower at once wrapped the child in the carpet and extinguished the fire. The explanation given by the elder child was that he was going to get a piece of paper to smoke, but it burnt his fingers, so he dropped it on his little brother. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 18 January 1867
KINGSTEIGNTON - An adjourned Inquest was held at the Bell Inn, Kingsteignton, yesterday (before Mr H. Michelmore, Deputy Coroner) on the body of THOMAS STIGGINS, a pilot of Shadon, who was found drowned at Hackney, near the above place, on Monday. The investigation lasted several hours, and the Jury returned a verdict, "Found Drowned, but how the deceased came into the water there is no evidence to show."

MARLDON - Fatal Accident to A Farmer At Marldon. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Royal Oak, Marldon, by Mr H. Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM PETHEBRIDGE, farmer, of that parish, who was accidentally killed on the previous evening through falling off his horse, whilst on his return home from Newton market. - Mr Wm. Henry Preston, school-master and stationer, of Newton, said that he saw the deceased on Wednesday evening at the Turk's Head, Newton. He saw the deceased at the inn between nine and ten o'clock, when he inquired of him if he had seen his brother. He told him that he had. The deceased was first drinking spirit and beer, and afterwards he had a glass of grog of him. His (deceased's) wife and servant man afterwards came after him, but before he left he had 3d. worth more spirit. The deceased then left, appearing to be rather excited because he had not seen his brother, a farmer, of Newton, with whom he said he had some business to transact. He did not appear to be intoxicated. - Henry Crocker, a labourer in the employ of the deceased, said that about nine o'clock on the previous evening he and his mistress went to Newton in a trap in search of the deceased. They were not in the habit of going for him, but MRS PETHEBRIDGE thought that as he had a considerable sum of money with him, and a "fresh" horse, it would be advisable to go and see for him. They first saw him at the Turk's Head, Newton, where he was in the habit of putting up. The deceased left about a quarter of an hour afterwards on horseback for home. Witness accompanied the deceased in a trap, in which was also MRS PETHEBRIDGE. No conversation took place on the road. Shortly after passing the Two Mile Oak Inn, deceased looked round (he being ahead at the time) and said "come on." No sooner had he uttered those words than the mare began to run back, throwing the deceased forward over her head. The deceased appeared to pitch on his head in the middle of the road. The deceased said nothing. Witness immediately went to his assistance and called out to him, "master, master, what's the matter?" but he made no reply. He with the assistance of MRS PETHEBRIDGE placed him in the trap and took him home. He did not appear to be dead until after he reached home. On getting to Marldon he went after Dr Goodridge, who subsequently saw the deceased, but life was extinct. He was only about a land yard behind when the accident happened. - At this stage of the proceedings the Coroner said that he had not summoned Dr Goodridge, as he thought his evidence was unnecessary. - Mr Butland (the Foreman) thought that they ought to have medical evidence before they arrived at a decision. The Coroner accordingly adjourned the Inquest until Monday next.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 January 1867
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child In Plymouth. - Mr John Gard Edmonds, Deputy Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday at the Guildhall on the body of WILLIAM RICHARD THOMAS GIBBS, two months old. The parents live in St. Andrew's-street, and the previous night about half-past nine o'clock they went to bed, the child being placed by its mother's side. During the night the infant cried once. Yesterday morning about four o'clock the father got up, and his son was then alive, but about half-past seven o'clock, when he went into the bedroom and awoke his wife to have a cup of tea, the child was found dead in her arms. It was told by a neighbour that MR and MRS GIBBS always treated their children kindly; and the Jury, of whom Mr Henry Preston was chosen Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 January 1867
EXETER - Death From Suffocation. - An Inquest was held at the Rising Sun, Russell-square, Exeter, on Monday evening by Mr Hooper, Coroner, on the body of a child, aged two months, named STANDLAKE, whose parents reside in Russell-street. It appeared that the child must have been overlaid by its mother; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 January 1867
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening at Exeter respecting the death of MRS BETSY ELLIOTT, aged 61, the widow of the late MR HENRY ELLIOTT, of Hooe, near Plymouth. Deceased resided with her daughter, the widow of the late MR W. A. W. BIRD, auctioneer, in Paris-street and had been confined to her bed for a few days. Mr S. Perkins, surgeon, found no traces of disease, but was of opinion that death resulted from Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 January 1867
EXETER - Death From A Fall In The Street. - On the last day of the old year an aged woman, named ANN HANCOCK, was accidentally knocked down in South-street, Exeter, as she was going to post a letter, by a girl named Elizabeth Loving, which not only severely shook the old lady, but broke one of her thigh bones. She was at once conveyed to her home at Mr Hill's, Paragon-street, and attended by Mr Edye, surgeon, but did not recover the effects of the fall, and died on Monday. An Inquest on the body was held at the Black Horse Inn, South-street, by Mr Hooper, Coroner, on Wednesday evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. Deceased was 86 years of age.

MARLDON - The Late Fatal Accident At Marldon. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" has been returned by the Coroner's Jury in the case of MR PETHEBRIDGE, farmer, who was thrown from his horse and killed while returning to his house from Newton market. Mr Goodridge, surgeon, of Paignton, said that deceased had sustained a fracture of the skull which caused death.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 January 1867
PLYMOUTH - A Boy Scalded To Death At Plymouth. - Mr John Gard Edmonds, Deputy Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon concerning the death of THEODORE HERBERT RENFREY POTTER, a boy residing with his parents in Morley-lane. The deceased was the son of JOSEPH POTTER, a shoemaker in the Royal Navy. On Tuesday his mother, who had been washing all the day, left the wash-house to take some tea, and meanwhile the deceased got on the copper in play, and one of his feet slipped into the hot water. The mother applied some linseed oil to the foot, but it got no better, and she sent for Dr Adams, who attended the deceased, who from that time appeared to be in a kind of drowsy state and never rallied. He died early on the morning of Friday. The Inquest was adjourned for the purpose of taking the evidence of Dr Adams.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 January 1867
PLYMOUTH - A Boy Scalded To Death At Plymouth. Alleged Medical Neglect. - Mr John Gard Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest last evening at a beer-shop in Russell-street, Plymouth, concerning the death of THEODORE HERBERT RENFREY POTTER. The deceased was seven years old, and resided with his parents in Morley-lane. One day last week the mother left the wash-house, where she had been washing al day, to take tea, and meanwhile the boy got on the copper in play, and one of his feet slipped into the hot water. The mother applied linseed oil, but it got no better, and the child died on Friday morning. Mr Josiah Oake Adams, surgeon, attended the Inquest yesterday, and the Coroner told him that the Inquest had been adjourned in consequence of certain statements made by the mother and one of the witnesses, and it would be optional on his part whether he would give evidence, for what he might say would be taken down in writing, and might be used against him if there were a necessity for so doing. - Mr Adams having expressed his willingness to be examined, he was sworn, and said he was surgeon of No. 3 district of the borough of Plymouth, which district includes Morley-lane. On Wednesday afternoon last, about half-past three o'clock, the mother of the deceased child came to his house in Tavistock-place, and in consequence of what she said he went to her residence in Morley-lane, and there he saw the deceased. The boy was in a state of shock from an external injury. He prescribed for him. The prescription was composed of salvolatile, two drachms; spirits of chloroform, one drachm; sedative solution of opium, half a drachm; camphor mixture, to four ounces. That would make a four ounce mixture. The directions were two teaspoonsful every four hours. He saw the deceased again on Thursday evening about eight o'clock. He had previously received two messages from the mother asking him to come down. The first was delivered about six o'clock by a boy, who said, "Please come down and see MRS POTTER'S child." He replied, "I wish his mother or some other person to come up and tell me how the child is." He afterwards saw Elizabeth Poynter at his house, who asked him to come down, as the child was very ill, and the mother had stopped giving the medicine. She also added, "The mother thinks the medicine is injuring the child." That produced in his mind a thought which found utterance in the expression, "What have I put in the medicine?" He told Mrs Poynter that he did not know whether he should come or not. - The Coroner: Are there any fixed times for visiting patients by your regulations? - Witness: Oh, dear, no sir, at any time of the day, if necessary. Afterwards he thought he would go and see the deceased, and on his way to the house he met a lad who produced a letter from Mr Channens, one of the Guardians, asking him to come down. On arriving at the house he found the child much worse. He prescribed again a mixture somewhat different from the first, and then left. Linseed oil was a proper thing to apply to the scald. He saw the child's leg on his first visit, but did not look at it on the second visit. - Q.: What should you say was the cause of death? - A.: Shock to the nervous system. - Q.: It was mentioned in the evidence that the child did not cry from the time it was burnt to the time of his death; would that help you in your opinion as to the cause of death? - A.: Very much so. - Q.: Would the first medicine cause the child to sleep very much? - A.: No. - Q.: Because the mother speaks of its being very drowsy after taking the medicine. - A.: The first medicine was given as a stimulant. It might produce a sedative effect. - A Juryman: Do you consider the medicine you prescribed would cause the state of stupor described by the mother? - A.: No. - Q.: did you consider the child dangerously ill when you first saw it? - A.: Yes. - A Juryman: Twenty-seven hours appears a long time to leave a child without seeing it. - Witness: So it is, sir, in a general way. In the first lace, with regard to neglect, you must remember that I was not called to the child for nearly a day after the accident occurred. As is my custom in critical cases, I desired the mother to come up and see me the next day, in this instance specifying the object of her coming being for lint to apply to the child's leg. Although the child was in a very critical condition, it was a very simple case. The condition in which the boy was would either simply deaden, as it did in this case unfortunately, into coma, and the patient would die, or else the child would recover from the stupor and live. - A Juryman: Then you consider that if the mother thought the child worse she should have come the next morning? - A.: She should have done so, certainly, according to my directions. - A Juryman: You see you were sent for twice, and on the second time you hesitated whether you would attend or not. - Witness: The woman's manner was extremely brusque. She not only implied that I had neglected the child, but also that the medicine I had ordered, so far from doing the child good, had injured it. This annoyed me, as well as the fact that I had not been called according to my directions. I therefore spoke hastily. - A Juryman: don't you think that in a case of life and death a patient should not be neglected on account of your feeling annoyed? - Witness: Quite so. I fully enter into your feelings. But I was perfectly aware that my presence or absence could not do the child any good, from what I heard from the woman. I was aware from what she told me that the case was passing through the regular stages of one which was about to prove fatal. If it had been a case in which I knew that my immediate presence would have done good, I have every confidence in saying I should have gone at once, notwithstanding my annoyance at certain things which had happened. - The Coroner: Perhaps you had better tell the Jury what the second prescription contained. - Witness: Carbonate of ammonia, spirits of chloroform, and camphor mixture; but the quantities I don't know. - Mr Frederick Herron, chemist, East-st, and Wm. Turner, his assistant, proved that the medicines were supplied in accordance with the prescription. - MRS POTTER deposed that after the first dose of medicine the child went into a state of stupor. She was positive she never gave more than two teaspoonsful at a time. On Wednesday evening, when Mr Adams came, she turned down the bedclothes to unbind the leg. He said, "The cloth is not very smooth." She replied, "No, sir. I continually smooth it, but by the boy being so restless I cannot keep it smooth." He said, "Never mind," and never looked at the leg. On Thursday evening, when Mr Adams arrived, he said, "I am come. What good can I do to your child?" with a sneer. She said, "You may have a parent's feeling one day," and he scornfully laughed and said, "Well, I may," and went to the fireplace. She asked him why he did not come to see the child at first, for he had told her neighbour that he did not know whether he should come. He said, "Oh, it was your neighbour, was it? I should not have come tonight, if I had known it was not you." Mr Adams was annoyed that she had sent a note, after having sent twice previously. Mr Adams tampered very much with a parent's feeling, and what makes it worse, the child's father is expected home after three years' absence. - Witness: I am quite sure he did not say come up the next day, and that is the way I did not think there was any danger with the child. - Mr Adams: I can draw the leg on paper now, so strongly it is impressed on my memory. - MRS POTTER: The leg is now healed up beautifully and I should like for you gentlemen (the Jury) to see it. It was not from the leg that the child died, and I greatly regret that I should have had Mr Adams. If ever I am laid down, I hope they will never send for him for me. - The room was then cleared, and on the reporters being re-admitted, the Coroner announced that the Jury had returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant At Plymouth. - The Deputy Coroner of Plymouth, Mr J. G. Edmonds, held an Inquiry last evening at Roach's wine and spirit vaults, Octagon-street, into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY WHITTLE, a child six weeks old. These, as narrated by the parents of the deceased, were very simple. On Friday night last JAMES WHITTLE, the father, a vendor of coke and coal, and ANN WHITTLE, the mother of the deceased, retired to bed at about half-past nine o'clock, both being quite sober. The deceased lay by the side of his mother. At three o'clock the latter awoke on hearing the child cry. She roused her husband, who got out of bed and struck a match; but before a light could be obtained the deceased had died in his mother's arms. A neighbour, Mrs Delaney, was immediately called in, and medical assistance obtained, but without avail. The child had been suffering from a slight cough for some days, but was otherwise well. Two days before its death MRS WHITTLE gave it half a teaspoonful of "squills"; but the Coroner pointed out that there was no necessity to inquire further into the quantity administered, although squills contained opium, in consequence of the time which had elapsed. The Jury, of whom Mr Roach was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 January 1867
TORQUAY - Overcrowded Dwellings. - At Torquay, on Tuesday, an Inquest was held before Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN HENRY STONE, aged two months. - ELIZABETH STONE, the mother, said she went to bed on Friday night with the infant, and suckled it several times during the night; it was very ill and suffered from the thrush. She found it dead in her arms about five o'clock on Saturday morning. She sent for no doctor until between eight and nine o'clock. - Mr Hartland, surgeon, said suffocation was the cause of death - the child had been overlaid. The Jury animadverted in strong terms upon the manner in which the family lived. The father is a mason earning from a guinea to twenty-four shillings a week, and the family consisted of himself, wife, child and the deceased, all of whom lived in one room, barely, it was stated, nine feet by ten. There were four or five rooms in the cottage, which was situated in Pimlico, and each room contained a family. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death in the case of the infant, and added to it a notification that the overcrowding of the dwellings of the poor was disgraceful, and requested the Coroner to communicate with the authorities on the subject.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 February 1867
STOKE CANON - The Boiler Explosion At Stoke Canon. - An Inquest was yesterday held at Dewdney's Paper Mills, near Stoke Canon, concerning the deaths of JANE HAYDON and SARAH THOMAS, who had been killed by the explosion of a boiler on the premises the previous day. Three men who had to do with the boiler and engine gave evidence, declaring that there was no neglect on the part of anyone; that the boiler when cleaned out on Monday week appeared perfect, and that just before the explosion it was being worked at about 45 lbs. to the square inch pressure, being only about half what it was supposed to sustain; and that it was more than half full of water. George Staddon, machineman in the mills, attributed the explosion to a defect in the iron, which he had perceived since the accident, but which could not have been discovered while the boiler was whole. The boiler was 14 years old, which was declared to be no unusual age. It was stated that had the explosion taken place at the same time of day during the late cold weather probably thirty people would have been killed. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," attributing no blame to anyone.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 February 1867
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At Keyham Steamyard. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, on the body of REUBEN MARTIN, the engineer student who was killed through a fall at Keyham Yard on Thursday. The deceased first entered the factory on Tuesday, when he was placed in Mr Fowler's shop, where he worked on that and the following day. On Thursday Mr Fowler, as he was a young hand at the work, sent him around the factory with another engineer student named Stribbling. Near Mr Fowler's workshop was a crane erecting, and the deceased and Stribbling got on this carne. While they were there two labourers who were employed working at the carne came up. On seeing the lads one of the men said, "It is no use our doing this if you are going to do it." Subsequently Thos. Morgan, another of the labourers, told the lads that they had no right on the crane, and requested them to come down. This, however, they did not do. Shortly afterwards while working at the carne Stribbling had occasion to move a plank. While he was so doing the deceased fell from the carne to the floor below, a height of over 20 feet. Stribbling said that the act of the deceased going on the crane was purely voluntary on his part. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 February 1867
EXETER - Serious Allegations Against The Master Of A Workhouse. - On Saturday morning the dead body of a man was picked up in the engine-stream which drives Mr Tremlett's bone mills, prince's-road, Exeter, and on inquiry found to be that of a pauper named JOHN ADAMS, an inmate of the St. Thomas Union. The body was removed to the Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-lane, to await the Inquest, which was held yesterday by Mr Coroner Hooper. The witness called was Mr Timewell, master of the Union, who stated that the deceased, aged 23, a native of Dunsford, had been an inmate of the Workhouse from his boyhood. On Friday evening the deceased was sent on an errand to South-street by the matron and on his return was sent to a place in the Prince's-road. Deceased was of weak intellect. Search was made on Friday night, it having been found that ADAMS had not returned. On the following morning witness heard that the body had been picked up in the river Exe. While Mr Tremlett was giving his evidence the Coroner read an anonymous letter placed in his hands, purporting to come from the inmates of the Union, which brought some serious charges against the witness. The letter insinuated that the deceased had been driven to commit suicide through unkind and tantalising treatment on the part of Mr Timewell. The witness strongly denied the allegations in the letter, and said he was prepared, in justice to himself, to answer the charges. - The Coroner considered that the matter was one requiring further and fuller evidence, and adjourned the Inquest.

DAWLISH - The Death From Burning At Dawlish. - The death of the child NARRAMORE, whose pinafore caught fire on Saturday evening while being held to the fire to dry, paraffin having been spilt upon it, and who thus sustained injuries which resulted in death, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquest yesterday at the Swan Inn. The witnesses gave an account of the affair similar to that published yesterday, Mr. Webb, surgeon, stating that from the first recovery was hopeless. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 February 1867
GREAT TORRINGTON - Sudden Death At Torrington. - A woman named MARY QUICK, aged 39 years, was found dead in bed by her husband on Friday morning. An Inquest has since been held when, in accordance with the medical evidence, a verdict was returned of "Died of a Diseased Heart."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 February 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Supposed Infanticide At Devonport. - On Wednesday morning FANNY JANE SMALL, a cook in the service of Mr Miller, the chief engineer of Keyham Yard, was observed by her fellow-servant, Ann Ellacott, to appear very unwell, and some spots of blood were seen on her dress. Ellacott made her mistress acquainted with the facts, and SMALL was at once taken to bed. Subsequently some spots of blood were seen at the back part of the premises, and SMALL being suspected information was given to the police. On making a search, Inspector Evans found the dead body of a newly-born female child in an ash-box underneath a bench which was fixed against the wall. A piece of tape was tied tightly around the neck, and was covered with blood. Evans then saw SMALL in bed and having cautioned her, charged her with the wilful murder of her child; to which she made no reply, but subsequently admitted that she had been delivered, and that she had not prepared any clothing for the child prior to her birth. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall on the following day, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, when Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body was examined, and stated his opinion that the child had breathed, but he was not able to state that it was born alive. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence regarding the death of the child; but SMALL, as soon as she has recovered, will be taken before the magistrates on a charge of concealment of birth.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Flora-Street. - Mr J. Gard Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the H[?] Park Hotel yesterday, concerning the death of MR ARTHUR WILSON. The deceased was a corn dealer and resided at No. 11, Sussex-street. On Thursday afternoon about five o'clock, he was walking in Frankfort-street, when he was met by Mr J. Barker, a corn dealer, who was on his way to Devonport. They walked together through Frankfort-street and half way through Flora-street, when Mr Barker heard the deceased say, "Oh, dear," and on turning round saw him catch hold of a window sill, and instantly fall to the ground. Mr Barker picked him up, but the deceased was dead and his eyes set. Dr Pearce was speedily in attendance and confirmed Mr Barker's impression. He was taken to his offices, which were about fifty yards distant. The Jury, of whom Captain Stanfield was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death by Disease of the Heart." The deceased was thirty-two years of age and leaves a widow and family.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 February 1867
EXETER - Inquests were held at Exeter on Friday evening, concerning the death of MARY DAVY, aged 84, of whose decease adverse rumours had been in circulation, but were disproved; and concerning the infant child of EMMA PARSONS, aged 23, which medical evidence shewed to have been still-born. No linen had been provided for the infant.

ASHBURTON - Fatal Accident At Ashburton. - At the Coroner's Inquest on Saturday upon the lad LANGWORTHY, who was killed while at work at David's Mine, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," a recommendation being added "That the future sufficient distance be left between the upright and the arms of the capstan to allow the free passage of a man when the capstan is in motion." For want of this provision, it appeared the lad was caught by the machinery and killed.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Barley Sheaf Inn, King-street, before Mr J. G. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man named ANDREW LAKE, of No. 3, Pontey's-cottages, who committed suicide that morning under the following circumstances:- The deceased, who was about 62 years of age, had for the last two or three months exhibited a very unsettled state of mind, which was aggravated by his inability to procure work. On Saturday morning the deceased left his home at half-past six to go to his work, which he had lately obtained. Shortly after seven he was found hanging in a building in Well-street by a labourer called Trowell, who gave information to the police. On the arrival of one of the officers of the force, the body had been cut down by a man named Warren. A tendency to insanity seems in the family of the deceased, he having a sister in a lunatic asylum. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 18 February 1867
DAWLISH - Death From Alleged Inhumanity. Committals For Manslaughter. - On Saturday an Inquest was held before Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, at Cockwood, Starcross, concerning the death of EMMA BAKER, a domestic servant, about twenty-two years of age, daughter of a carpenter residing at Middlewood, near Starcross. About two months ago she went into the service of Mr and Mrs Allday, of Reed Vale, Teignmouth, and had not been there more than a few weeks when her appearance gave rise to certain suspicions, and she was questioned by Mrs Allday and Miss Dean, the governess. She stoutly denied the imputation, and explained away her uncomely appearance. Nothing more appears to have been said on the subject. towards the end of January the deceased began to complain of a violent pain in her back, the effect, as she alleged, of a cold, and on the Wednesday preceding the 1st February she was so ill in bed that Mrs Allday deemed it advisable to send for the girl's mother, who visited her on the evening of that day. Miss Dean had, at the request of deceased, applied a mustard poultice, and it seemed to give her relief, for she expressed a hope that she should be able to get up the next day. She told her mother she was sorry she had been troubled to come down to see her. She proved no better on the following day and her mother was again sent for and arrived Feb. 1st. Mrs Allday asked MRS BAKER to go and see her daughter. She did so, and found she had been confined a short time before, unknown to anyone in the house. The same evening the young woman was removed from the house in a close fly and taken home, where she was attended next day by a nurse named Bennett, who seeing that it was a dangerous case, went to Dawlish for Mr Cann, surgeon, who attended regularly up to the girl's death, which occurred on Thursday evening. The girl was in a dreadful state, and had not been properly treated. It was not at all safe for her to have been removed. He would not say that her death was caused by the removal, but in his opinion if she had been attended at Teignmouth no medical man would have allowed her removal, and there was no reason why she should not have recovered. The deceased required every kind of nourishment, and the mother was unable to procure it for her. The foregoing facts are undisputed; but, with regard to the girl's removal from the house of Mr and Mrs Allday, there is a direct conflict of evidence. Mrs Allday's statement, in which she is mainly corroborated by Miss Dean, is to the effect that she spoke to MRS BAKER as to the safety of such a step, and suggested to MRS BAKER the advisability of sending for a medical man. MRS BAKER, however, said that being the mother of ten children, she knew what was right for her daughter, and could better treat her at home, and would take upon herself the responsibility. She (Mrs Allday) was not anxious that the girl should be removed, and if she had remained she would have been properly attended to. MRS BAKER was unable to find any medical man at Teignmouth, and it was only by promising that she would get a medical man on the following day that she assented to the deceased being removed. MRS BAKER declares that when she told Mrs Allday of her daughter's condition, she was quite angry, and insisted upon her removal. MRS BAKER pointed out that her daughter was not fit to be removed, and begged the loan of some changes. Mrs Allday refused at first, but eventually got some article of clothing. The deceased was then taken out of bed and wrapped up, and another appeal was made to Mrs Allday for changes, but none could be obtained. Mrs Allday continued to insist on deceased's removal on account of Mr Allday's health. - At the conclusion of the evidence Miss Dean wished to make a statement in contradiction of MRS BAKER'S statement, but the Coroner declined to hear it. - After some consideration the Foreman announced that the Jury had found the following verdict: "We, the Jury, find that Mr and Mrs Allday caused, or accelerated the death of deceased by their inhumanity in having her removed from their house on the day on which she was confined of a dead child." - The Coroner said that amounted to a verdict of Manslaughter. - Mr and Mrs Allday were then committed for trial at the next Assizes. Bail was accepted in the total amount of £400.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 February 1867
TORQUAY - Censure By A Coroner's Jury At Torquay. - Mr Michelmore, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday night respecting the death of ELIZABETH ANN WESTAWAY, aged five years. The parents live in George-street, Torquay, and on Saturday evening the mother sent the deceased with her father's tea to the cab stand where he was employed. While running across the road she let the can fall, and fell over it herself. At the same moment a cab came up, one of the hind wheels of which went over her neck. The deceased died while being conveyed to the Infirmary. The Jury commented severely upon parents allowing young children to be abroad in such frequented thoroughfares by themselves, and returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

EXETER - A Suspicious Death Explained. - A few days ago MR W. F. C. CROSS, architect, died at Exeter under somewhat unusual circumstances after a few days' illness. Mrs Ellen Summersford, one of the nurses of the Southernhay Institution, attended the deceased, and reported to the superintendent that the countenance of deceased bore a terrified appearance, that the body had a twitching motion, and other suspicious circumstances. This led to a rumour of his having died from poison, and an Inquest was held on the body yesterday afternoon. The medical evidence explained that deceased died from Tetanus produced by falls on the ice while skating, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 February 1867
ROBOROUGH - Death From A Fall Near Barnstaple. - An Inquest has been held before Mr J. H. Toller, County Coroner, at the village of Roborough, about three miles from High Bickington, on the body of MARY PENBERTHY, wife of JOHN PENBERTHY, of that place, labourer, who died from injuries sustained by a fall on the 26th January last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 March 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Alleged Death From Neglect. Committals For Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devonport Guildhall, before Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of JANE ANN BUDWORTH, a child six years of age. The Inquiry excited great interest, and lasted five hours. The voluminous evidence adduced went to shew that the parents of the deceased are middle-aged persons, and have been married several years. The man formerly served in the navy, and has a pension of £30 10s. annually, and also earns 13s. per week as a dockyard labourer; he is known as an industrious steady man. For a long time past, however, all his efforts to keep a comfortable home have been frustrated by the drunken habits of his wife. So strong has been her passion for drink that her husband, finding that she spent the money he gave her in liquor, has himself purchased necessary food. But even this precaution did not suffice, for no later than Sunday she sold to procure drink the meat that had been bought for their use and on the previous day she disposed of two loaves under similar circumstances. This being the state of affairs, he unhappy child now dead has often been left alone. About three years ago she fell, and the injuries caused were so severe that she has ever since had t keep to her bed. The hapless and lone condition of the child induced some neighbours to take steps in the matter, and on Sunday afternoon Mr J. E. Bennett, M.D., at the request of Mrs Critchell and Mrs Luscombe, went to the house. He found the child lying on a rudely fixed palliasse, covered only with an old coverlid, both being indescribably filthy. The condition of the child herself was, it was stated, even worse. The body was deplorably dirty, and more or less covered with vermin, the extent of which in some portions was almost incredible. On the back part of the head there were two wounds, which appeared to have been almost entirely eaten out by vermin. On the back there were three ulcerations, and on the front and back of the right thigh there were no less than six running wounds, so severe that the flesh had sapped away, leaving the muscles visible. The bed and the covering were saturated with the discharge. Mr Bennett expressed his inability to do the child any good until she had been thoroughly cleansed, and gave directions to the effect to the parents, both of whom were present, stating that he would call again during the evening. At about nine o'clock Mr J. Bennett, accompanied by Mr R. J. Laity and Mr Superintendent Lynn, again visited the house, where they found the deceased still lying in the same filthy state. The man, in reply to questions, attributed the filthiness of the child and his home to the drunkenness of his wife, who even then was apparently under the influence of drink, and who appeared callous and hardened. The suggestion of Mr Laity, to remove the child to the Royal Albert Hospital, was at once put in force, and having been thoroughly cleaned, stimulants were applied, but without any apparent effect, as she appeared quite exhausted, and died at eight o'clock on Monday morning. - In reply to the Coroner, Mr Bennett attributed the death to exhaustion consequent upon great discharge from the wounds in the body of the deceased, whose death he considered had been accelerated by the neglect of her parents. - In summing up the Coroner said that the points for consideration of the Jury were, whether there was any neglect to the deceased by which death had been accelerated; if so, who were the parties responsible. - After a lengthy consultation, the Jury, through their Foreman, Mr Olver, expressed their opinion that the death of the deceased had been accelerated by the neglect of her parents, to whom, more especially the mother, great blame was attached. - The Coroner said this verdict amounted to manslaughter, and committed both parents for trial. - During the Inquiry the parents of the deceased, at the request of the Coroner, were in Court. The woman presented a piteous spectacle, her haggard features and emaciated form shewing too plainly the effects of her habits. They will probably be brought today before the magistrates, by whom they were formally remanded yesterday morning, on the application of Mr Superintendent Lynn, to await the result of the Coroner's Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 March 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - A Fatal Accident In Hamoaze. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Devonport, concerning the death of WILLIAM BLACKMORE, who was killed on the previous day by the fall of the topmast of a barge, which he was steering out to the Sound from the Dockyard. The evidence shewed the occurrence to have been purely Accidental and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 March 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - The Murder And Suicide Camel's Head. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, on the body of MRS VENTON, who drowned herself and her child at Camel's Head, Devonport, last week. Evidence was given that deceased had been very melancholy, and had threatened to drown herself. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide At Stonehouse. - Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of a shoemaker, named JOHN LAWRENCE, on the previous day. The deceased was found in his room, with the door locked, with his throat cut, a razor lying near at hand. The question for the Jury was as to the state of mind in which he was at the time of the commission of the crime. It was adduced that he had some months ago been under medical care in the Devonport Workhouse for a carbuncle in his head. He still felt the effects of this, which were sometimes "like a vice." His wife has recently been absent from home for a considerable time, in attendance on her mother, at Devonport, she being very ill, and deceased felt melancholy from being so much alone, and on the day that he committed suicide he said to his son that he was "almost mazed." Under these circumstances the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 March 1867
TEIGNMOUTH - Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held last evening at Teignmouth, concerning the death of a woman named BOWDEN, ninety years of age. The old lady lived with her daughter in Sax-street, West Teignmouth, and the latter when she arose yesterday morning perceived a strong smell of burning. On going into her mother's room she found that the bed was on fire, and that both legs and one arm of the poor old lady, who had been bedridden for some years, were completely consumed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 March 1867
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Distressing Suicide Near Horrabridge. - An Inquiry was held at Uckworthy Bridge, near Horrabridge, on Saturday, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of JETHRO GREGORY, a lad 17 years of age. The deceased was in the service of MR AMBROSE GREGORY, of Uckworthy, to whom he was related, and with whom he had been for some months, apparently satisfied and comfortable. About a fortnight ago MR GREGORY told the deceased that he thought he would scarcely be competent to assist him as a trainer of horses, and therefore he would endeavour to find him a comfortable place with some farmer. It appeared that the lad was of weak intellect, but several witnesses stated that he was quite capable of taking proper care of himself. On Monday afternoon MR GREGORY sent the deceased with a horse and cart to a neighbouring field to get some wood. The youth loaded the cart, but did not return home. He was seen on Tuesday and Wednesday in the neighbourhood of Horrabridge, walking on the later occasion towards home, and he told a man whom he met that he was going home. Nothing further was seen of him until Thursday afternoon, at about two o'clock, when MR GREGORY'S maid servant saw his body hanging by the neck in the hay-loft adjoining the house, suspended by a rope, one end of which was around a beam. He was quite dead and cold. Giles, a farmer, was called, and cut the body down, but the deceased seemed to have been dead for some hours. The Jury found that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 March 1867
IVYBRIDGE - Death By Drowning At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was held before Mr Bone, County Coroner, yesterday at Ivybridge, respecting the death of EMMA JANE BEER , a child nearly four years of age, the daughter of JOHN BEER, a waggoner in the service of Messrs. Allen and Company, paper manufacturers. Immediately opposite the cottage of BEER is a gate, inside which at the bottom of some steps is a part of the mill stream belonging to the paper manufactory; the only fastening to this gate is a strap over the top of it. The mother of the deceased at about seven o'clock on Saturday evening observed this gate to be open. At this time the child was seated on a chair in the kitchen and playing with her brothers. She got off the chair saying she would go to a neighbour's to play. She then went outside the door into the public road which is between the dwelling-house and the gate. In a few minutes the mother went out to look for her, but she was nowhere to be found. About an hour afterwards Richard Prout, a neighbour, found the child dead in the stream, about fifty yards below that part of it which is opposite the gate. Mr Patterson, the engineer of Messrs. Allen and Co., attended at the request of the Coroner, and readily promised that measures should be taken to prevent as far as possible the occurrence of accidents. There being no evidence adducible to shew how the child came into the water, the Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 March 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Suspected Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Bone, Coroner for Devonport, yesterday convened a double Jury to investigate the circumstances connected with the death of ANNA MARIA LEGGETT, a married woman, who was suspected from certain information to have committed suicide by taking oxalic acid in her husband's house in Chapel-street, Devonport. The Jury sat for a considerable time, and the Coroner examined several witnesses either acquainted with or related to the deceased, in the hope of eliciting some of the material circumstances of the case. The two principal witnesses, and, indeed, the only ones whose evidence was likely to throw any light on the case, could not, however, be produced. One of these, the husband of the deceased, was so drunk that he was unfit to give evidence, and the other, a friend who was present when the deceased died, had removed her goods into Stonehouse and followed them herself. Under these circumstances Mr Bone adjourned the Inquest until Friday.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 March 1867
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Soldier At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, before Mr R. G. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, at the Brunel Hotel, touching the death of JOHN HENRY JACKSON, a middle-aged man, who was a sergeant attached to the staff of military pensioners at Millbay Barracks, Plymouth. It was gathered from the witnesses that for several weeks past the deceased - on behalf of whose friends Mr G. H. E. Rundle, of Devonport, watched the proceedings - had been addicted to excessive intemperance, from the effects of which he was compelled to leave his employment in the staff office of the pensioners. Since that time his discharge had formally been made out by the authorities at the War Office, but as he was suffering from delirium tremens he had been living in his old quarters in the barracks. During the past few days the disease had become more powerful in its influence over the deceased, with whom a nurse had sat up at night. During Wednesday night the deceased was very restless, and at times appeared bereft of reason. At about half-past 4 yesterday morning the deceased got up and left the room. Within five minutes the nurse called him and he answered, but when called again immediately afterwards he made no reply. Suspecting that something wrong had occurred the nurse, Elizabeth Reed, roused the sergeant who occupied the adjoining apartment, and on going into a little room at the rear of the premises deceased was found lying on the round dead, with a frightful gash in the throat, the windpipe being completely severed. The Jury were unanimous in returning a verdict of "Temporary Insanity produced by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 March 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - A Verdict Of "Felo De Se". - Mr Bone, Coroner, yesterday resumed the Inquiry into the death of ANN MARIA LEGGETT, which had been adjourned from Wednesday in consequence of the intoxication of the principal witness, the deceased's husband. The evidence now brought out shewed that after having been drinking with another woman for some time at the Shakspere Inn, on Tuesday, the deceased returned home, being slightly under the influence of liquor. She found her brother, GEORGE KEYS, at her house in Chapel-street, and "had some words" with him. Part of the dispute referred to some money, the deceased considering that she had a claim on her brother. He put a sovereign and a half sovereign on the table, but she was not satisfied. He, however, left, but was followed by the deceased, who caught him by the coat-tails to bring him back. In this attempt, however, she was unsuccessful, and returned alone. She told her husband, who was present, to take the money and put it in his pocket and then sat down. In a little time, however, she rose and went to a cupboard and then asked her husband to hand her a kettle containing water. He did so, not taking much notice of what she was doing. He observed, however, that she poured some water into a glass, stirred it up, and poured it into a cup and drank it off. She then exclaimed, "Oh! my." This aroused her husband's attention, and he observed on the table a piece of paper, which was produced, marked "poison." He said, "Have you taken poison?" Deceased said, "Yes;" and, in answer to a further question, said it was two pennyworth, and "if it had been fourpenn'orth she should have done the same." The husband then called for the assistance of a neighbour, Mrs Cardew, and sent for Mr Bazley, surgeon. He was not at home and Mr Bennett came. Deceased had in the meantime been vomiting, but Mr Bennett saw she was dying and quite past recovery. He received the paper and the contents of the stomach which had been vomited by the deceased. On an analytical examination he found that the latter contained enough oxalic acid to cause the death of any adult. The paper was marked with the stamp of Mr R. C. Bath, chemist and druggist, but Mr Bath did not remember having sold any to the deceased for some considerable time. It appeared that her husband had always treated her kindly, and when at sea allowed her £4 a month, and was continually sending her home money presents. - The Jury deliberated for about an hour, when twelve agreed to a verdict of Felo De Se. The deceased was buried at the Cemetery last night between nine and ten o'clock.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 April 1867
IDEFORD - Suicide Of A Gentleman. - An Inquest was held on Monday by Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, at Well Farm-house, Ideford, near Chudleigh, on the body of ALEXANDER EVELYN CHERRY, a gentleman of independent means. - Mr Joseph Vought, farmer, residing at Well, said the deceased was 47 years of age, and had lived with him about thirteen years. He was of weak intellect, and when first brought to Well had an attendant with him. About three years ago he was placed in an asylum, at Kensington, and had previously been at St. Thomas's Asylum. Deceased was generally well and did not require to be looked after, but was subject to severe attacks about every two years. This madness was chiefly about money matters. His money was under the control of trustees, and he wanted to get the control of it to get married. He was continually talking about this, and a week ago he said if he could not get it he would as soon die as live. Nothing unusual had been observed in his conduct lately. On Saturday witness left home in the afternoon. The deceased had then just finished his dinner, and appeared very cheerful, and he was afterwards missed. Every probable place was searched on Sunday, and at last the deceased was found in a water-closet, in an orchard about 200 yards from Well Farm-house, quite dead, with a pistol, which had been recently discharged, in his right hand. - Dr Lillies, of Chudleigh, gave confirmatory evidence. - When found deceased appeared to have been dead many hours. From the appearance of the wound it commenced in his mouth and proceeded upwards; he must have put the pistol either into or close to his mouth and fired it. - John Clarke, of Newton, gunsmith, said the deceased called at his shop at about eight o'clock on Thursday evening, and gave 3s. 3d, for a pistol, which he asked witness to load. The Jury returned a verdict that the "Deceased Shot himself while in a fit of Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 April 1867
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident Near Tavistock. - An Inquest was yesterday held at the Union Workhouse, Tavistock, before Mr Bone, County Coroner, on the body of RICHARD PERKINS, aged about fifty years. Yesterday week he was engaged at the farm of Mr Robert Perkins, at Stilesweek, to bind straw and thrash corn. Without anyone having seen him he fell off a mow of corn and broke his back. He was taken to the Tavistock Workhouse, where he died on Monday night, leaving a widow and five children, the eldest of whom is not ten years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow and the Coroner kindly added a gratuity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 April 1867
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Young Man. - Mr J. Edmonds, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth, touching the death of HENRY HOLBERTON. The Jury expressed their pleasure at seeing Mr Edmonds so far recovered from illness as to be enabled to resume his duties as Coroner. The deceased was a journeyman painter, unmarried and lived with his mother, the widow of a marine, at 14 Wyndham-street. He had lately worked for Mr Grey, with whom he had served an apprenticeship. On Monday morning he worked until nine o'clock, and his master told him that, as it rained, he might take a holiday. The deceased accordingly went home and shortly before ten o'clock, he walked down to the Bull's Head, in King-street, his mother telling him that she would meet him there in half-an-hour. On arriving at the public-house, the deceased called for some porter, and told Mrs Budge, the landlady, that he felt a pain under his left breast. He looked ill at the time, and shortly afterwards he slid off his seat. MRS HOLBERTON was immediately sent for, and when she arrived the deceased complained that he had the cramp in his legs. Soon after he died in her arms. - In reply to the Coroner, MRS HOLBERTON said, some years ago her son had two attacks of painter's cholic, and had not been well for some time. He had complained of pain about the heart. - In answer to Mr Harding, the Foreman of the Jury, the mother said the deceased had not been to a place of worship lately, but he used to be a Methodist. - Mr Harding: I have been struck with the thought that it is the duty of all parents to advise their children as far as they can to keep out of a public-house, for it is a serious thing to die there when we hear of the promises that are given us if e turn from it, and the punishment we are threatened with if we follow it up. - MRS HOLBERTON said the deceased did not go to the public house for the sole purpose of drinking, he went there to keep his appointment with her. - Mr Harding: But it is a very serious thing to drop down and die in a public-house. I have thought so through life. I was struck one day when in a public-house with something I saw there and it was the cause of driving me from such places, and I have never taken a glass of ale since. After a brief consultation the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died by the "Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 April 1867
TORQUAY - The Fatal Boat Accident At Torbay. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday evening, lasting from six to ten o'clock, in the Townhall, Torquay, before Mr Deputy Coroner Michelmore, on the body of DAVID OCTAVIUS LLEWELLYN, who was drowned on Good Friday by the upsetting of a boat in Torbay. MR JOHN LLEWELLYN identified the deceased as being his brother. - William Rolstone, who lets out boats, said some young men came to him on Good Friday morning for a boat, but he refused. Some time afterwards he was surprised to see his sailing boat - the Paddy - out, because the weather was not altogether suited for her. He felt very anxious about her, and watched her for some time. On the boat returning it passed the Millstones, and there he missed her. Witness left the entire management of his boats to a man named Easterbrook, who had authority to let them. - Mr Benjamin Lancaster, lodging at the Imperial Hotel, deposed to seeing, from his window, the boat upset. - Richard Easterbrook said young Larter and the other lad came to him and said Mr Rolstone had stated that they were to have the boat. It was entirely upon that representation that he allowed them to have her. He only allowed them to hoist the storm jib and take two reefs in the mainsail, and strongly enjoined them to keep upon the weather shore, where the water was much smoother; instead of which they stood out in the bay and went round the Great Rock. Larter could handle a boat very well, and had had the Paddy scores of times before. - Arthur Larter, the survivor, who is seventeen years of age, said he went to Mr Rolstone and asked for the boat, and he said she could be had at ten o'clock, and he obtained the boat of Easterbrook. Witness was accompanied by the deceased and William Memery. They went round the Great Rock, and then worked back to Torquay. When off the Millstones, opposite the Baths, seeing a squall coming - the boat was going free - he luffed up. The squall took her and threw her on her beam ends. Some of the ballast got adrift, and before he could get her head round a roller struck her, and she filled and went down. He let go the tiller before the boat was struck, in order to take in the sails. Witness and the rest were thrown into the water. He and LLEWELLYN struck out for the rocks, which they gained, but he suddenly lost sight of the deceased. He also saw Memery struggling in the water, and then saw nothing more of him. - The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Drowning, and condemned the practice of letting out boats - especially sailing boats - to inexperienced lads. They also expressed a hope that the local authorities would form bye-laws for licensing boats for hire.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 April 1867
CHUDLEIGH - Fatal Fall Over Chudleigh Rocks. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Chudleigh concerning the death of JAMES TANCOCK, a labourer, in the employment of Lord Clifford, at Ugbrook. The man was at work with others woodbuilding, and on heavy rain coming on they took shelter in a linhay at Gappah, belonging to John Cook, and remained there drinking the cider they had brought in their bottles, until eight o'clock in the evening, when Cook refilled the bottles and the deceased left to go home to Chudleigh. He then, it was stated, was the worse for drink, but could walk tolerably steady. Next morning he was found by Samuel Snell, a labourer, at the bottom of the rocks, quite dead. His nearest way home would have been by a path not far from where he fell, and he was seen not far from the spot after leaving Gappah. The marks on the ground above the precipice indicated that deceased had wandered about and tumbled down once or twice before falling over. The Deputy Coroner, Mr Michelmore, having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was walking from Gappah to Chudleigh, and being intoxicated he missed his way and fell over the rock and was killed.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 April 1867
PLYMOUTH - A Terrible Death At Plymouth. - Mr J. Edmonds, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Grylls's spirit vaults, Union-street, on the body of SELINA MALLETT, who lived at 3 Bath-place, Plymouth. The deceased was 26 years of age, unmarried and cohabited with Richard Jones, a pensioner, and a bailiff at the East Stonehouse County Court. - Jones said he slept with her on Thursday night, and on the following morning she asked for a glass of beer, which he fetched. He left home about half-past eight o'clock. The deceased would drink hard if she could get it, and would lie in bed nearly all day long. - The Coroner: And would she walk the streets by night? - Witness: No, not that I know of. The general state of her health was delicate. When I left the house on Friday morning she appeared quite well. I did not return home until nearly ten o'clock at night. The shutters were then closed, and the room was dark. I asked if anybody was at home, and received no answer. I struck a light and said, "SELINA is there any supper for me?" There was no reply, and I thought she was asleep. I went over to the bed side and touched her arms, and finding that it was cold I became frightened. I then called Mrs Searle who lives upstairs, and it was found that the deceased had ceased to breathe. - The Coroner: Did the deceased provide for the house, or did you? - Witness: I did sir. She went to get money sometimes from a gentleman whose name I don't know. I was told she had £10 from him a few days since. - Caroline Searle, a married woman, who lived in the same house with the deceased, said: After Jones was away on Friday morning my little girl Emily fetched over pints of ale for SELINA MALLETT, which I shared with her. The second pint was fetched at a quarter before twelve o'clock. The deceased never got out of bed all the day. On Thursday she gave me a pair of gold ear-rings , a new bonnet, and two sovereigns, to take care of until she saw her mother, as she wanted her to take some things she could pledge with the money. - The Coroner: Would the deceased drink hard if she could get it? - Witness: I believe she was a thorough drunkard. She came home tipsy every night. She used to complain of rheumatism in the head, and on Friday afternoon at two o'clock she said her head was dreadfully bad, and asked me to tie it up. I did so, and that was the last time I saw her alive. - The Coroner: Was she not in a dreadful state on Friday morning - I mean with vermin about her? - Witness: I never saw anything worse in my life. - Q.: How long have you observed these vermin about her? - A.: I did not notice them until a few days ago, when the neighbours asked me to look at her. - Q.: Had she any chemise on? - A.: She had none on for several days. - ELIZABETH EASTON, a widow, living in Flora-street, said the deceased, who was her daughter, had led a bad life for the last two years, and had consequently been a great trouble to her. She was positive that her daughter had drunk very hard during the last three years. - Thomas Pearse, surgeon, said he saw the body about ten o'clock on Friday night and the deceased had been dead several hours. Her limbs were stiff and cold, her eyes dull and glazed. There were no marks of violence on the body. He believed her death to have been accelerated by excessive drinking acting on a previously diseased brain. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 May 1867
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr J. Edmonds held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, concerning the death of W. PALMER SKINNER, a boy eleven years of age, who on Friday last was playing with another boy, named Wm. Mitchell, on board the man-of-war Brunswick, which had been brought into Mr Marshall's yard for the purpose of breaking up, when he accidentally fell from the main-deck to the hold, a distance of 28 feet. When taken up by Mr Richard Hill, his skull was found to be fractured, and he was taken to the South Devon Hospital, where he died after a few hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 May 1867
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - SAMUEL CLARKE, a carter in the employ of Messrs. Gardiner and Crowhurst, coal merchants, Stonehouse, was on Saturday last with his cart outside Messrs. Seymour and Wallace's shop, Union-street. The man was engaged with some hay which he had in the cart, when Mr Mills's omnibus which runs from Stoke to Plymouth, driven by John Horn, rounded the corner and came very close to CLARKE'S horse. Horn, however, backed his horses and proceeded on the other side of CLARKE'S cart to Plymouth. Looking round, he saw CLARKE'S horse at a stretch gallop. The horse ran through Manor-street, CLARKE holding on to the breeching of the horse. On reaching the door of the Exmouth Music Hall CLARKE jumped out of the cart, and holding on by the horse's bridle, he ran three or four steps with the horse, and when near the gutter, he fell on his back and the wheel went over both his thighs. - Mr Matthew Stephens, a bootmaker, who witnessed the accident, ran to CLARKE'S assistance, and he was taken to the South Devon Hospital, where he died about 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning. At the Inquest held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, before Mr John Edmonds, the Borough Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 May 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - A woman named MARY ANN BLAKE committed suicide at her residence No. 9, [?] Buildings, on Tuesday. At the Coroner's Inquest it was elicited that on Tuesday afternoon a woman named Jane Allen, who was on intimate terms with the deceased, called on her, and on opening the door saw the deceased suspended by her neck from the top rail of the bed by a piece of a handkerchief. With the assistance of a woman named Harris she cut deceased down. In about ten minutes Mr Delarne and Mr Wilson arrived, but life was extinct. The deceased had been very low spirited for the past two months, was continually throwing her arms about in a wild insane manner, and uttering strange things, which, however, were taken little notice of, because she was prone to intoxication. The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 May 1867
PLYMOUTH - Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall on the body of JOHN CHAPPLE. The deceased was 61 years of age, was a superannuated officer of her Majesty's Excise, and resided in Clifton-place, Plymouth. For the last 20 years he has been subject to fits, and when they were over he generally gave way to despondency. On Friday afternoon last he had three severe fits, and then he became very excited, but subsequently he was tolerably clam. On Sunday night, however, he was raving mad, and his wife was so frightened that she rushed into the apartment of Mr Partridge, the landlord, for protection. About midnight he became quieter and he called to his wife to return to her bed, which she did. MS CHAPPLE stated that she could not sleep, as her husband was restless and talked a good deal. About 2 o'clock on Monday morning, while still out of his mind, the deceased got out of bed, dressed himself and telling his wife that he could not stop there any longer, left the house. MRS CHAPPLE thought that he would come back again, as he had done on former occasions when he had taken it into his head to leave the premises suddenly. This time, however, he went under the Hoe, and there after divesting himself of his inverness cape and cap, it is supposed he jumped into the water and was drowned. At all events his body was picked up some hours later near the Millbay Pier, by two watermen named William Jones and Wm. Hooper. The marks on the body are supposed to have been caused by the deceased being washed against rocks while in the sea. The inverness cape and cap were found at Rusty Anchor, at half-past four o'clock on Monday morning, by Mr Sydney Knight and Mr Le Cras, two compositors on the Western Morning News, who were taking a walk after leaving their work prior to their retiring to rest. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 June 1867
TAVISTOCK - The Supposed Suicide At Tavistock. - An Inquest was yesterday held in the Guildhall, Tavistock before Mr Bone, County Coroner, on the body of the boy called LEONARDS, who, it was said, had drowned himself. There was no conclusive evidence whether death was the result of an accident or premeditated, but there was much reason to fear that the latter was the case. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 June 1867
TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Monday night on the body of WILLIAM STATON, who died on Sunday afternoon, from a wound in his throat which he inflicted on himself a few days before whilst confined in one of the police cells. Evidence was given shewing that it was his own act, and that during the time he had been at the Infirmary, he repeatedly cursed his friends and expressed a wish to die, and that he died with an oath on his lips. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo De Se.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 June 1867
CORNWOOD - The Late Railway Accident At Cornwood. - Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquiry concerning the death of JOHN MAUNDER, a foreman of packers on the South Devon Railway, who was killed at Cornwood on Friday by being jammed between the buffers of two trucks of a goods train. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressing the opinion that no blame rested on any person in the matter, except upon the unfortunate deceased himself.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 June 1867
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Married Woman At Plymouth. - MARY ANN WHITE, the wife of an excavator at Bovisand, hung herself on Thursday evening under somewhat singular circumstances. The deceased, whose age was thirty-two years, lived in Kinterbury-street, Plymouth, where her husband kept a beer-shop known as the Barrel, and during the absence of her husband she conducted the business of the house, which is one of a very low character. On Saturday afternoon there was a disturbance in the taproom, and deceased endeavoured to pacify one of the men, who was extremely quarrelsome, but she was struck several times by him very severely. This it is supposed caused deceased to be very much depressed in spirits, and although she made no complaint, her husband was so alarmed by her appearance that he stayed away from work during the week. On Thursday evening the deceased went upstairs with her little girl, who is about eight years of age, and after embracing the child tied a rope around her neck and fastened it to the bedpost. Finding that her mother was unable to answer her, the child ran out of the room, and called for assistance, which was speedily forth-coming, but too late to be of any avail, as the unhappy woman died almost immediately after she was cut down. The deceased has been married for about nine years, and has lived on tolerably good terms with her husband. At an Inquest which was held yesterday at the Guildhall, before Mr J. Edmonds, the Coroner, the Jury, after a somewhat lengthy consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 24 June 1867
BIDEFORD - A Frightful Death Watch. - Two young men, JAMES BRAUND and JOHN his brother, rambled forth together on the mighty cliffs which form Lundy, an island rearing its craggy side in the centre of the Bristol Channel. They were searching for gull's eggs, which abound on the sides and summit of the rocks. Straying apart from each other for a few minutes, JOHN presently heard a voice indistinctly calling. He went to the edge, and looking over saw his brother some yards down the side of the cliff hanging by his hands to a little jutting piece of rock, and searching with his feet for the smallest foothold. It was in vain, the rock was hard as adamant and smooth as glass, and there he hung, a chasm full three hundred feet deep yawning below him. Help from above was impossible, a foothold below there was none, and certain death started him in the face. With the iron grip of despair the poor young fellow hung on for a few minutes - minutes that seemed like hours to his helpless brother watching him from above - and at last nature gave way, and, with a wild scream, JAMES BRAUND released his hold and plunged headlong down, his head being shivered to fragments against a projecting crag in the descent. The mournful tale was told by the surviving brother at the Coroner's Inquest at Bideford last week.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 July 1867
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In Plymouth Sound. - While the speed of the screw corvette Daphne was being tested on the measured mile outside the breakwater on Tuesday a fatal accident occurred to one of the crew. The deceased, RICHARD OSBORNE, a stoker, thirty-four years of age, was after dinner engaged with others in lowering a quantity of coal from the upper deck through an iron shunt into the stokehole. The deceased, who had been engaged on deck, was ordered with another stoker to relieve the men who were receiving the coals below, and he descended the ladder leading to the stokehole, but on reaching the bottom he was struck on the head with a bag of coal and felled to the ground. He was picked up in a state of insensibility, and placed in a cot, but died soon afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday morning, before Mr Bone, County Coroner, at the royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, and in cross-examination by several of the Jurors, it was elicited that each bag contained about two hundredweight of coal, and was attached by a becket to a hook fastened to a rope. In reply to the Coroner John Samson, A.B., who was on deck, said that occasionally the bags of coal would not pass through the shoot, and they then "let go," trusting to the heavy weight to carry the bag through it. - The Coroner: Was that done with the bag that fell on the deceased? - Witness: Yes, it was. - Q.: When you let go the bag did it fall quickly through the shoot? - A.: Yes, within a minute. - Q.: But was there no warning that the coal was being lowered? - A.: Yes, someone called out from the upper deck, and before that one of the men in the stokehole told me to lower away. The Coroner having briefly summed up the evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr W. Drew was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury expressed an opinion that the position of the shoot through which the coal had fallen on the deceased was dangerous to those who were in the habit of going into the stokehole over the ladder, as it was impossible to get from the ladder into the stokehole without passing under the bottom of the shute, and suggested that the authorities should be communicated with concerning an alteration of its position. The Coroner concurred in the opinion of the Jury, and observed that a notification of their views on the subject in the newspapers would probably lead to their suggestion being acted upon.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 July 1867
DAWLISH - Last evening an Inquest was held at Dawlish by Mr Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of MR J. STOKES, of Shutterton farm, who suddenly died during the fire on Sunday night. Dr Rycroft proved that he had been attending deceased for disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that excitement and heart disease were the causes of death.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 July 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Drunkard. - JOSEPH BROWNLOW, a lance-sergeant attached to the corps of the Royal Military Hospital at Devonport, has committed suicide. The deceased, a man of about forty years of age, might have done well, being in receipt of good wages, and allowed to reside outside the barracks. But his habits of excessive drinking have increased of late to such an extent as at times to produce temporary derangement. On Monday he was observed by his comrades to be unusually moody and downcast; he did not return home until nine or ten o'clock, and then he was partially intoxicated. He passed a very restless night, and the following morning got up early, but refused to take any breakfast, and said "I'm not going to the Hospital today; I shan't work any more; I'm done up." He walked about the room in a very strange manner, sat down, and took a phial, subsequently proved to have contained nitric acid, and drank its contents. The quantity of the poisonous liquid was so considerable that the deceased was almost immediately in a state of collapse. His affrighted wife speedily procured the services of Dr Page, who with great difficulty administered an emetic, the deceased obstinately refusing to have any assistance, saying repeatedly "I want to die." He was subsequently conveyed to the Military Hospital, where he made use of a similar expression, adding "I did not think the acid would have let me live so long as this." The wife of the deceased came to see him at the hospital, but he told her to go home and look after the children, and leave him to himself. He died in the course of the evening, after experiencing great agony. An Inquest on the body was held yesterday afternoon at the Military Hospital Inn, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, when a double Jury, of whom Mr J. Murch, was foreman, returned a verdict that "The deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 2 August 1867
DAWLISH - The Late Boat Accident At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Railway Hotel, Dawlish, before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, concerning the death of MR HENRY BOULTON, of Exmouth, who was drowned on Tuesday, off Dawlish. It appeared that deceased on the day had been drinking freely at Dawlish, but was not drunk. He left Dawlish in a small boat with Mr Charles H. Bennett, of Exeter, when the deceased got upon the gunwhale of the boat to adjust the sails, and the boat capsized in about eight feet of water. The deceased swam a short distance, and then sunk. Mr Bennett was rescued. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Last evening Mr Edmonds, Coroner, held an Inquest concerning the death of JAMES GRANT, a baker, of 9 High-street. SARAH RUDDLE, who had lived with deceased as his wife, for seven years, deposed that the deceased had done no work for the past month, the greater part of the time he had been drunk. After drinking he was usually in a desponding state, and on Wednesday night he was very low spirited and said he thought he had thrown away all his friends, but if his brother and sister would forgive him he should be happy. Yesterday morning he said he had not slept all night, and got up and went down in the bakehouse. He was subsequently found lying on the floor of the bakehouse with his throat cut. He had told his wife that she would never be troubled with his drinking habits again. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 August 1867
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide Of A Lady At Stonehouse. - Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday concerning the death of PHILIPPA PEARSE DU PRE, who committed suicide by cutting her throat, as already recorded. The deceased was the niece of Admiral Pearse, of Durnford-street, Stonehouse, and had been suffering from nervous fever for the last six weeks. On Wednesday evening, about six o'clock, the family of Mr Pearse were called to tea, and on the deceased being called she could not be found. Mr Pearse searched the house, and on going to his bedroom he found the door locked. He burst it open, and found the deceased on the floor, near the bed, bleeding freely from the throat. In her right hand was an open razor, and her throat was cut. Mr Eales, surgeon, stated that the deceased had been very low spirited lately, and was constantly saying that her friends were deserting her. The deceased was a widow lady, and leaves several children. She was 54 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 August 1867
TEIGNGRACE - Fatal Accident At Teigngrace. - A little boy named FORD, the son of a packer on the South Devon Railway, residing at Teigngrace, was on Monday accidentally knocked down by a horse and cart belonging to Mr Dord, of that place, and sustained such injuries that he died before medical aid could be obtained. At an Inquest held yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 August 1867
TORQUAY - Concealment Of Birth At Torquay. - An Inquiry was held at the Torquay Infirmary by Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, on the infant child of LEONORA METHERELL, on Tuesday night. - Eliza Sheriff, residing at Park Hill, stated that LEONARA METHERELL came to her house on Sunday afternoon, and asked for a cup of tea. This was given her. METHERELL then told witness that she was confined of a child on Thursday, and had brought the body with her. Witness then assisted to remove four parcels from under her clothes, one of which METHERELL pointed out as containing the body. METHERELL then went upstairs to bed, and said she did not know what to do, because she feared her father's anger. witness sent for the police, and gave over the bundles to Sergt. Mashford. - Police Sergeant Mashford stated that the last witness gave him four bundles. He partially opened one, and seeing the face of an infant he sent for the house surgeon of the Infirmary, Dr Powell. Upon his arrival the parcel was opened, and found to contain the body of a male infant, the other bundles consisting of soiled linen, &c. Witness then went upstairs to METHERELL, and asked what ailed her, to which she replied, "Give me a knife; I want to cut my throat." She repeatedly attempted to take her life by strangling with her hands, and also with her hair, which was very long. Witness charged her with concealing the birth of a child, and all she said was "Let me kill myself, let me kill myself." She was then removed in custody to the Infirmary. - Dr Powell stated that the woman was in a very excitable state, and not fit to be brought before the Jury. Witness had made a post mortem examination of the body of the child, there were no marks of violence. Death had been caused by want of attention, the child died through loss of blood, he supposed it was three or four days old. - Emma Boundy, in whose charge METHERELL had been placed, said she had told witness that she had confined herself "and locked all up in a box in the next room." The Coroner intimated that in his mind it was a clear case of wilful murder. The Jury deliberated for some time and at length returned a verdict that the child was Found Dead. The Inquiry terminated about half-past ten o'clock p.m.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 August 1867
PLYMSTOCK - Singular Death Of A Tramp At Plymstock. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, at the Church House Inn, Plymstock, on the body of a man named LAVERS, aged 59 years, a wheelwright, who came by his death in the following peculiar manner:- It appears that deceased has been for some time past in the habit of sleeping in out-houses, or, in other words, "roughing it," and that some time on Monday night he repaired to the hayloft of Mr Rowe, of Horn, for the purpose of sleeping, and by some means fell head downwards into the hayrack of the stable beneath. Being, it is supposed, in liquor, and labouring under the disadvantage of having but one hand (the other having some years since been cut off in a machine), he was unable to extricate himself, and in that position he was found in the morning by a farm lad in Mr Rowe's employ. Dr King was summoned, but life had been extinct for some time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." -
Monday 12 August 1867 - The man LAVERS, who was mentioned on Friday as having come by his death in a strange manner at Plymstock, was not a tramp in the ordinary sense of the word, but an old inhabitant of the place, whose eccentricities have lately led him to lead a somewhat vagrant life, seldom sleeping beneath his own roof.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 August 1867
ASHBURTON - The Farmer Buried Alive Near Ashburton. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday concerning the death of the unfortunate man JOHN ANDREWS, whose death by being smothered by an earthfall at Holne Moor Mine has already been reported. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The unfortunate man leaves a widow and nine children to lament his untimely death.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 August 1867
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Royal Western Yacht Club House. - Mr J. Edmonds, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Saturday, on the body of the young man AVERY, who died on Thursday from injuries he received by the fall of the flagstaff of the Royal Western yacht club on the Hoe. The evidence contained the facts already given - that the deceased was painting the flagstaff, sitting in a "boatswain's chair," within four or five feet of the top, when one of the galvanised iron wire stays gave way, and the pole fell, carrying with it deceased, who fractured his skull and was killed on the spot. The boy Noble, who had been up the staff before the deceased, had looked to the stays before ascending, and found them all "taut." After the pole had fallen it was found [?] have been "stepped" - imbedded in the ground - only five inches, it being 61 feet in height. It was stated that m[?] on flagstaffs of this kind were usually "stepped" a tenth of their height. One of the witnesses, a porter to the ch[?] believed that if the staff was only "stepped" five inches he would not have ascended it. Mr Hingston, mast-maker, of Richmond Walk, Devonport, who made and erected the flagstaff, and who was now advised by Mr J. Shell, solicitor, stated that the mast was stepped in a limestone of a ton weight to the depth of five and a-half inches because the club wanted it as high above the surface as possible. This was the first flagstaff he had ever erected. When it was fixed it fitted into the place made for its reception admirably, and his foreman painted it from top to bottom while it was standing without any support save the signal halyards. By his direction five galvanised iron wire stays were fixed to the staff. Captain Hope Johnstone had seen the flagstaff before it was erected and approved of it, and also of the place in which it was stepped. The wire rope which had broken was produced and it appeared that with the exception of one or two wires in it all had been cut by the belt which fastened it. - One of the Jurors said he considered the bad fitting of the wire rigging to be the cause of the accident. The Coroner observed to the Jury that he did not see that they could substantiate a charge of criminal negligence against any person or persons, but that there had been negligence of some sort seemed to him to be very apparent. A mast of this description - sixty-one feet high - required a much greater depth in stepping than this one had. He regretted that the gentleman who had interfered so much in the making and erection of the staff was not present to give them his version of the story. They had Mr Hingston's version, and would have to say whether anyone was to blame. It was quite a different question whether a [?] action would lie for loss of life, and whether a man could be committed to a criminal bar to answer for it. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of Accidental Death, adding that they considered that a flagstaff of this height ought to be stepped six feet in depth, and not five inches as in the present case. - A member of the R.W.Y.C. who was present expressed the great regret of the club at the accident having occurred; as they had believed that the flagstaff was quite deep enough for the purpose of hoisting flags and bearing anyone who might ascend it. The members of the club felt so strongly on the point that they were most liberally contributing to a fund which was intended to assist the parents of the deceased. Mr Hingston expressed the deep sorrow he felt at the occurrence, and offered a sovereign for a similar purpose.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 September 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, held an Inquiry at the Townhall, Devonport on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN HOYTEN, a respectable young man, and well known in Devonport. He was the son of MR HOYTON, supervisor of Excise at Plymouth, and nephew of Mr Wm. Wood, auctioneer and printer of Fore-street, Devonport, in whose family he had been brought up from early life. About five months ago he left his uncle and opened a small general business in Bilbury-street, Plymouth, but soon gave this up, and Mr Wm. May, photographer of Fore-street, Devonport, occasionally employed the deceased to solicit orders on commission on board men of war, and in this undertaking he had been very successful. He then had employment at Mr Baron's, china dealer, Devonport, but only remained there a day. On the arrival of H.M.S. Valorous in Plymouth Sound on Friday morning the deceased and Mr Samuel Rogers Gould, outfitter, of Fore-street, Devonport, visited the ship in a boat to solicit orders. The deceased then appeared to be very despondent, and steered the boat very badly. After staying in the Sound about an hour they made for Mutton Cove, the deceased on the way again shewing signs of great despondency by placing his head on his knees, and appearing to be in deep meditation. About one o'clock on Friday afternoon the deceased returned to Mr May's shop and had conversation with Mrs May. When Mr May came home from the dockyard, where he had been on business, the deceased went to the water closet. Mr May then went up to the top of the house, and after a lapse of five minutes Mrs May told him that the servant had heard a groan in the water-closet. Knowing deceased to be in the closet, he opened the door, which was not locked, and then saw the deceased stretched out with a little foam about his mouth, unconscious, and breathing heavily. He then immediately set out for medical assistance and casually met Mr P. W. Swain , surgeon, who was speedily in attendance. On arriving at the closet Mr Swain observed that a strong smell of prussic acid issued from the deceased, and he believed death was caused by taking cyanide of potassium, which contains prussic acid. Spots of the solution of cyanide potassium were observed in the closet and also on the deceased's straw hat. The deceased was not employed in Mr May's business, and, according to Mrs May's presumption, the deceased had no knowledge of photographic chemicals, nor was cognisant of their use. The chemicals were put away on a shelf in Mr May's workroom, and the bottle which contained the cyanide of potassium was labelled poison. - Wm. Wood, the uncle of the deceased, said the deceased was in tolerable circumstances, and had not the responsibility of maintaining his mother and sister. His refusal of the situation at Mr Baron's, seems to have continually preyed upon his mind, and on one occasion he wrote in his pocket book "I have been guilty of base ingratitude, conscience stings me," and to his relatives he repeatedly said he would never be happy again. The deceased was twenty [?] years of age and was single. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 6 September 1867
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Pennycross. - Mr Edmonds, Borough Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest at Cobourg-street yesterday, concerning the death of THOMAS WIDECOMBE, who died suddenly at Pennycross on Tuesday. The deceased was a farmer and cattle dealer. On Tuesday afternoon he was walking around his farm at Pennycross, when he complained to one of his sons-in-law, who [?]ding him, that he felt ill. He was taken into a barn which was close at hand, and Dr Square was sent for, but he was not at home. The deceased shortly after died in his grandson's arms. The deceased lived at 31 John-street, Plymouth, and was 73 years of age. The Jury, of whom Mr Wm. Holmes Haynes was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 September 1867
PLYMOUTH - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Yesterday an important Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of JAMES GUNNELL, who died on the previous morning while confined in a cell at the Guildhall. The Mayor (Mr Radford) and Mr Superintendent Thomas were present. - The Coroner told the Jury that the deceased was a porter in the Plymouth market and was of drunken habits. On Saturday evening about seven o'clock he was found lying outside the Post-office in Whimple-street, and being drunk and incapable he was removed to the Guildhall and locked up. He was visited during the night, and at six o'clock on the following morning he was found dead. As to the cause of death, the deceased had been to the Golden Lion Inn, Old Town-street, and a report said that he had a quantity of gin and water given to him - in fact he drank as much as he could have. - He (the Coroner) did not believe there was the slightest neglect on the part of the police, and the question for the Jury to consider would be whether GUNNELL was forced to take the gin or whether he voluntarily drank it, because forcing a person to drink was an offence of the highest order. - The Jury having viewed the body and the cell in which deceased had died, Wm. H. Butland, landlord of the Golden Lion Inn, Old Town-street, was examined, and said he had known the deceased for many years; he was a porter in the Plymouth Market, and of rather dissipated habits. Deceased was at his house on Saturday night, in the tap at the back of the market. Witness did not see or hear him, being in the front of the house. The barmaid, Miss Sawyer, tended him. The spirit is drawn in the front and then carried to the tap in small barrels for use. - Q.: What commercial men were there at your house that day? - A.: No commercial men, but there was a gentleman named Moore. He came through the tap between 4 and 5 o'clock, and Mr Moore being stout, I am told that GUNNELL called him Mr Rew, and asked him to stand a glass. - Q.: Where does Mr Moore come from? - A.: He is from London, travelling on his own account. - Q.: Did you see him after the deceased was drunk? - A.: Yes. - Q.: And did you have any conversation about the man GUNNELL? - A.: No. I am told the deceased asked Mr Moore to give him three pennyworth of gin and he did so. Other persons present also gave him something to drink. - The Coroner: It is a pity that Mr Moore is not here. - Witness: He is gone away by train. He has been staying at my house four or five days. I think he will be here again tonight. - Q.: Do you know where he has gone? - A.: I believe to Tavistock. - The Foreman: Was this GUNNELL in the habit of coming to your tap? - A.: Yes. - Eliza Sawyer said she served in the tap at the Golden Lion, and saw the deceased every day. He was at the tap several times on Saturday. - The Coroner: What did he drink before he saw Mr Moore? - A.: Gin or beer, but never more than a pennyworth of either at one time. - Q.: When did he last come in? - A.: It may have been five or six o'clock. - Q.: Were there several persons in the tap then? - A.: Yes. - Q.: What did he say to them? - A.: Mr Moore happened t come in, and he called him Mr Rew, and said, "Give me some sherbet," meaning gin. - Q.: Did Moore order any gin for him? - A.: He said, "Give him a drop;" and then he put down sixpence for what himself and GUNNELL had had. Mr Moore did not pay for any more spirit for the deceased. - Q.: Did the deceased ask for more gin from other people? - A.: He asked for it, and wanted more than he had. - Q.: How much did he have altogether? - A.: About five or six threepennyworths. - Q.: And there it ended? - A.: Yes; he left as sober as when he first came in. - Q.: You said just now that he wanted more? - A.: He did, and I would not let him have it. - Q.: What time did he leave your house? - A.: I don't think he was there more than ten minutes. He went away singing. - Q.: Tell us the names of as many as you can who gave him spirit? - A.: I cannot tell, I was so busy at the time. Mr Stroud, Mr Shears, and Mr Moore were there. - Mr Bowyer: I heard that Mr Brock was there? - A.: I don't think he was. - The Coroner: What he drank did he take voluntarily? - A.: Yes, and he wanted more. - The Foreman: Did he appear drunk when he came in? - A.: No; he was always in one way - never drunk, never sober. - A Juryman: Did you hear the deceased had drunk a quart of gin that day? - A.: I heard it mentioned in the bar in the evening in fun, and I said "people must be silly to draw him a quart." - Q.: Do you know how much he had that day? - A.: I cannot tell exactly, but he did not have enough at our place to make any man "tight." - Aaron Woolf, a jeweller, living in Whimple-street, said on Saturday evening between six and seven o'clock he was standing at his door, when he saw a mob outside Masters's hat shop, and on going up he saw the deceased lying on the ground. A man picked him up, and GUNNELL put his hand to his side as if he had been injured by the fall. The deceased staggered across the road as a drunken man would, and when he got outside the post-office he fell again, and he appeared motionless. - Policeman Williams proved bringing the deceased to the Guildhall. - P.C. Strang stated that after GUNNELL was brought to the station he was sick, and after being put into the cell he went to sleep, and snored very loudly. - P.C. Kingston said he visited the cell in which the deceased and other prisoners were placed at intervals throughout the night, but at six o'clock on Sunday morning he found GUNNELL dead. - Peter West, a coloured man, said just after nine o'clock on Saturday night he walked into the Guildhall for a night's refuge. He was put into a cell with the deceased, and a policeman came to see them several times during the night, so that he was often disturbed. He heard the deceased snoring. - James Driscoll, another inmate of the same cell with the deceased, brought to the Guildhall about three o'clock on Sunday morning, said he remembered the deceased snoring up to the time of his getting to sleep. - Mr Stevens, surgeon, said he was called to the Guildhall at six o'clock on Sunday morning, but when he arrived GUNNELL was dead. From the history of the case in all probability death took place from alcoholic poison, but as deceased had fallen in the street, death might have resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain, causing extravasation of the blood, which could only be determined by a post mortem examination. Snoring was a symptom of great pressure on the brain. - Mr Supt. Thomas mentioned that the deceased was well known to the police. He was dissipated in his habits. - The Court was cleared - the Coroner, however, remaining with the Jury, and after half an hour's consultation it was re-opened. - The Coroner then told Mr Supt. Thomas that the Jury were of opinion that when a man was brought to the station in a helpless state, as the deceased was, the police should ascertain whether he had fallen in the street, and that if on visiting him he was found to be snoring loudly, which was a sign that the man was labouring under a serious injury, then a medical man ought to be sent for immediately. - Mr Thomas said he would take care that the suggestions of the Jury should be attended to in the future. - The Jury then returned a verdict to the effect that GUNNELL died from the effects of Excessive Drinking, and falling about while he was drunk and incapable. the Inquest lasted three hours.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 September 1867
PLYMOUTH - Another Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of a man whose death was alleged to have been caused by excessive drinking. The deceased took a passage in the smack Intrepid, Capt. Bougerd, from Guernsey to Plymouth, on Saturday. A few hours after he came on board the captain discovered that the deceased had been drinking, as he was sick and incapable. After he was on board he had some drink, and the following morning was observed by a fellow passenger to be shaking all over. In the afternoon he was staggering, and the master took hold of him and led him as far as the hatchway, where his legs gave way and he fell down. Captain Bougerd went below, but in a few minutes was called, and found the deceased dying. He gave him some brandy, which revived him for a time, but he had a relapse, and died at twenty minutes after three. The previous night he had been calling out for brandy every ten minutes or quarter of an hour. On arriving at Plymouth he was discovered to be a man who went by the name of "TIT" MARSH, and lived in Horn-street, Guernsey. - The Coroner remarked that on the previous day he had held an Inquest on a drunkard, and at the same time in that dead-house lay the bodies of two drunkards - a very painful subject to contemplate. In this case the deceased had drunk before coming on board, and afterwards quite enough to injure any man's health, and even to destroy life. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Excessive Drinking."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 September 1867
HONITON - Fatal Gun Accident. - MR SAMUEL BROMHEAD, of Littletown Cottage, Honiton, was killed by the accidental discharge of his gun on Thursday evening. MR BROMHEAD was out shooting in company with Mr Hewlings, and the latter having no ammunition asked MR BROMHEAD to supply him with some. MR BROMHEAD rested the stock of his gun on his foot with the muzzle towards his face, and proceeded to assist Mr Hewlings in loading his gun, when his own went off, the contents loading in his face, completely shattering the upper part and blowing away part of the nose and the brain. MR BROMHEAD only survived a few minutes. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of An Artilleryman. - An Inquest was held at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, on Friday evening, concerning the death of WM. CUMMING, a gunner in the 4th Brigade Royal Artillery, stationed at Plymouth Citadel. The deceased was 22 years of age, and had been in the service about four years, and was greatly addicted to drink. He was ill a short time ago, and since then he has been rather depressed in spirits. About three o'clock on Thursday morning he was observed by Gunner Bush to get up for a short time; he returned to bed again, and went to sleep until about 6 o'clock, when he told Bush that he was not very well. Bush then left the room, and when he had been gone about a couple of minutes he heard the report of a carbine, and on the room being entered it was found that the deceased had shot himself. The surgeon was called, but life was quite extinct. The Jury of which Mr D. Holland was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

CHURSTON FERRERS - Alleged Death From Violence At Brixham. - An Inquest was held on Friday and continued on Saturday, at Churston, concerning the death of SAMUEL CRISPIN H. FRANKS, late an apprentice to Mr J. Barter, shipbuilder, Brixham. Mr H. Michelmore was the Coroner. The deceased was weakly, having overgrown his strength, and in July last he was ill for six weeks with typhoid fever, and was attended by Mr Brooking, surgeon, Brixham. One evening just before the bell rang for the men to leave work, the deceased and another apprentice named White were asked to assist in carrying some planks to the sawpit. White came, but FRANKS began to swear, and said he would not help the sawyers. However, he afterwards took up one end of a plank and put it on his shoulder, but presently threatened to throw it down. Fearing he would do so, Mr Edwin Barter, son of Mr J. Barter, put his shoulder under and lifted the plank, whereupon the deceased turned round startled, and Mr E. Barter struck him in the forehead with his left hand, and he also lifted his leg to kick FRANKS, but he did not reach him. Mr Barter then told the deceased to go out of the yard, but afterwards he noticed that FRANKS was beginning to cry, and he directed a lad named Matthews to bring water in order that the deceased might wash away the blood that was running from his nose. Afterwards FRANKS left the yard laughing, but when he went to his home at Churston Ferrers, he told his parents that he had been ill-treated by his master, and complained of pain in his head and bowels. Subsequently he went to work with Mr Gill, blacksmith, and although he was able to go to Dartmouth regatta and Totnes races he gradually got worse, and he died on the 19th instant. Mr Brooking, by the direction of the Coroner, made a post mortem examination of the body, but he found nothing which would lead him to suppose that deceased died from a blow. The Coroner told the Jury that a master had a right to correct an apprentice in any legal way, and it would be for them to consider whether in striking the deceased with his hand Mr Barter went beyond the means that ought to be used for the purpose of correction. - The Jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict that the deceased died from Natural Causes. - Mr H. W. Nelson, solicitor from London, attended on Saturday to watch the proceedings on behalf of Mr Barter.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 September 1867
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of FLORENCE ELIZABETH YEO,, an illegitimate child, five week sold, whose mother resides at 13 Rendle's Cottages, Bath-street. It appeared from the evidence of the mother, MARY YEO, that the child became ill on Saturday last, and in the evening she took her to Mr Hawkings, a chemist, who told her to go to a surgeon on Monday, and gave her a powder, which she gave to the child; the child went to sleep and never woke afterward. - Mr Hawkings said the child was brought to him on Saturday evening, and he advised the mother to take the child to Dr Whipple, and gave her a powder; the child was suffering from syphilis. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts. The Coroner pointed out to the girl how her immoral life had resulted in the death of her child.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 September 1867
EXETER- Death Through Swallowing An Arrow Head. - JOHN CRISPIN, aged 16 years, the son of a labourer residing at Kenton, about three weeks ago accidentally swallowed a cast iron tip of an arrow when in Powderham Park. It was three days before medical assistance was called in, when he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remained up to the time of his death. A post mortem examination of the body shewed that the arrow-head had become imbedded in the left lung, which had caused gangrene, resulting in death. At the Inquest on Wednesday the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 September 1867
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident At The Bideford Railway Station. - A few weeks ago we stated that a railway porter named JOHN DAVEY while shunting some carriages at the station slipped and fell, the wheels of the carriages crushing his leg in a shocking manner, which necessitated amputation, which was performed by the medical men of Bideford. The man did very well at first, but subsequently became worse and died a few days ago. The report being that amputation had been improperly performed, thus causing the man's death, an Inquest was held before Mr T. L. Pridham, on Thursday evening when it was shewn in evidence that there were no grounds for reflection on the medical men engaged in the case, and every care had been taken of the deceased. A verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased has left a wife, but no children. The Railway Company supported the man during his illness.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 October 1867
PLYMOUTH - A Man Drowned In Sutton Pool. - Mr John Edmonds, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday on the body of JAMES CHARLES DOWN, a journeyman house carpenter. On Sunday morning, about four o'clock, a custom-house officer named John Macey, who was near the Harbour Avenue Police-station, heard a groan and a splash in the water from the North Quay and on looking into the water saw a man struggling. A fisherman named James Jones came to the assistance of the officer in a boat. - P.C. Shepheard, who was on duty at Briton-side was sent for, and he promptly arrived with a light, but when the deceased was recovered he was quite dead. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was Found Drowned, but by what means there was no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 October 1867
PLYMOUTH - Suicide in Plymouth. - An adjourned Inquest on the body of THIRZA NORTON, who was supposed to have died from taking two packets of Hunter's vermin destroyer, was held on Thursday evening, before the Coroner (Mr John Edmonds) and a Jury, of whom Mr Mark Levi was Foreman. The Inquiry had been adjourned for the purpose of having the contents of the internal organs further analysed, to endeavour to discover the poison with which the deceased was supposed to have terminated her existence. Mr Alfred Payne Balkwill and Mr May, surgeon, made the analysis, and found distinct traces of strychnine in the contents of the stomach, and they were quite satisfied that the girl died from taking this deadly poison. - The Coroner told the Jury that there were two questions for them to consider, whether someone had poisoned her, or whether she did it herself. The evidence pointed clearly to the latter. It had been stated that she had a very uncomfortable home, but that would not bring a criminal charge against the parents, and it was for them to consider whether that preying upon her mind caused her to destroy herself. He thought an Act of Parliament ought to be passed prohibiting such deadly poisons to be used indiscriminately. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 4 November 1867
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident By Machinery At Plymouth. - On Thursday afternoon an accident, which has since resulted fatally, occurred to the engineer of Messrs. Call and Pethick's Steam Sawing and Planing Mills, Norley-street, Plymouth. The unfortunate man, RICHARD ANDREWARTHA, went down into the shaft pit as was his wont, and whilst examining the machinery he was caught by it and whirled round several times. John Oram, the driver of the engine, who was in the pit with the deceased, heard him cry out and made an alarm. Richard Slogett, machinist, stopped the engine, and then ANDREWARTHA was found to be in a state of nudity, every particle of clothing being stripped off him. His left arm and both legs were smashed. He was taken to the South Devon Hospital, where both feet were amputated, but he died on Saturday morning. He was thirty years of age, and leaves a wife and two children. At the Coroner's Inquiry on Saturday at the Guildhall, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 November 1867
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death From Suffocation At Stonehouse. - Mr Allan B. Bone, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Queen's Arms, Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse, on the body of an infant named ANN ACKLAND. MRS ACKLAND, who is the wife of a marine, lives in George-street, Stonehouse, and about three months ago she was delivered of twins - girls. On Wednesday night last one Agnes Darke slept with MRS ACKLAND and her two children. Another child, KATIE ACKLAND, three years old, was placed in a cradle by the side of the bed. About six o'clock on Thursday morning the twins began to cry and half an hour later KATIE got out of her cot and went into bed between her mother and Agnes Darke; MRS ACKLAND at the same time taking up the deceased and laying her across her bosom. They all seemed to have dosed for a short time, then the mother awoke and finding the deceased had slipped from her bosom, she took the infant up and discovered that it was dead. In reply to the Coroner, MRS ACKLAND stated that the twins from their birth had a "tie" on their chest, and she had applied to the doctor, but he had told her that as long as they could eat and drink there was nothing the matter with them. Mr Perry, surgeon, stated that he had examined the body, and he believed the child had died from suffocation, caused by being overlaid. He added that as the child had had a constitutional cough, the respiratory organs of the deceased might have been very weak. The Coroner: So that a very slight pressure on the child would cause suffocation? - Mr Perry: That is my opinion. - The Jury, of which Mr J. Clarke was the Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased had died from Accidental Suffocation. - MRS ACKLAND being poor, the Jury kindly gave up to her their fees, and the Coroner generously added half-a-crown, in order that the mother might have sufficient money with which to bury the deceased child decently.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 November 1867
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr Edmonds, Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, on the body of DAVID BLACKMORE. The wife of the deceased had been out of her house for a short time, and on returning found her husband lying on a bed with, as usual, his coat and waistcoat off, but shewing no sign of life. She sent her son-in-law for a surgeon, and Mr Harper came, and pronounced her husband to be dead. Mr Russel Rendle, as surgeon of the club to which the deceased belonged, followed, and both medical men expressed their opinion that he had been dead about an hour. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 November 1867
PLYMOUTH - Suicide By A Domestic Servant. - Mr J. Edmonds, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, on Saturday evening on the body of ELIZABETH BURNARD, who had been found drowned at Deadman's Bay. The deceased was 28 years of age, and about two years ago she went to service as cook and housemaid with Mr J. D. Collins, draper, who lives at 60 Chapel-street, Devonport. For several months past her mistress had suspected that she had been improperly familiar with one or two married men, and about a week since Mrs Collins received an anonymous letter, in which it was stated that BURNARD and Mr Collins were too familiar, and that sometimes since the deceased had a child, and on another occasion a miscarriage. Mrs Collins at once summoned BURNARD and read the communication to her, but the deceased said it was entirely false, and took her oath there was no truth in any portion of it. Mrs Collins was willing to believe the girl's statement, and so she let the matter drop. The deceased, however, seems to have pondered over it, and on Wednesday last she told her fellow-servant, Mary Oliver, "That if she lost her place through the reports about her and her master, the bottom of the sea would find her." On Friday Mrs Collins received a letter from a Mrs Stacey, asking her to meet her. She did so, and then Mrs Stacey told her that the girl BURNARD had been spreading certain reports, which she named. The conversation resulted in a Mrs Harris, of High-street, Stonehouse, being brought to Mrs Collins's house. There she had an interview with the deceased in the presence of the mistress. BURNARD appeared confused, and at length admitted that she had stated things wrongfully. Thereupon, Mrs Collins determined to get rid of the deceased, and she told her to leave the house within twenty-four hours. BURNARD merely replied, "Well, I can go; I don't want to stay." Twenty minutes had hardly elapsed after the interview before the deceased quitted the house. She, however, left her clothes behind; telling Mrs Collins that she would send a cab for them in the morning. Nothing more was heard of the deceased until the following morning, and then she was found drowned at Deadman's Bay by Charles Tucker, the foreman at Mr J. D. Marshall's shipbreaking yard. - In reply to the Coroner, Mrs Collins said she had every reason to suppose that the reports which the deceased spread were false. - Q.: Do you know that the deceased was pregnant? - Mrs Collins: I have been told that she was, but I don't know. - Mary Oliver, child's maid in the service of Mrs Collins, said the deceased had a sweetheart named Henry Masters, a marine. He went abroad about four or five months ago, and about four weeks since BURNARD had a letter from him. The deceased had no relations at Plymouth. - Mr Collins was called, and he denied that he had at any time had illicit intercourse with the deceased, and he had never observed anything improper in her conduct. - The Coroner told the Jury that after the deceased was discharged from her place she must have found her way to Plymouth, and then he had not the slightest doubt she threw herself into the water at Deadman's Bay. They must consider that at the moment when she left Devonport there was a good deal to prey on her mind, for she had lost her place, her character, and in point of fact her all, and there she was standing alone in the world without a single friend. What, therefore, was it likely that a person would do in such a care but effect self-destruction. Anonymous letters he thought were the worse productions in the world, for they ofttimes caused the greatest misery in families where happiness had formerly prevailed. - The Jury, after some consultation, returned a verdict, "That the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

ROBOROUGH - Mysterious Death On The Highway. - An event which is at present surrounded with much mystery has just occurred in the village of Roborough. On Friday morning, MR JOHN CREBER, of Birchay Farm, Whitchurch, near Horrabridge, assessor of taxes, attended the Roborough Police Court on business. On leaving the Court he went into the Lopes Arms, at Roborough, and partook of some spirit and water, and other refreshment. About a quarter to six in the evening he told the ostler, John Allen, to get his horse. The ostler brought it, and CREBER, after some difficulty, mounted. He then told the ostler to ask if Mr Blackford, a gentleman in the public-house was ready to start. Mr Blackford told CREBER to go on quietly, and he would overtake him. The ostler then led the horse, which appeared not to have been properly broken in, a few steps, and then the horse went off at a fast trot. According to the son, JOHN HENRY CREBER'S statement, deceased had then about £5 and some papers relating to his business in his pockets. About a quarter after six o'clock in the evening Mr Colton, a road surveyor, of Knackersknowle, was coming along the road from Horrabridge, when some persons asked him if he had seen a horse. He answered in the negative. On the road he met Jonas Jenkins, a regrator, in his waggon, and spoke to him some time. They proceeded together up to the hill near Buckland turning. Jenkins trotted off and Colton lost sight of him. On arriving at the bottom of the hill Colton saw the body of CREBER lying near the bank on the eastern side of the road, and Jenkins stooping over it. Mr Rowe, a farmer living at Meavy and Mr Jope, who were at the Lopes Arms with the deceased, left just after him. On the road they heard someone speaking loud, and on a nearer inspection they found Jenkins lying over the body, and speaking to the deceased. When they got near the body Jenkins immediately went away with his waggon. Colton and Rowe then took the body to the police-station. On examining the body there appeared to be no marks of violence whatever. The clothes were in proper order, except a rent above the elbow on the right arm, about two inches in length. The collar and back of the coat were covered with dust. Mr Langford, surgeon, of Knackersknowle, saw the body about half-past seven on Friday evening. It was a little warm, the countenance was perfectly placid, a little blood was oozing from the nose and mouth. On examining the body externally he could not detect any mark of violence, or anything to account for deceased's death. The eyes were closed and the pupils appeared just naturally dilated. On an internal examination he found no marks of injury,. On removing the scalp at the back part of the head he found a large quantity of effused blood, and above the skull the membranes of the brain appeared very much congested. The brain itself was perfectly healthy, no clot or blood on either of the ventricles. There was no fracture on any part of the skull. He thought the deceased died from severe concussion of the brain. A fall or a blow would produce concussion of the brain. - Police Sergeant William Butt found in the watch-pocket a few papers relating to taxes, notices of appeal. In his trousers pocket he found a pencil, and in the coat pocket he found a handkerchief. His purse was gone. - At the Inquest on the body at the police court, Roborough, the above facts were deposed to, and the Coroner (Mr Allan Bone), in summing up the evidence, said there did not appear to be any marks of violence about the body, and there was no appearance of any struggle about the clothes. The deceased had never had any attack of epilepsy, or any affection of the heart. Supposing he had had a violent struggle with another, and had received a violent throw in the struggle, the probability was that there would have been some external mark and appearance corresponding with some internal injury There was nothing of that kind. The throw, according to Mr Langford's statement, would produce concussion of the brain, and a sudden shake might have produced it. The deceased when he left the house was cheerful and well. He had taken some amount of spirit and water, but there was no evidence to shew that he was not at all fit to take care of himself and his horse. The horse, although quiet to ride, was a little fidgety to mount. When the deceased had gone a few paces the horse went into a trot as fast as he could, and nothing more was heard of him until he was found in the road, and on examining the body the money was gone. The deceased might have by some accidental means received a blow from a fall on the ground. - The Jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased had been found in a dying state on Roborough Down, and died from Concussion of the Brain, but how the deceased became so there was no evidence to shew. " The deceased was 66 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children, a son and a daughter who are grown up.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 November 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Suffocation Of A Child At Devonport. - Mr Allan B. Bone, the Borough coroner, held an Inquiry at the Townhall, Devonport, yesterday afternoon, into the death of an infant three months old, named JOHN GEORGE WILCOCKS, the son of JOHN WILCOCKS, a warrant's steward in the navy. The mother was in bed with the deceased on Friday night, and on the following morning, between eight and nine o'clock, it was found dead. The Jury, returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident To A Sailor In The Hamoaze. - Mr Allan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, on the body of RICHARD ROBERTS, a seaman of H.M.S. Redwing, who met with his death under the following circumstances. Mr Ayers, first-class gunner of the Redwing, said that the ship was fastened by a buoy to the Cambridge, in the Hamoaze, and on Saturday afternoon about 1.35 the Confiance, government tug, towed the Redwing on her port side to the Gunwharf for a gun. They had turned the head of the vessel straight up the stream when the steamer volunteer, towing a schooner, came towards them from the Dockyard, right across the stream. The Confiance stopped her engines, and the helm was kept midships. The vessel remained in that position for four or five minutes. The captain of the Volunteer turned round sharp to go down the stream to avoid a collision, and the sudden strain parted the cable, and the steamer went right into the Confiance on the starboard quarter, carrying away the anchor with her paddle-box. The schooner struck the tug a little above the centre part on the starboard side. Mr Reynolds, who commanded the Confiance, asked the captain of the Volunteer which way he was going, but received no reply. The deceased, who was a stoker on board the Redwing, was painting the funnel, and when the collision took place he fell down and fractured his skull. He was conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, where he died about half-an-hour afterwards. In Mr Ayers's opinion, if the Volunteer had ported her helm no collision would have taken place. - John Clarke and John Westcott of the Redwing gave corroborative evidence. That was the version of the case given by the men of the Redwing; but the Coroner, thinking it fair to hear the version of the case by the captain of the Volunteer, the Inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday next at four o'clock. The deceased was about 24 years of age.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 November 1867
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Collision Between Steamships In Hamoaze. - Mr A. B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest on Wednesday at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, on the body of JOHN ROBERTS, a stoker on board the gunboat Redwing. - Mr R. N. Bennett attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the owners of the steamship Volunteer. On Saturday last the Redwing and the steamer Volunteer came into collision in the Hamoaze, and the deceased, who was painting the funnel of the Redwing, fell, and received injuries from which he afterwards died. The Redwing at the time was being towed by the tug Confiance to the Gunwharf, and the Volunteer also had in tow the schooner Stonehouse, which was being taken from the Dockyard to Catwater. Thomas Christie, the captain of the Stonehouse and Charles H. Ham, the Captain of the Volunteer, explained to the Jury that after they left the dockyard the Pique hulk in the Hamoaze prevented them from seeing the approach of the Redwing as soon as they ought. - Captain Christie attributed the accident to the close proximity of the vessels ere one could see the other. - Bapt. Ham thought that if after the Redwing saw the Volunteer the captain had reversed the engines and had gone astern the collision would have been prevented. Mr Ayres, first-class gunner of the Redwing, was of opinion that if the volunteer had ported her helm there would have been no collision. Captain Ham, however, believed that if he had done that, owing to the strong tide, the Volunteer would have been cut in two by the Confiance tugboat. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from an Accidental Injury received during a collision." Mr R. W. Stevens, a director of the South Devon Shipping Company, to which company the Stonehouse belongs, was present during the Inquiry.

IVYBRIDGE - Suicide At Ivybridge. - Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at Ivybridge into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM WAKEHAM, a gardener, who was formerly in the employ of the late Mr Elliott, of Highland House, Ivybridge, and subsequently in that of Mr Herndon, the present occupier of Highland House, who was absent from home at the time of his servant's decease. Within the last few weeks WAKEHAM had been observed to be somewhat altered in manner, being depressed in spirits. On Wednesday morning at eleven o'clock Richard Tall, a labourer in Lady Roger's employ, saw him and borrowed a garden-hook of him. Deceased then appeared to be low in spirits and scarcely spoke. About four o'clock in the afternoon Tall went to the garden at Highland House again to return the hook, but on approaching the tool-house he saw some object within which on examination he discovered to be the deceased suspended by a rope from a beam. He called for assistance, and the deceased was taken down, but life was extinct. It did not appear that he had been seen alive after Tall borrowed the hook of him in the morning. His clothes were saturated with wet, and it was stated that close to the tool-house there was a tank of water two feet deep. His money and papers were found on him. When he left home in the morning, Mrs Wells, with whom he resided, asked him "What about dinner?" to which he replied, "Oh, do as well as you can;" but he did not return as usual to dinner. Other witnesses spoke of the deceased's low spirits lately, and the Jury found that the deceased had committed Suicide when in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 December 1867
SHALDON - An Inquest was held last evening at the London Inn, Shaldon, before Mr Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, on the body of ANN WHITE, who was found hanging in a garret in the house of Mr Weathers, Shaldon, on Saturday. It appeared from the evidence given that the deceased, who was housekeeper at Mr Weather's, had complained during the day of being unwell and about twelve o'clock asked for a cup of coffee, which was supplied to her, and she then said she was going upstairs to her bedroom, where she might be found if wanted. About an hour afterwards, when required, it was discovered that she was not in the bedroom, and on a search being made, was found hanging in a garret by a clothes line. Dr Brooks was immediately sent for, but life was extinct. The deceased was much respected by her master with who she had lived nine years, and he has only a few weeks since come to reside at Shaldon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 6 December 1867
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - A Lady Suffocated In A Private Asylum. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Private Lunatic Asylum, St Thomas, Exeter, to Inquire into the circumstances of the death of a MRS JANE CLARK, aged 58, an inmate of that establishment. - The coroner pointed out to the Jury prior to calling evidence that it would be their duty to Inquire whether there had been culpable neglect on the part of any of the officials in the house, or whether the unfortunate deceased had been treated with undue severity, or whether she was a patient with a suicidal tendency, and that she purposely destroyed her own life. The first witness called was Mr Hy. Eales, who stated that he was acting for the medical superintendent. The deceased was admitted into the establishment November 23rd last. She had been there on five previous occasions. She was of an excitable disposition, but not given to personal violence. Her talk was usually rapid and incoherent. She had always been very destructive, and torn up or broken all the things in her room. On December 3rd witness had deceased removed from her own room, as she had destroyed everything in it, to another. The deceased was seen on that evening, when she seemed comfortable. On the following morning witness was roused by cries of fire, and almost directly it was found that smoke was issuing from the room occupied by deceased. On opening the door, which was locked from the outside, the room was found to be densely filled with smoke. Deceased was lying on the floor on her face and hands. Witness had her instantly removed, but she was seen only to breathe once, when she expired. Several superficial burns were found on the body, but, strange to say, no marks of burning were on her night dress and long waterproof cloak. On examining the room it was discovered that the walls and ceiling were blistered by the heat, and that here and there the floor was charred. Two beds, one flock, and the other straw, were in the room. The latter had been consumed, the contents having been taken out by ripping a seam in the tick. A fire was in the room, protected by a strong guard, which was locked. Witness thought that the fire was occasioned by the intentional act of the deceased for mischief, and not with the desire of destroying her own life. - A Juror: But how can you account that there were no marks of burning on the clothes? - Witness: I can only suppose that the deceased put on her clothes after she was burnt. - Dr Drake stated that deceased, when at her own home, had a mania for lighting fires in the night, and would frequently go from one room to the other to do so. - After hearing the evidence of some of the attendants who saw deceased late on the evening of the 3rd, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased intentionally set fire to her room, and that she died from Suffocation.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 December 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Suffocation At The Raglan Barracks. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Devonport, before Mr A. B. Bone, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of JOSEPH KENSON, a private in the second battalion of the Rifle Brigade now stationed at the Raglan Barracks, Devonport. On Monday evening, about nine o'clock, a private of the brigade named James Brien met the deceased on the stairs leading to the barrack-room of the Brigade's quarters. He appeared to be intoxicated, and was unable to get up the stairs without assistance. He led the deceased up to the barrack-room, and gave him in charge of Private Thomas Jones, who, with the aid of another private named Johnson, took the deceased to his own room, and laid him on his bed on his right side. There were several men in the room then. Early the next morning Jones found the deceased dead in bed, lying on his face. His head was buried in the pillow, his hands and arms were projecting over his head, and he was lying straight in the bed. - Philip Hart, acting corporal of the Brigade, saw the deceased in his own room a quarter before eight o'clock on Monday evening. He (deceased) had been drinking, but he was quite sensible, and knew what he was about. At eight o'clock he saw the deceased; he was in the same condition. At ten minutes to nine o'clock the deceased answered to his name on the roll being called by Sergeant Hallett. - Mr William Climo, assistant-surgeon of the Rifle Brigade, saw the deceased between seven and eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, on his bed in his barrack room, fully dressed with his coat on. The deceased had a serge jacket underneath. His body was cold except over his abdomen, where there was a little warmth. His nose was bent on the left side. His face and neck were deeply congested, and the congested portion of the neck was divided by a white line. He thought deceased's head had depended over the edge of the bed and that the white mark was caused by the pressure of the serge and the overcoat. The deceased had no stock on, but the button of his shirt was very tight, as well as the clothing around the neck. On an internal examination he found congestion, especially above the white line. There was very little evidence of liquor in the stomach, but there was a slight odour of beer from the body. He felt confident the deceased had not died from any poisonous matter. He thought the deceased died from Suffocation, caused by the pressure of his clothes. - The Jury returned a verdict to that effect. The deceased was 26 years old.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 December 1867
BARNSTAPLE - Death of An Infant Under Mysterious Circumstances. - On Thursday evening an Inquest was opened at the Unicorn Inn, Pilton, Barnstaple, before Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, upon the body of a female infant daughter of SARAH DUNNING, of Pilton, single woman, who died suddenly on the previous night. The mother deposed that the child was born on the 21st of November. It took the breast well, but did not appear very healthy, and had a bad eye, which grew much worse on Tuesday, and discharged a great deal of matter. In the afternoon she obtained an order for the parish surgeon, but afterwards, having bathed the eye, and believing it to be better, did not send the order. The child ate but little on Tuesday, and was sick several times. She went to bed about eleven, and when she awoke about half-past seven the next morning found the child dead in her arms. - Mr Andrew Ferine, of Barnstaple, surgeon, deposed that death, in his opinion, was caused by Suffocation, and that the child might have been overlaid. There are no marks of violence on the body. A post mortem examination was deemed necessary, and an adjournment therefore took place.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 December 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Falling Downstairs At Devonport Workhouse. - Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Workhouse yesterday, on the body of ANNY RYMES. The deceased was 81 years of age, and had been in the workhouse since May last. She was active on her legs, and did not walk with any crutch or stick. She was light in the head occasionally, but generally she was quite rational. On Friday fortnight she went to bed in No. 21 Ward about seven o'clock in the evening in her usual state of health. About four o'clock the following morning she exchanged a brief conversation with the watch-woman, Eliza Norris, who then left to go into an adjoining ward, where other old women were sleeping, and during her absence the deceased got out of bed unnoticed by the other paupers, and soon a noise was heard as if some person had fallen. Norris and Nurse Yeo hurried out to see what had happened, and discovered the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs, which descended from a landing near to which the closet was situate. RYMES was lying on her side, and when Yeo spoke to her she replied, "Nurse, don't be angry, I did not ought to have been out, but I have fallen and knocked myself." The deceased was taken up and put to bed and the matron (Mrs Richardson) applied hot flannels to her side. Mr Delarue, surgeon, subsequently examined her carefully, and found that the upper part of the thigh bone was fractured. He gave the nurse directions for her management, and the next day he had the deceased removed to the hospital in the house. She appeared to progress favourably up to Friday last, but then appeared to have had a slight apoplectic fit, and from that time she gradually got worse, and died on Sunday evening. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from the combined effects of an Accidental Fall and Natural Causes." The Jury also attached a recommendation to the Board of Commissioners that a portable barrier, or hand rail be placed on the landing at the top of the stairs leading to the corridor of the upper infirm wards.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 December 1867
PLYMOUTH - A Child Burnt To Death In Plymouth. - Mr Edmonds, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall concerning the death of MARY JANE CLARKE, a child four years of age. On November 19th, about nine o'clock in the morning, Mary Ann Putt, a young woman living at 4 Martin's-place, was having her breakfast, when she heard a child scream, and on proceeding to the room occupied by the mother of the deceased, she saw the child sitting on the bedside, with her calico chemise on fire. The clothes were stripped off, and it was found that the deceased had been burnt very much about the stomach, the chest and under the right arm. The deceased was subsequently conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, and died on Monday morning. The Jury, of whom Mr Nicholas Moysey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 December 1867
BRIXHAM - A Sad Death At Brixham. - An Inquest was held at the Old George Inn, Brixham, before Mr H. Michelmore, on Thursday, concerning the death of a child aged 10 years, named MATILDA BUFFETT, daughter of a poor drunken fisherman. The evidence disclosed a sad condition of misery. The poor child had complained first on Friday last of sickness, no doctor was called, and she had received no special attention. On Sunday morning a kind neighbour named Cornish took the child in, and gave her a breakfast. All the child had received since, according to the mother's evidence, was a little boiled rice. On the Wednesday the child kept in bed, and in the afternoon the mother being without food, coal, or candle, left her home in quest of charity. On her return at 5 p.m. she found the child senseless, and death followed almost immediately. The Jury visited the dwelling, a two-roomed underground cellar in Middle-street, quite devoid of furniture, the bed consisting of a bundle of straw, the place having no windows except holes covered with wooden shutters, which when opened to admit light also let in the cold. The father, it appeared, spent all his earnings in drink, family quarrels resulted, the brutalised father gave up his wife and family, three daughters, two left them, and the wife went charring and washing, the poor wife, for the miserable shelter she obtained, paying 10d. weekly. The Coroner remarked on the sad case, describing it as one of the worst scenes of wretchedness he had ever met with. There was no doubt the child had been starved, the evidence clearly shewing that proper sustenance and care had not been given. He characterized the father as a disgrace to creation, and having called him in gave him a severe but kindly rebuke, and asked him to look after his family. The Coroner also remarked on the disgraceful condition of the dwelling, and thought that the sanitary authorities ought to see that such squalor was not allowed to continue. The Jury gave as their verdict "That death resulted from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of the necessaries of life and by parental neglect."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 December 1867
BIDEFORD - Fatal Gun Accident At Bideford. - The boy GEORGE PADDON, thirteen years of age, an accident to whom has already been reported, died on Friday. He was out with some other little boys shooting birds on Thursday, and while pushing a stick down the barrel of the gun, a charge of powder being in it, and a cap on the nipple, it went off, the stick passing into his groin and coming out at his shoulder. An Inquest was held on Saturday night, before Mr T. L. Pridham, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. Several of the Jury, and also the Coroner, observed that little boys such as the deceased ought not to be allowed to carry guns, which is a common practice in Bideford.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 December 1867
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Result of Intemperance. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport, Mr A. B. Bone, and a Jury yesterday Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of MRS CHARITY KENDALL, wife of a shipwright in the Devonport dockyard, aged 63 years, and lately living at 46 Clowance-street. On Saturday afternoon, between four and five o'clock, the deceased's daughter and a charwoman heard a noise downstairs, and on going down found the deceased lying at the foot of the stairs on her back, with her head turned on one side, and resting against the wall, while her feet were on the bottom stair. She was snoring very loudly, and was insensible. she was removed into the parlour, where she continued in the same state. An hour or two afterwards blood was found to be issuing from her mouth and Mr Laity, surgeon, was sent for. Mr Bennett, surgeon, came, but later in the evening she died. Evidence was given that during the day the deceased had drank considerably. At the Clowance Inn she had two "half-quarters" of gin, and at home she shared with her two daughters two half-pints of the same spirit, and at dinner a pint and a half of beer. She was consequently found to be the worse for liquor not long before her fall, and had been left so in the parlour. About a year ago she had a "seizure," and she had of late frequently expressed an opinion that she should have another. She was very weak in her feet and legs. - The Coroner observed that he had no doubt the ultimate cause of death was apoplexy, but they would consider whether the evidence pointed to the fall as the primary cause. - The Jury found that the deceased had died Accidentally from the effects of a fall.

[No newspapers in the archive for 1868]

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 January 1869
PLYMOUTH - Last night Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Millbay Pier Hotel, touching the death of JOHN FINN, a private in the 9th Company, 1st battalion, 12th Regiment, stationed at Raglan Barracks. - James Walker, a corporal in the 12th Regiment, said he was on duty at Millbay on Saturday afternoon. About half-past three hearing a disturbance in the Pier Hotel, he went and found Corporal Heydon, the non-commissioned officer in charge of some men going on furlough, intoxicated and his face covered with blood, the effects of a blow from the deceased. He placed Heydon under arrest, and was proceeding to do the same with deceased, who was also intoxicated, when the latter ran down the steps, throwing off his great coat and tunic into the water, and swam towards a small boat a short distance from the shore. He failed in his attempt to get into the boat, and then turned and swam towards the Pier. An artilleryman, formed one of the escort who attempted to arrest him, endeavouring to rescue deceased, who sank before he was reached. John Swift, a private in the 12th Regiment, gave corroborative evidence to the above. John Penhay, a waterman helped to bring deceased to land. He gave no sign of life. Every effort was made to restore life, which proved of no avail. John Blight, a police constable in the employ of the Great Western Dock Company, said that the deceased was intoxicated, and had occasion to speak to him respecting his disorderly behaviour. After the man was brought ashore Drs. Hunt and Rendle, together with Mr Danney, of Millbay, rendered valuable assistance. After a short consultation the Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 January 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, touching the death of GEORGE TRAVERS, a child four months old, who resided with his parents at 6 Peacock-lane. Some time since the deceased suffered from convulsions, and on Monday afternoon whilst the grandmother named Sawle, was nursing him, he suddenly expired. Dr Dale, who made a post mortem examination on the body, said that the deceased died of convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr Damerell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 January 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry concerning the death of ELIZABETH WILDY, an infant, who resided with her parents at 80 King-street, Plymouth, was held before Mr Brian, at the Tradesman's Arms, King-street, Plymouth, last evening. The mother of the deceased, MARY WILDY, went to bed early on Wednesday morning with the deceased and two other children in one bed, which it was said was not fit to hold more than two of them. About half-past eight the mother woke, and discovered the child lying dead, face downward; one side of the face was discoloured. Mr Graham was sent for, but gave no opinion as to the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation, caused by Accidental pressure during the night, owing to the overcrowding of the bed."

Western Morning News, Monday 11 January 1869
TORQUAY - The Inquest on the little boy STOYLES, who was killed while playing near a stack of deals on the Quay, Torquay, has terminated in a verdict of Accidental Death. Mr H. Michelmore, the newly elected coroner, conducted the Inquiry. It was generally thought that the deals were piled up in a dangerous manner, and a recommendation that the attention of the harbour authorities should be called to it was resolved upon.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 January 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, concerning the death of LEONORA THOMAS, a child four years old, who died on Sunday morning from the effects of burns received on Saturday afternoon. ANN THOMAS, a charwoman living at the back of 44 King-street West, said that on Saturday afternoon, at about four o'clock, she left deceased and her brother, aged two years, in charge of their sister, ALICE, five years old, whilst she went out to her work in a house on the opposite side of the street. A small fire was left in the grate, which was not protected by either fender or guards. On being told by the child ALICE that the baby was burning, she left her work, and going into the street, found deceased standing at the door of the house, the flames rising over her head. After stripping off her clothes and applying oil to the wounds, she took her to the South Devon Hospital, where the sufferer received every attention from the house surgeon, but without avail. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and a hope expressed that the mother would be more cautious for the future, and that the lamentable effects produced by her carelessness would be a warning to all placed in a similar position to take necessary precautions to prevent their children having access to the fire.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 January 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - The Inquest on the body of MR THOMAS EDWIN SARAH took place last night at the Newton Townhall. Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, conducted the Inquiry. The hall was crowded, and great interest was manifested in the Inquiry. The evidence of several witnesses was taken, but was not satisfactory to the Jury, and the Inquest was adjourned until this evening at seven o'clock for the production of other witnesses.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 January 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - The Fatal Occurrence At Newton. - The Inquiry concerning the death of MR THOMAS EDWIN SARAH, landlord of the Prince of Wales Inn, Courtenay-street, Newton, was held on Friday before Mr Michelmore at the Newton Townhall. The peculiarity of the circumstances attending the case and his being well known in the town created a deal of interest, and during the Inquiry the hall was crowded. - Elizabeth Sanders, of the Plymouth Inn, deposed to having seen the deceased at her house on Wednesday night just before twelve o'clock with a young man, whom she believed was a servant in the employ of the Rev. H. Tudor, of Newton. She could not say that the deceased was the worse for liquor at that time. Mr Lang she believed had come to her house with the deceased. - A groom in the employ of the Rev. H. Tudor, named John Cordner, who was with the deceased on the night in question, said he was about to cross the road to go home when he said to the deceased "Are you not going home?" Deceased replied "Yes." Witness told him he was coming the wrong way. The deceased swore a little. He then shook hands with the deceased, wished him good night, and the latter then turned towards his home up the street. He (witness) then went home. In answer to questions Cordner said the deceased was not drunk, but had been drinking. The only difference he could see was that he was a little more cheerful than usual. He, himself, was not drunk, but had been drinking. - William Sanders, manager of the Plymouth Inn, said the deceased went into his house about a quarter before twelve on the evening in question. Mr Lang was outside the house, but did not enter. Two young men, named Train and Gregory, and Cordner were there. The deceased asked for three-pennyworth of brandy, but did not drink it. The deceased appeared to have had a glass or so, but he could walk straight, and did not appear to be drunk. - Anne Williams, who resided at Windsor Terrace, Queen-street, with her husband, said she rented apartments on the ground floor of Robert Lethbridge. Two young dressmakers lived in the house - Shapley and Harding - upstairs. She went to bed about ten o'clock on Wednesday night. There was no lock on the front door, but it was kept fast by a large stone inside. The two young lodgers were not in when she went to bed, but soon afterwards she heard them go in by pushing the door. About half-past twelve o'clock she was awakened by someone pushing the door, and she heard footsteps as of many persons entering. She was dreadfully frightened and heard one man say to another, "Now hold fast by the balusters, and I'll go behind." A reply was given to that, but she could not say what it was. She heard them go upstairs and by their voices and movements they appeared to be tipsy men. She awoke her husband and told him there were some men gone up the stairs very tipsy, and asked him to get out. She then heard the men go up as far as the first landing, which was very narrow. She did not hear them go further, and there some conversation took place between them. She heard someone fall over the stairs down to the bottom. The other man then came and knocked at the door, and said, "Come out; a man has fallen over the stairs." She asked him why he had come there to disturb her, and told him if he did not go away and take the man with him, she would call for the police. The man said, "Will you?" She asked him his name, and what he had come there for? He replied, "To see a friend, the door was open, and so I walked in." She told him the door was closed, and that she distinctly heard him move the stone. She then heard the man say, "TOM, speak to me." There was no reply. The man repeated the sentence, and then went out of the house. Her husband went out, and found the deceased in a sitting posture, with his head against the edge of the door. Her husband put the lamp against him, and exclaimed, "For god's sake, 'tis SARAH!" She saw the blood flowing from the side of his head. Up to this time she had heard nothing of Shapley or Harding. She called out to them, but received no reply. Her husband then went for a policeman, and Dr Gaye arrived within half an hour. In answer to questions, the witness said the man was not a Devonshire man; he had a different accent. She heard no scuffling before the fall. - Thos. Williams, husband of the last witness, corroborated her evidence. - Police-constable Squires said that on questioning the two girls who were in bed they said they had heard no one in the house that night, or heard any noise, nor had they seen MR SARAH. - Louisa Shapley said she knew the deceased by sight, and had spoken to him at his house. She got home on Wednesday night about 10.30 with Harding, and they then went to bed. She had not seen SARAH that day. She had spoken to Cordner twice, but not on Wednesday. She had never seen the deceased in the house before. - Dr Gaye said on his arrival he found the deceased insensible. There was a contused wound at the back of the head, and the scalp was torn away from the skull. He thought it would be caused by a blow against the wall, and not by an instrument. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that it was very clear that there was one person that went into the house with the deceased. Who that person was they could not determine. The witness Cordner was the last person that saw the deceased alive as far as they knew. Cordner swore that he did not go to that house with the deceased. He (the Coroner) thought the man and the deceased were possibly in the same state. Why they went to that house they had no direct evidence to shew. The man, who was in the house with the deceased, possibly found out the wiser plan of running away. The man evidently stayed to [?] conversation; he did not at the moment contemplate running away. But before Williams went out with the light the situation of the man with the deceased flashed across him, and he made the best of his way away. - The Jury then retired and on coming into Court the Foreman (Mr Stuart) stated the majority of the Jury wished to have the Inquest adjourned for further evidence. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Saturday evening. - On the Jury reassembling the Coroner observed that since the previous evening most of them had examined the premises at the Windsor-terrace, and that they were very well acquainted with the position of the stairs and the "dern" of the door against which the deceased fell and received the blow, and upon which the blood and hair was found. He (the Coroner) had certainly the previous night thought that entrance to the house had been effected by the front door, but they had found out that it was effected through the back door. - Ann Williams was here recalled and questioned as to the way in which the door was fastened. - Robert Lethbridge, a labourer residing in Newton, said he was at the Windsor-terrace on Monday night. He took apartments in the house for 12 months of Mr Jackman, who lived across the road in Queen-street. He never had a key for the lock of the door outside the chapel. He had never seen the deceased in the house, though he knew him. He slept in a room over Williams. Shapley and Harding slept on the same landing as he did in the front room. He had never been disturbed by the door being opened at night. He generally went to bed about ten o'clock. He never saw Cordner in his life, nor did he recollect seeing any man there. He was not in the house on Wednesday night at all. - William Cook, a labourer, living with the last witness in what was called the Barracks, said there were two entrance doors, and he went into the room at the back generally; they used to call the back, front. He used the door opposite the chapel. There was no fixture against the door, but a great stone against it. He never saw MR SARAH in the house. He had never been disturbed by anyone pushing open the door after he had been in bed. - Wm. Gregory, a carpenter living at 12 Quay-terrace, deposed to having seen the deceased in the Plymouth Inn on Wednesday night with a man believed to be Cordner. He did not hear any remark made when the deceased and Cordner left. He did not hear them speak to anybody outside the door. - Mr Stephen Lang, of Combeinteignhead, deposed to having met the deceased at the Prince of Wales, at the Commercial, and the Plymouth Inns. At Magor's they stopped about half-an-hour. There were some gentlemen there. The deceased and himself had a glass of sherry each, and, as far as he knew, they had nothing but that. He should say that the deceased was decidedly not tipsy when he entered the house. He (witness) then got on his horse, and went down the street, the deceased and the man walking on one side of him and Mr Bickford the other. The deceased said to him "Come on, we'll go down to the Plymouth Inn and have a glass." The deceased then went off with the man, and no other conversation then passed between them. When they got at the inn the deceased asked him to have something. He said "No." The deceased and the man then went in. - Anne Cook, wife of William Cook, said the young girls lived upstairs about three or four months. She was there about a week before they came. She had never seen the deceased in the house, nor had she ever heard anybody come upstairs of the house at night. A person might come in by the side door and go upstairs without her hearing it. She never saw Cordner there. - Charles Henry Bickford, clerk at the railway station, corroborated Mr Lang's evidence. - Anne Harding heard nothing until the policeman came into her room. She did not see the deceased that night. She knew Cordner only by sight. She did not see him on the night in question. She was sure she had never seen him in the house. She and Shapley went to bed and they saw no one. - The Coroner, in summing up, said much of the time after the deceased left the Plymouth Inn was unfortunately wrapped in mystery. To have got into the house he must have known the way. He could not for one moment lead them to believe that the deceased went into the house for the first time. The deceased to get at the spot where he was supposed to have tumbled over, would have to pass two or three doors and corners, and he could not have done it in the dark unless he had been in the light before. He (the Coroner) thought if the man who was with the deceased had come forward and explained the whole circumstance no stain would have been on his character as to causing the death of the deceased. From the evidence he did not think they could have the slightest doubt, but that the deceased was intoxicated. - Police-constable Squires said he found gold and silver on the deceased. - The Jury then retired and on returning said they found "That deceased died from injuries received at No. 1, Windsor-terrace, but how those injuries were occasioned there is no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 January 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - A little boy named GEDDY was accidentally run over in Cumberland-street, Devonport, on Saturday, and received such severe injuries that he died at the Royal Albert Hospital soon after his arrival. At the Inquest held yesterday, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, it was stated that the deceased was riding in a waggon, when he accidentally slipped off and fell to the ground, and the wheels of the waggon passed over his body. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMSTOCK - Mr Bone held an Inquiry at the Castle Inn, Mount Batten, concerning the death of DANIEL PLAYDON, a private in the Royal Marines, serving on board H.M.S. Terrible, now lying in the Sound. Mr Duncan Rose said he was a midshipman on board the Terrible. Shortly after 3 o'clock on Saturday afternoon the cutter belonging to that ship left Millbay, he being the officer in charge of her. The wind was blowing nearly due south, and he had the fore and mizen sails set. The dingy was in tow. After standing for some distance on the starboard tack, he attempted to go about, but the boat missed her stays. He again attempted to do so, but failed; and when about eighty of hundred yards from the shore he for the third time tried to tack, and ordered the foresail to be lowered and the lee oars to be got out to assist her, but having stern way, and a squall suddenly striking her, she drifted on to the rocks. The tide was coming in, and an eddy caught her. He told the men to remain, but several of them got out and scrambled ashore. The deceased and two others pushed the dingy off the rocks, and after she was some distance from the shore he jumped in, but shortly afterwards left her, and turned towards the land. When about two feet from it he sank and did not rise afterwards. He requested a man who could swim to throw off his clothes and try to save the deceased, whilst the others ran along the rocks. The crew, as well as the witness, were perfectly sober. - William Doughty was coxswain of the boat, and had been in the service between ten and eleven years. When about half a mile from Mount Batten they attempted to tack, but the boat missed her stays and after trying to go about for the third time the two boats drifted ashore. Seeing the deceased attempting to get the dingy, then high and dry, off the rocks, he called to him, and told him not to do so, saying, "Another dingy can be built, but another man can't." PLAYDON threw off his jacket and boots and pushed the boat out, taking no notice of witness's warning. - William Woodey, a seaman, said he swam towards the deceased when he saw him in the water, but he sank before he could reach him. - A Juror thinking the officer in charge of the boat was to blame for not trying to tack before, Mr Henry Bath, chief officer of coastguard stationed at Mount Batten, was called, and said that he had been connected with the navy and the coastguard for thirty years. He saw the boat go ashore, and thought the officer was justified in doing as he had done. If he had been in charge of the boat he would have worked it in the same manner. The Court having been cleared, the Jury after some discussion brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 January 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide At Barnstaple. - An Inquiry was held at the Ship Inn, Barnstaple, yesterday, before Mr R. I, Bencraft, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of WALTER PALMER, landlord of the Ship Inn, public-house. JANE PALMER, wife of the deceased, deposed that for the past three months her husband had been unwell and in very low spirits, which she attributed to his having sustained heavy losses in connection with a vessel that belonged to him. Deceased had not been drinking much lately, and had not been intoxicated the last three months. On Wednesday morning he got down early and lit the fire. When witness got up she did not see deceased, and on calling him and not receiving an answer she ran across the street for Mr Bater, a neighbour, who on proceeding to a loft in the court behind, found deceased with his throat cut. He was put to bed, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, called in. Deceased lingered on in a delirious state until Thursday evening when he died. - Mr Alfred Bater corroborated this statement, adding that the deceased said he had cut his throat because he would not go to the asylum. There was a razor on the wall near where deceased was found. - Mr M Cooke, surgeon, said he found deceased in bed with a jagged wound across his throat about four inches long. The windpipe was cut. Witness saw deceased several times afterwards. He was delirious throughout, and died on Thursday evening. Witness had no doubt that deceased was of unsound mind when he inflicted the wound of which he died. - The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 January 1869
PLYMOUTH - Suspicious Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Summerland Inn, Plymouth, on Saturday afternoon before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of ALBERT BASSETT, a child. The Coroner considered the case to be surrounded with suspicious circumstances and summoned a double Jury, and ordered a post mortem examination of the body of the child. - James Barter, registrar, St Andrew's Sub-district, said: MRS JANE KITT, the deceased's mother, called upon him after the deceased was six weeks old, in the month of September, to have the child registered. He told her to go to Mr Pridham. he told her, as she was a poor woman, he would relieve her of five shillings of the seven and sixpence required, and she promised to call and pay the other half-crown and register the child. She again promised the same thing subsequently. On the 15th of the present month, when the child was six months old, the woman KITT called at his office, when he complained of the trouble she had given. She said there was an uncertainty as to the name in which the child should be registered - whether in the name of KITT or BASSETT. It was a child by her late husband BASSETT, and she wished it to be registered in the name of KITT. The witness told her that the only way he could register it was in the name of BASSETT, the father. He expressed his surprise at the woman wishing the child to be registered in the name of her present husband. He remarked that there must be some object for that, and she said, "The reason is this: My husband is an Odd fellow, and if the child is registered in the name of KITT and dies I shall be entitled to £3. I shall not get it if it is not registered in the name of KITT." He said he had nothing to do with clubs or Oddfellows, and asked her if the child was ill or dying, and she said it had not been ill. Up to this time he did not know that the child had been born after the second marriage. He accompanied her to Mr Pridham, and the child was registered in the name of BASSETT. On the 22nd, a week afterwards, an old woman named Elizabeth Bird brought to him the medical certificate of the death, and he registered the death. About two hours afterwards MRS KITT and Mrs bird came into his office, when MRS KITT, who was much displeased with something, said holding up the certificate of death - "I can't get the money with this; you must put the child's name KITT." He said, "What money?" She replied, "My husband has been paying to the widows' and orphans' fund, and I ought to have the money. You must make the name KITT." He, of course, refused to do that. On being questioned by MRS KITT, the witness said he did not tell her the child could be registered free after six months; the law would not allow that. - In answer to the Coroner, MRS KITT said she did not wish to be examined, as she could not "answer for herself." - Mrs Bird said she lived in the same house with MRS KITT, at 14 Henry-street; the deceased was a weak child, and about noon on the 21st instant it was taken very ill. In the evening it was taken to Mr Pearse, as it was worse. MRS KITT gave it a powder, which she said had been given to her by Dr Pearse, and about ten or eleven o'clock the mother and child went to bed. The child died about four o'clock in the morning, having had a second powder, in witness's arms. When she took the certificate to MRS KITT from Mr Barter she remarked that the name of neither the father nor mother was upon the paper. When she and MRS KITT went to Mr Barter he said it would be an imposition for her to get the club money. Mr Barter spoke in an uncivil way, and said something about her getting married three weeks after the death of her former husband. No mother could treat a child better than MRS KITT did. - Elizabeth Harding, a married woman, living in the same house, who was in the room when the child died, said she heard MRS KITT say that a Jury was going to inquire into the cause of death., and that it was all done through spite. - Mr Wm. Pearse, M.R.C.S., said he saw the child and found it in excessive fever. There was no sickness, but he concluded that the child would not recover. He gave the mother four powders. He was not surprised to hear of the child's death the next day. He granted a certificate of death from bronchitis. By direction of the Coroner he made a post mortem examination, and had analysed the contents of the stomach. He believed the child died from exhaustion, consequent on a rapid accession of fever combined with bronchitis, in fact, from Natural Causes. - The Jury returned a verdict accordingly, at the same time expressing thanks to Mr Barter for bringing the matter forward.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 February 1869
TOTNES - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN HONEYWILL, Jun., late of Totnes, was held yesterday before Mr Coroner Michelmore. It seemed that the deceased, in company with other men, was engaged in shunting a truck at the Littlehampton Quarry, and he got between the waggon and the wall and the other men happening to shunt at the time, he was very severely crushed. A labourer, named Buckingham, said that seeing there was not room for the deceased to pass between the waggon and the wall, he called out to him to come back, but HONEYWILL did not heed his warning. Witness then motioned the other men to stop shunting, and when they did so, the deceased fell forward and was taken home, and died from the injuries he had sustained. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 February 1869
BRIXHAM - The Coroner's Inquiry concerning the death of SAMUEL HALL, of Brixham, was held last evening. The brother of the deceased said that the latter told him after the accident that no one was to blame in the matter. Mr Barter, junr., said that the stage from which the deceased fell was secured in the customary manner; but owing to HALL swaying the stage, a nail was broken, and this was the cause of the accident. The evidence of Mr Pain, surgeon, shewed that death was caused by internal haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 February 1869
BARNSTAPLE - A painfully sudden death occurred at Barnstaple, the facts being elicited at an Inquest held by Mr R. B. Bencraft, Coroner, on Saturday. On Friday HANCOCK SMITH, for many years in the employ of Mr c. S. Smith, ironfounder, had complained of feeling unwell, and went into a public-house next door to his residence, in the evening, and there partook of nine pennyworth of brandy. He went home quite sober, had supper and went to bed about midnight. About twenty minutes afterwards his wife heard a gurgling noise, and asked the deceased what was the matter? She received no reply, and on getting a light found her husband with his face downwards and blood issuing from his mouth. Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed to having been called in to see SMITH, who was dead when he arrived from the bursting of a blood vessel in the chest. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 February 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, concerning the death of FANNY HEYBEARD, aged 22 years, who resided with her parents at 16, Essex-street, Plymouth. For some time past the deceased has been subject to epileptic fits, and for several months had been under the care of Mr Graham, surgeon. On Sunday morning the deceased partook of repast with the other members of the family and afterwards retired to an adjoining room to read. Later in the afternoon the deceased's sister-in-law went into the room to call the deceased, when she saw her reclining on a chair near the window quite dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 March 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - FRANCIS HOSKINS, a carpenter living at Stonehouse, 48 years of age, while at work at a building near the Laira Embankment, apparently in good health, suddenly fell down dead. Doctor Isbell at the Coroner's Inquest gave the result of a post mortem examination, expressing his belief that he died from the rupture of a blood vessel and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 March 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham Yard. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Royal Albert Hotel, Devonport, by Mr Allan B. Bone, coroner, concerning the death of JOHN EDWARD TRUSCOTT, a boy fifteen years of age, who was accidentally killed on board the gunboat Growler on the previous day. - William Hammond Cross, one of the crew, stated that there was a large number of labourers on board the ship in Keyham dock, engaged in lowering the steam funnel, when he suddenly heard one of the men call out, "Stop lowering." The deceased, a shipwright apprentice, was then standing close by him on the deck, merely looking on, as he had nothing to do with the other men, who were working. Shortly after witness saw the end of the rope give way from the block, and the funnel fell down to the deck on the deceased's stomach. - Thomas Bouldan, boiler maker, stated that on Tuesday afternoon he proceeded to lower the steam funnel, and having seen everything secure, he with the help of the labourers, got a rope attached to the foremast. A block was then fastened to it, and hooked into two chains, which kept the funnel in its proper position. He then ordered the funnel to be lowered, and to stop when within seven feet from off the deck, so as to enable the men to get a box ready to receive the end of the funnel. The deceased was sitting a short distance from the funnel on another box at the time. - Samuel White, a labourer, stated that whilst working at the funnel with the rest of the men, he distinctly heard the last witness call out, "Stop lowering," which was done, and might have been heard by anyone who was on deck. - William Jeffery, leading man of labourers, stated that it was usual for him to be present and superintend the work when a heavy funnel required lowering. The labourers occasionally lowered light funnels without his superintendence. The funnel in question did not exceed thirty hundred-weight, and was not of such weight as to make it irregular for it to be lowered without his supervision. He had heard the witness, White, describe the manner in which the funnel had been lowered, and there seemed to have been no reason to suppose that it was not secure previous to its giving way. The Jury, of whom Mr Holman was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 March 1869
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Millbay. Censure By A Coroner's Jury. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of EDMUND BULLOCK, aged 60 years. It seemed from the evidence that on Sunday evening the deceased called at a house in Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, to see his son, CAPTAIN BULLOCK, but finding that he was out he immediately left for the Millbay docks in search of him. Nothing more was seen of the deceased until early on Monday morning, when he was found by a quarryman named John Snell in Gill's Quarries, Plymouth, lying on his back on the ground apparently quite dead. Assistance was procured, and he was immediately conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where life was found to be extinct. It appeared that the deceased had most likely gone over the hill along the edge of the quarries near Gill's Cottages, where there is no lamp for some distance, and left the main road, which was about fifteen or twenty feet from the edge of the quarries, and fell into the quarries, a distance of forty feet. - Mr Hilson, manager of the quarries, stated that at the place where the deceased must have fallen there was fourteen or fifteen feet from the road a horizontal ledge of rocks projecting over the quarries. - The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Coroner remarking that the Jury desired him to read the following remarks:- "That it should be pointed out to the owners of the West Hoe Quarries that the spot where the deceased fell and was killed ought not to have been left in such an unprotected condition. The Jury urge that sufficient wall or fence shall be erected for the purpose of preventing the occurrence of another such frightful accident."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 March 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cambridge Inn, Plymouth, concerning the death of ELIZABETH TREMILLS, 74 years of age, who died suddenly on Sunday afternoon at her residence in Cambridge-street. The immediate cause of death was, according to Dr Square, disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Keyham. - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday, before Mr A. B. Bone, concerning the death of NATHANIEL MAY, a shipwright, who was killed whilst at work in Keyham yard, at half-past ten that morning. Deceased was, with several other shipwrights engaged on board her Majesty's ship Valerous, lying at No. 2 dock for the purpose of being repaired and having defects made good, and had received instructions to unbolt the Blake slip and examine the watering. The first part of his order he had executed, and then stepped on the second port sill on the starboard bow, and pulled the shifting rail towards him. He had just succeeded in getting this rail out of its socket, when, apparently by overbalancing himself, he was precipitated into the dock, falling a distance of about 34 feet, and pitching on his head. He was immediately conveyed to the surgery, but died before he reached it. Some of the witnesses examined at the Inquest considered that the deceased, who is about 36 years of age, and who it is stated leaves a widow and five children, was guilty of great imprudence in attempting to take the shifting rail out of its place, as he had received no instructions to do it, and as there was no staging outside the port. It was also stated that it was customary for two men to perform this duty. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 March 1869
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was yesterday held at Tavistock, before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on the body of a child named RICHARD THOMAS, about four and a half years of age, who received a fatal injury from the kick of a horse belonging to Mr Battams, of Kilworthy, a short time since.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 March 1869
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Crosse, at the Ship Inn, St. Thomas's, Exeter, on the body of THOMAS HARFORD, who fell down and expired in Alphington-street, on Monday morning. Deceased was a seaman, but owing to illness had not been at work for the past three months until that morning. When he was returning home he felt unwell. Death was attributed to disease of the heart.

BERRY POMEROY - An inquest was held last evening at the Exeter Inn, Bridgetown, before Mr Henry Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of the man found in the River Dart the previous day. A witness, named Luxton, a shoemaker of Totnes, said the deceased called at his shop on Tuesday, and asked for work. He gave his name as Williams, and that he had left his wife and child at Bristol. - John Full, the young man who first saw the deceased in the water, stated that he saw the deceased struggling in the water. - John Daw saw the deceased walking out the Exeter road about three o'clock in the afternoon, about half an hour before he was called by Full. He found a bag of tools on the bank. Had heard a man say that the deceased told him that his name was Frederick Wallis, and that he had friends living at Dockwall Buildings, Devonport. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 March 1869
BERRY POMEROY - On Thursday an uncle and sister-in-law of the man who was found drowned in the river Dart on Tuesday last came from Devonport to identify the body. It had been interred before they arrived; but the shoemaker's tools which were found on the bank of the river they recognised as being the property of their relative. They stated that he had not been to Bristol, as deceased told the witness Luxton, neither was he married. The name he gave of Frederick Wallis was likewise incorrect and was his brother's, his real name being JOHN WILLIAMS WALLIS. About nine months ago deceased's father left his home at Devonport in a similar manner, and committed suicide at Liskeard.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 March 1869
BLACKAWTON - An Inquest was held at Blackawton on Thursday by Mr Henry Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of MR A. P. LAMBLE, who committed suicide the previous day by cutting his throat. The deceased was a churchwarder, and had been during the day busily engaged in preparing his books and papers for the vestry meeting the next day. At three o'clock he had been supplied with a glass of whisky and water by Miss Ashford, a relative, who had been tending him for some time, and on her going to him again at four o'clock she found he had cut his throat and was quite dead. Deceased was a native of Blackawton where he was collector of taxes and highly respected. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. It is stated that the father and grandfather of the deceased also committed suicide.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 April 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Fatality At Devonport Dockyard. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Naval Hotel, Devonport, by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of JAMES TABB, a labourer, aged 39 years. Early yesterday morning the deceased was employed by himself at work on a stage on the starboard side of her Majesty's ship Britannia, now lying in dock undergoing extensive repairs, the stage being supported in an horizontal position by ropes, two at the outer end and one close to the ship's side near the stern. About ten o'clock orders were given to cast off the stage ropes around the stern. A labourer, named Robert Bell, was on the poop of the vessel by this time, and he also received orders from the two leading men, Bone and Antony, to go over to where the deceased was working, and lower away a spar which was hanging over the stern walk or gallery, in the meantime giving him instructions as to which rope he was to lower. The deceased was then at work outside the ship, and by this means Bell was unable to see him. All the three ropes were then in one ring, very close together, and it is customary in such cases in the service to cut a rope away if the man is unable to slip it off or lower it. Bell, it appears, took the latter course, as he could not unfasten the rope, and, mistaking one rope for another, cut the one which supported one end of the stage on which TABB was at work, and precipitated him down to the bottom of the dock, a distance of sixty feet. Assistance was procured, and the man was immediately picked up and conveyed to the surgery in the Dockyard, when it was discovered that life was extinct. - Mr bone, the Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said that any man who had been instrumental in the death of another by means of gross negligence was by law guilty of "manslaughter." Of course they had to consider the circumstances of the case, and whether they thought that Bell had wilfully or negligently cut the rope. If it was an error in judgment, and that it was, it would be only a slight degree of negligence, and not gross negligence, then their verdict would be "Accidental Death." The Jury having retired for a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 9 April 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - Melancholy Suicide Of A Lieutenant In The Navy. - An Inquiry as to the cause of the death of HORATIO AUSTIN, son of the late ADMIRAL AUSTIN, 31 years of age, who held a commission as lieutenant on board H.M. Indus, lying in Hamoaze, was held at the Queen's Arms Inn, Stonehouse, yesterday, by Mr A. B. Bone. After viewing the body of the deceased, the following evidence was given, and shewed conclusively that at the time of the suicide the deceased was suffering from delirium tremens. - The first witness called was Thomas Alexander O'Flaherty, M.D., and assistant-surgeon in the navy, at present resident in the Royal Naval Hospital, at Stonehouse, who said that about eleven o'clock on the preceding morning he, with other medical men, examined the deceased, who had just been brought in, and saw that he was suffering from great nervous excitement, but quite clear from delusion. He answered questions coherently when his attention was fixed; but when his attention was not fixed his conversation was rambling. Witness accompanied him to his ward, and the deceased asked if he would be tried by court-martial, for if so he "would be done for." It would be "hard lines" to be tried after having been so many years in the service. Some personal effects of the deceased were brought in, and amongst them was a case of razors, which witness had removed. When witness saw the deceased an hour after, he was quietly lying in bed, but was labouring under delusions. Witness saw the deceased again about half-past three o'clock, and at that time the delusions were increasing. About three quarters of an hour afterwards he was called to the ward again and saw the deceased lying on the bed insensible. Drs. Bernard, and Davidson and witness examined him, and found that he was suffering from severe concussion of the brain, and that his case was hopeless. - Susan Cole, nurse at the Naval Hospital, after detailing the circumstances attending the admission of the deceased into the hospital, went on to say that after the previous witness had left the deceased got out of bed and washed his hands, and subsequently read a book. This calmness did not last long, and the deceased talked incoherently, saying he should have "thirty days in chokey." About four o'clock he jumped out of bed, and said there were some men under his bed. He ran into the sitting-room of the ward, and said to Dr Sanderson that there were men under the table, caught up a poker, and refused to go into his own "cabin" again, as there were men there. Dr Sanderson said that he would go and see, but really went for assistance, as the deceased was getting worse. Soon after Dr Sanderson had left, the deceased went into an empty "cabin" and shoved the window up with the poker, got on a table under the window, and got the trunk of his body out of the window. Witness caught hold of his legs, held him as fast as she could and screamed loudly. The deceased struggled violently to get out of the window, and held fast by some woodwork outside. Witness held him by his drawers till they came to pieces, and the deceased got from her and fell out of the window to the ground. Witness was very frightened, and went downstairs. A few minutes after, the deceased was brought into his ward, and was then in a state of insensibility; he never recovered his consciousness, and died about 6.30 o'clock. - Mr O'Flaherty said that some hours before the death of the deceased he was suffering from delirium tremens. The distance the deceased fell was 20 feet. In answer to a question from the Jury, the witness said that at the time of the deceased's admission he thought a female nurse sufficient to look after him; but there were male nurses within call. - After hearing the summing up of the Coroner, the Jury found that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 April 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Early on Saturday morning, a naval pensioner, residing at Alexandra Cottage, Ford, near Devonport, named WILLIAM JOSIAH BURT, committed suicide by hanging himself in an outhouse, adjoining his premises. The deceased rose very early in the morning, and about half-past six o'clock was discovered by a neighbour named Amelia Warren, who had occasion to go near the outhouse, suspended by a rope to a beam. Assistance was immediately procured, and the deceased cut down, life however, being extinct. The only reason assigned for this rash act of self-destruction is, that about three months since the deceased came home from a foreign station in her Majesty's ship Constance, and missed obtaining a berth on board one of the ships in ordinary. Since that time, the deceased appeared to have lost all his usual cheerfulness. At the Inquest a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 April 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of RICHARD JONES, late seaman on board the schooner Susan and Anne. Some time since the ship was lying in Cattewater, and about two o'clock in the morning of the 22nd ultimo the master heard a splash, when it is supposed the deceased must have fallen overboard. Later in the morning drags were used, but the body was not picked up until Sunday afternoon last, when it was discovered floating, about thirty feet from the shore near Mount Batten, by a boatman named Thomas Line, who was at the time conveying some people in a boat from the Barbican. The body was in such a state of decomposition that it could not have been recognised, had it not been for the clothes. An Open Verdict was returned. The Jury considered that as far as the evidence went, there was no effort made to save the deceased at the time he went overboard, and that the master of the schooner Susan and Anne did not shew sufficient care in leaving behind him particulars respecting the deceased, and where his friends might be communicated with.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 April 1869
BRIXHAM - At an Inquiry held concerning the death of a seaman named GEORGE WOOD, by Mr Michelmore, at Brixham, yesterday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It seemed that the deceased was on board the Corsair, bound from Neath for Teignmouth, and when a short distance from the Start, the deceased ordered a sailor to furl the gaff sail. The man did not obey speedily, and WOOD went to assist him, and in climbing up the rigging missed his hold and fell on to a boat stowed on the deck. The injuries he sustained were so severe that death ensued.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devonport Guildhall before Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of WILLIAM GEORGE SMALL, a little boy, about two years of age, who resided with its parents at 41 Mount-street, Devonport. On the morning of the 23rd inst., the deceased left in a room by himself whilst his mother, REBECCA SMALL, went into the courtlage of her house. Shortly after the deceased was found sitting on the floor of the room near the fire-place with its bed-gown on fire. The deceased was seriously burnt about the body, and, notwithstanding aid, died on Saturday morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, on the body of a mason, named ROBERT BICKLE, aged 64 years. On Saturday afternoon the deceased was employed in repairing the roof of a house in Queen-street, when a plank which he was standing upon suddenly gave way. He fell to the footpath, and received such severe injuries about the head, as well as internally, that he died about five o'clock on Sunday evening at the hospital. One end of plank had been resting on a shute, whilst the other was fastened to a ladder; and it appeared that the weight of the deceased on the plank caused the shute to give way. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 May 1869
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held by Mr H. Michelmore, the Coroner, yesterday, at the Steam Packet Inn, Torquay, on the body of ELIZABETH STENTIFORD, whose sudden death on Friday night was noticed in Monday's Western Morning News. The husband of the deceased, the landlord of the Inn, and Mr Nind, surgeon, were examined. It appeared that she suddenly fell while engaged in her household work, and blood rushed from her mouth and nose, the result, it was believed, of a rupture of a blood vessel. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. The Jury fees were handed over to the Torbay Infirmary.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 May 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held last evening at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge Street, Plymouth, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of an old woman named SUSAN TURNER, aged 75 years, who resided at 85 Cambridge-street. The deceased of recent years had followed up the employment of general work within the last week. On Monday afternoon she was last seen out of her room, and in answer to a question from a woman who resided in the house named Elizabeth Burgoyne, she said she was very unwell. Nothing more was seen or heard of her until about six o'clock on Wednesday morning, when the deceased appearing to be moving about the room. Elizabeth Burgoyne, thinking something was the matter with the deceased as she had remained in bed since the previous Monday, entered the room late in the evening, in company with another neighbour. They then discovered her lying on the bed dead. Dr Dale said the deceased had been dead for twelve hours. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 May 1869
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest concerning the death of HENRY BAILEY, who was drowned by the upsetting of one of the boats belonging to H.M.S. Terrible in the Sound, on the 29th ult. The circumstances of the catastrophe will be fresh in the recollection of our readers. It was proved that whilst the three persons who were unfortunately drowned were struggling in the water a lugger came within 150 yards, but took no notice of them. Mr Brian, in summing up, said he believed there had been gross negligence on the part of the lugger's men, and he wished they could have been found out. After highly commending Little, the waterman, for rescuing the remainder of the boat's crew, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 May 1869
DAWLISH - A Woman Drowned At Dawlish. - Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at Edgecombe's Hotel, on the body of the woman who was washed on shore on Sunday morning. - Ann Hugo, the wife of a stonemason, at Plymouth, was the only person who could identify the body. Deceased was known by the name of "IRISH KITTY;" she slept with the deceased last Friday night at Exmouth. The last time she saw deceased alive was about three o'clock on Saturday afternoon, when she said she was going to Teignmouth. The verdict was "That the deceased was found in the sea, but how she came by her death there was no evidence to shew." it is believed by many that the unfortunate woman was swept away from the beach by the sea during her walk to Dawlish on Saturday night. This is a very dangerous walk for strangers in the dark, owing to the break in the eastern promenade. If this high walk was completed such an accident could not happen. The most dangerous part of the walk from the encroachment of the sea at high tide is just opposite the scene of the late railway accident. A stranger coming from the Exmouth end of the beach must pass the spot and in the dark would be very likely to walk into the water.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 May 1869
TORQUAY - Singular Suicide At Torquay. - Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening into the cause of death of ISABELLA GRAHAM, who was found dead on Monday, at Livermead, under strange circumstances. - Jane Rendell, a fellow lodger, stated that the deceased was a cook in the service of Mr Brown, but had left her place some weeks; was told by her that she was engaged to a young man in Hull, and that she had made the acquaintance of a young man named Marshall, in Torquay, who was desirous of marrying her, and that she was puzzled what to do. On Sunday afternoon she went out with Marshall, and returned at ten o'clock, apparently in her usual condition. At ten o'clock she went out again for some medicine, but never returned. - Mrs Stidworthy deposed to the deceased stating that she was engaged to these two young men, and that having left her situation some days, she did not like to go home. Her late master, at her request, wrote to Cranford and broke off the match, saying the deceased was about to be married in Torquay. Her manner was very strange; witness knew that she was not in the family way. Deceased and Marshall seemed to be very fond of each other. - John Aggus deposed to seeing the body of the deceased in the water on Monday, at eleven o'clock, in front of Livermead House, and he went and gave information to the police. - P.C. Grylls brought the body to shore, and took it to the Infirmary. - Police Sergeant Ockford deposed to finding the deceased's cloak and hat on a seat in some grounds some distance from where the body was found. - John Marshall, the whip to the Torquay Harriers, said he had been engaged to the deceased for fifteen months, but did not know that she was engaged to a party at Hull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 May 1869
FENITON - Alleged Murder At Fenniton, Near Ottery St. Mary. - Considerable excitement has existed in the neighbourhood of Ottery St. Mary since Friday last, in consequence of the death and the allegations concerning the cause thereof, of EDWARD PALFREY, a child five years of age, the son of WM. PALFREY, labourer, living at Tailwater, Tallaton, near Ottery. Mr S. M. Cox, Coroner, opened an Inquest on the body at the Railway Inn, Fenniton Station, on Friday last, which was adjourned to yesterday morning. In the meantime the father of the deceased had been charged before the magistrates sitting at Ottery on Tuesday with the "Wilful Murder" of his son. At the conclusion of the case the magistrates decided to commit WM. PALFREY to prison to take his trial at the next Assizes on the capital charge. It will be seen by the following evidence which was given yesterday before the Coroner, and which was almost identical with that given before the magistrates on the previous day, that the father had been charged with stealing some coals, and that the deceased child upon being questioned had told the person who had lost the coals that his father had stolen them, and in consequence of such information he had been accused, and had confessed to the theft, and restored a quantity of the coals. The theory advanced to shew a motive for such a crime as the father stands charged with is based upon the assumption that he was enraged at the discovery of his malpractices through the information given by his child, and smarting under the influence of its consequences he inflicted the injuries which caused the death. - Jno. Wright, farmer, of Tallaton, deposed that he saw the deceased in his yard at about six o'clock on Thursday evening last. Deceased's grandfather and brother were also there, and helped me to turn a colt into the orchard. Deceased then appeared to be quite well. Witness returned to the court again about eight o'clock, and going into the inner court observed the deceased in a crib behind the door. Witness awoke him with some difficulty, and told him he ought not to lie there and give his father and mother the trouble to look for him. He could not swear he made any answer, but thought he said they were not looking for him. He then got him out of the crib, and the boy held on to the side of it. Found his cap in the crib, and put it on his head. Deceased then fell to the ground. Witness told him if he liked to lie there till his mother came he could do so. Deceased looked very pale. The child's mother came shortly afterwards and took him towards my house, where she was working. I did not see the child afterwards. Was sure the colt did not kick him, he was not close enough. The prisoner, WILLIAM PALFREY, also works for me occasionally, and I saw him on the day in question about six o'clock. He had been to work with me, and then left me going round the pig-styes by the woodricks, and I did not see him afterwards. This was about 30 or 40 paces from the crib, in which I afterwards found the deceased. He made no complaint to me; he did make a kind of moaning noise when I tried to awake him, but he did not continue it after. I did not think he was ill, but that he had been drinking cider, and was the worse for it. - Ann Dyer Wright, wife of Mr J. Wright, said that PALFREY had worked for her husband several years in and out. His wages were 8s. per week and cider. His wife also occasionally helps. Witness heard a report about the coals, but never heard any blame laid to the child. PALFREY was working for her husband on Thursday last in the fields. The boy was about the premises; he seemed to be well. MRS PALFREY was engaged that morning in serving the pigs in one of the yards, but she could not see the crib in which the boy was found from the court where the pigs were. She asked witness if she had seen the child. Soon afterwards the mother brought in the child; witness saw him leaning against the settle; the mother said he was drunk. Heard the father also say the child was drunk, and that he would take him out and wash him. After going out to attend to the cows, witness returned to the house and found the father and child both gone. Prisoner was in the habit, during the absence of their regular man servant, who was serving in the militia, of coming in the evening to attend to the bullocks, for which he had his supper in the house. Whilst having his supper on this evening witness heard the mother of the deceased ask prisoner if he had seen "NED" (the deceased); he said no. - Barnabas Wright, son of the previous witnesses, saw the deceased boy up to half-past six, seemed perfectly well; had not observed him drinking during the day. Witness asked prisoner to accompany him, but he said he had to go somewhere. Whilst milking, which he did with his mother, prisoner came close by, and they walked together along the head of the court. PALFREY said he had a drop of cider left in his firkin, and he should drink it then. While he was drinking it prisoner's wife came out and asked him if he had seen NED, and he replied, "No." About twenty minutes past eight witness saw prisoner coming towards the lane gate, which leads to the orchard; saw him go down through the court, and towards the bridge. When witness returned, about half-hour later, PALFREY was in to supper. Prisoner's wife asked him if he had seen NED, and he said, "No." After supper saw the prisoner lead the child out of the room through the passage, and try him whether he could stand, but he could not. It was about ten yards from where witness saw the prisoner drink the cider to the crib where the child was found. - Chas. Searle said on Thursday night, the 13th inst., at half-past nine, he was in W. PALFREY'S house, where he lodges. WM. PALFREY brought the deceased child into the house over his left shoulder, and his body behind. WM. PALFREY had hold of one of the child's arms, the child's face was resting on the father's shoulders, and his belly on the father's back. He threw the child along the floor, not very hard; but he did not stoop very low to do it. The child began to groan, and lay groaning about quarter of an hour. On throwing him down the father said, "The child is drunk, get up, I'll knock you if you don't get up." I said, "Don't serve the child bad if he is drunk; correct him when he is sober." The father said he dipped the child in the brook twice. The mother of the child came in shortly after, and took the child upstairs. The others then went to bed, leaving PALFREY and wife. The PALFREYS all slept in one room. About one o'clock witness was awoke by MRS PALFREY calling, "Thompson and Searle, come out, my child is dead." He went into the room, and saw the child lying across the foot of the bed, under the bed-clothes in the place where he usually slept, but apparently dead. Prisoner was in bed, but said nothing. He got out of bed, and dressed himself upon his wife saying he had better go up to her father. Witness had not heard PALFREY or his wife say anything about it since. Witness explained that when he said the father kicked the deceased on throwing him down he meant that he kicked him slightly. He fell middling and heavy on the floor, which was of lime, but his feet touched the floor first. The child's clothes were damp, but witness thought he had not been totally under water. The prisoner, after he had touched the child, took him by the arm, and sat him up on the floor, but the child could not sit up. When his mother took him up he said, "Don't mother; let me lie." He groaned all the time after he was on the floor. He looked pale. Never knew the child take much cider. After the mother came in the prisoner said, "I'll hang the little b...... up." - John Thompson, brick maker, who also lodged with the prisoner, said that on Monday morning, the 10th, the deceased child told him and Mr Sprint, and Charles Searle that his father had taken coals from one of the tile sheds the Sunday before. He said that when the man brought the child in on Thursday last, he said, "I've got the drunken little heller," and then he jerked him off his shoulder on to the floor, holding him by one of the wrists. The boy did not appear to fall with any violence. The kick was more of a shove than anything else. After the child was set up by the father he fell down and knocked his head against the floor; it did not appear to be very hard. Prisoner said, "I gave him two duckings over in the shute as he was coming home, and kept him there until he began to sigh." When the mother came home she said to her husband that she hoped he had not been serving the child bad. Prisoner replied that he had given him two stripes, the marks of which would be seen on the morrow. The examination of this witness was a corroboration of the previous one. - William Street, foreman at the brick yard, said he had lost a lot of coals from the yard lately, and in consequence of something deceased said to him he charged prisoner with stealing the coal. Prisoner gave it up, and the next morning deceased told him his father knew what he had told witness. In consequence of prisoner's taking the coal he had to leave his house on Saturday last. - Mr Walter Edwards, surgeon, of Ottery St. Mary, said: On the 15th of May I made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, in which I was assisted by Dr Whitby. I found the child to be well nourished, apparently rather more than five years of age. On examining the body I found no external marks of violence, with the exception of a small bruise on the right arm. On examining the liver in situ I observed a laceration of its surface. On removing the liver I found an extensive laceration on the right lobe, going completely through it, and almost dividing it. The cause of death was the rupture of the liver and the haemorrhage that subsequently followed. A kick or a fall from some height might have caused the rupture, or a sharp blow in the side, which might not have left any mark externally. The rupture could not have arisen from natural causes. I do not think that the deceased being thrown on the floor, as described by the witnesses, would have caused the rupture, though a sudden twist would. The rupture might have caused a collapse, and would account for the deceased being in the state described by the witnesses. - Mr Charles William Whitby, M.D., who had assisted in the post mortem, gave corroborative evidence. - Thos. Fronde, police-sergeant, said on Friday morning between eight and nine, prisoner came to the police-station at Ottery, and said that his boy was found dead in his bed at one o'clock that morning by his wife. On Monday last prisoner said he wanted to send a message to his wife. he said he should like her to give evidence before the magistrates; she could prove that he did not see the child from half-past six till he was brought into the house by his mother. That he (prisoner) had been to Colistock to try to take a house, that he saw Mrs Tucker, but could not have the house; that Mrs Tucker could prove he was there. - The Coroner carefully read the evidence of each witness and exhorted the Jury to be guided by no proceedings that had taken place elsewhere, but to give a verdict in accordance with the evidence as presented to them. He reminded them that theirs was a separate tribunal, entirely distinct from that of the magistrates, and he begged them not to allow the course they had pursued on the one hand, or any feeling of regard for the prisoner on the other, to influence them. - The Jury, after an absence of a few minutes, returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased, EDWARD PALFREY, died from Rupture of the Liver, but as to how or by whom caused there was no evidence to shew." - The prisoner, who had attended the Inquest, abstained from putting any question to any witness, and was removed at the close of the Inquest to the County gaol, to take his trial on the Magistrates' commitment.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 May 1869
TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide Of A Gentleman At Teignmouth. - MR HODDER, who on Saturday week threw himself from a window on the third floor of a house in Higher Brook-street, Teignmouth, died on Saturday morning last of the injuries then received. In the evening an Inquest was held, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, at the Commercial Hotel, when it appeared that the deceased had been suffering from depression of spirits for some time past, and occasionally very violent, especially towards his wife, and towards a niece who was living with them. Latterly he had been a patient of Dr Magrath. The verdict of the Jury was "That the deceased died of injuries received by jumping from a window into the street, whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 May 1869
PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of MR WAY, dairyman, of King-street, Plymouth, was the subject of an Inquest last evening, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner. The deceased, who is 74 years of age, was, prior to his death, in a perfect state of health, and was in the act of following to the grave the remains of Mr Berry, a neighbour, when he was observed to become ill, and before the arrival of Dr Isbell he was quite dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 May 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - ISABELLA LEE, a child two years of age, has been burnt to death, at Devonport, owing to her having been left alone in Granby-street, and gone too near the fire. An Inquest was held yesterday; verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 May 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Woman At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Mr Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of RACHAEL HOUSE, 28 years of age, an inmate of the lock ward of the Royal Albert Hospital. Having shewn signs of mental derangement she was removed to a separate room, where she seemed quieter, but yesterday morning at two o'clock, just after the house surgeon had visited her, she jumped out of bed, ran to the window, twenty-seven feet from the ground, and threw herself out. The fall did not at once kill her, as she walked about screaming "Murder," but she died soon after she was taken into the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 June 1869
BIGBURY - The Alleged Child Murder At Bigbury. - The adjourned Inquiry into the cause of death of the illegitimate child of THIRZA SHILLABEER, was held yesterday by Mr A. B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, at Bigbury. Mr Windeatt, solicitor, of Totnes, appeared on behalf of the accused, SHILLABEER, and cleverly cross-examined the surgeon, Mr Langworthy, as to the cause of the death of the child, but no further evidence from this or any other witness was elicited against the prisoner. - The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, observed that there were two points for the Jury to consider - first, whether the child was born alive; and, second, what was the cause of death. As to the first the evidence of the doctor was substantially conclusive that the child was born alive, and the doctor had also stated that the child had died from suffocation. The only evidence of violence on the part of the mother was that she threw the child into the privy, and the Jury would have to say whether the child was alive at the time or not. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the child was born alive, and died from Suffocation; but what caused the suffocation there is no evidence to shew." - The accused is still retained in custody at Bigbury, and will be brought before the magistrates at Yealmpton on the charge of concealment of birth, but she will not be in a fit state to go before the magistrates for several days.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 June 1869
AXMINSTER - Burned To Death In A Pigstye. - A horrible death is reported from Devonshire. The deceased was JOHN CHUBB, aged 51, woodman, in the employ of Mr J. A. Knight, of Axminster. On Wednesday morning the pigstye at his house was found to be on fire. His wife, who had two children ill, tried to open the door of the stye, but the fastening was so hot that she had to take the tongs to do so. In the stye she found the charred remains of her husband. The body was scorched like a log of wood. Deceased had been intoxicated, and was a great smoker. It is supposed that whilst the man was smoking the stye had taken fire. At the Inquest the Jury brought in a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 June 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Drink claimed another victim at Devonport last week in the person of R. H. MARTIN, beerhouse keeper, of Stonehouse, who was found drowned or suffocated at Mutton Cove. It was elicited at the Inquest that at eleven o'clock the previous night the deceased, who was a married man, 38 years of age, with a wife and several children, was drinking at the Royal Exchange public-house, Pembroke-street, and when he left the premises he was in such a state as to be unable to take care of himself.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 June 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquiry was held at the Mill Bridge Inn, Stoke, yesterday, before Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, concerning the death of FLORENCE STEAR, an infant eight months old, who died from the effects of severe scalds received on the 24th of last month. According to the evidence of the deceased child's father and a sister ten years of age, the deceased was sitting on the lap of the latter before the fire when another sister, about six years of age, began to tickle both of them. Suddenly the deceased sprang off and fell on the floor, overturning a teapot full of boiling water, which was standing in front of the fire, and which falling upon her inflicted the injuries of which she died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 June 1869
PLYMOUTH - JANE LEE, wife of a Plymouth policeman, was found dead in bed yesterday morning. Deceased, who was 29 years of age, had some years ago had two paralytic seizures, and had recently been ailing. An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Brian, Coroner, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 June 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned by a Jury who assembled with Mr Bone, Coroner, last evening to Inquire concerning the death of WILLIAM MEDLAND, a waterman, 59 years of age, who, as mentioned yesterday, hanged himself in his bedroom, at Little Durnford Street, Stonehouse. It was proved that he had on various occasions suffered from delirium tremens, and that a recent promise extorted from him to abstain from drink had not been kept.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 June 1869
HIGHWEEK - A lad named LAKE, whose parents reside in Mill-lane, Newton Bushel, was accidentally drowned yesterday in the mill-leat by falling in the water, just above the Newton Mills. An Inquest was held in the evening at the Townhall, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 June 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner, having received communications stating that one ROBERT PHILLIPS, a porter at the Albion Inn, Southside-street, had died from the effects of violence, held an Inquest on Saturday. It was proved that the deceased, who was forty-eight years of age, received some injuries in a scuffle with some drunken men on Whit-Monday night at the door of the inn, and one of them, named Stanley, gave confused evidence, and another, Kendal, refused to be sworn. Medical testimony, however, was conclusive that the deceased died of inflammation of the lungs, the result of natural disease. The deceased was an intemperate man.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 June 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cambridge Inn, Plymouth, before Mr T. C. Brian, concerning the death of JEMIMA PETERS, 59 years of age. Deceased's son stated that he last saw her alive on Saturday morning between six and seven. She was then in bed, and appeared to be in her usual health. A little boy about seven years of age was in the same bed. - Elizabeth Daniels said that about twenty minutes to one she was called by the little boy, and on going into the deceased's room she found her lying on the floor dressed, with the exception of her shoes and stockings, and foaming at the mouth. She was sensible, but speechless and almost immediately after being laid upon the bed she died. Deceased, who was in receipt of 2s. 6d. per week from the Board of Guardians, has had two seizures before, and it was thought that death was accelerated by want of food. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest last evening on the body of a child named NORAH MCCARTHY, who while at play on Saturday evening, at the bottom of Cecil-street, was knocked down and killed on the spot. Evidence was given to shew that the horse was not being driven furiously at the time, and that the driver, who was perfectly sober, pulled up immediately. The Jury, therefore, acquitted Alexander Ash, the driver, from all blame, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH - A Naval Cadet Killed On Board H.M.S. Britannia. - The first fatal accident that has occurred on board H.M.S. Britannia since she has been the cadets' training-ship at Dartmouth, took place yesterday, when ARTHUR C. SHERRARD, a naval cadet, fell from the fore-top and was killed. The deceased with several others was in the fore-top on duty, when he slipped, and fell head foremost on to the deck. He was immediately picked up by two of the crew, and carried to the sick bay, where Mr Caldwell, the ship's surgeon, was quickly in attendance. The unfortunate youth, however, was beyond the reach of surgical skill, being profoundly insensible, his skull badly fractured, and the brain protruding. He died in about ten minutes. The accident occurred about 8 o'clock yesterday morning, and in the evening an Inquest was held at the sick quarters, Dartmouth, before Mr J. M. Puddicombe, Coroner. Evidence was given by Lieut. Phillimore, Surgeon, Caldwell and Quartermaster Netting, and it being stated that the occurrence was purely accidental, a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 June 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, by Mr Allan B. Bone, concerning the death of WILLIAM SHAW, a private soldier of the 50th Regiment, about 24 years of age, who died from falling into the trench at Devonport. Deceased had on the previous evening disembarked from the troopship Himalaya. Between four and five he was seen sober, but at eleven rather the worse for liquor. Subsequently he left the barrack-room, and about two o'clock was seen lying in the trench dead. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 June 1869
BIDEFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Bideford, on the body of MOSES BAKER, maltster of Hartland Quay, who was on Monday night engaged in the rigging of the schooner Susannah, when he fell off and was killed on the spot. Deceased, who was much respected, leaves a widow and young family. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 June 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, concerning the death of WM. WARNE MITCHELL, a child seven years of age. The father of the deceased stated that he and the child were in a yacht moored about 40 fathoms from the Hoe, and whilst working the bow he suddenly missed his son, who a minute before was playing in the stern sheets. After searching the yacht he pulled around it, but could discover no traces of him until he got home, when he ascertained that the child was drowned. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 July 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Infant Put In A Water-Tank By His Father. - The infant child of the man BICKLE, who was recently committed for trial at the assizes by the Plymouth magistrates for attempting to murder it by throwing it into a tank of water, died on Thursday, and an Inquest was held on Saturday, at the Shaftesbury Institute. Prior to the opening of the Inquiry, the Coroner (Mr Brian) mentioned that the father was committed by the magistrates a few weeks since, and was then in the borough prison. But as the present Inquiry would be as to the death of the little child having been thrown into the tank, he thought it was only Englishlike, fair and proper, towards the father that he should be present before them on the Inquiry. (Hear, hear). He was told by Mr Superintendent Thomas that application must be made to the governor of the prison (Mr Simm), and he had written that gentleman, asking the father to be present, "as it is obvious that he must be seriously and personally interested in the result of the Inquiry." He received a reply from the governor that he had no authority for allowing the prisoner to be present, and that in the absence of a writ of habeas corpus he should not feel justified in complying with the request. In the course he (Mr Brian) had pursued he was only following in the steps his honoured predecessor - (hear, hear) - and he should not, if the result of the inquiry shewed it to be necessary, make an application to the Secretary of State for the Home Department to get the prisoner brought before them. Evidence was then taken that BICKLE had put the child into the tank when intoxicated, and had used threatening language towards it. - The medical testimony of Mr Harper, however, went to shew that the child had died from convulsions consequent on teething and that putting the child in the tank had nothing to do with its death. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

DARTMOUTH - The body of a woman named WALK, aged 78, the wife of JOHN WALK, labourer, was picked up in Dartmouth harbour on Saturday. At a Coroner's Inquest held the same evening, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 July 1869
BARNSTAPLE - The evidence at the Inquest concerning the death of MR JOHN BATE, ex-Mayor of Bristol, who was shot at his residence, Whitefield Barton, near Barnstaple, last Friday, shewed that the deceased must have been in the act of loading one barrel of his gun when the charge of the other barrel went off and passed through his heart.

YEALMPTON - A fatal accident happened on Saturday evening to a young man named JAMES SCOBBLE, while returning in a spring cart with two other persons from Plymouth to Kingston, near Modbury. The horse, a young one, shied at something in the road, and the deceased jumped out to stop the horse, when one of his feet became entangled in the reins, and he fell on his head. He was picked up immediately, and taken to a surgeon, but death shortly ensued. At the Inquest held yesterday at Yealmpton before Mr A. B. Bone, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 July 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - The body of THOMAS SOBEY, three years old, son of a waterman of 22 Dockwall, Devonport, was found on Tuesday evening in a well in the courtlage of the house, and the Inquiry into the circumstances yesterday by Mr Bone, the Coroner, resulted in a verdict of "Found Dead." It was stated that the well, which was about 18 inches square, and 4 ½ feet deep, was not covered over, and was a stagnant pool. The water was stinking, and the Coroner's officer, Schubert, who smelt and tasted it, was sick. It was further elicited that there were 24 persons, including children, in the house, and that no other water was brought to the house, but that the well was common to all. The owner of the house, Underhill, a shipwright in the dockyard, said offal and foul things had been thrown into the well, which was supplied by town water, and promised to have a tap forthwith, the Coroner observing that he should tell the sanitary inspector of the circumstances.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 July 1869
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter on the body of JOHN COTTERY, hawker, who it appeared had died from the effects of taking "Burnett's disinfecting Fluid." The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 July 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest yesterday concerning the death of CHARLOTTE MARY DAVEY, a child two years and three months old. About five o'clock on Friday afternoon the deceased was with her two sisters, aged eight and four respectively on the lawn at the back of King-street, Plymouth, and were turning the corner of a building which is being erected and was seen by a witness, named Mary Matthews, to fall into a pit containing a quantity of liquid lime. On Matthews running to the spot she found the child with her head under the surface of the lime, and two other children endeavouring to get her out. The deceased was taken home and medical assistance sent for, but after lingering until Sunday morning she died from the effects of the injuries she had received, being severely burned and having swallowed a quantity of the lime. Matthews stated that she had seen another child fall into the same pit the day before the accident occurred, and in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death", the Jury recommended that places of this description should be fenced.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on the body of SARAH HARRIET NORTHCOTT PELLOW [?] months old, who was found by her mother dead in her arms. The evidence went to prove that the deceased died from convulsions, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 July 1869
STOKE CANON - JAMES MOLLAND, 17 years of age, was drowned while bathing in the river Culm, near Stoke Canon, on Sunday. A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased could swim, but overtaxed his strength.

BARNSTAPLE - A Bather Drowned At Barnstaple. - The Barnstaple Borough Coroner yesterday held an Inquest concerning the death of THOMAS DUNN, aged seventeen years, who resided at Lake, about a mile from the town, and on Sunday afternoon, in company with a young man named Harvey went to bathe in the river Taw. Deceased could not swim, but he floated about for some time with the aid of corks tied together by a string. Suddenly, while still in deep water, he called out that the string had broken, and before his companion could swim to him he sank. The cord was still entangled round his body and by drawing this Harvey raised DUNN to the surface, and drew him towards the shore. But the cord slipped, and the poor fellow fell back into deep water, and his body could not be found for two hours. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressed a hope that the occurrence would prove a warning to bathers who could not swim not to go beyond their depth.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 July 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At A Picnic Party. - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Newton concerning the death of RICHARD SKINNER, a plasterer, who received fatal injuries while proceeding on Monday with a large party, consisting chiefly of the congregation of the Baptist Chapel, to Watcombe. He and others got out of one of the vehicles to relieve the horses while going up a hill near Cadwell House on the Torquay Road, and in attempting to get up again without stopping the horses, fell, and the wheels passing over his chest he received injuries from which he died on Thursday.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 July 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at Newton by Mr Michelmore, Coroner, concerning the death of CAROLINE BESSIE PUDDICOMBE, aged five weeks, an illegitimate child, who was found dead in bed on Saturday morning. According to the evidence the child, with the exception of a shortness of breath, was healthy. She was put to bed on Friday night, and soon afterwards the mother and a young woman named Cross lay down in the same bed. The child cried several times during the night, the last time at about four o'clock. At seven o'clock the child was found to be dead. Surgical assistance was immediately sent for. Dr Drake promptly attended, and afterwards made a post mortem examination, and found the lungs in a very congested state and full of frothy mucous. He considered from the state of the lungs that deceased had not sufficient air lying between two women, though if the lungs had been healthy no evil effects would have occurred. Its body was well nourished, and the stomach was perfectly healthy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 July 1869
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In The Plymouth Citadel. - JAMES MITCHELL, a gunner, of No. 1 Battery, Coast Brigade of the Royal Artillery, committed suicide by shooting himself in the Plymouth Citadel yesterday morning. He reported himself sick early in the morning to Patrick MacLachlin, who went to the hospital orderly at his request, and had been absent about five minutes, when he heard the report of a gun. He went back and found the deceased lying on the floor by the side of the bed with a musket in his hand, and apparently quite dead. The ball from the gun had passed through his head, causing instant death. The deceased had been very desponding the previous day, and assigned as a reason, that, from something he had heard, he was afraid that he should not be able to get his pension. He formerly served thirteen years in the Marines, and had been about two years in the Artillery. At the Inquest a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 July 1869
PLYMSTOCK - The Suicide Of A Marine In The Sound. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Bone, County Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM RYALL, private in the Royal Marines, who recently committed suicide by jumping overboard from the steamer Fairy, in Plymouth Sound. The body, which was found by a woman high and dry on the shore, near the coastguard station, at Bovisand, was in a frightfully decomposed condition, so that it was impossible to identify it. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased jumped overboard whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." We understand the body will not be brought back to Plymouth to be interred, nor will a firing party be sent to attend the burial in the parish where the body was recovered.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 August 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Murder Of A Non-Commissioned Officer At Devonport. - CORPORAL ARTHUR SKULLIN, of the 57th Regiment, now stationed in Raglan Barracks, Devonport, was on Saturday morning shot dead by William Taylor, a private soldier in the same corps. On Saturday morning the accused, a very fine man, about twenty-two years of age, was brought up at the Devonport Guildhall, before the Mayor (Dr Rolston), Colonel Brown, Messrs. C. Row. J. L. Cutcliffe, J. May, A. Norman, and R. J. Laity, magistrates, charged with the Wilful Murder of SKULLIN. Sufficient evidence was given to justify a remand until today. - On Saturday afternoon Mr A. Bone, the Borough Coroner met a Jury at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, where the latter was sworn, after which they proceeded to the dead-house at the Military Hospital, to view the body of the deceased which presented a fearful spectacle, a great part of the head being shot away. The Coroner and Jury then adjourned to the Devonport Guildhall, where evidence was taken. Mr John Beer appeared to watch the case on behalf of the War Department; prisoner was present in the charge of Inspector Bryant. It appeared that from the evidence that about half-past six on Saturday morning Taylor and two other soldiers "fell in" on the Barrack-square for defaulters' drill. The whole of these men were ordered by the deceased corporal to "fall out," and shew their knapsacks, it being a regulation in the army for all men who are undergoing defaulters' drill to appear on parade with the whole of their kits in their knapsacks. There was some portion of clothes in two of the men's knapsacks, but Taylor's was entirely empty. This was reported by SKULLIN to Sergeant Bailey, and he informed the sergeant-major of the circumstance. Presently Bailey said that Taylor had better be sent to the guard-room for disobeying orders, but SKULLIN said he would report his conduct to the adjutant of the regiment. Taylor said "he was for guard that day, and he had borrowed a knapsack to appear on parade with". SKULLIN desired him to proceed to his barrack-room and put on his own knapsack, and added that he had better take his rifle - a Snider breech-loader - with him. Taylor took up his rifle and went away to his room, but previous to his doing so his rifle and ammunition - 20 rounds of ball cartridge - had been examined by Sergeant Bailey, this being another regulation with regard to defaulters. Taylor was absent from the square for a few minutes, and when he returned he and the two other defaulters were drilled by SKULLIN. This continued until 7.30, when they were dismissed, and the deceased walked away towards his room. Taylor followed about seven paces behind him, and when they had proceeded about twenty yards the accused halted. He brought his rifle, which had been at the trail, up to the "present" at the shoulder, and before anyone could prevent him he fired at SKULLIN, who instantly fell to the ground. Lance-Corporal Burns and Drummer Walsh, both of the 57th Regiment, who were on the square and had seen Taylor fire, instantly ran and seized him, and after taking away his rifle and bayonet, marched him to the guard-room, where he was given into the custody of Sergeant Green. He was put in a cell, and Green said to him, "What made you do this?" Prisoner said, "It will end my life, and that is what I want; you don't know everything; I have a wife and child, and have behaved very badly to them." In the meantime Mr Poppelwell, the surgeon of the regiment, had been sent for, and on arrival he examined the deceased. He was dead, and there were two large wounds in his head; one behind the left ear, and the other under the left eye. The wounds were such as would be caused by a rifle bullet which was fired at a short distance. The whole of the bones on the left side of the head and face were smashed, and the brain was protruding. Death, said Mr Poppelwell, must have been instantaneous. - P.C. Shubert took accused into custody. He charged him with the murder of SKULLIN, and he replied, "Yes." He was then taken to the station-house, and on their way there, he said to Shubert - "It is curious what things come into a man's mind. He was the drill corporal, and he was annoying me the whole morning. I had seven days to barracks. I had not my kit in my knapsack, and he took my name down to report me. It must have been the devil that tempted me." When prisoner was taken into custody his ammunition was examined, and it was found that one cartridge was missing. - Sergeant Green said, in answer to a question from a Juror, that he had known Taylor for two years, and that he bore a good character in the regiment; at this time he had a good conduct badge. - The Coroner remarked to the Jury that the case appeared to him to be as plain as it was melancholy. A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was instantly returned against Taylor. He will be examined before the magistrates at three o'clock today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 August 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner last evening held Inquests concerning the deaths of DAVID JONES, captain of the Welsh schooner Annie Waring, lying in Catwater, who was found dead in his berth yesterday, and on a lunatic youth, who had been dumb from birth, an inmate of the Plymouth Workhouse, who was seized with a fit yesterday and died immediately.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 August 1869
DORSET - A frightful and fatal railway accident, hitherto unreported, occurred last week at Axefarm, just within the County of Dorset. MR LOVERIDGE, landlord of an inn at Axminster, while on his way to join a fishing party, climbed the railway embankment, and was about to cross the line when an express train rushed by going at 45 miles an hour, and striking the deceased knocked him down upon the rails and shattered his body into many fragments. The deceased was 51 years of age, was quite sober, and when he went out said he hoped he should bring home a good basket of fish. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 August 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suspected Child Murder At Mutley. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the County Police-station, Stonehouse, by Mr A. B. Bone, on the fragments of the body of the male infant found in the coal cellar and the ashpit of Mr W. D. Shilson, of Ford Park. The circumstances under which the remains were found, and the confession of SKELLEY, Mr Shilson's cook, to a fellow-servant, that she had given birth to the child and cut it up to conceal it, were detailed, as stated yesterday Mr Square, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the pieces, stated that they were those of a full-grown male infant. The skull had been crushed, and the remainder of the parts severed by some sharp instrument. The fragments of lung that remained floated in water; and a piece that was attached to the heart had sufficient buoyancy to float it also. As the lungs were not in the lest decomposed this was evidence that the child had breathed. He would not, however, say whether the child had been born alive or not, or whether it had died from natural causes or otherwise. The injuries to the head could not have been caused by a fall; but it was possible that the child might have died in birth. - The Jury took some time to consider their verdict, and at length found that there was evidence that the child had breathed, but none to shew whether it had an independent existence or not, or whether it had or had not died from natural causes. - The Coroner characterised this as a very merciful verdict

Western Morning News, Monday 16 August 1869
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, Barnstaple, on Saturday, before Mr J. Bencraft, Coroner, concerning the death of WILLIAM DAVIS, a farmer, 33 years of age, whose body was found in Cooney Gut, about two feet from the stream, on the soft mud, about four o'clock on the previous afternoon. Elizabeth German stated that she kept the Commercial Inn, in Boutport Street, and had known the deceased for several years. He came to her house on Thursday evening last between 8 and 9 o'clock, and remained there about an hour and a half, and left in company with Mr William Vagg. He drank three or four glasses of ale, but was perfectly sober when he left. Sergt. Songhurst, of the Borough Police, searched the body, and found deceased's watch in his pocket, it had stopped at half-past ten; also half a sovereign, and some silver and coppers. Mr Law, surgeon, found no marks of violence on the body and believed death was caused by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 August 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide Of A Stonehouse Tradesman. - JAMES EVANS COLLINS, a timber dealer, living at 8 Francis-street, Plymouth, yesterday committed suicide by hanging. In the morning the deceased took the key, which he had had the previous day from his son RALPH, who was in business with him, and proceeded to the yard at Windsor-place, Stonehouse, where, after locking the door on the inside, he hung himself to a beam which went across a stable in the corner of the yard. The son finding the place closed, and not being able to ascertain the whereabouts of his parent, gained admittance with another key, and after searching about, discovered his father hanging by a rope. Assistance was quickly to hand, and the deceased was cut down, but he was dead and cold. There were several articles found in his pockets, including a razor. The deceased was rather given to drink, and was not in the habit of attending a place of worship. At an Inquest held on the body in the afternoon, MISS B. COLLINS stated that her father had appeared in a very low state for the past week, and had complained of pain in the head. - In reply to Jurors, she said her father was discharged many years ago from the Victualling-yard, where he was a master mason. The deceased and his wife had been separated for 17 years. Her mother resided at Millbrook. - The Coroner (Mr A. B. Bone) asked the Jury to consider whether the act of the deceased was premeditated or whether it was done while he was of unsound mind. - The Court was cleared, and after a few minutes' consultation, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned last evening at the Inquest on the body of JAMES MACKINTOSH, who was found dead at Mr Merchant's Dining Rooms, Bedford-street, Plymouth, on Sunday evening.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 August 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatal Accident In The Sound. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner yesterday opened an Inquest concerning the death of JOHN P. NICHOLLS, a shoemaker's apprentice, son of a waterman, who was drowned in the Sound on Saturday week, and his body was found in the Hamoaze. The deceased was in a boat that was run down by the Waterford Company's steamer Vesta. It being desirable to procure attendance of witnesses from a distance, the case being a serious and important one, the only evidence taken was that of John Williams, who was in the boat run down, and the Inquest was adjourned until Saturday, the Coroner giving an order for the immediate interment of the body, which was greatly disfigured.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 August 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Recent Fatal Collision In Plymouth Sound. - The Inquest on the body of JOHN PHILLIP NICHOLLS, the boy who was drowned on the night of the 8th inst., by the Vesta, Waterford Steamboat, coming in collision with a small sailing-boat, in which he was fishing near the Asia buoy, in the Plymouth Sound, was resumed on Saturday afternoon. - The captain of the Vesta, Edmund Roach stated that his engines were slowed, stopped and reversed before the collision took place. The boat drifted down across his stern, otherwise she would have been run over. The men on the Vesta's forecastle had been shouting to the boat four or five minutes before the collision took place. - The chief officer of the Vesta, John Ryan, corroborated this statement. - Williams, the other boy, who was in the boat at the time of the accident, said he did not see the engines reversed, or hear any person hailing the boat. - After an Inquiry of four hours, the Inquest was adjourned until Wednesday for the attendance of the master of the Nimble, coastguard cruiser, Mr Surrey, that vessel lying at anchor near the spot on the night of the accident.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 August 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - Supposed Child Murder At Devonport. - At the Devonport Guildhall, yesterday, before Messrs. C. Row and J. W. Ryder, magistrates, a young woman named DINAH BENNETT was charged with the Wilful Murder of her newly-born male child. Inspector Evans gave evidence that he apprehended prisoner at an eating-house in Tavistock-street, Devonport, on the previous evening, and told her that he wished to ask her a few questions, which, however, she need not answer unless she liked to do so. He then asked her if she left a bundle at that house on the previous Saturday week, and she admitted that she did do so. He told her that the bundle contained the body of a newly-born male child, and prisoner replied, "Yes; it is mine. I put it there; I did not know what to do with it." - Mr Superintendent Lynn applied for a remand which was granted until Thursday. Immediately after the examination of the woman the adjourned Coroner's Inquest on the body of the child was resumed. Evidence was given by Mrs Rice, wife of the landlord of an eating house in Tavistock-street, that the woman BENNETT left a bundle in her house on the 14th instant, and that it was opened on the 23rd, in consequence of a very offensive smell proceeding from it, when the body of a child was found. The medical man was unable to say whether the child was born alive and the Jury returned a verdict that the child was Found Dead, but whether it was born alive or dead there was no evidence to show.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 August 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Recent Fatal Accident In The Sound. - The Inquest on the body of JOHN HENRY NICHOLLS, the boy who was drowned as the result of a collision between the Waterford steamer Vesta and a boat in which deceased and a boy named Williams were sailing on the night of August 8th, near the Asia Buoy, terminated yesterday with a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was proved to the satisfaction of the Jury that the steamer could not have run into the boat, which must have drifted against the steamer. The thanks of the Jury were tendered to Captain Surrey, of the Nimble Revenue Cutter, for his attempt to save the deceased, and they also wished it to be known that all boats were by law compelled to carry a light at night.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 August 1869
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At The Plymouth Railway Station. - Early on Saturday morning GEORGE HATTO, an engine driver, was killed at the South Devon Railway terminus, by being crushed by an engine and trucks. About half-past five o'clock HATTO was oiling a part of his engine, the Cato, opposite the coal platform. Coal was put on the engine, and she was put back into the shed. The deceased continued to stand between the coal platform and the rail. Another engine, the Una, came out towards the coal platform, not faster than a man could walk, with a coal truck attached to it in front, and proceeded on towards the main station. HATTO, who was looking in the direction of the advancing truck, ran to the corner of the coal platform nearest the engine-shed to avoid the truck, but before he could get there the end of the truck caught him, turning him round and round between the truck and the side of the platform, the whole length of the truck. As soon as HATTO had got to the end of the truck, he fell down; and the wheels of the engine passed over him, fearfully mangling the body, and causing instantaneous death. - An Inquest on the body was held in the evening, Mr Welch, stationmaster, being present; and Mr G. Derry watching the case on behalf of the Company. It was elicited that Frederick Palmer, fireman of the engine that bore down upon HATTO, and who, while giving his evidence, was greatly distressed, did not call out to the deceased, nor put on the break when the truck caught HATTO in the breast; but the engine went about eight yards before she was stopped. He did not blow the whistle when he saw the deceased before him, and did not think it necessary to stop the engine before it got up to where the deceased was standing, because he thought he would get out of the way. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased had for some years subscribed to the railway casualty fund, and only this year discontinued his payments. He leaves a widow and four children

PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Plymouth Gaol on Saturday evening concerning the death of WM. MARSH ALLEN, who was sentenced to eighteen months' imprisonment a year ago for stabbing his brother-in-law, named Hughes. Medical evidence shewed that the prisoner had died from "brain consumption, accelerated by imprisonment," and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 September 1869
LYDFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was yesterday held at the Duchy Hotel, Princetown, before Mr Fulford, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR WINSTANLEY, the gentleman who died on Sunday from the effects of a fall from a gig, as stated in our impression of yesterday. The Jury, of which Mr J. G. Doidge was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and spoke in strong terms of censure on the state of the highway where the accident happened. The body of MR WINSTANLEY was conveyed to London from Tavistock in the evening. He was a Roman Catholic, and was attended in his last moments by the priest on duty at the convict establishment.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 September 1869
TOTNES - Accident On Totnes Racecourse. - The severe injuries received by MR GEORGE BARRETT, by being thrown while riding a steeple chase on the third day of the Totnes Races, resulted fatally yesterday morning. He continued unconscious until his death. MR BARRETT was well known and respected in the neighbourhood, and much pity is felt for his widow and family of five children, who are left totally unprovided for. An Inquest was last evening held at the Bull Inn, Totnes, before Mr H. Michelmore. - The son-in-law of the deceased, James Stevens, deposed to seeing him ride a horse belonging to Mr Morris, of Blackawton, for a steeplechase, at the Totnes races, on Thursday. On the opposite side of the river the horse tripped, and threw the deceased over on his head He could not say the horse fell on him, as he was some distance away, but he thought he was knocked by the horse's feet. He was taken home and attended by Messrs. Owen and Hains. He never spoke up to the time of his death, five o'clock yesterday morning. There was no other horse near the deceased at the time of the accident. The deceased was a horse-breaker by trade. He was perfectly sober at the time he started for the race. He was 40 years of age. - John Potter corroborated the last witness, but said he was quite sure the horse rolled over him. When witness came to him he was bleeding at the nose and mouth. - In reply to a Juryman, the witness said one of the riders was about to stop, but was called to by the people to go on. - Mr T. E. Owen, surgeon, said the cause of death was doubtful, but he considered it injury to the brain. - The Coroner, in summing up, said no blame could be attached to any of the riders. Riders of steeplechases did not generally stop when one met with a mishap, but possibly went on all the faster. It appeared that one, with more than usual kindness, was about to dismount, but was urged to go on. There could be no doubt as to the cause of death. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - Mr W. Oldrey, the Foreman of the Jury, stated his intention of giving up his fee for the benefit of the widow and family of the deceased, and the rest of the Jury followed his example.

DARTMOUTH - An Inquest has been held at Dartmouth, before Mr J. M Puddicombe, Coroner, concerning the death of DANIEL PAGE, a native of the Isle of Wight, aged 18, seaman on board the yacht Maritana, belonging to Lord Louth. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was going on board on the night of the 31st ult., and was rather after time, and, in running round the corner of the new quay, ran against an iron post and sustained fatal injury. The verdict returned was "Death from peritonitis, caused by a violent blow in the region of the bladder." His body was interred at the cemetery yesterday, the owner and crew following. The Jury appended a rider to the verdict to the effect that the post was dangerous to life, and recommended its removal.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 September 1869
PLYMOUTH - HENRY KINGWELL, a boy nine years old, whose father is a painter at Plymouth, was yesterday found drowned off the Vauxhall Quay. At the Coroner's Inquest last evening, no facts satisfactorily accounting for his death were stated.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 September 1869
STOKE GABRIEL - Death From Drowning Near Totnes. - On Tuesday morning the body of a man named STREET BREWER, a labourer and a widower, living at Stoke Gabriel, was found by a man named Drew in a brook called Longcombe, in the parish of Berry Pomeroy. There was only about a foot of water in the brook at the time. The deceased was lying with his face downwards and was quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body before Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, on Wednesday evening, at the Church House Inn, Stoke Gabriel, when the evidence of Drew was taken, as well as that of Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, Totnes, who was of opinion that the deceased was attacked with apoplexy, and afterwards drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 17 September 1869
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was recorded yesterday at the Inquest on the body of ANN BURNETT, the woman who was found drowned off the Plymouth Hoe on Wednesday morning.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 September 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall on the body of STEPHEN JOHN SKINNER, the son of poor parents residing at 9 How-street. The deceased was nearly five months old and had been delicate from his birth. On Friday night the mother as usual laid the child by her side, and on Saturday morning when she awoke he was dead. There were no marks of pressure on the body. The evidence went to shew that MRS SKINNER had been very kind to her son, and the Jury, of whom Mr J. Vodden was the Foreman, returned a verdict that the child had died by the Visitation of God.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 September 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - The Accident On The Cornwall Railway. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday afternoon on the body of the lad CRUZE, who was killed on the Cornwall Railway on Saturday afternoon. Mr Northcott, Cornwall Railway Inspector, was present. It seemed that the deceased left his home on Saturday afternoon with two boys named Maddock and Jarvis. They went to Camel's Head, and after staying some time picking blackberries, they got on the viaduct there for the purpose of going home by a nearer route. They had no sooner got there than they perceived a train approaching from the Devonport station, and heard the whistle blown. The whole of them got into the side of the viaduct, but as the train approached nearer two of them made a start to run. This was perceived by the engine-driver, James Clatworthy, and in addition to desiring the stoker to put on the break he got on to the right hand side of the engine, and shouted to the two boys "to keep close to the viaduct." One of them did as desired, but the deceased did not, and continued to run by the side of the train. He passed the engine safely, but the step of the first carriage struck him in the upper part of his legs, and knocked him on his face and hands, laying him straight out by the side of the rails. The train was shortly afterwards stopped, and the driver, stoker, guards, and several passengers went back o the spot, and found deceased lying with his head on the rails. His thighs were nearly severed from the body. He was taken upon a door to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died at a quarter to five on the same evening. The driver, in answer to questions, said it would have been impossible to stop the train sooner than he did, or in time to have prevented the accident. - Mr Northcott said persons were often trespassing on the part of the line where the accident occurred, although they had no right to be there, and consequently the driver and stoker of trains always took the precaution of looking over the viaduct as soon as they came in sight of it. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought there was no blame attributable to the servants of the railway company. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and thought that credit was due to the men on the train for the steps they took both before and after the accident. The deceased, who was seven years of age last July, was the son of MR W. H. CRUZE, boatswain, H.M.S. Lion.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 September 1869
BARNSTAPLE - The Barnstaple Coroner has held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM CANN, a man 53 years of age, who accidentally met with his death whilst in a state of intoxication. The deceased was riding a spirited horse down the Newport-road, when he touched the animal with his spurs. The horse sprang one side, and, being intoxicated, the rider was unable to retain his seat. He fell heavily on his back, and was removed by some bystanders to the Newport Inn, and subsequently to the North Devon Infirmary. He gradually got worse, and died two days afterwards. The house surgeon (Mr J. W. Cook) gave it as his opinion that death was caused by the rupture of some large vessel in the abdomen. The Jury returned as their verdict "That the deceased was Accidentally killed by injuries received from falling off the horse he was riding, he being intoxicated at the time."

Western Morning News, Monday 27 September 1869
PLYMOUTH - On Saturday afternoon a woman of ill-fame, named ELIZA ALLEN, was walking down Exeter-street, Plymouth, towards Sutton-road, in company with a sailor named Thomas Kind. They called at two public-houses, and had a glass of ale at each, when the woman complained of sickness, and almost immediately vomited a large quantity of blood on the pavement, and what was described by King as a piece of "black soft stuff, about the size of an ordinary tea cup." Prompt attention was paid the woman, and she was taken to the South Devon Hospital, but the house surgeon, Dr Thomas, pronounced life extinct. The Inquest on the body was held on Saturday evening, and was adjourned until this evening, for the purpose of allowing Mr Thomas to make a post mortem examination.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 September 1869
ILFRACOMBE - The Melancholy Death Of An Army Surgeon At Ilfracombe. - Some additional light has been thrown on the circumstances attending the death of MR WM. JAMES BARBER, at Ilfracombe, reported in the Western Morning News of Saturday. At the Inquest it transpired that the deceased, who was about 42 years of age and a widower, had served for the last 14 years in India and Mauritius. He returned to England some months ago in ill-health, and he had recently been put on temporary half-pay for twelve months, which made him low-spirited. On Thursday, however, when he left his hotel nothing unusual was observed in his manner. Whilst waiting at the Pier Hotel for the Tenby steamer he partook of refreshment, after which he went into the bar, where he took a flask from his pocket and drank twice. He then said to the landlord, "I am afraid I shall not be living with you very much longer in this world," and immediately fell backwards. Dr Penruddock, who was staying in the house, was immediately called, and the deceased was just able to say, in reply to the doctor, that he had been in the habit of taking opium and laudanum for some years, and always carried the flask in his pocket. - Mr P. Stoneham, surgeon, soon after arrived, but the remedies applied by him were unavailing. - The flask found on the deceased smelt very strongly, and tasted of chloroform and laudanum. - The Jury returned a verdict - "That the deceased died from the effects of taking chloroform and laudanum, but whether from accident or design there was no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 September 1869
TOTNES - Suicide At Totnes. - Yesterday MRS LANE, wife of MR SAMUEL LANE, one of the relieving officers of the Totnes Union, committed suicide. She got up as usual in the morning, leaving her husband in bed, nothing strange being observed in her manner at the time. About eight o'clock the boy brought the milk for breakfast, which was poured out by the deceased and the empty can handed back to him, nothing remarkable being noticed. Half an hour afterwards MR LANE came downstairs, ready to take his customary journey, and found the breakfast things in order, and did not take any notice of the absence of his wife. On opening the door of the back kitchen, however, he was horrified at seeing her suspended by the horse's halter to a crook in the ceiling. He immediately cut her down, poured some brandy down her throat and ran for a neighbour, who immediately hastened for Mr T. E. Owen, surgeon, but on his arrival MRS LANE was quite dead. The distressing occurrence has cast a gloom over the neighbourhood, and great commiseration is felt for MR LANE, who is greatly respected. - An Inquest was held last night before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr W. Godfrey was Foreman. MR LANE, the husband of the deceased, said he believed she was 68 years of age. The deceased had complained for the past week of very severe pains in her head. They had six children, one son was living with them. He spoke to the deceased last about 11 o'clock on Tuesday night. There was nothing peculiar about her then. He did not see her alive yesterday morning. She got up without his hearing her. She generally got up about seven o'clock. He went down about twenty minutes to nine. She did not come to meet him as usual. On his opening the back kitchen door he saw her hanging almost in a kneeling position. She was suspended from a crook in the ceiling. He took a knife and severed the rope, and slackened it around her neck. He did not think she was dead at the time, as she made a noise as if breathing through her nostrils. He poured some brandy down her throat and sent for a doctor, who, on his arrival, after using means to restore her, pronounced her to be dead. He had heard her say that she was tempted to do something of the sort, but he had replied, "Don't, for God's sake; think of such a thing." He had also heard her say that some member of her family had committed suicide. Her maiden name was SMALE, of Newton. She had been low-spirited for some time. Her two sisters and a brother died in a very low state. Mr Owen had lately attended her. She must have brought the rope from the stable, where she was in the habit of going mornings to tend the pony. She had said sometimes that she did not care to live. - While giving his evidence MR LANE was greatly affected. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he had been informed, or rather misinformed, when he came there that no medical man had previously attended her, but from the evidence of MR LANE this did not appear to be the case. He had not, therefore, directed the medical man to be present; but if the Jury wished it, he would send for Mr Owen. He considered that the deceased must have meditated the act with so much premeditation that they would not be at a great difficulty in finding their verdict. The very determined way in which she had done the act was a symptom of insanity. The Jury then returned a verdict, "That the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 4 October 1869
PLYMOUTH - A Corpse Conveyed By Train As Luggage. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday night, by Mr T. C. Brian, on the body of a newly-born male child, which had been brought from Torquay to Plymouth that day by train in a parcel by a woman, who was eventually ascertained to be the mother. - Jane Burns, servant to Mr Martin, at the Brunel Arms, Millbay, said that about half-past ten that morning a woman, who looked ill, came to the house, and stated that she had just come by the train from Torquay. She had some bundles, and a large paper parcel with her. Some refreshment was supplied her in the sitting-room, and about half an hour afterwards she went out. Witness then went to clean the room, and saw the tings which the woman had brought with her on the floor. She took them up to put them on a chair, and feeling something which she thought to be the head of a child in the paper parcel, looked in where the paper was broken, and found that it was so. She at once told her employer, and P.C. May was called. In the meantime the woman returned, and went back to the sitting-room. The parcel was then opened, and found to contain the body produced, and the woman was taken into custody. - P.C. May deposed that he was called in to the Brunel Arms at a quarter to one that day. In the sitting-room he saw a paper parcel and some bags. In the parcel he found the body. He asked the woman if it was her child; and she replied "it is." He then asked her what she intended to do with it, and she replied, "I don't know. I must leave it somewhere, or take it home to my friends." he then asked her where she had come from, and was answered "Torquay." He told her that he would take care of the child for her, whereupon she cried out "My God, you are not going to take me to the police-station?" She stated that she could not walk, and was taken to the Guildhall in a cab. She declined to give her name. - Superintendent Wreford stated that the last witness brought the woman and the body to the Guildhall about 1.20. She gave her name to him as ELIZABETH DOWN, and was afterwards, by the advice of Mr Stevens, removed to the Workhouse. The body was sewn up in flannel. DOWN said she had come from Torquay, where she had been living about a fortnight, previously to which she had been a nurse in the Exminster Lunatic Asylum, but that she belonged to Gunnislake. - Mr J. N. Stevens, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body. It was that of a full-grown newly-born male child. There were no external marks of violence, but the skin was partially discoloured from commencing decomposition. The umbilical cord was cut, but not tied. The lungs did not half fill the cavity of the chest. They were dark brown, did not crepitate on pressure, and sank immediately in water. From the various appearances he could swear that the child had never breathed, and consequently was born dead. He had seen the mother previous to the examination, and found her in such a state that he directed her removal to the lying-in ward of the Workhouse. She said she had been confined of the child alone about three o'clock on Friday morning at Pimlico, in Torquay. The Jury found that the child had been Stillborn.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 October 1869
SHALDON - THOS. BAKER, a fisherman of Shaldon, on Friday last went out in a boat, taking two of his children with him. The next day the dead body of BAKER and a portion of the boat were found near Labrador. An Inquest was held yesterday at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Shaldon, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned. The bodies of the children have not been found.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 October 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday concerning the death of the lad PETER ELLIOTT, nine years of age, who was drowned on Tuesday evening in Stonehouse Pool. It was proved that deceased went on a piece of timber to the assistance of another boy, who was floating about in a boat in the pool, and the other lad was taken out of the boat, and got on the plank. After they had been there a few minutes the piece of timber turned over, and both lads were thrown into the water. A youth named Crocker made several attempts to save deceased, but they proved ineffectual in consequence of the latter trying to catch hold of him, when he eluded the dangerous grasp. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The Coroner awarded Crocker a half-crown, in addition to the regular fee for a witness, for his gallant conduct. We are requested to say that the deceased was not a brother to Mr Elliott at Messrs. Beer and Rundle, as previous stated.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 October 1869
DARTMOUTH - A mysterious death was under investigation last evening by a Coroner's Jury at Dartmouth. The deceased, MARY ANN JONES, the wife of a mason, was found yesterday morning floating in the harbour. The evidence was conflicting and the facts had not been elicited when our parcel was despatched.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 October 1869
DARTMOUTH - The Coroner's Inquest at Dartmouth on the body of MARY ANN JONES, aged 40, who was found drowned in the harbour, has been adjourned for a post mortem examination and further evidence. The deceased, although living with her husband, lived an immoral life, and was seen on the New Ground at midnight on Wednesday, in company with a man who had grey hair, and had a dog with him. Two schooners were alongside the New Ground, the masters of which were examined and though they admitted talking with women at the time and place named, were certain that the deceased was not one of them. The evidence of Dr Newman was that, judging by external marks, death was caused by blows on the head. The police are believed to have a further clue to the mystery.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 October 1869
TEIGNGRACE - A Coroner's Jury at the Union Inn, Teigngrace, near Newton, returned on Saturday an Open Verdict in the case of the man ENDICOTT, who was found drowned in the canal last week, the body being in a very decomposed state.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 October 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide By A Lady At Devonport. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the King's Arms Inn, Pembroke-street, Devonport, concerning the death of MRS MARGARET JAMES, thirty years of age, wife of CAPTAIN R. H. JAMES, late of the 20th, and now of the 83rd Regiment, who committed suicide on the previous night by cutting her throat, at her lodgings in George-street, Devonport. The evidence adduced corroborated the report of the occurrence published in our columns yesterday. Witnesses spoke of the eccentric behaviour of the deceased for some time past. About four weeks since she was seen walking about one of the rooms she occupied with a newspaper over her head; she was heard talking to herself, and frequently stood in front of the looking glass with the paper over her head. She had also been seen dancing about the room. On Wednesday she was very reserved, ate nothing for the whole day, and appeared anxious to avoid anyone entering her apartments. She was not given to such peculiarities when her husband was at home, and they always lived most happily together. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, observed that the only question for the Jury to consider was whether at the time deceased committed self-destruction she was in a sound state of mind or not. They had heard the evidence regarding the strange conduct of late on her part, and he would remind them that in the sight of the law, whether a person destroyed his or her life, or took the life of another, if it was satisfactorily proved that that person was insane at the time, he or she would be absolved from the crime. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." - CAPTAIN JAMES arrived from London yesterday.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 October 1869
SALCOMBE REGIS - A Coroner's Jury at Salcombe yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of MR W. HOOPLE, who was accidentally shot by his own gun when out rabbit shooting on Thursday at Starehole bottom. Mr J. Luckham and Mr E. Cove gave evidence.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 October 1869
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board H.M.S. Calliope. - A fatal accident occurred on Friday morning to JOHN CROSSMAN, leading stoker of the Calliope, now lying in the harbour. Between eleven and twelve o'clock he was ordered by the engineer, David Wilson, in charge of the floating factory, to put a belt in the centre drum, which is used for turning lathes, to work one of the lathes. CROSSMAN put the belt as desired. He stopped from the fore and aft beam on to the thwart ship's beam, the belt struck him in the side, and propelled him with some force to another fore and aft beam, where he was thrust into a corner between the two beams, and then fell to the deck on his feet. He remained on his feet, and was asked if he was hurt? He said he was not, and returned to look after the engine, his usual duty. He remained there about a quarter of an hour, when he was taken faint, and hardly able to speak; but with difficulty told his questioners he was hurt in his left arm. He was carried to the cabin, and the surgeon of H.M.S. Indus, which was about 100 yards off, was sent for; and by the surgeon's orders, CROSSMAN was taken to the Indus, where he died in about ten minutes. An Open Verdict was recorded at the Coroner's Inquest at Stonehouse on Saturday. No medical evidence was given, although the surgeon of the Indus was present. The deceased was 51 years of age, and has left a widow, who will receive money from clubs in which her husband's life was insured.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 October 1869
The body of SAMUEL MARLES, who was drowned in the river Mole, near its junction with the Taw, on Wednesday evening has been recovered; and an inquest held by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner. The deceased had accompanied Mr Henry Pulsford Hobson and his brother, who are on a visit t the neighbourhood, on a fishing excursion; and, in endeavouring to free one of the lines used from a bush, lost his balance, and fell into the river. The stream was much swollen, and the current being very swift, the unfortunate youth disappeared before any assistance could be rendered to him. Mr Hobson has acted in a most generous and felling manner towards the family of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 November 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall on the body of ENOS ALBERT MINIFIE aged three months. The parents of the child live at 34 Market-street. In the absence of the mother, who is a fish saleswoman, the deceased was looked after by Louisa Wakeham. MRS MINIFIE was engaged at her calling until late on Saturday night, and when she returned home the child was in bed asleep. Before she retired to rest she gave it some food. At half-past eight o'clock the following morning when she awoke the child was lying on her left arm as she had placed it before going to sleep. She looked at it and said, "What ails thee, baby," and the child gave one heavy sigh and died. The mother stated that her infant had been delicate from his birth. - Corporal Williams had examined the body, but found no marks of violence. - The Jury found that the child had died from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 November 1869
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Plymouth Coroner on the body of THOMAS HARLOW BURROWS, quay porter, living at 13 Looe-street, who died suddenly in his bed on Wednesday afternoon. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 November 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - A Coroner's Inquest was held last evening by Mr H. Michelmore, at Newton, on the body of SAMUEL STONE, of Ellicombe, Torquay, mason, who was found the same day in the River Teign, near Whitlake, between Newton and Kingsteignton, by two lightermen, who were searching the river with drags for the body. The deceased had been missing since the 25th of October, and his son and grandson were the last persons who saw him alive. The Inquiry was adjourned until Friday, for the production of further evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 November 1869
NEWTON ABBOT - The Suspicious Death At Newton. - At the adjourned Coroner's Inquest last evening at Newton on the body of SAMUEL STONE, late of Ellacombe, Torquay, mason, the Jury, after hearing evidence from six to nine o'clock, returned an Open Verdict, "That the deceased was Found Drowned, but how he came in the water there was no evidence to shew." It was proved that the deceased and his son had been very freely drinking at several houses during the afternoon of the 25th of October last, and there is no doubt he met with his death from the effects of drink. The following persons gave evidence in the case:- Thomas Frost, John Woofoin, Thomas Joyce, JOHANNA STONE (widow of the deceased), Mrs Hobbs (the woman he lodged with), JAMES STONE, SAMUEL STONE, and Mrs Hobbs (who keeps a cidershop at Kingsteignton, in whose house deceased was drinking on the fatal day.) - The Coroner censured and warned the son of the deceased, SAMUEL STONE, for his conduct on the 25th, when he was out drinking with his father; and he hoped this would prove a warning to him as to his future conduct. The case at the first appeared rather dark against him, but he was happy to say there was no evidence to connect him in any way with causing the death of his father. It was stated in evidence that the deceased had threatened at times to commit suicide, and that he was also not on very friendly terms with his wife, but the wife denied this.

PLYMOUTH - MR DANIEL BRADLEY, a gentleman 30 years of age, lodging at 2 Caprera-terrace, North-road, Plymouth, died suddenly yesterday morning. For the last five or six weeks the deceased had been suffering a great deal from the effects of drinking. On Thursday night he drank a bottle of wine and yesterday morning, about eight o'clock, when about to go out, he dropped down dead in the passage. At the Inquest in the afternoon, a verdict of death from "Natural Causes" was returned. The deceased, who was a man of good education, has been in Plymouth about twelve months, and during that time has lived a very dissolute life. His relations live in Ireland.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 November 1869
DEVONPORT - WALTER TOZER, a silversmith, while proceeding upstairs to his room in a house situate at 6 Prospect-row, Devonport, on Wednesday evening last, fell down and struck the back of his head. He was put to bed, and not appearing to be better on the following day, Dr J. E. Bennett was called in, and he immediately said he was dying. Shortly after he died from paralysis. At an Inquest held on Saturday the Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from Paralysis, accelerated by a fall."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 November 1869
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon concerning the death of ALBERT JAMES NETHERTON, son of WILLIAM HENRY NETHERTON, bootmaker, 5 Deptford-place, Charlestown, Plymouth. The parents of the child went to bed with the deceased as usual on Sunday night, and on the mother waking up at half-past seven the following morning the child was found stiff, cold and dead. A verdict "That the deceased died from Suffocation" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 November 1869
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Plymouth, before Mr Brian, concerning the melancholy death of MRS A. B. VIVIAN, who was found by one of her daughters on Sunday hanging from a bedpost, quite dead. The deceased, a widow lady, had for some time past been in a low, nervous condition, and at times excited and bewildered, but latterly was apparently somewhat better. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 November 1869
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Drake's Island. - ROBERT HENRY LAUNDER and his father have been employed at Drake's Island to lay down asphalt. They were on Friday covering over one of the arches on the north side of the island. At about a quarter to eight LAUNDER directed his son to fill a can with water as it was breakfast time. There were two ways to get to the pump. ROBERT took the nearer along the top of a wall nearly six feet thick. A minute or two after he had gone a man shouted to his father that he thought he saw him lying on the road below the wall. The elder LAUNDER hurried along the wall to see what was the matter. He found the can his son had taken with him with a cup in it on the top of the wall; beside them was a block of granite over which ROBERT had probably tripped, and three and twenty feet below him he saw his son insensible and bleeding from the head. Assistance was obtained, and he was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where, though he received every attention, he died at half-past four, not having spoken since his admission. He was 24 years of age and unmarried. An Inquest was held on Saturday, Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, presiding. The senior LAUNDER related the particulars of the accident, and said, in answer to a Juryman, that the stone was on the wall, as it is to be re-coped; and in answer to another, that he had never heard of his son having more than one fit. The resident surgeon of the hospital attended, and said the external injuries were a small wound on the head and a broken arm. He probably died from concussion of the brain. - Mr Brian was about to address the Jury when he was interrupted by the Foreman, who said they were already agreed. - The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 December 1869
STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport yesterday an Inquest was held concerning the death of the infant child of MRS MOULD, wife of a gardener living in John-street. It was evident that the child had been accidentally overlaid in the night, and the Jury gave a verdict to that effect.

TORQUAY - A Man Found Dead In An Old Ruin At Torquay. - Passengers by rail to Torre probably have observed near by the railway station a huge crag of limestone that rises immediately opposite to the yard, the base clothed with a plantation, and the summit crowned by a very quaint old ruin known as St Michael's Chapel; so ancient is it that not a note can be gathered as to the purposes for which it was originally designed. On Monday afternoon a gentleman climbed the hill, and looked into the ruin, when greatly to his astonishment he found the dead body of a respectably dressed man stretched out along the rocky floor. It was subsequently ascertained that the man, whose name is ABRAHAM DYER, keeper of a public-house at Kingskerswell, arrived at Torre by the midday train, walked up the hill, and had not been seen since. The body was taken to the neighbouring inn. An Inquest was held last evening at the Clarence Hotel, and after the reception of some evidence was adjourned until the day following.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 December 1869
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter concerning the death of WILLIAM WARREN, 15 years old, who died from the effects of a kick in the stomach received on Saturday last from his horse, which he was putting in the stable. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORQUAY - In the Western Morning News of Wednesday appeared an account of the strange death of a man named ABRAHAM DYER, whose body was found in the ancient ruin on Chapel-hill, close by the Torre railway station. The adjourned Inquest was held on Wednesday evening, at the Clarence Hotel, before the Coroner, Mr H. Michelmore. Medical testimony was given by Mr Finch, who had made a post mortem examination. The cause of death he attributed to venous apoplexy, the right side of the heart and the brain being gorged with blood. From what motives the deceased went out of his way, in fact turning back in the opposite direction to that he intended going, namely Torquay, on a wet afternoon, and entering the deserted building far removed from the highway, it is impossible to divine. The only rational conjecture is that he went over the hill as the nearest way to Barton, and for shelter from the rain entered the building where his body was found. A verdict of "Died from Apoplexy" was returned by the Jury.

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Wednesday night, before the Coroner, Mr H. Michelmore, on the body of GEORGE WILLIS, who died the night previous from the kick of a horse. Dr Radclyffe Hall stated that the deceased was his coachman. About twelve o'clock he was called to the kitchen, where the deceased was stretched out in front of the fire. The man stated that while singeing one of the horses under the belly it kicked out, and struck him in the stomach. Although every attention was paid the poor man grew worse, and on Tuesday morning he was conveyed in a close carriage to the Torbay Infirmary. There he lingered on until ten o'clock when he died. No post mortem examination was made, but it was believed that death had been caused by severe internal injuries, as at death there was a discharge of blood from the mouth and ears. The deceased was a young man belonging to Ermington, and was much valued by his master. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 December 1869
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held last evening concerning the death of WM. GARTRELL HENWOOD, 80 years of age, who was found dead in his bed by his son and partially dressed. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The deceased lived in Cambridge-street, and had been suffering from heart disease.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 December 1869
BARNSTAPLE - Singular Death Of An Infant. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Barnstaple by Mr I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of the infant child of DR FORESTER, which occurred under unusual circumstances. On the previous night the child, which was about fifteen weeks old, was put to bed by its wet nurse. He was then in perfect health, and was several times suckled during the night. At about six o'clock in the morning, the girl finding that the child had slept for a much longer interval than usual tried to wake him, but found that he did not move. Being much alarmed she called her master and mistress. DR FORESTER at once sent for another medical man, and Mr Harper speedily arrived, but the child was beyond recovery. On examination it was found that death had been caused by the presence of a hard ridge of flannel upon the windpipe which had been formed by the child slipping down in the bed. The Jury, without deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" coupled with an expression of sympathy with DR and MRS FORESTER. The Jury presented their fees to the soup kitchen.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 December 1869
TORRINGTON - Suicide Of An Octogenarian At Torrington. - An Inquest was held at Torrington on Wednesday on the body of a widow named ELIZABETH CHAPPLE, about 83 years of age, who drowned herself on the previous day in the canal. It appeared that the deceased resided with her son-in-law, PHILIP BLAKE, who is the superintendent of police. About five o'clock in the evening MRS BLAKE had occasion to leave her mother alone in the house, and on her return, at about seven o'clock, she was missing. A search was instituted, and between ten and eleven o'clock the same night she was found lying on her right side in the canal. It transpired in the course of the Inquiry that the deceased was subject to mental aberrations, and had on two previous occasions attempted self-destruction. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased Drowned Herself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 December 1869
TAVISTOCK - In the afternoon of Friday a fatal accident occurred at Crelake Mine. THOMAS WILLIAMS, a middle-aged man, was working in the 60-fathom level with his son, when a large piece of rock suddenly fell away, crushing WILLIAMS beneath it. The son went for assistance, and the rock was found to be so large that it was obliged to be broken before it could be removed from the poor fellow. It was then found that his arm was broken, and he was injured very much internally. He was taken to his home and died a few hours afterwards. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - An accident happened to a girl called EVELY, about 15 years of age, on Thursday afternoon, near Lidford Waterfall, during a terrific storm of rain and hail. She was a servant in the employ of Mr Jeffry, at the Manor Hotel, and it was her duty frequently to put a horse into a field beyond the River Lid, which had to be crossed at a fording place. On Thursday, about three o'clock, she took the horse for this purpose, but did not return, although the horse came back some hours afterwards, without having crossed the river. Search was then made for her, and late at night she was found in the water half a mile below the ford quite dead. It is supposed that in the attempt to get across with the horse the girl was carried away by the increased force of the stream, which had become much swollen. As, however, there was no direct evidence of her death, the Jury, on Saturday afternoon, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 December 1869
MILTON ABBOT - An Inquest was yesterday held at Chillaton, before Mr A. B. Bone, jun., on the body of RICHARD SQUIRES, who was killed on Saturday by the discharge of a gun, as stated in our columns of yesterday. A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 December 1869
PLYMOUTH - Death From Starvation At Plymouth. A Drunken Mother. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, and a double Jury, met at the Prince Arthur public-house, Cecil-street, on Friday evening to investigate the circumstances attending the death of a female child named GUNHOUSE, who died that day from, as is supposed, starvation. The body, which was lying at a house in Flora-street, presented a most miserable spectacle. The face of the infant appeared more like that of an elderly person, while every bone in its body was plainly to be seen. The mother of the child, who attended the Inquiry, was in a state of intoxication, and appeared quite unconcerned, although, as will be seen below, the facts elicited told greatly against her. - Mrs Fanny Wilkinson, who is the wife of a labourer, and resides at 27 Flora-street, Plymouth, deposed that she knew the mother of deceased, who resided at 56 King-street, Plymouth, in a house occupied by a Mrs Bees. On Saturday morning last she was working for the last-named person, when she was informed by her that there was an infant upstairs starving. She left her work and went with Mrs Bees into the room which MRS GUNHOUSE occupied, and in a bed noticed a child, which was in a filthy condition. It was then sleeping, and she observed that the clothes it had on were in a "stinking" state, in addition to which the child presented every appearance of having been starved. While she was there the child awoke, and commenced crying piteously. She said to Mrs Bees, "Can I have the child?" and that person replied, "Anyone can have it." She said, "Supposing the mother comes home and finds it gone, what will she say?" and Mrs Bees answered, "She will not ask for it." She (witness) then took the child to her own home, washed it, and gave it a little arrowroot, which, however, it had great difficulty in swallowing. It seemed to her that the child was past swallowing. She then carried the child to Dr Graham, who resides in the North-road, and he examined it, after which he said there was nothing the matter with the child, but that it wanted nourishing food and care. He desired her to give it a little wine, milk, and arrowroot, which she continued to do until that morning, when the child died. The child gradually sank, although she gave it every care, as much as she would one of her own children. From the time she took the child until it died the mother never asked her for it, nor made any inquiry about it. - The mother here exclaimed, "She has found me and Mrs Bees asking for the child every day for the week." - Witness denied this, but added that she had seen MRS GUNHOUSE on the previous day in Mrs Bees room. Believed she was quite sober then, and Mrs Bees told her that she had been keeping her in the room to prevent her getting drunk. - Anne Bees, wife of a marine store dealer, said the deceased was four months and a fortnight old. MRS GUNHOUSE was the wife of the master of the brig British Queen, which was generally used as a coasting vessel, but which was now at some port in Ireland. He left Plymouth about three weeks since leaving, as his wife said, £2 18s. with her. MRS GUNHOUSE had four children at that time, and three of them had been removed to the Workhouse on the previous day. The deceased child had been neglected by its mother for about five weeks. It never, in witness's opinion, had had two hours nursing before Mrs Wilkinson took it. The child never was a healthy one, but during the last five weeks it had wasted away from starvation. The mother was given to drinking intoxicating liquors. Sometimes she got up at five o'clock in the morning, and would commence drinking at that time. The Coroner: Since her husband has been gone, had she been drunk more than once? - Witness: Well, I cannot say she has been sober up to now. - The Coroner: How long has she been away from her child at a time? - Witness: From five o'clock in the morning until eleven at night. She had never known the child left for two days at a time. Sometimes when the mother was absent her grandmother would come into the house, wash it, and give it some food. The child had wasted away through the want of care and food. - The Coroner: May I ask why you did not see to it yourself? - Witness: Because I have eight persons to provide for, besides a small shop to look after. - The Coroner here explained that he thought it necessary to adjourn the Inquest in order that a post mortem examination should be made of the body, when a definite opinion would be given as to the cause of death by the medical man, Dr Graham. - The Mother: I wish to make my statement now. - The Coroner: I shall not hear you now, but will do so on the adjourned day if you chose. - The Mother: I have been to Mr Graham and others about the child. Mr Graham can speak all about it now. - A Juror thought the child's grandmother should be summoned to attend the Inquiry on the adjourned day. - The Coroner said she should be in attendance, and with the consent of all the Jury the Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday next at the Guildhall. - Mrs Wilkinson subsequently complained to the Coroner that she was afraid she should be maltreated by GUNHOUSE for the part she had taken in the matter. - The Coroner thought everyone ought to respect her for the manner in which she had acted, but should she have any good ground for alarm she had only to apply at the station-house, and she would be protected.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 December 1869
PLYMOUTH - The Death Of A Child From Starvation At Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter Against The Mother. - The adjourned Inquiry into the death of a female child, named GUNHOUSE, four months and a half old, was held last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall. - Mr Graham, surgeon, who had at times attended the child, said the mother brought the child to his house about a fortnight ago for examination. It was then in a very emaciated state, and the mother was smelling of alcohol. The child had the appearance of being very much neglected. He prescribed for her, and told the mother to come again within two days, but she did not do so, and he did not see the child until Mrs Wilkinson (who casually attended the child just previous to her death, and who had been previously praised for her kindness) brought the infant to him about a week after in a dying state. He had made a post mortem examination of the child. Its body was greatly emaciated. The features were contracted looking more like an old person than that of a child. The body weighed 6lbs 14 oz. From 8lbs. to 11lbs. is the proper weight of a newly-born child. There was no subcutaneous fat whatever about it. There was also appearances of uncleanliness externally. The body indicated disease, and shewed that the child had been properly cared for, for two or three days previous to death. In his opinion the child died from pleura-pneumonia, a disease generally brought on from want of proper nourishment and care. The disease was not of more than two or three weeks' standing. - In answer to Mr J. H. Matthews, who watched the case for the Guardians, Mr Graham said the child's death was certainly accelerated by neglect. - ANNE CUNNINGHAM, the mother of the child's mother, was then sworn, and said her daughter's husband, who is a captain of a coasting vessel, had been away nearly five weeks. She had seen her daughter every day during that time; she had generally been tipsy, and had spent most of her time in two public houses near her house. She had four children, three boys and the deceased child. Witness had taken the three boys to her home, and left the deceased at her daughter's room. Witness went there every day three or four times, and washed the child every morning. She used to try to feed it, sometimes with arrowroot, but it would not swallow it. The mother was there at that time. She had seen the mother give it the breast every night. She would swear the mother was every night in bed at 11 o'clock. She never left the house until the mother was in bed. The mother came home before 11 o'clock - when the beer-shops closed - when she was often very tipsy, and was not in a condition to take care of the child. Witness had repeatedly stopped there all night. She had noticed that the child was wasting away during the absence of its father, and drew the mother's attention to it. The mother, she believed, took it to Doctors Pearse, Dale, and Graham. She had repeatedly seen her give the child the breast, and had often accused her of neglecting it. Last Monday week she found the child gone. She would swear the child was not left 18 hours alone. The child was always delicate, and did not improve at all. It had got much worse the last five weeks. The mother left her house every morning, and did not return until the last thing at night, and then was tipsy. - The Coroner reviewed the case, and pointed to the state of the body, as one of the strongest facts of the case. The law was that if a person entrusted with the care of another, who was entirely dependent upon that person for life and support, should neglect to provide a proper amount of nourishment and support, that person was held responsible. The present case was the same in principle as that of the Welsh fasting girl, but a little different in facts. It was true that this child was not shewn to be suffering from apparent extreme disease, but it was very young, and therefore, if the nutriment were not supplied to it, of course it must die from want of food. - The mother, who was present, was asked if she would like to say anything to the Jury? - She replied - "I should like to say something, but there are so many against me." - The Coroner told her that if she gave evidence she would have to submit to cross-examination, and advised her to say nothing. - She began to cry, and said - "I acknowledge my fault - a very great fault - in neglecting my child." She was again asked if she would give evidence, and consented; but, at the advice of the Coroner, refrained, saying - "Perhaps I am not worthy to make a statement." She was not drunk, she added, when she went to Mr Graham's, and she produced the doctors' bills and medicine bottles to shew she had cared for the child; but the Coroner refused to enter that as evidence, whereupon she exclaimed - "I have done all in my power for her; I can do no more." She attributed her mother's evidence to "passion more than anything else," and frequently muttered she did not think the child was dangerously ill. - The Court was then cleared for the Jury to consider their verdict, during which time the mother fainted. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict that MRS GUNHOUSE did "Feloniously Kill and Slay" her child. The mother, who conducted herself with much decorum, was afterwards taken charge of by the police, and committed for trial under the Coroner's warrant.

PLYMOUTH - The Alleged Manslaughter Of A Woman At Plymouth. - HENRY WILLIAMS, master of a small vessel, was placed in the dock at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, charged with striking SUSAN DOVE WILLIAMS, his wife, on the head, and thereby causing her death, at the Napoleon Inn, High-street. The prisoner looked sad, and appeared to feel acutely the position in which he was placed. The magistrates present were the Mayor (Mr W. Luscombe) and Mr J. B. Wilcocks. - Thomas Pellow, the landlord of the Napoleon Inn, said about ten o'clock on the previous evening the prisoner entered the bar, and called for a glass of ale. WILLIAMS might "have had a glass," but was not intoxicated. About ten minutes afterwards his wife, accompanied by another woman, came in and asked for a noggin of brandy. There were several other persons in the bar. MRS WILLIAMS, who was sober, stood directly in front of her husband, whom she did not notice. On being informed that he was there, she went outside, and afterwards came back again. The deceased then spoke to a dog which her husband had, and called it by its name. The prisoner, however, said, "Don't you speak to the dog, nor me either." MRS WILLIAMS replied that she did not want to, "she could get his betters any day." Afterwards she began to tantalize him by saying that she did not want him, and calling him names such as "a fellow," and "blackguard." - The Mayor: You mean that she used jeering and offensive language? - Witness: Yes, more than anyone could hear. The prisoner at once struck her with his fist. I think he aimed at her face, but I could not say positively that she was struck there. I went and parted them, and afterwards they appeared more reconciled. In fact the prisoner called for three glasses of spirit, which he, his wife and another man carried with them into the taproom. Soon after, however, I heard a scuffle, and the deceased ran out of the taproom towards the side door which leads into the lane. The prisoner followed, caught her, and struck her with his fist in the face near the cheek bone. - The magistrates' clerk (Mr Phillips): Did she fall from that blow? - A.: No; I put the prisoner back from her, and then the deceased rambled and fell, one part of her body lying in the passage and the other in the bar. - The Mayor: Did she receive any support in falling? - A.: Her head came against the gas meter. - Mr Phillips: Did she bleed at all? - A.: No. - Q.: did you see any mark where she was struck? - A.: No. A woman there went and picked her up, and rested her head on her lap, and I fetched some water with which to bathe the deceased's temple, as I thought she might be faint. She, however, never spoke and died soon after. - Q.: Was the prisoner sober? - A.: He was neither tipsy nor sober; he knew what he was doing. - Mr Phillips: Do you know this woman at all? - A.: I think she has been in the habit of drinking a good deal at times. - The Mayor: Had she been in the habit of coming to your house? - A.: Not much. - The Mayor: Did you hear any altercation in the inner room when they took the spirit there? - A.: Not until I heard the woman run. - Mr Phillips: They went in there good friends? - A.: Yes. The prisoner said he had struck her once, and he should not do it any more. Then he called for three glasses of spirit, and said he should go home and sit down, and be comfortable. - In reply to a further question witness said he had seen the man who accompanied WILLIAMS and his wife into the room before, but he did not know him. - Philip Jude, a hawker, said about half-past ten o'clock on the previous night he went with his wife over to the Napoleon Inn. In the parlour they found several married men and women, who were speaking of how MRS WILLIAMS had been aggravating her husband in the taproom. He said to his missus that as he had never met MRS WILLIAMS'S husband he would like to see him. She thereupon told him to go out and look at him. A young woman in the room said she would go too. They went together, and on entering the taproom he saw the deceased standing up in the middle of the room laughing at the prisoner, who was seated inside a table. - Q.: Was it in fun? - A.: No; she was annoying him. She said she could get his betters any time, and she kept on tipping up her feet against him. At last the prisoner said, "You had better go away and leave me alone." - Mr Phillips: Was she sober? - A.: I think she had been drinking a little. As the prisoner got up to drive her away she jumped at me, and clung to me round the neck. I made a run, and she ran with me, and as I ran up against the young woman who had come with me from the parlour knocked her up against the doorway. The prisoner followed and caught his wife just at the side door, and then he struck her in the face. Afterwards she staggered and fell. - Sophia Coombes, who lives at 1 Lower-lane, also witnessed the blow. She said she immediately took the deceased by the hand, and led her from the door to the bar, where she apparently tripped her foot and fell. She thought the deceased had a fit, and she stooped down and washed her face, and offered her water to drink, but she could not swallow. - Q.: Did she strike the gas meter? - A.: I think she did. - Policeman Lock said he arrived after the blow had been struck, and he sent for Mr Stevens, surgeon, who quickly arrived and pronounced life to be extinct. He knew the deceased had been a "very drinking" woman about that neighbourhood for a long time. He charged the prisoner with striking his wife, and WILLIAMS admitted having done so, but said he did not believe that the blow caused her death. - The prisoner declined to put any questions to the witnesses, and when asked who it was that accompanied him and his wife into the taproom he replied that he did not know the man, but he went by the nickname of "Navvy George." - On the application of Mr Superintendent Thomas the prisoner was remanded until next Monday. - Mr Kent, who keeps the "Crown and Anchor" on the Barbican, asked that WILLIAMS, who was his brother-in-law, might be admitted to bail. - The Mayor, however, said it was too serious a case for bail to be granted. He thought it would be best on all accounts that the prisoner should remain in custody. - Mr Kent then asked that he might have permission to see the prisoner, in order that he might give him some words of consolation. - The Mayor said he had no doubt that for all proper purposes the governor of the gaol would feel himself authorized to allow him to confer with the prisoner. - The Borough Coroner held an Inquest in the afternoon at the Guildhall on the body of the deceased. A double Jury was summoned and Mr Emmanuel Cole was elected Foreman. Mr Elliot Square, solicitor, watched the proceedings on the part of the husband, who was not present. The evidence was similar to that given before the magistrates. - Pellow, the innkeeper, said in cross-examination by Mr Square that when the deceased used aggravating language, her husband displayed a good deal of patience, as he wished to have nothing to say to her. - Mr J. N. Stevens, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, said he found no external marks of violence, with the exception of a small bruise on the upper portion of the left cheek just below the eye. On opening the skull for the purpose of examining the brain, he found nothing particular between it and the dura mater, the external covering of the brain. On removing the dura mater, he observed the brain superficially slightly congested and a small amount of clotted blood outside the longitudinal sinus and dipping down between the anterior lobes of the cerebrum. He then continued the dissection of the brain for the purpose of removing it entirely from the skull, and noticed a considerable amount of clotted blood at the base of the men magnum, which extravasation of blood was quite sufficient to account for immediate death. The extravasation was caused by the rupture of a blood-vessel, one or more, in the brain. He did not think the blow which the deceased received was sufficiently heavy to have produced the effects he had described, but he considered that they might have been occasioned by the fall, which she was said to have had. - In cross-examination Mr Stevens said in the case of a person semi- intoxicated and much excited it would not be necessary for her in falling heavily to strike against anything to produce fatal consequences; the fall itself might occasion them. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that what might have been the husband's share in the woman's death it was not for him to say, but that the evidence went in the direction of charging him with being concerned in the matter no intelligent person could for a moment doubt. And yet the man against whom all that had been directed was not present. WILLIAMS had been brought that day into that very hall before the justices, and as soon as the magisterial inquiry had terminated he (Mr Brian) addressed a few words to the mayor, informing him that the Inquest would be held at four o'clock, and that without wishing for a moment to raise any question of right or privilege, yet, inasmuch as the man was still within the walls of the Guildhall, and the evidence probably would be fully gone into, he did hope that his worship would give an order which would secure the attendance of the said HENRY WILLIAMS. The mayor's reply was - "Respecting the prisoner WILLIAMS I can only say that as he was committed before the Court rose to the custody of the governor of the gaol, by a warrant of remand, signed by Mr Wilcocks and myself, I have no power to make any further order in the matter." He had merely introduced that correspondence to shew that he had done all he could to get the man there. Referring to the woman's death, the Coroner thought the Jury could have no doubt that the fall was the result of the blow. Looking at the amount of irritation and aggravation evinced by the deceased towards WILLIAMS, and at the blow being so slight, they need not Inquire into it as a case of murder, but they had to decide upon the evidence, whether it was one of manslaughter. - The Court was cleared, and after the lapse of a few minutes, was reopened. The Jury were unanimous in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 December 1869
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death of A Naval Surgeon At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr Brian, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon concerning the death of A. SOUTHBY CROWDY, surgeon, H.M.S. Indus, who died early on Tuesday morning. - Eliza Binney, an unmarried woman, living at 6 Summerland-place, Plymouth, said the deceased, whom she knew well, came to the house on Monday evening, about seven o'clock. He remained about an hour and then went out to meet a friend whom he expected would come out of the Theatre. About a quarter before ten o'clock he returned in a cab alone, and brought her a bottle of champagne. The deceased was quite sober, but he looked ill, and on her asking if he were unwell, he replied in the affirmative, and said that he had been faint at Harvey's Hotel. He laid down on the sofa, and she had a fire lighted. Soon after he said that if he went to bed he thought he would be better and he walked upstairs. She ate her supper and went up about half an hour after. She put some scent on his pocket-handkerchief, and bathed his face with cold water, and he told her he was much better. She went to bed about 11 o'clock, and the deceased laid upon her arm. A bout a quarter of an hour afterwards she spoke to him several times, but he did not answer her, although he made an effort to do so, and turning his head he went off in a fit. [The deceased had told her previously that he had been subject to fits, and that if he were seized with one she was not to be alarmed.] Afterwards he partially recovered and said "Don't be frightened, I shall be better in a few minutes." She sent for several doctors, but they were out. At last Dr Prance arrived. The deceased never properly recovered and died about a quarter past three o'clock. - In reply to a question the witness said about two months ago deceased had a fit on the sofa, but recovered in about ten minutes. - Dr C. R. Prance said he arrived at the house about twenty minutes after one o'clock on Tuesday morning and on inquiry he was told that MR CROWDY had had a succession of fits - nine in about two hours. At that time the deceased was in a state of coma. He examined his chest and found that he had disease of the heart. There was a gentleman in the room who told him that he was a messmate, and said that MR CROWDY had for a very long time been suffering from Bright's disease of the kidneys. Soon after he entered the deceased had a fit, was violently convulsed, and he recognised it as an epileptic fit. He told MR CROWDY'S friend that such fits were quite consistent with the state of disease to which he (deceased) had been subject. The convulsion passed off, and he remained in a state of stupor. The deceased had one slight and two severe fits afterwards. Watching him in the fit before the last, he found the heart stop, but it recovered again on the fit passing off. He warned the deceased's friend then that the attack would most likely be fatal. After an interval the deceased had another convulsion, the heart again stopped and never resumed its action. Had not the slightest doubt but that he died from natural causes. Saw Detective Evans, and told him he thought the Coroner should be communicated with, but that it was a case of disease, and he did not think any Inquest was necessary. - The Coroner: Were you aware at that time of the character of the house in which he died? - Dr Prance: I was; and it was for that reason - the peculiar circumstances of the case, and not the case itself - that I said you should be communicated with. The girl Binney was perfectly sober, and she and the people of the house did all they could for him. - In reply to the Foreman, Dr Prance said there was nothing in the condition of the deceased which would lead him to believe that opiates had been given him; there were symptoms which would lead him to think the contrary. - Detective Evans, who searched the clothes after the death, found in the deceased's pockets £8 5s. 3d., a silver watch, two gold rings, a gold pin, and other articles. - The Coroner, in summing up, explained why it was the Inquest had been held. He had no hesitation in saying that if that fit had taken place in a house of a different character he would not have thought it necessary to have called a Jury together. But looking at the fact that the deceased was seized with an alarming series of fits in the dead of night in a house of ill-fame, he thought they would agree with him that it was a case in which they were justified in knowing that there was an entire absence of anything suspicious in the death, and that they could not ascertain except by an Inquest. Had the case been passed over it would probably have been said that because that was a gentleman there was no Inquiry thought necessary, but that if it had been a poor man an Inquest would have been held. He did not choose to let it be said that he had one law for the rich and another for the poor. (Hear, hear.) - The Jury, through their Foreman, Mr Frederick Martin Cooper, returned a verdict that the deceased had died from Natural Causes, and expressed an opinion that it was a very proper case for investigation. - A party of naval seaman, armed with the Coroner's order, subsequently removed the body of the deceased from Summerland-place, to the Royal Naval Hospital at Stonehouse.

PLYMOUTH - MR JOHN PASCOE, a widower, who lodged at 6 Eldad-place, Plymouth, was found dead in bed yesterday morning. He formerly was a draper, and since that a musician. Money and food were found in his room. MR THOMAS PASCOE, farmer, of Lower Hellend, near Bodmin, stated at the Coroner's Inquest last evening that the deceased was 55 years of age, and had for some time past been under the treatment of Dr Dale for lung disease. A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 January 1870
ASHBURTON - The Suicide Of An Ashburton Publican. - Concerning the death of JOHN BUTCHERS, landlord of the Sun Inn, Ashburton, who committed suicide by hanging, on Saturday evening a Coroner's Inquest was held. - Eliza Mugridge said she had assisted in deceased's house for the last three years. She saw him alive at breakfast time on Friday morning, when he complained of being bad in his head. His wife persuaded him to go and lie down, but deceased said he should "go up in the 'big' room with father and sit down and sleep." Witness only heard him go over one pair of stairs. This was about 10 o'clock. About ten minutes afterwards a young man on a pony came to the door, and requesting to see deceased, witness went upstairs to look for him. His daughters also called him, and as he did not answer witness proceeded upstairs, and saw him hanging to a beam. Behind him was a door leading to another room, which has a step about two feet high to enter it. His toes were on the floor and his legs crossed. Witness ran downstairs, caught up a knife, and called to a man named Coleman, who followed her and cut deceased down. He was quite dead. On Thursday night deceased had told witness his troubles were great. Some little time since deceased was fined by the magistrates for keeping a disorderly house, and since then witness has observed a marked change in his demeanour; his appetite has failed and he was generally low. Dr Gervis proved being called to see the deceased, and found him lying on the bed in the attic. He was in his shirt sleeves and dead, but did not appear to have been dead long. The neck was not broken, but deceased had died from strangling. For the last fortnight he (Dr Gervis) had observed a marked change in deceased's manner, lowness of spirits having taken the place of former cheerfulness. - Other evidence was given, and the Jury returned a unanimous verdict "That deceased Hung himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind." Deceased was 49 years of age.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 January 1870
EXETER - Suicide Of An Accused Man At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter concerning the death of THOMAS HODGE, a porter, 39 years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Isaac Lang, corn merchant, of Exeter. On Thursday evening last Mr Lang charged him with stealing some seeds, and told him if he would tell the whole truth about the matter he would not prosecute him. Deceased denied that he had robbed his master, but was told to remain in the room. Presently he asked to be allowed to leave the room for a few minutes; Mr Lang gave him permission, and deceased left, first going towards the closet, but then ran out of the yard. Mr Lang followed him, saw him go across the road and run towards the river. On arriving at the edge of the water Mr Lang saw the deceased in the river, about sixteen feet from the bank. The water being high and the night dark, Mr Lang did not feel disposed to jump in after the deceased, but at once raised an alarm; before a boat could arrive, however, the deceased had sunk. He had noticed that of late HODGE had been very depressed, owing to his having lost two of his children. When the deceased left the house on Thursday night Mr Lang noticed that he looked very wild and he did not now think that he could have been in his right mind when he jumped in the water. The body was not found until Friday morning. The man who found the body saw deceased on Thursday afternoon and he then appeared to be in very low spirits. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind." Deceased leaves a widow and several children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 January 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Plymouth Pilot. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon concerning the death of CHARLES LUMBARD, an assistant pilot, who lived at 39 New-street, Plymouth, and who died almost suddenly yesterday morning, as mentioned in our columns of yesterday. The deceased got out of bed about two o'clock yesterday morning to call the man belonging to the pilot boat, who was standing on the Barbican Pier with George N[?] another assistant pilot, and after remarking that the weather was very bad, but he supposed he must face it, he immediately fell down. He was taken into the police station close by and was observed to breathe once or twice. Dr Stevens was sent for, and he found the deceased dead. At the Inquiry yesterday Mr Stevens said the deceased had either died from disease of the heart or the bursting of an artery, which had choked him. The verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. LUMBARD was 43 years of age, and leaves a widow and children unprovided for.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 January 1870
BURRINGTON - Fatal Fall Of A Chimney In North Devon. - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at the village of Burrington, North Devon, concerning the deaths of WM. GOULD, aged 91, ELIZABETH BIRD, and MARY JANE BIRD, respectively 11 and 5 years of age, who had been killed the previous day by the fall of a chimney of the cottage they occupied. - MRS BIRD deposed that she, her four children, and her father-in-law went to bed in one upstair room, about nine o'clock, that about one a.m. she was awakened by hearing one of her children cry, and almost immediately the chimney of the cottage fell and roof came in at the same time, burying her and all in the room, and carrying the floor into the kitchen. Her daughter now living got out from the ruins and called for assistance, and Thomas Hill came running out from the adjoining cottage and got her out after removing a quantity of rubbish. The youngest child was also got out and neither of them were much injured, but she did not hear any sound come from either of the three deceased. As she was going to bed on Friday night, her eldest daughter, one of the deceased, said she was afraid to sleep in the house, for there were great cracks in the wall. Witness, however, did not think there was any immediate danger. She had never felt easy in the house, because the wall did not appear safe; she had complained of it several times, and last November told Mr Buckingham the landlord, who then promised to have it repaired. - Thomas Hill, the tenant of the adjoining cottage, gave corroborative evidence. He also had asked Mr Buckingham to have the wall made safe last rent day, and that gentleman promised to do so. - Thomas Ford, a mason, said he was at the cottage the day before it fell in. He did not notice that it was in a dangerous state, but he merely went there about the thatch. - Mr Buckingham, the owner of the house, said a complaint was made to him on his last rent day in Nov., by MRS BIRD. She told him the thatch was in a bad state, and he ordered his bailiff to have it repaired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that in their opinion that at the time of the accident eh house was in very bad repair.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 January 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Devonport Tradesman. - An Inquest was held at the No Place Inn, Plymouth, yesterday, by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, concerning the death of WM. HIMVEST. The deceased, who was 78 years of age, and was in business as a brushmaker in [?]-street, Devonport, left his home on Thursday, about [?], and shortly after three went into the No Place Inn, asking to be shewn to the closet, where he died about a quarter of an hour afterwards, Mr Pearse, surgeon, who had been sent for, arriving too late to render assistance. The sum of £6 19s. 8d., some receipts, and a watch, were found upon the deceased, who had a seizure about six years ago. No medical evidence was produced, and a Juryman asked whether it would not be better in such cases to get an opinion of a medical man upon the cause of death. - Mr Brian thought that there was nothing in the circumstances to justify him in ordering a post mortem examination, as there was nothing at all suspicious in the circumstances under which he was found. The Jury appeared fully satisfied that there was no foul play, and returned a verdict that the deceased died from the "Visitation of God." Although the Jury did not entertain suspicions, it would be more satisfactory for the public if in such cases the evidence as to the actual cause of death were forthcoming.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 January 1870
BICKINGTON - An Inquiry has been held by Mr Toller, Deputy County Coroner, into the death of the infant child of RICHD. EDWARDS, labourer, of Bickington, Barnstaple. The child, which was 2 ¼ years old, was left in the kitchen by its sister, and was shortly afterwards discovered to be in flames. The fire was extinguished, and a medical man called in, but death resulted. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 February 1870
PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Of A Seaman In The Sound. - The Inquest on the body of THOMAS BOYSE, seaman belonging to the Amy, who was drowned in Plymouth Sound on Saturday night, was held last evening by Mr Brian, Coroner, at the Guildhall. The facts elicited were similar to those published by us yesterday. The seaman who was in the boat with the deceased at the time of the accident - Thomas Charley- acknowledged that he and the deceased had three quarts of beer between them while ashore and that after the provisions were obtained and before they put off from the Fishermen's Steps, they had some more beer. The wind and tide, he said, was "right against them." He wanted to make for the lights in the vessels in the Sound, but the deceased, who was not, like witness, an absolute stranger to the part, and who was the more intoxicated of the two, would not do so. No part of the shore could be seen, the night being so dark, and they were ignorant of their whereabouts. He got out of the boat when she grounded, but was too weak to render any assistance to his comrade, who, however, got out of the boat and laid down on his side on the beach, as if suffering from cramp, and exclaiming, "Oh my, oh my!" The face of Charley's rendering no help whatever to BOYSE, and his leaving him alone while he went to the Custom-house and not returning to the spot, with the Custom-house officers to endeavour to find the deceased, elicited strong disapprobation from the Jurymen, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they hoped the circumstances that had occurred respecting the death of the deceased would not be forgotten by Charley, and that it would be a warning to him.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 February 1870
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter concerning the death of FLORENCE CRABBE, a child aged two years, who died suddenly the previous day from a convulsive fit, occasioned, according to the medical evidence, by "teething". The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

HIGHWEEK - A boy named STEVENS, 14 years of age, in the employ of Mr Vicary, Newton Bushell, went on Saturday to his master's stables to fetch a horse. He twisted the halter around its neck about his arms, and put his hands in his pockets. After proceeding some little distance through Bradley-lane, the horse bolted, and dragged the lad for a considerable distance. He was dashed against every projection, and so mutilated that body and brains were left in the lane. When extricated the poor boy was of course dead, and at an Inquest held in the evening a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 February 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday concerning the death of an infant child of the chief warden of the military prison, named MARTIN. The child was shewn to have been sickly from birth, and the only reason for holding an Inquest was a doubt as to whether there had not been neglect in not earlier calling in medical aid. The Jury, however, saw no reason to pass any censure, and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 February 1870
BARNSTAPLE - Inquiries were held on Saturday by the Barnstaple Borough Coroner, Mr R. I. Bencraft, into two cases of sudden death. The one was that of a butcher, named JAMES DOCKETT, who dropped down suddenly in Boutport-street on the previous evening, and only survived a few minutes: and the other that of a butcher's wife, named SUSAN PARKIN, who died suddenly in her own house just as the Inquest on DOCKETT had been concluded. Death in both cases resulted from apoplexy, and the Juries returned verdicts of "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Suspicious Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Inn, North-street, Exeter, on Saturday, before Mr Hooper, City Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN MILLER, a currier, 43 years of age, who died under somewhat suspicious circumstances on the previous Tuesday. It was shewn by the evidence that the deceased had been ill for nearly six months, but had only occasionally been prevented from attending to his work. He complained of violent pains in his stomach, which were always worse after meals. At times he suffered so much that he was unable to stand. Recently he became a patient at the dispensary, and was treated by Mr Phelps for ulcer in the stomach. He was under the surgeon's care when he died. MILLER had been twice married, and his widow has had three husbands. They lived very unhappily together, and quarrels were frequent. Deceased had told two or three parties that when he drank anything at home there was something which seemed to grate between his teeth. On one occasion his son heard him complain to his wife about the milk being of a dark colour, but she replied that it was fetched in a clean can. About Christmas he was on a visit to his mother for some days, and during that time he was entirely free from pain. When he returned home he had a return of the pain. He told his mother that he could eat what she gave him, but what he had at home always seemed to grate between his teeth. Deceased's father asked the widow to have the body opened, but she refused to allow it. Mr Phelps had given a certificate that death had resulted from an ulcer in the stomach, but having heard the evidence given at this Inquest he thought it was singular that he should have been free from pain when he was at his mother's. - The Coroner thought the case a suspicious one, and adjourned the Inquiry until this evening in order that a post mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 February 1870
EXETER - The Suspicious Death At Exeter. - An adjourned inquest was held yesterday at Exeter, before Mr Hooper, City Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN MILLER, 43 years of age, a currier, who died under suspicious circumstances last week. The deceased's widow, his second wife, has been married three times, and she and her late husband lived very unhappily together. MILLER, who had suffered for some months past from severe pains in his stomach, frequently complained that what he partook of at home grated between his teeth, and that he was always worse after meals, but stated that when visiting his mother he was free from pain. In consequence of this evidence, a post mortem examination was ordered to be made on Saturday, and the Inquiry was adjourned for that purpose. Yesterday, Messrs. Blankhart and Phelps, who had made the examination, reported that there was no ulcer in the stomach of deceased, for which complaint he had been treated by Mr Phelps, and they recommended that an analysis of the stomach should be made. The Jury concurring, the Inquest was further adjourned for a fortnight, in order that this might be done. It is rumoured that the deceased's life was insured by his wife for £13 without his knowledge.

EXETER - JOHN SWEETLAND, a mason, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Saturday, from injuries received on the 23rd December by the falling of a wall at Shobrooke. At the Inquest held yesterday, Mr Roper, surgeon, said if deceased had consented to have his right leg amputated his life would have been saved. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 February 1870
WESTWARD HO! - The Suicide Of SIR WM. GORDON, K.C.B. The Inquest. - The Inquest concerning the death of SIR WM. GORDON, was held yesterday at the Royal Hotel, Westward Ho! Bideford, before Mr J. Toller, Deputy Coroner. - Colonel Hutchinson stated that SIR J. WILLIAM GORDON, his brother-in-law arrived on the night of the 31st ult. at his house. He complained that he had not felt well for a day or two. He was a Major-General in the Royal Engineers, and was about 57 years old. He had been 30 years in the service, and was in the Crimean War, where he had charge of the right attack, and was wounded through the arm. About quarter-past eight a.m. on the 31st inst. witness heard a heavy fall in SIR WILLIAM'S bedroom, followed by deep groans. He found the door locked, and called to deceased, begging him to open the door; which he did; and then rushed back to his bed. On entering the room he found him sitting up in his bed with a deep gash in his throat. He just managed to say "Oh, that this should have been done in your house." Drs. Ackland and Thompson were then sent for. Witness saw deceased in the summer, and there did not appear to be anything mentally wrong with him, but he could say nothing of his mental condition at the time of his arrival, as he was not home. - COLONEL CHARLES GEORGE GORDON, who came down with SIR WILLIAM to Westward Ho! stated that he had noticed for some past that deceased was suffering from great depression of spirits. At times his thoughts and speech were most strange, but at others he was quite clear and lucid. Witness considered that he might be guilty of some rash act if not removed from London to some place where he would be able to have his mind cheered by other thoughts than those that oppressed him. For the three days previous to his arrival at Westward Ho! he talked wildly of having given offence and injured witness and other officers. Witness considered this resulted from an over pressure of business, which a change of air would remove. In consequence of this conduct he sent for a medical man on the 30th January unknown to SIR WILLIAM, who saw him at his house. He thought deceased's manner was somewhat strange, and sent a soothing draught. Witness was so alarmed that he thought right to take deceased's razor case from his room, and he had kept it until he came to Westward Ho! SIR WILLIAM was aware that he had it. On their way down he was perfectly sensible, and said "You must let me have those razors back now, for I cannot go unshaven at my sister's." He said in the carriage from Bideford railway station to Westward Ho! "I am perfectly right now," and desired him to bring the razors. Witness put the razor case in his pocket and went up to Col. Hutchinson's at eight o'clock. He left the house at ten o'clock, and went back to the hotel. About half-past ten p.m. SIR WILLIAM came towards him and said, "You did not give me my razors." Although not wishing to do so, witness then gave him the razors, and waited for Col. Hutchinson, who arrived soon after, and told him of the state of SIR WILLIAM'S mind. Col. Hutchinson told him that he had listened at the deceased's bedroom door on the Monday night, and found that all was quiet. On Tuesday morning, when he got in SIR WILLIAM'S bedroom, after he had cut his throat, he said, "You thought I would never do it." He was sure deceased would have been the last man to commit the rash act had he been in his right mind. - Dr Ackland of Bideford, gave evidence as to the state of the deceased. He was very depressed, and the subject of many delusions; and in this state he continued until he died. Up to Monday evening he was progressing favourably. Great prostration then set in; he passed a very restless and sleepless night, and died at 1 p.m. on Tuesday. The cause of death was exhaustion, intimately connected with mental alienation. - The Coroner remarked that the case was a melancholy one, as SIR WM. GORDON stood high in his profession, and had won laurels at home and abroad. A verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 February 1870
EXETER - Fatal Railway Accident At Axminster. - A fireman in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company named BENJAMIN OXENHAM, aged 27, died on Friday in consequence of an accident which occurred on the previous day. On Thursday he was stoking the engine of the 2.30 p.m. down train from Salisbury. When about one mile from Axminster, the driver (Samuel Reed) observed the danger signal; and the deceased went forward for the purpose of strewing sand on the rails, in order to stop the train as quickly as possible. While so engaged, he fell off the engine upon his head. Reed pulled up, and went back to the poor fellow's assistance; and deceased was then taken to an inn, where Dr Elliott attended him. He was found to have fractured his skull. Having taken on the train to Exeter, the engine driver returned directly with a first class carriage, in which deceased was conveyed to the Exeter station, and he was thence taken to the hospital. The poor fellow was insensible when admitted and he did not recover consciousness. - Mr Ley, the house surgeon, stated at the Inquest, which was held yesterday before Mr Coroner Hooper that death resulted from concussion of the brain. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased had not been married long. He was spoken of as perfectly sober and respectable. He had worked on the engine from which he fell nearly four years.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 February 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner and a Jury yesterday investigated the death of a female child named SPURR. The mother of the child is an elderly woman, and is married, but her husband left her about 16 years ago. She has since been living in Truro, but finding herself in an unfortunate condition she came to Devonport in December last. For a fortnight she stopped with her sister, a MRS BAKER, the wife of a marine, who occupies a room in Princess-street-ope. Whilst staying there she slept in the same bed with her sister and her husband. Subsequently she obtained work in Stonehouse and on the 11th of January was confined in the Stonehouse Workhouse. She left there in a fortnight and returned to her work at pipe making. Owing to the recent severe weather, however, she could not continue in this employment, the clay having become frozen, and on Saturday she again went to the house of her brother-in-law. They all slept in the same bed, the child being placed next the wall. On the following morning the child was found to be dead, and Mr Delarue, surgeon, was of opinion that it had died by being overlaid. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, with the addition that it had been overlaid accidentally.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 February 1870
DARTMOUTH - The Late Fatal Wreck Off Dartmouth. - Mr J. M. Puddicombe, Coroner, held an Inquiry on Tuesday evening at Dartmouth concerning the deaths of EDWARD KING, 25 years of age, and WILLIAM EVENS, 16, found at Blackstone Cove that morning. - Wm. Loughton, the only man saved from the wreck of the Courser, said they left Swansea on the 1st inst. for Fecamp, and left Fecamp on the 11th in a strong gale from the east, bound to Torbay for orders. On the morning of the 13th they lost their mainsail, and at daylight found themselves about four miles off Dartmouth. The fore, jib and sky sails were furled, and they ran for the harbour. When near the Castle Ledge Buoy, the helm was put down, but it failed to bring her to. They dropped anchor, ran out about 40 fathoms of chain, and signalled for assistance. The anchor did not hold and they were fast driving on shore, when the tugboat Guide came to their assistance. When she was within about 100 yards of the Courser, the crew of the latter manned their boat and made an attempt to board the Guide, which being herself in danger did not come near enough for them to do so. She threw out a cork fender with a line bent on for them to catch, but they missed it, and she then steamed ahead. Finding that they could not board her the Courser's crew made for shore, hoping that the people there would be able to save them. When about three yards from the shore the boat capsized and the men were thrown in the water. There were six in all - Capt. Brusey, John Guildford (mate, Daniel Long, KING, and witness (able seaman), and EVENS ( a boy). The people on shore did all they could, but all perished but himself. If the tug had been out before they might have been saved. No boats came to their assistance. [A pilot boat had gone out to them in the morning, but there being such a heavy sea could not round the castle, and was compelled to put back. A lifeboat or rocket apparatus could have assisted them.] - This was the only evidence adduced, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased were Drowned in landing from the schooner Courser.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 February 1870
EXETER - The Suspicious Death At Exeter. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JAMES MILLER, late a currier of Exe-lane, Exeter, was resumed yesterday. The result of a post mortem examination had proved that death was not caused, as was certified and supposed, by perforated ulcer of the stomach, and the Inquest was adjourned for a chemical analysis of the contents of the stomach. The analysis was made by Dr Taylor, of London, who, after giving a detailed description of the appearance of the various parts of the viscera sent to him, said "the only conclusion to be drawn from the examination and chemical analysis is that no poison was present in the viscera of deceased submitted to examination, and there is, therefore, no chemical evidence to shew that poison had been administered or taken, or that it had operated as a cause of death." - The Coroner remarked that Dr Taylor had not suggested the cause of death, and the case remained enveloped in mystery. - A Juryman said it had been reported that pounded glass had been given to the deceased. - The Coroner: The analysis shows that that could not be so. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple before Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner on Monday evening, on the death of a servant girl living at Beercharter Farm, near Barnstaple, who committed suicide on the previous day. It appeared that the deceased, ELIZA CHUGG, lived with Mr [?] as a servant and was about 21 years of age. During the morning she was missed by her fellow servants, and on a search being made she was found hanging by the neck in an outhouse. There had been no indication that her mind [?]. Her mistress had given her notice to leave, after she had confessed to having taken some things which did not belong to her. The notice to leave would have expired today. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased came to her death by Hanging herself, but there was no evidence to shew her state of mind.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 February 1870
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday by Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of an elderly man, named THOMAS WOODWARD, who was found dead in his bed on the preceding day. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 March 1870
EXETER - The Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest yesterday on the infant daughter of a man named DAWE, who died on Saturday of convulsions. Mr Cuming, surgeon, was sent for in the morning, and promised to attend; but neglected to do so. The child died in the evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Convulsions," and censured the surgeon for his neglect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 March 1870
TOTNES - The Fatal Accident To A Farmer At Totnes. - An Inquest was held last night by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, at the Plymouth Inn, Totnes, concerning the death of MR THOMAS DEWDNEY, a farmer, residing at Hareden, Ugborough, who was killed on Tuesday night, when returning home from Totnes market, by his horse running against a wall. - HENRY DEWDNEY, son of the deceased, stated that the horse his father was riding at the time of the accident was a young one, which had been in his possession for about six weeks, and had not been ridden much. The deceased was 51 years of age. - John Hosking started for home, in company with the deceased and Mr Codd, at about seven o'clock. MR DEWDNEY had difficulty in holding his horse at first, but it was quieter afterwards. At the corner of the Plymouth road the deceased and Mr Codd left witness. They first trotted and then got into a gallop. He walked his horse on, and when he came to the Union he met Mr Codd coming back. He said, "Oh Farmer Hosking, this is a bad job," and rode towards the town. When witness came to Broomborough-gate his horse did not care to pass. He could not see anything, but got off and feeling about found the deceased's horse in the drain. It was quite dead. He called the deceased by name, but received no answer. Someone then came with a lantern, and he saw MR DEWDNEY about twenty feet from the house. He had examined the spot that day, and found on the gate pillar the hair of the horse about breast high. The horse was lying on the opposite side of the road to the pillar, and the deceased the same side, but some feet further from it than the horse. When the lantern was brought the deceased was quite dead. The deceased at the time he left the Plymouth Inn he should say was quite sober. Mr Codd was also sober. MR DEWDNEY was a very temperate man. - The Coroner said it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquiry, as although Mr Codd had been told to be there he had not thought fit to come. He was informed that he was advised not to attend. He regretted that he should be obliged to adjourn the Inquiry, but after the evidence of the last witness he could not but do so. A man in Mr Codd's position ought to have known better. - Mr Pack, the landlord of the Plymouth Inn, said the deceased was perfectly sober when he left Totnes. He brought the lantern referred to by Mr Hosking, and found MR DEWDNEY lying on his face and breathing, with a gurgling noise in his throat. He lifted deceased's head on his arm, but he died immediately afterwards. - Mr Hains, surgeon, came to the spot about a quarter of an hour after Mr Pack, and found the deceased quite dead. On examination he found he had a lacerated wound which quite divided the left nostril, two slight bruises on the forehead, but he could detect no fracture of the skull. The head could be moved in any direction. He believed the bones of the neck were broken. This would produce instant death. The face was perfectly placid, and it appeared as if the deceased had not suffered any pain. The injuries were such as might have been produced by the deceased being thrown violently against a stone wall. - The Inquiry was then adjourned until Monday that Mr Codd may attend.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, respecting the death of EVELINA PALMER, 14 years of age. The deceased resided with her father in King-street, and whilst blowing the fire on Friday morning the flame communicated with her clothes. The fire was extinguished, but not before the poor child had been severely burnt about the legs and body. She was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where every attention was paid her, and where she died. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 March 1870
DEVONPORT - The Mayor of Saltash, Mr Wm. Rundle, held an Inquest at Mutton Cove, Devonport, on Saturday, on the body of the man HALL, a superannuated painter from the dockyard, who was found drowned under Longroom Point, on Thursday. The Jury, however, was composed entirely of watermen from Devonport. The evidence shewed that on Thursday morning deceased left his home at 41 Ker-street in order to go to Keyham-yard, to do some painting work, as he had agreed. He was seen going in that direction, but at about 10.25 he was observed going down over the rocks near Longroom Point in search, as a witness thought, of some wood which was being washed ashore there. A quarter of an hour afterwards he was found in the water, and quite dead. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The son of deceased is not, as stated on Saturday, undergoing penal servitude for a series of burglaries which, in conjunction with another lad, he committed in this neighbourhood a year ago, having been liberated from custody in July last, after serving four months' imprisonment.

NORTH MOLTON - An Inquiry was held on Thursday by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy County Coroner, concerning the death of MARY PERRIN, of Northmolton, who committed suicide by hanging herself from an iron bar of a window. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased hanged herself, but that there was no evidence to shew the state of her mind at the time.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 March 1870
EXETER - SAMUEL CANN, a quarryman, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Saturday from injuries received on the previous Tuesday, while at work in a quarry at Drewsteignton. He was engaged in blasting, when a large quantity of earth and stones fell on his head. At an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TOTNES - The Late Fatal Accident At Totnes. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR THOMAS DEWDNEY, who was killed on Tuesday night last when returning from the Totnes Cattle market, was resumed at the Plymouth Inn, Totnes, last night. At the Inquiry on Wednesday, the principal witness (Mr Codd) did not attend, and it was adjourned for his attendance. - The Coroner pointed out to Mr Codd that he had acted unwisely in not attending on Wednesday, and that it might have placed him in a very curious position. - Mr Codd explained that he had expected to be summoned to attend, and stated that he, the deceased, and Mr Hosking left Totnes a little after seven in the evening. The deceased's horse was restless and suddenly started off at nearly full speed. Witness galloped behind, but did not at any time come up to the deceased. He saw him as he passed the lamp-post in the Plymouth-road, and shortly afterwards heard a crash and scramble. Witness came within about two paces, and heard a struggling in the drain as from a horse's hoofs, but his horse would not go forward. He then turned and came towards Totnes, when he met Mr Hosking. They both went towards the spot and Mr Hosking got off his horse and felt about with his stick. In a few minutes he said here's the horse, quite dead. The witness then rode back to Totnes to get a light. He believed the deceased was quite sober. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that he thought the Jury would safely arrive at the conclusion that the deceased could not manage his horse. The gate was in a straight line with the side of the road coming from Totnes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," coupled with a recommendation to the Town Council to place a lamp at the spot, in order to shew the direction of the road, and also to Mrs Phillips to cut the growth of the shrubs on her side of the road.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 March 1870
PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning At Plymouth - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, at the First and Last Inn, Plymouth, last evening, concerning the death of a child named CLARA LOUISA KINGDOM, seven years of age, daughter of a boat builder residing at Alma Cottages. On the morning of the 21st of February MRS KINGDOM left her kitchen, in which was the deceased, who was imbecile, with another child 18 months old. She was not absent more than a minute when she heard the child scream, and on going to her room found her clothes on fire. She soon extinguished the flame, but the child died yesterday. There was a stove in the room, which was closed when the mother left, and also when she returned, and her opinion was that the child's clothes were ignited by a cinder falling from the fire. - The Coroner, in summing up, referred to the emaciated state of the deceased, which was probably attributable to the disease of mind she was suffering from. The burns she received were slight, but in consequence of her wasted condition, she had not strength to bear them. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 March 1870
PLYMOUTH - A somewhat sudden death occurred yesterday morning at the Plymouth Railway Station. A man, 41 years of age, named HEATH, a roper, had been brought by his mother from St Austell, where he had been working, by the first Cornish train. He was in rapid consumption, and had been in bed three weeks. At the Plymouth station he was helped out of the carriage, and was taken to the waiting-room to await the departure of the next train for Launceston, where his mother lived. The poor fellow became much worse in the waiting-room, and died there in a short time. An Inquest was held later in the day and a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

BRIXHAM - An Inquiry was held at Brixham yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, concerning the death of MR WM. MICHELMORE, the landlord of the Rising Sun, who died on Friday. In December the deceased, in the course of a disturbance in his house, was severely injured, and had one of his thumbs broken. He had not been able to work since, and had been in bed for the past month. Mr Green, surgeon, stated that since the deceased had taken to his bed he had gradually lost the use of his arms and legs He believed the immediate cause of death to be disease of the lungs, which set in about a month ago, and the loss of the use of the limbs to be caused by paralysis, the effect of the assault. The fall at the time of the assault might have developed the lung disease. The Inquest was adjourned until the 14th of next month for the production of material evidence. Deceased was 43 years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 March 1870
BRATTON CLOVELLY - Fatal Accident To A Gentleman In North Devon. - Shortly after six o'clock on Friday evening MR JAMES REDDAWAY, of Burdon House, Highampton, was found lying in an insensible state in the road near the village of Bratton Clovelly. The deceased gentleman was returning from a run with the Hon. Mark Rolle's hounds, and it is supposed that after passing through Bratton Clovelly, and whilst descending a steep hill his horse, which was high-spirited animal, shied, and one of the stirrups breaking he was thrown to the ground. MR REDDAWAY was conveyed to an inn, where he was attended by Mr Willis, of Lewdown, who pronounced the case to be hopeless, and his sad prediction was verified by the death of the unfortunate gentleman some hours afterwards. At an Inquest held on Monday by Mr R. Fulford, Deputy Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. MR REDDAWAY, who was 62 years of age, was well known in North Devon, where he was held in general esteem.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 March 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held two Inquests yesterday concerning the sudden deaths of two persons who, strange to say, were nearly related to each other. MRS SARAH ANNE HEARN, 33 years of age, wife of a carpenter's mate on board H.M.S. Jason, and residing at 27 Queen-street, has been unwell for some time past, and was attended on the 9th of this month by Mr Eccles, surgeon. Although in a weak state, she was not considered to be dangerously ill; and on Sunday afternoon her mother, who lives with her, left her home while she went to the house of her sister. She had not been gone long before a Mrs Gidley, who lives in the house, went into the room, and found the woman dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.
The Inquest on the aunt of the deceased in the last case, who is a widow named SARAH GRIGG, 65 years of age, residing at 25 Cambridge-street, was held last evening. Deceased spoke of the death of her niece on Sunday evening to her neighbours, and complained that she had a pain in her side. A Mrs Hawkings advised her to seek the assistance of one of the parish surgeons, and offered to go and fetch an order for one on the following morning. She had volunteered to get such an order on that day, but deceased said they could not get an order for the attendance of a surgeon on a Sunday. She then went to her room, and was not seen again until eight o'clock on Monday morning, when a woman named bird, at the solicitation of the landlady of the house, carried her a cup of tea, and found her dead in her bed. Mr Graham, surgeon, was sent for, and was of opinion that she had died from the effects of diseased heart. He added that had he been sent for on the Sunday he would have come to see her without waiting for any order. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was also returned in this case.

EXETER - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Exeter on the body of MISS ANNE ELIZABETH HARINGTON, sister of the REV. CHANCELLOR HARINGTON, who, as we yesterday stated, was found dead in her bed on Sunday morning. The evidence adduced shewed that deceased, who was about seventy years of age, retired to rest in her usual healthy on Saturday night about ten o'clock. She had been better than usual during the day and evening, and had paid a visit to the Dean and Mrs Boyd; but when she retired for the night she complained of a headache, and had some sal volatile brought her. She slept alone; and nothing was seen of her until the next morning at half-past nine when her maid-servant having an hour after her usual hour for rising, knocked at her door and received no answer - the door was broken open by the direction of Mr Kempe, surgeon, who had been sent for, and the lady found dead in bed. Mr Kempe, who was her medical attendant, had no doubt death resulted from apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect. The chancellor left home on Saturday morning; and not having communicated his destination to anyone but deceased, his friends have been unable to communicate with him. He had not returned yesterday afternoon.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 March 1870
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Suicide Of A Boy. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exwick, near Exeter, before Mr Coroner Crosse, concerning the death of HENRY ALLEN, a boy 14 years of age, who committed suicide on the previous day by hanging himself in a hay loft. The deceased was the son of a guard on the Bristol and Exeter Railway. The evidence at the Inquest failed to reveal any cause for the commission of the rash act by the boy, who was said to be of a very sulky temper. His step-mother was sharply examined by the Jury as to whether she had not ill-treated him, but she denied that she had done so, and some neighbours gave evidence confirming this statement. Life was quite extinct when the boy was discovered by his father hanging in the loft. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 March 1870
OKEHAMPTON - MR H. LEE, solicitor's clerk, at Okehampton, has died suddenly, according to the verdict of the Coroner's Jury, of heart disease.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 April 1870
DOWN ST. MARY - The Suicide On The North Devon Railway. - An Inquest was held at Coplestone on Saturday by Mr Crosse, Coroner, concerning the death of WM. WOODROW, whose shocking death on the railway we recorded on Friday. - Henry Mitchel, a porter at the Coplestone railway station, deposed that about 4.10 a.m. deceased, who drove the mail cart to Launceston, came to the station as usual to await the arrival of the mail train. Witness remarked to him that he had a cough. He replied, "I have, and one might fancy that I was drinking last night, but it was not so." Witness then, hearing the train approach, left deceased to attend to the signal. After the train had left, witness observed that the mail bags were remaining on the platform, and not seeing the deceased, he sought for him, and presently found him with his head (which was all but severed from his body) towards the station, and his legs between the metals on the down line. His hat was about five or six yards distant. - JOHN WOODROW, a son of the deceased, who travels for Mr Leach, spirit merchant, of North Tawton, deposed that his father drank tea with him on the evening previous to his death, when he mentioned that he was summoned to appear before the Lifton magistrates on the next day at the instance of a woman who declared that he was the father of her illegitimate child; and the deceased appeared altogether in a depressed state of mind. Witness added that deceased's father and grandfather had both been afflicted with insanity. - The guard, driver and stoker of the train deposed that they did not see the deceased on the morning in question. - Other witness were examined, and the Jury found that deceased had committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity

STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner held an Inquiry on Saturday afternoon into the death of ANNIE MERRIFIELD, daughter of JOSEPH MERRIFIELD, chief gunner's mate of H.M.S. Impregnable. About three weeks ago the child was playing in the court of her father's house, 41 Monument-street. She fell down, and knocked her head against a stone and died on Wednesday from the effects of the accident. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 April 1870
PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, Plymouth, concerning the death of GEORGE WILSON, two years and nine months old who died the previous evening in a convulsion, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 April 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death In Plymouth. - Yesterday morning, about five o'clock, Joseph Webby, a labourer, employed at Mr Marshall's ship-breaking yard, Plymouth, going to his work by the cliff at Queen Anne's Battery, saw just outside Mr Westcott's lime kiln, and about six feet from the foot of the cliff, a man lying on his left side. His left arm was inclined under his body. The left side of his head was on the ground in a pool of blood, and he was quite dead. P.C. Gill then took charge of the body, which was taken to the deadhouse at the Guildhall. Mr Connell Whipple there inspected it, and found a wound at the root of the nose extending across the forehead, and a little below the right lower lid of the right eye. The jaw was broken. A ship's certificate was found on deceased, and by this paper Mr Deacon, clerk in the Mercantile Marine Office Exchange, was able to identify him as a man named SAMUEL HUNTING, who had the previous day asked him to report his continuance on board the vessel Hope, of Truro. Mr Deacon had entered the circumstance into the certificate, which was found upon the deceased, and had paid him £1 10s. in gold as retainer. HUNTING was then perfectly sober. These facts were elicited at the Inquiry yesterday, and at the instance of the Coroner the Inquest was adjourned until Monday afternoon for further inquiries. The Jury visited the cliff with the Coroner immediately after the adjournment.

PLYMOUTH - Death By Burning At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held by the Plymouth Coroner yesterday concerning the death of a girl five and a half years of age, named MARY ELIZABETH WILLIS, daughter of HENRY WILLIS, quarryman, living at Cattedown, who died from the effects of burning. A few days ago the mother of the deceased left her and a baby for an hour in a room in which a fire was burning. In her absence the child caught herself on fire, and it was entirely through the efforts of a little girl, eight years of age, living in the same house, named Sarah Coles, who rolled the deceased on the floor to extinguish the flames, that the deceased was prevented from being burnt to death at the time. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the mother was blamed for having left the two children alone in the room, and was allowed no expenses. The girl Coles was warmly praised.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 April 1870
BRIXHAM - The Inquest concerning the death of MR W. MICHELMORE, of the Rising Sun, Brixham, was resumed yesterday, having been adjourned from about a month since, when evidence was given to the effect that the deceased on the 11th of December last had been knocked down by a drunken man during a quarrel with another man, and medical testimony that he had died from paralysis and inflammation of the lungs, which might have been accelerated by the fall. Corroborative evidence was given yesterday, and the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had died from Disease of the Lungs.

PLYMOUTH - The Mysterious Death In Plymouth. - The adjourned Inquiry into the death of RICHARD HUNTING, of the Steam Reserve, who was found dead at the bottom of the cliff at Queen Anne's Battery, Plymouth, on Wednesday morning, the 6th instant, was held yesterday by the Coroner, at the Guildhall. The whereabouts of the deceased were traced from eleven o'clock on the morning of the day previous to his being discovered up to about eleven o'clock in the night, when he was seen near the cliff in a drunken state. During the day mentioned he had been in the company of women of bad character, and had become intoxicated. The money (£1 10s,.) he had previously had was partly accounted for, and there was no evidence to shew that the deceased had been murdered. Mr Connell Whipple had made a post mortem examination of the body. The head was literally knocked to pieces, but the clothes were clean. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had fallen from a considerable height into the road below, and had received such injuries as to cause instantaneous death, but how the fall was occasioned there was no evidence to shew. - The Jury considered that some protection, such as a barrier, should be placed at the entrance of the road at the kiln head, which was under the cliff, and also that the boarding should be considerably extended and strengthened between the kiln and the precipice adjoining. They also thought that the attention of the police should be drawn to the fact that many persons assembled near the kiln at night, and that the policeman on that beat should never fail to give his attention to that spot every night.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 April 1870
PLYMOUTH - At the Inquest held yesterday afternoon upon the body of the little boy, WM. WYATT, son of MR WYATT, auctioneer, Union-street, Plymouth, who was run over by a horse and waggon the previous afternoon, just outside his father's door and killed almost instantly, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, but it having transpired that the driver of the waggon - Foxaway, in the employ of Messrs. Hitchins and Walter, forage dealers, Britonside - was seated on one of the shafts at the time of the accident, although holding the reins, and having full command over the horse, the Jury pointed out that the drivers of such waggons should always walk by the side of the horses, so as to be able to see straight before them, which would be impossible when seated on one of the shafts.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 May 1870
PLYMOUTH - JOSHUA REYNOLDS, who met with a severe accident at the Delabole Slate Quarries, Camelford, about five months since, died almost suddenly on Saturday morning at the Plymouth Railway Station. He was going to Bodmin-road by train, and was attended at the railway station by his daughter, MRS STANBURY, who keeps wine and spirit vaults at Millbay. He suddenly complained of lightness in the head, and was helped into the station with the assistance of a porter, but was eventually put into a cab and carried back towards his daughter's house, but died before he got there. The deceased had complained many times recently of pains in his head, and had not been well since the accident. An Open Verdict was returned at the Inquest held the same afternoon.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 May 1870
PLYMOUTH - An inquest was held at the Jubilee Inn, Plymouth, yesterday concerning the death of a child named PHILP, three months old. The mother of the deceased stated that her husband was a basket-maker, and that she resided in Friary-street. About seven o'clock on Saturday evening she left the child with its grandmother while she went to market. She retired to rest at twelve o'clock, but did not give the child any nourishment as it was asleep. She awoke shortly after five, and saw that the child's eyes were rolling, and that its mouth was open. She called her mother, who took the deceased up, but it died in a few minutes. Mr Harper, surgeon, was called, but declined to express any opinion as to the death of the child. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and considered that the sad event should be a lesson to the mother to be more careful in future.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 May 1870
COLYTON - Murder In East Devon. - A brutal murder has just come to light in East Devon. On the 22nd of April a man named PEPPERELL, thirty years of age, after attending the East Devon races at Colyton, arrived at the White Hart Inn, Colyton, about nine o'clock in the evening. Though somewhat the worse for liquor he was not drunk. About ten minutes after he came in a man named Harris, a labourer of Lyme Regis, entered the house and drank with PEPPERELL, who paid for the liquor. Harris left about eleven o'clock, and ten minutes afterwards PEPPERELL also left, taking the same road as Harris. PEPPERELL had been in the habit of leaving his home for a week or a fortnight, and his absence from home was unnoticed. Nothing was seen or heard of him until Tuesday, when his body was found in the river Axe, about a quarter of a mile from the White Hart Inn, with serious injuries about the head, face and neck. A post mortem examination was made, and the body found to be perfectly healthy, there being not a single trace of disease. Upon opening the head several contusions were found, and one of the eyelids and one ear were cut. The cause of death was a severe blow on the left side of the head, under the ear. Harris was apprehended on Friday morning, and upon being charged with wilful murder said he was innocent. - The Inquest was held on Friday afternoon. The evidence was to the effect that Harris had a large stick in his possession, and that he left the house just before deceased. It is supposed that Harris, who bears a bad character, thinking that PEPPERELL had money, waylaid him after he left the White Hart, knocked him down at the bridge, beat him to death, and then threw him over the bridge into the river. A stick was found near the bridge which witnesses stated was similar to that in Harris's possession on the night of the murder. The Inquest was adjourned, and Harris removed in custody.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 May 1870
COLYTON - Murder In East Devon. - Yesterday Mr S. M. Cox held an adjourned Inquest at Colyford, near Seaton, on the body of JAMES PEPPERELL. The deceased, a labourer, of Membury, was thirty years of age, and of rather dissolute habits. On the 22nd of April he went to the East Devon steeplechases, at Colyton, where he indulged pretty freely in drink, and on the same evening he was drinking at the White Hart, Colyford, with James Harris, a labourer, of Lyme Regis, and a woman of ill-fame, named Gunn. At eleven o'clock Harris left, going in the direction of Exminster, and PEPPERELL followed alone about ten minutes afterwards. Nothing was seen of PEPPERELL until a fortnight afterwards, when his body was found floating in the river Axe, about a couple of hundred yards from the White Hart - where he was drinking on the night of the races. When taken out of the water his head was found to be covered with bruises, and it was evident that he had met with foul play. Suspicion at once fell on Harris, who bears but an indifferent character; on his being apprehended he denied any knowledge of the affair, stating that he was at home at two o'clock on the morning of the races, and that he never had any stick in his possession on the night in question. (A stick, which was stated to be similar to that carried by Harris on the night of the murder, was found near the spot.) When the Inquest was opened about a week since evidence was given shewing that the statements respecting the hour on which he arrived home, and that he had not any stick with him, were false. Yesterday other evidence was called, corroborating this. It was also stated by a Mr Fowler, a farmer, that about half-past eleven on the race night he heard loud cries as if of a man in distress coming from the direction of Axe Bridge - near where the body was found - but the cries did not frighten him, as he thought it was merely a row between people returning from the races. His daughter also stated that she heard cries of distress. - Mr Hoare, a miller of Shute, said he found the prisoner sleeping in a field about half a mile from the scene of the murder on the day after the races. The prisoner complained of being cold and thirsty, and when witness offered to give him some beer if he came as far as the public-house he took off a "slop" he was wearing, remarking that if he kept it on, as it was torn, people would think he was a rough fellow. When nearing the bridge, where the body was afterwards discovered, Harris crossed from one side of the road to the other, and on coming to the bridge he looked over into the water on the same side as where the body of deceased was found. Sergeant Gunn apprehended Harris and on his "slop" were marks of blood, which he said were caused by a rabbit which he caught. - The Jury, after a short consultation returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against James Harris," who was afterwards removed in custody to Axminster.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Recent Fatal Fall At Devonport. - The Inquest on the body of the lad JOHN FEDRICK ROBINS, who was killed by falling from the top to the bottom of an old building at the back of Clowance-street, Devonport, on Friday, was held yesterday at the Devonport Guildhall, before the Deputy Coroner. The facts attending the fatal fall, which we have already given, were detailed by one witness; another who was offered was unable to read or write, although thirteen years of age, and his evidence was therefore, in the opinion of the Deputy Coroner, inadmissible. A third witness, a respectable looking lad named Franks, was objected to by one of the Jury, on the ground that he was a thief, and known to speak falsely. In fact it was proved that he had even in this case invented a sensational account of the accident, although all the other boys declared that he never witnessed it. - Mr Pearse, the owner of the property where the accident occurred, stated that he had sent men to look after the place, and had boarded it up four times since he purchased it. He had not got a man there at the time of the accident, because it took place in the middle of the day, at which time he considered the presence of a man unnecessary. - The Inspector of Nuisances for the Borough complained that a weekly journal, in speaking of the building, had over-stated its bad condition, alleging that it was calculated to create an epidemic and that one person had been obliged to leave his house in consequence of the stench arising from it. - The Deputy Coroner and Jury, agreeing that there was a nuisance occasioned by the building, thought that no such results were calculated to arise from it as stated. - A verdict of "Accidentally Killed by a Fall" was returned, and Mr Pearse announced that he should at once proceed to tear down the premises, and carry out his original intention of building on the land.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 May 1870
EXETER - A farm labourer named WILLIAM AVERY, a resident of Northtawton, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday morning from injuries received on the 6th inst. He was riding on the shafts of a waggon near Eggesford when the horse bolted, and in jumping off he sustained a compound fracture of the thigh. Deceased, who was 20 years of age, was in the employ of Mr Salter, of Barton Farm, Northtawton. A Coroner's Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 May 1870
ROBOROUGH - Child Murder Near Roborough. - A few days since we reported a child murder at Meavy, near Roborough. Yesterday afternoon the Inquest was held at the latter place, and the evidence taken was to the following effect:- On Wednesday morning last, about eleven o'clock, a young woman named MARY ANNE TREWIN left the Tavistock Union Workhouse with a strong healthy illegitimate female child, five weeks old, and went to Clarebrook, a small village near Meavy. When she arrived there she told her friends that the child had died about ten days previously in the Tavistock Union, and had been buried at Tavistock. The following Friday a man in charge of the leat on Roborough Down found the body of the child in the water of the leat. A woman resembling TREWIN was seen near the spot where the body was found by a boy in the afternoon of Wednesday last; and about the same time TREWIN was seen going towards Clarebrook, and shortly after was lost sight of. It was proved that the woman had lied a great deal in the many statements she put forth as to the whereabouts of the child. The body of the child was examined by Mr Willis, Horrabridge, who certified that it had died from drowning. After deliberating for two hours the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against TREWIN. The Inquest lasted six hours. she will be brought up before the magistrates this morning at Roborough. It is stated that TREWIN has several times attempted to commit suicide, but there appears to be not the slightest foundation for this statement. The woman was present during the Inquiry, accompanied by some friends.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 May 1870
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict yesterday that the sudden death of MR MARTIN, of 2 Abbey-place, Plymouth, early on Tuesday morning, resulted from Natural Causes, a post mortem examination having shewn he was suffering from a disease near the heart.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 May 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday on the body of BESSY UFFEN, aged 4 ½ years, who was burnt to death on Wednesday, and who resided at the Half Moon Inn, George street, Devonport. The deceased, who slept with her brother in the same room with the servant, caught fire by playing with matches just after the servant got up. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 May 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held in the Royal Albert Hotel, Morice Town yesterday by Mr A. B. Bone, on the body of a man supposed to be called JAMES DAVENPORT. The deceased was a performer about the streets, and one of his feats was t allow anyone to break a stone on his chest. He went to Cawsand, performing on Wednesday; and whilst there he arranged with two men - Richard Clemens and Henry Hicks - to break a stone as usual, before having the stone placed in position saying, "I don't know after whether I shall be dead or alive." After striking several blows with the hammer, Hicks broke the stone; and Clemens following quickly, and not perceiving that it was broken, struck the poor fellow's breast. It was at once seen that he was injured, and they helped him up; but he said that he could walk by himself. He came home to his lodgings at the Lifeboat Inn, Morice Town, and Mr May, surgeon, was called in. DAVENPORT, however died on Thursday. Mr May made a post mortem examination of the body and found two wounds on the small intestine, from which death arose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 May 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of MR ROBERT WHITE STEVENS. - It is with deep regret that we announce the sudden death on Saturday last of MR ROBERT WHITE STEVENS, one of the most respected and valued inhabitants of Plymouth, at the age of 64. For some time past symptoms of declining health had manifested themselves, though not to such an extent as to give any cause for alarm, or, indeed, to render medical attendance necessary; and up to the hour of his death MR STEVENS continued to be engaged in his business avocations. On Saturday afternoon he was at the Winter Villa, Stonehouse, with MRS STEVENS, and some of his family, and there saw Mr Charles Skardon, appearing at that time to be in a fair state of health. Half an hour afterwards, as he was passing Mr Skardon's offices in Bedford-street, alone, he was seen by a bill-poster named Banfield to totter and fall. Banfield at once lifted him, and took him into the office. He was then still alive, but insensible, and without recovering consciousness expired within a quarter of an hour, evidently from disease of the heart. Mr Stephens, surgeon, who was sent for, was almost immediately in attendance, but the deceased gentleman was past all human help. An Inquest was held at seven o'clock by Mr T. C. Brian, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" returned, the proceedings being of course merely formal; and the body of the deceased was then removed to his late residence in Windsor-terrace. - MR R. W. STEVENS was the brother of MR THOMAS STEVENS, who died in December last at the age of 70, also from heart disease; and like him was the architect of his own fortune. He was a Plymothian by birth, his father being the landlord of the Maritime Inn on the Parade. Whilst his brother took to the sea he became a printer, and entered early in life into trade for himself. By his industry, perseverance, and ability he succeeded in establishing the flourishing business of mercantile stationer and chart dealer on the Parade, which up to the time of his decease he continued to direct. He was the author of a work widely known and valued in commercial circles - "STEVENS ON STOWAGE " - which is recognized as the authority upon the important subject whereon it treats. This book has passed through several editions and MR STEVENS was engaged in revising it for another issue. In another capacity he was also well known, as correspondent for the Times at the port of Plymouth, which post he filled with real discretion and acceptance for nearly forty years up to the time of his death. - MR STEVENS, in addition to the successful prosecution of his private affairs, found time to discharge important public duties. For many years he was continuously a member of the Town Council, with the exception of his rejection for a twelvemonth in 1853, with several other good men and true, on account of his support of the then unpopular water bill. In 1854 he returned to his place, and in 1859 he attained to the aldermanic bench, upon which his decease will create a vacancy. He acted at various times as chairman of the water, special works, and other committees, in which capacities his business tact and foresight enabled him to render good service to the town, in the progressive capabilities of which he was a firm believer. Hence works of improvement found in him a staunch supporter. He was never given to much speaking, and his remarks were always practical and to the point. In politics the deceased gentleman was a Conservative, and he was a member of the Church of England, having been churchwarden of the parish of Holy Trinity. He was twice married, and has left a widow and a family of twelve children. In token of respect for his memory the Corporation flags at the Guildhall and on the Hoe are at half mast.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 June 1870
PLYMOUTH - A Man Drowned In The Sound. - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall on the body of ROBERT CHAFFE, a porter. The deceased was last seen alive at five o'clock yesterday morning, when he was proceeding along George-street, apparently in a sober state towards the railway station. Two hours later his body was seen by a young man named George Thomas washing against the rocks at Rusty Anchor, at the back of West Hoe-terrace. Two gentlemen passing at the time told Thomas to fetch the Hoe constable, and he at once ran to Kessel's house. In the meantime a waterman towed the body into the Pebble Beach east of the West Hoe Baths. The Jury thought that when the body was first discovered an effort should have been made to have got it on shore, as life might not at that time have been extinct. - Thomas explained that he was too much frightened at what he saw, and he hastened to do as directed by the gentlemen. - The Coroner considered such assistance was not given as they had a right to expect. - The deceased, who was about fifty years of age, had of late been in a desponding state, and for the last three weeks he had been out of work. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was Found Drowned, but how he got into the water there was no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 June 1870
TRURO - SAMUEL THOMAS, of Plymouth, who has been in the habit of attending fairs with a cup and balls, fell in Kenwyn-street, Truro, on Sunday and died within a few minutes. The deceased, who had been in Truro in a destitute condition for some days, had just partaken of bread and butter for tea, which had been given to him by the landlord of the Golden Lion Inn. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" has been returned by a Coroner's Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 June 1870
PETER TAVY - An Inquest was held at Petertavy, on Monday, before Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on the body of an old man called ROBERT ASH, aged 72, who was killed at Wheal Friendship on the previous Friday. He had been working a machine on one of the landings at the surface, and was missed for a few minutes. On looking for him it was found that he had fallen over an embankment about 10 feet high, and must have been killed instantly, as he fell on his head. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 June 1870
PLYMOUTH - On Saturday morning, at nine o'clock, Mr Brian, the Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on the body of EDWARD PLACKETT, one of the soldiers drowned on the 22nd May last in the Sound. The evidence was similar to that given in the case of SETH WILLIAMS, and the Jury, of which Mr Thomas Brown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 17 June 1870
BRIXHAM - The Jury at the Coroner's Inquest on the body of the coal-porter ELLIS, who hanged himself on Wednesday at Higher Brixham, have returned a verdict of "Committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 June 1870
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall upon the body of JOHN IFE. A labourer named James said he was walking that morning near the ladies' bathing place under the Hoe, and seeing something black in the water took off his cloths and brought the body of the deceased to the beach, where a hat, supposed to belong to the dead man, was found. - EMMA IFE stated that she was the wife of the deceased, whom she had last seen alive about half-past four on Tuesday morning, when he went out for a walk,. He had been several years servant to Mr Mulley, and appeared to be comfortable. She could not imagine any reason for his committing suicide. - P.C. Jones found two books, a newspaper, 10s. 6d. in silver and 1s. 0 ½d. upon the deceased, who, in his opinion, had been for several hours in the water. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 June 1870
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Ford, concerning the death of GEORGE PENGELLY, 37 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a wood near Camel's Head. The deceased, who has been in a desponding state for the last two months, left his home on Tuesday afternoon, telling his wife he was going to Plymouth, and was not seen again until Wednesday afternoon, when his lifeless body was discovered. The Jury found that the unfortunate man committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 June 1870
TORQUAY - Death By Drowning At Torquay. - An Inquest was held by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, yesterday, on the body of DAVID WHITE, who was drowned in the new harbour works last Saturday night. Several witnesses were examined, and from their evidence it appeared that the deceased and three or four others were engaged in extending the outer staging of the new pier head, and were carrying out some railway metals for the purpose of laying down. Deceased had hold of one end of a rail and was walking backwards with it, and in stepping from the permanent work to the plank staging the deceased missed his footing and fell into the sea, his head coming in contact with a cross beam as he went down. The water was 25 feet deep. The body was recovered in about half an hour. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to Acting Police Sergeant Board to hand over to the deceased's widow, who has been left with five young children.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 July 1870
PLYMOUTH - Suspected Child Murder At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of a newly-born male child found in the closet of 132 King-street West. About seven o'clock on Sunday morning a young girl went to the closet, and saw a child which had been thrust, head downwards, into the narrow portion of the pan. She informed the landlord, Mr J. Heals, who took the child out. Upon his doing so, some coloured fluid, which filled the closet up to the feet of the child, ran off. This fluid, it was considered, must have been thrown in after the body had been forcibly placed in the position described, as the closet contained no trapand; the water must otherwise have run away. A policeman was called in, and spots were traced from the court through the passage and up the stairs to the door of a room occupied by a labourer named VICARY and his wife, who is 21 years of age, and has been married for about two years, having had no children previous to Sunday. A stone in the court bore the impress of a child's body. Between ten and eleven o'clock Inspector Daw and P.C. Evens of the Plymouth detective police, went to the house and saw MRS VICARY washing some plates in the room of her mother, MRS WARD. When asked, MRS VICARY raised no objection to the officers going to her room, where spots were found upon the floor, for which she accounted by saying they were marks of red paint. Her husband was not in the house at this time. An attempt had apparently been made t wash the stains outside Mrs Ward's room, and in the room of MRS VICARY. In reply to a remark of P.C. Evens, she said, "I have had no child, and you can send for as many doctors as you like." Dr Pearse came to the house and examined her, she freely submitting. She presented all the appearances of a woman recently confined, without having had any of the ordinary attention paid to her. Inspector Daw took her into custody, and conveyed her in a cab to the Workhouse, where she now remains. In the afternoon some stained underclothing, identified by the husband and mother of MRS VICARY as belonging to her, was found wrapped in an apron, and concealed under the bed. An attempt had been made to wash the articles. Mrs Ward, the mother of the woman, positively asserted that she had no idea that her daughter was enceinte, and that she did not see her between half-past eleven on Saturday night, when she went to her room, and the discovery of the body on Sunday morning. The husband, who thought his wife was enceinte, stated that he went to bed about half-past one on Sunday morning, went to sleep, and did not wake until half-past eight, about an hour and a half after the body was found. Dr Pearse made a post mortem examination of the body yesterday. It was that of a fully-developed and well-formed child, although small for a male. The placentia was attached to the body. There were no marks of violence. The lungs were partially inflated, and of a light pink colour, thus shewing they had come into contact with the air. They floated both when entire and when divided. The child had breathed but imperfectly. The lungs crepitated slightly on pressure, and their appearance might be accounted for by the child having breathed in the act of parturition, not having been completely born. Children might be born alive and yet breathe imperfectly, dying after a few gasps. He could not undertake to say that the child was fully born alive. It might have lived with a proper amount of care, and might have died in the act of parturition. - The Jury, a double one, found that the child was that of SARAH VICARY, that it was found dead, but that whether it was born alive or how it came into the closet there was no evidence to shew. - The Inquiry lasted for more than three hours. The woman when sufficiently well will be brought before the magistrates.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 July 1870
EXETER - WILLIAM EASTERBROOK, a tailor, residing in Paul-street, Exeter, committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself. Deceased had for some time been a sufferer from epileptic fits, and had been in a desponding state. His wife carried him a cup of tea to his bedroom yesterday morning, and half an hour afterwards found him hanging by a rope to a clothes hook behind the door. He was quite dead when cut down. At an Inquest held in the afternoon a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 July 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Sailors' Home concerning the death of GEORGE MORRIS, late a seaman on board the barque Viking, at present lying in the Great Western Docks. Deceased, who had been lodging at the Home since Monday, was a strong, muscular man, in the prime of life, and apparently in good health. Yesterday morning he went to a dormitory to lie down, and upon a messmate proceeding to the room about an hour afterwards to arouse him, in order that he might come to dinner he was found lying on a bed, dressed and in a dying state. Mr Hicks, surgeon, arrived about ten minutes afterwards, but life was extinct before he came. The master of the Viking, Charles Gentles, tendered himself as a witness in consequence of reports having been circulated that deceased's health had been impaired through being compelled to sleep on deck during the last six weeks of the voyage from Constantinople. Witness stated that the cargo, consisting of maize, having become heated the crew had been in the habit of sleeping on deck to avoid the steam rising from the hold. He had ordered a house on the deck to be cleared for the use of the men, but only two availed themselves of it. Witness further stated, two of the crew corroborating, that deceased had no cause of complaint, and that the food was good, both as regards quantity and quality. The Jury, of whom Mr Putt was Foreman, were perfectly satisfied that no blame was to be attached to anyone, and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 15 July 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of SAMUEL FARLEY. Deceased, who carried on business as a baker in Briton-side, went into his bake-house shortly after five yesterday morning and complained of being unwell. Shortly before seven he assisted in mixing, and suddenly fell to the ground, groaned, and died. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. MR FARLEY was 49 years of age.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 July 1870
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, Torquay, on the body of GEORGE POTTER, a labourer, aged twenty-nine years. He was engaged at a quarry beneath Daddy Hole, and while hauling along a "tilly" or truck he slipped over the edge of the precipice and fell into the sea. James Matthews and Robert Northcote, fellow workmen, hastened to the rescue, and threw ropes to him, but he sank immediately. Grapples were used and the body was recovered in half an hour. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 July 1870
TOTNES - The Death From Drowning At Totnes. - An Inquest was held at Totnes yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, concerning the death of HENRY HARRIS, nine years of age, who was drowned in the river Dart on Friday evening by accidentally falling from the shooting marsh into the water. Some boys who were bathing near the spot having been informed of the occurrence by a boy, who, although with deceased, did not see him fall into the river, drew the attention of some people on board a small steamboat passing at the time. A man put off from the steamer in a boat, pulled to the spot, and endeavoured with an oar to find the deceased. He did not succeed, and went back to the steamer, which then went on her way to Dartmouth. Mr W. W. Holman stated that he recovered the body by means of a fluking rake after several hours' search, and after he and others had dived several times to endeavour to recover it. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned;" and at the suggestion of the Foreman, Mr Theodore Hannaford, they desired the Coroner to communicate with the mayor of the Borough their opinion that so many cases of drowning having occurred, it was a reproach to the inhabitants of the town to remain any longer unprovided with drags and other appliances for the rescue of life and the recovery of bodies. They recommended a supply of such drags, &c., for different parts of the river, and handed in their fees towards the purchase. The Coroner referred to the conduct of Mr W. Holman and the others who dived for the deceased as most praiseworthy.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 July 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday concerning the death of GEORGE SKELTON, aged 50 years. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Rew, brewer, Richmond-street, and when engaged at his work in a loft, on the 12th February last, had occasion to descend a ladder to attend to a copper of hops, which had but a few minutes previous stopped boiling. The ladder slipped, and precipitated the deceased into the copper. He was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was found to have been severely scalded about the back and lower parts of the body. Notwithstanding the careful attention bestowed on him the deceased expired on Thursday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 August 1870
TORQUAY - A Shocking Sudden Death At Torquay. - WM. EDWORTHY died suddenly at Torquay on Sunday morning. He was about thirty years of age, had served in the navy in the East Indies, and as a petty officer. About six months ago he was paid off, and came home to Torquay. Subsequently he had spent his money very loosely with dissipated people. Last Saturday he was drinking a great part of the day at a public-house near the quay - the Steam Packet Inn. In the evening he got amongst some rough characters and picked up with some of the girls of the town. Later on he took a cab and went home with one of the girls to her lodgings in Ellacombe. When the girl woke about five o'clock next morning the man was lying beside her dead. A Coroner's Inquiry was held last evening.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 August 1870
NEWTON ST CYRES - Murderous Folly At Newton St. Cyres. - An Inquest was held yesterday, near Newton St. Cyres, on the body of THOMAS BASTIN, a child twelve months old, who was shot on Sunday afternoon by Peter Cann, a sawyer, about 18 years of age, under circumstances reported yesterday. The evidence shewed that the gun with which the child was fatally shot belonged to a pensioner named Gibson, who resided next door to BASTIN. Cann went to Gibson's on Sunday afternoon to buy some nuts, and seeing a gun behind the door he took it up. He said to James Perkins, a farm labourer who was in company with him, he would try to frighten the folks next door. He went to the doorway of BASTIN'S house and thrust in the barrel without entering himself. He then pulled the trigger without putting the gun to his shoulder, and shot the child dead, severely wounded the mother, and injured a young man named Elworthy who was in the room. Cann gave evidence at the Inquest and said he believed it was a nut gun, and that it was unloaded. It was part of an old musket which had been fixed to a stock by Gibson, and fastened with a piece of tin. Gibson, who attended fairs with a nut stall, said he had loaded the gun some days before to shoot a blackbird. It was capped, but the hammer was on the cap. - The Coroner censured Gibson for leaving a loaded gun in such a place; and the Jury, after a long deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Coroner (Mr Crosse) told Cann he hoped it would be a warning to him.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 August 1870
TORQUAY - A Torquay Victim To The Drink Trade. - The Coroner's Inquest concerning the death of WILLIAM EDWORTHY, a seaman, who was found dead in a house of bad repute at Ellacombe, Torquay, on Sunday morning, was resumed on Tuesday night, at the Infirmary. A great number of witnesses were examined, and the evidence was to the effect that the deceased was paid off six months ago; that he came to Torquay with more than £100 in his pocket; that he daily frequented the Steam Packet Inn; that he was invariably carried to the house at Ellacombe drunk; that on Saturday he was at the Steam Packet from twelve o'clock in the day to midnight; that he was taken to Ellacombe helplessly drunk, and put on a bed; and that the next morning he was found dead. He had evidently turned his face on the pillow, and, being unable to help himself, was suffocated. The medical evidence was to the effect that the various organs were healthy, but very much congested. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was Accidentally Suffocated whilst in a state of helpless intoxication." - The coroner severely reprimanded Crocker, the landlord of the Inn, for supplying the man with so much drink when he was already drunk. The woman Farmer was sharply lectured for keeping a disreputable house.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 August 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Milehouse. - An Inquest was held at the Britannia Inn, Milehouse, on Saturday, by Mr A. B. Bone, the Devonport Borough Coroner, on the body of SUSANNAH MORTIMER, 60 years of age, who died from injuries received by being thrown out of a trap on Friday. Deceased, with three other women and two children, were driven in a light spring trap from Devonport to Milehouse by a man named Muchmore, to whom the pony and trap belonged. They stopped at the Britannia Inn, Milehouse, where they had a quart of porter, and then the head of the pony was turned to proceed down the Saltash road - which is almost at right angles with the Milehouse road - to go to Devonport Workhouse. In turning the corner the trap capsized on the near side where deceased was sitting, and she fell out, receiving internal injuries from which she soon after died. The trap met with no obstruction in turning the corner, and the only explanation of the occurrence was that the spring on deceased's side gave way slightly, and that she then caught hold of Muchmore, pulling him over, and thereby causing him to tighten the rein. It was first stated that the man was drink at the time, but all the witnesses at the Inquest denied this, and the mayor of Devonport also asserted that he was sober, although very much excited. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 August 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Dolphin Inn last evening concerning the death of the infant daughter, one month old, of MR STANBURY, baker, Southside-street. The child had previously been in good health, but upon the parents awaking at half-past six on Sunday morning, she was found to be dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.
Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 August 1870
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Exeter Workhouse on the body of a newly-born child. A young woman named ADAMS, who had been lodging for a few days in Smythen-street, but who belonged to Topsham, was on Monday removed in a cab for the purpose of being taken to the Workhouse to be confined there. While in the cab the child was born, but before medical assistance arrived the infant had died. Medical evidence shewed that it had been Accidentally Suffocated, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 August 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at the Townhall, Devonport, on Saturday, with reference to the death of GEORGE WHEELER, 50 years of age, a retired sergeant in the artillery militia, who died the previous evening. On Friday morning the deceased drank a pint and half of ale, besides taking laudanum. Later in the day he went into a grocer's shop, sat on a chair, and shortly afterwards became insensible. Mr R. J. Laity stated that the deceased died from apoplexy, which might have been accelerated by drinking laudanum. A verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Destitution And Death At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday at the Queen's Arms Inn, North-road, Plymouth, concerning the death of BELLA NELSON, who had died in circumstances of great poverty and destitution. Deceased was the wife of a Dane, a bandsman on board H.M.S. Royal Adelaide, who, together with a daughter by a former husband, a child 13 years of age, resided with her. The husband was in receipt of 8s. per week and his rations. Deceased has been suffering for a considerable time from consumption, and about a fortnight since sent her daughter to Mr Mayell, relieving officer of the district, who, finding that the child's stepfather was a bandsman, and slept at home every night, hesitated to give her a medical order. Eventually one was given and Mr Graham, surgeon, saw the deceased. He prescribed medicine for her, and subsequently gave a recommendation for the supply of meat. This was taken to the office of Mr Mayell, who declined to accede to it, telling the child that her stepfather should call himself. Mr Graham stated that finding the recommendation was not complied with he desisted from giving any further aid in the case, which was clearly one in which not medicine, but nourishment of an extra kind, such as beef, arrowroot, and wine were required, things which [?] in the circumstances of deceased could not obtain. If his recommendation had been complied with he should have given others for articles of the same description. Although the illness of the woman was sure to have had a fatal termination; yet, if she had had extra nourishment her life might have been extended, and she might have been living at the present time. - Mr Mayell gave evidence, and Mr J. W. Matthews, clerk of the Plymouth Board of Guardians, explained to the Jury that recommendations such as the one given by Mr Graham were not obligatory on Mr Mayell, who was bound to exercise discretion as to whether he ought to comply with it. In the present case the husband received as good as 10s. per week, and it was not Mr Mayell's duty to comply with the medical recommendation. - The Coroner having summed up, and pointed out the law bearing upon the case, the room was cleared. After a long deliberation, the Jury, of which Mr George Rogers was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes," appending a statement that they considered the husband was to blame in not making a personal application to the relieving officer and that Mr Mayell should be censured for not complying with the medical officer's recommendation, or at least for not going himself personally to inquire into the case.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 August 1870
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at the Marine Hotel, Coxside, Plymouth, concerning the death of JOHN SAMUEL REED BUNCEHALL, who fell over and was found lying dead at the bottom of the stairs by his wife, with whom he resided at Teat's-hill. Deceased received an injury to his head at Keyham factory about twelve months since, and was very excitable. He had had an altercation with a man just previous to his death on Saturday evening. A verdict of "Death from an Accidental Fall" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 19 August 1870
PLYMOUTH - Two men in the employ of Messrs. Barter and Jordan were on Wednesday evening pushing a cart down Harwell-street, Plymouth. When near Glanville-street they felt a jerk, and immediately after they saw that they had run over a child. One of the men quickly took the child to Dr Square, who pronounced the case hopeless, and the child died two hours afterwards. No one seems to have seen the deceased until the cart had passed over it. The child was two years old, and was the son of JAMES EDWARD NAPPER, cooper in the Sugar Refinery, Mill-lane, Plymouth. An Inquest was held last evening, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 September 1870
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Brutal Sergeant Of Marines. - Mr Allan B. Bone, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Stonehouse concerning the death of SARAH MARIA RYAN, who, it was said, had died from injuries received from her husband, WM. RYAN, a sergeant in the Marines. The deceased had been attended during her illness by a girl named Jennett, and she had several times complained of severe suffering. On Monday, the 15th, the deceased, who was pregnant, went to the house of her brother, ALFRED ARNOLD, High street, Stonehouse, where she met her husband, and there was a quarrel. RYAN asked her why she did not come back, and struck her violently. ARNOLD, who was in the room at the time of the occurrence, gave his evidence in a very loose and ambiguous manner. He said he did not see the occurrence because his sight was bad. He was frequently told by the Coroner to tell all he knew about the affair, and not to perjure himself. - Evidence was given that the deceased had several times complained of her husband's ill-treatment, and that he frequently threatened to stab her with a knife. - Mr Bulteel, who made a post mortem examination on the body of the deceased, said he could arrive at no other conclusion than that she had died from natural causes, and added that fright might have caused miscarriage. - After consideration, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, and added that they wished the Coroner to censure RYAN for his cruel conduct towards his wife. - The Coroner strongly admonished him for his cowardly conduct in striking a woman, and especially who was his wife, and who was in a debilitated physical condition. As a soldier and a man, he should always be humane; and he ought surely to be ashamed and disgusted with himself at having ill-treated his wife in a manner so shameful and deplorable. The deceased was 34 years of age, and leaves three young children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 September 1870
DARTMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held last evening at Dartmouth, before Mr Puddicombe, concerning the death of WILLIAM DAVIDGE, who was drowned at Redlap Cove, near Dartmouth, on the 22nd of August. The body was identified by the widow. Robert Godfrey deposed to finding the body. Henry Coaker deposed that on the 22nd ult., he was out in a yacht and saw a lighter coming out of Redlap Cove. She was deeply laden, and appeared to roll over and go down. He attributed the accident to over-loading. He bore down on the lighter and was on the spot in about five or six minutes, but could see nothing of the men; a few planks were floating about. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." - The body of the other man Godfrey, has not yet been recovered.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 September 1870
SANDFORD - A Man named HARFORD, accidentally set fire to his clothes in a limekiln at Sandford, near Exeter, on Monday week last received injuries which resulted in his death. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 September 1870
EXETER - THOMAS SULLIVAN, railway clerk, the young man who fell out of a train on the North Devon Railway, near the Eggesford station, some weeks ago, died on Friday last at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It will be remembered that the deceased was missed from a compartment of a train, the both doors of which were locked, and early the next morning he was discovered sitting on an embankment close by the line of rails, about a mile and a quarter on the Southmolton side of the Eggesford station. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." No evidence as to how deceased got out of the train was given at the inquest.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 September 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, concerning the death of MARGARET MARTIN, 83 years of age. The old woman lived in a room at 6 Moon-street, alone, and received 3s. a week parochial relief. A neighbour, named Eliza Wright, who had been very kind to her, found her dead in her bed at seven o'clock yesterday morning. There was no fireplace in her room, and the deceased was in great destitution, having hardly anything but rags about her. She had been a widow for years. Many of the Jury thought it was a pity that the old woman could not have been induced to go into the Workhouse, and in this the Coroner concurred. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board The Inconstant. - Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday on the body of SAMUEL SHATTOCK, who was killed on board H.M.S. Inconstant on Friday whilst on her way from Vigo to Plymouth. The captain of the vessel, Captain Aplin, ordered the men to be at quarters on Friday and exercise the guns. Among those who were working the after pivot gun was GUNNER SHATTOCK, aged 23, a native of Taunton. The gun "fetched away," throwing the men who were attending the "falls" off it. It then surged round, and no one being there to stop its course, knocked down SHATTOCK, who was at his proper station, killing him instantaneously. Several of the Jury asked questions of the witnesses with the view of ascertaining what their opinions were as to the propriety of ordering the men to quarters on a day when there was a stiff breeze blowing with a good sea on. The answers given were contradictory, and the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Thursday, in order that Captain Aplin might attend.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 September 1870
KINGSBRIDGE - Two Inquests were held at Kingsbridge yesterday by Mr Michelmore. The first was on HENRY CAMPION, who committed suicide by cutting his throat and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.
The second was on THOMAS STONEMAN, aged 22 years, a man in the employ of Mrs Jarvis, Phoenix brewery, Dodbrooke. The unfortunate man, while engaged in his work on the 30th of August, had to walk across a large cauldron, in which was boiling liquid 22 inches deep. The plank slipped, and he fell into the liquor on his legs, being immersed half-way up his thighs. Although he sprang out immediately, the scalds were so severe that he lingered in great pain until yesterday morning at five o'clock, when he died, lock-jaw having seized him a short time previously. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 September 1870
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Inconstant. The Captain Censured By A Coroner's Jury. - The adjourned Inquest concerning the death of SAMUEL SHATTOCK, gunner Royal Marine Artillery, who was killed on board the Inconstant on the 9th instant, was held yesterday at the Stonehouse Police Station by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy County Coroner. Deceased was engaged in working the after pivot gun, when it "fetched way," and threw off the men who were attending the falls. It then surged round, and, no one being there to stop it, knocked down the deceased, who was 21 years of age, killing him instantly. Captain Elphinstone, D'O. D'A. Aplin, who was in command of the vessel at the time, attended the Inquiry yesterday, and produced the ship's log book. - The Coroner, addressing him, said the Inquest had been adjourned as he (Captain Aplin) had given orders for the guns to be worked, as several of the witnesses swore that they believed at the time they went to work the guns there was danger, and that working the after pivot gun caused deceased's death. He (the Coroner) mentioned this as no man was bound to make any statement that might prejudice him. - Captain Aplin said the responsibility for what occurred on board the ship rested entirely with him, but he wished to know before he was sworn why he was called on to attend an Inquest when he was not present at the time the accident occurred. - The Coroner: Because in pursuance of an order you gave the man met with his death. - Captain Aplin said he was quite willing to assist the Jury, and being sworn, gave evidence, of which the following, omitting several slight altercations with the Coroner, is a summary:- At the time the accident took place - shortly before ten in the morning - the ship was heeling over 16 degrees to starboard. With proper care there would be no danger in working the guns with the ship heeling over to such an extent. There was nothing whatever at the time to prevent the guns from being cast adrift, and he had no hesitation in ordering the ship's company to go to quarters, considering the weather and everything relating to the duty the men had to perform. The witness here insisted that the exact words he had uttered should be taken down. - The Coroner said it was very unusual in a court of justice to dictate what questions should be asked. - After some further remarks the witness stated that he had been on the bridge and saw what the roll was ten minutes or quarter of an hour before giving the order to go to quarters, and immediately after giving the order he went on the bridge again. Previous to giving the order he satisfied himself that the weather was sufficiently fine to go to general quarters. - The Coroner inquired if the witness thought it was perfectly safe to work the gun when the ship was heeling over to 16 degrees? - Witness considered walking along the streets dangerous, for a chimney pot might fall. There was danger in any weather, and it would be "rather strong" for any man to say on oath what was perfectly safe. - The Coroner: You expressed an opinion to me that no Inquest was necessary; will you be kind enough to explain why you think so? - Witness, in reply, stated that his official instructions did not require an Inquest to be held in the event of a man dying or accidentally meeting with his death on board ship, unless the captain desired it. At the time of the accident the Inconstant was from 130 to 140 miles from land. - The Coroner remarked that something was said at the previous Inquiry that the deceased would have been buried at sea, if it had not been for the wish of his messmates. - Witness replied that whenever a man met with his death at sea, if there were a probability of the ship being soon in harbour, he was buried on land; if not, or if his messmates did not wish it, he was buried at sea. He had had deceased's messmates consulted upon the subject, and the answer was that they thought they would wish him to be buried on shore. - The Coroner wished to know whether witness considered it was perfectly safe to work the after pivot gun, 6 ½ tons in weight, when the ship was heeling over 16 degrees. He would be glad of a specific and not a general, answer. - Witness: Certainly, with proper care. - The Coroner remarked that that opened another question. Did the witness mean with more than ordinary care? - Captain Aplin said he saw the gun moved up. It appeared perfectly safe. By proper care he meant ordinary care under the circumstances. He was not aware of any peculiar danger in working the after pivot gun. They were under steam and sail, and going at the rate of twelve knots an hour. He should not think there was more danger in working a pivot gun than another, but there was more difficulty. They would have to fight when the ship was heeling over 16 degrees, and it was their duty to become accustomed to it. There was a stop handspike as well as a table to stop the gun. - Lieutenant Donald, R.M.A., who was in command of the party working the gun, here remarked that the gun had not arrived at the point where the stop handspike should be used. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it appeared to him on the day the Inquiry commenced that it should be adjourned, in order that Capt. Aplin might be present. The only question was whether proper care was observed. Several of the men who were working the gun expressed the opinion, before they went to work, that there was danger. The captain, who gave the order, was on the bridge three or four minutes before the accident. [Capt. Aplin observed that he could not be positive to a minute.] If Capt. Aplin meant thirteen or fourteen minutes, there was no reliance to be placed upon his statement made on oath. Many of the men said before working the gun that they considered it would be dangerous, and the deceased himself observed that it was a "leg breaking" case. - Lieut. Donald, being referred to , interposed to explain what he meant by the evidence he gave on the previous occasion. He did not think they would have gone to general quarters when the ship was heeling over so much; not because of any fear of danger, but because it would be very hard work for the men, and very little good would result from it. There would not have been any danger if he had had a turn taken in the lee tackle. - The Coroner, in the course of some further remarks, said it was not respectful to the Court to come there and slur the questions that were asked. His remarks were not meant to apply to Lieut. Donald, but in another quarter. Did Mr Donald think it safe to work the gun with the ship heeling over 16 degrees? - [Lieut. Donald: Certainly.] The Inquest ought to have been held by the Coroner of Saltash, who had jurisdiction over the neighbouring waters, but the body having been landed in his district he had no alternative but to hold it. - After about twenty minutes' private deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Foreman adding, "the Jury are of opinion that the captain did not use sufficient discretion in going to quarters in such weather."

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 September 1870
LYNTON - Sudden Death Of A Q.C. In North Devon. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Lynton on Thursday concerning the death of MR ALEXANDER NORMAN. Q.C., a gentleman between 50 and 60 years of age, residing at Rutland-square, Dublin. The deceased arrived at Lynton alone on the previous morning, called at the Valley of Rocks Hotel, where he ordered a place to be kept for him at the table d'hote at seven o'clock, and a bed for the night, and then left, saying he was going for a walk. In the afternoon, as Mr A. Ditchfield, of London, a visitor at Lynton, was returning with several ladies from Lynmouth from a drive, he saw the deceased lying on his face by the side of the road. He lifted him up, and found him to be quite dead. - Mr F. R. Fairbank having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Natural Causes - probably disease of the heart.

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at Torquay yesterday on the bodies of two workmen named STRAWBRIDGE and VEALE, who were killed on Thursday at the new harbour works by the falling of a crane. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, on the body of ELIZA JANE STREET, eight years of age, who died from injuries received by falling into the fire in a room. The evidence went to shew that deceased accidentally met with her death, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the circumstances.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 September 1870
ASHBURTON - Fatal Accident At Ashburton. - Mr Michelmore, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Market Hall, Ashburton, on Friday, on the body of MR GEORGE EDGECOMBE, saddler, of that town, who died from injuries sustained by being thrown out of a trap whilst returning from Widdecombe fair on the previous Tuesday night. Deceased was in his trap alone, the person who had accompanied him to the fair returning home on foot, starting before deceased, believing that he would overtake him. He did not consider MR EDGECOMBE in an unfit state to manage the horse. Messrs. Easterbrook and Northcott, farmers, who rode on their horses in front and behind deceased respectively, stated that the trap upset in rounding the turn at Chittleford Farm. Deceased had a wound in his right temple about two inches long, from which a large quantity of blood was lost. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," appending a suggestion to the effect that the Coroner should communicate with the Highway Board relative to the dangerous state of the road, and the turning near Chittleford Farm. At the conclusion of the Inquest the Coroner asked whose duty it was to keep the room - the Market Hall - in repair, and on being informed that it was the lord of the manor, who intended visiting Ashburton the following day, he expressed a hope "That he would find it necessary to sit there," referring to the dust on the bench, tables and forms in the room.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 September 1870
DAWLISH - JOHN BATTEN, aged sixty-three, a resident of Dawlish, was found hanging behind his room door in that town on Monday night, and at the Inquest yesterday evidence was given shewing that deceased's mind seemed impaired of late. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned.

PAIGNTON - The Coroner's Inquest on the body of GEORGE LEAR, who was killed by falling into an open quarry at Paignton, has resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury recommended that Mr Belfield, the owner of the quarry, be requested to build a wall around his property, which the Coroner undertook to communicate to him.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 October 1870
EXETER - Strange Suicide At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest at Mount Radford, Exeter, yesterday afternoon, on the body of SARAH LEY, a young woman 26 years, the daughter of the landlady of the Mount Radford Inn. According to the evidence of her mother, a widow, deceased has been in a feeble state of health for some time; and her mind suffered. At night she would wander about the house declaring there was somebody on the roof, whistling down the chimneys. Deceased was missed on Friday afternoon; but her mother, thinking she had gone to Countess Weir, two or three miles distant, was not uneasy about her, and does not appear to have been alarmed at not seeing her for the night. ~She had noticed that the door of one of the rooms on the ground floor was locked, but this raised no suspicion in her mind. The next morning she found that there was no key in the lock of this door. Still she waited until the evening, when she had the door broken open. In one corner of the room huddled up she found the body of her daughter quite dead. On Sunday morning she found a bottle of laudanum in an upstair room, which had been taken from a drawer which MRS LEY kept locked, but the lock had been forced. No post mortem examination had been made; but acting on an opinion expressed by Dr Elliott, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased had poisoned herself with laudanum while in an Unsound State of Mind.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Effects Of A Mother's Drunkenness. - The sad and it is believed fatal results of parental neglect will form the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at Stonehouse today. On Tuesday last a child named JOHN LORD, two years of age, whose parents reside at Cleave's Cottages, George-street, Stonehouse, was conveyed to the Workhouse by order of Mr Perry, the medical officer, who visited the child in consequence of an information given to the relieving officer. The little fellow was in a most deplorable condition. He was covered with vermin, his hair was closely matted to his head, and he was suffering from water on the brain, but principally from starvation and neglect. He gradually sank, and died between eight and nine on Saturday morning. As we stated on Friday, the Guardians decided at their meeting on the previous day to prosecute the mother, in consequence of the report given by Mr Bignell, the relieving officer, who said when he visited her she had a pack of cards telling her fortune, the child lying asleep on a heap of straw in a corner of the room, which was in a most filthy state. Her husband is a marine, at present in the hospital, and when the lieutenant of marines made his periodical visit he was shewn into the clean room of a neighbour instead of her own dirty apartment, in order that her husband should not be ordered to reside in the barracks. The woman although young, is said to be of very intemperate habits, and the deceased was her only child.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 October 1870
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sad Death Of A Child At Stonehouse. - On the morning of the 4th of the present month Mr Bignall, the relieving officer of Stonehouse, went to 1 Cleave's cottages, George-street, and found a child about two years old in a shocking condition. The child was named JOHN LORD, and was the son of a marine, who is addicted to drunkenness, and who now lies in hospital with the worst of diseases. The mother, an Irishwoman, was sitting on some straw in a corner of the room with a broken chair in front of her, on which were a few playing cards, the remainder of a pack she had in her hand, and she was apparently "telling her own fortune." There was a portion of a bedstead in the room; some of the posts were against the wall, and others on the floor. There was nothing on the bedstead, and this and the chair were the only articles of furniture in the room. The child was lying on the straw apparently asleep, with a small piece of rag over him. Grease was literally piled up in some places on the chair, which had served for a candlestick. The room had a very dirty appearance, and indicated general neglect. Mr Bignall went to the Marine Infirmary. Dr Burnett visited the child, who was taken to the Workhouse. Every attention was paid to it in the Workhouse by the nurse, but it died on the Saturday following the relieving officer's visit. At the Inquest on the child yesterday, it was stated by a person named Hawthorne, living in the cottage, that the child was delicate and sickly from birth and that the mother fed it with arrowroot and other meat, but it vomited as soon as it was fed. She had seen the mother drunk once. She had frequently lent the mother of the child money to buy eatables, and had often attended to the child by night. Another neighbour asserted that the mother and her husband were both too fond of drink, and it was also elicited that the woman was in receipt of 5s. 10d. per week, the smallness of the sum being accounted for by the deductions from the usual pay while her husband was in hospital, and that she spent 6d. a week in tobacco for her husband, and 1s. 3d. for rent; also that she had had arrowroot and wine supplied her from the Dispensary. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Perry and Mr Bulteel at the request of the Coroner, Mr A. B. Bone, sen.; and Mr Perry, who gave evidence, believed that the child died from disease of the brain, but that this was not occasioned by deficient aliment or personal attention. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect, but the Coroner strongly censured the mother, who was present, for her "disgraceful conduct."

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 October 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dock Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday, to Inquire into the cause of the death of a man named BATHURST, fifty-five years of age. It was shewn that the deceased received injuries, which resulted fatally, in the lower part of his body while engaged in rolling a cask of sugar in the Great Western Docks, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 October 1870
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Captain, R.A. - CAPTAIN ANDREW HENRY, R.A., V.C., commanding the 4th division of coast brigade, died suddenly at Plymouth on Friday night. The deceased was a gallant soldier, and greatly respected, having by his own exertions and merit won his way to the position he held. He has been for many years stationed in the Western District, and on Friday he had been over a Bovisand (accompanied by his wife and one of his children, and a lady friend) to superintend gun practice by a detachment of his division, on which occasion he appeared to be in his usual excellent health and spirits. The practice over, he returned to the Citadel about 6.30 p.m., and whilst sitting at the table in his quarters, in cheerful conversation with his family and friends, including Captain Grier, he was suddenly observed to put his hand to his head, at the same time complaining of an unusual sensation of giddiness, and changing colour. Before medical aid could be procured he had fallen from his chair. Dr McAdam, who attended immediately afterwards, pronounced him quite dead. - On Saturday evening the Borough coroner, (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on the body, and the Jury, after hearing the facts, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Captain Grier desired that the expenses which he was allowed as a witness might be handed over to the Captain Relief Fund. - CAPTAIN HENRY, who was only 45 years of age, served in the Eastern campaign, of 1854-55, including the battles of Alma, Balaklava, and Inkerman, and the siege of Sebastopol (medal with four clasps and Turkish medal), and received the Victoria Cross for defending the guns of his battery against overwhelming numbers of the enemy at the battle of Inkerman, and continuing to do so until he had received 12 bayonet wounds. An older brother of the deceased, who will, we understand, be present at the funeral, which takes place on Wednesday at the Cemetery, is captain-commanding the 8th Division of Coast Brigade R.A., at Dublin, and who also distinguished himself in the Crimean war. A younger brother lost his life in the service of his country, having been blown up, with many others, at the great magazine explosion in the Crimea.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 October 1870
DAWLISH - Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at Dawlish, concerning the death of WM. JOHN MAYS, late of Devonport, who was found dead early on Wednesday morning, in the pond near the railway station. - ANNIE MAYS, deceased's wife, said she resided at 7 Charlotte-terrace, Morice Town, Devonport. The deceased had been master-at-arms in the Royal navy, but was discharged on account of his suffering from paralysis, of which he had several attacks. He left home unknown to her on Tuesday morning. About three months since he had a seizure, and had since complained very much of severe pains in the head. She had been in the habit of dressing and undressing him, as he was incapable of doing so himself. The Jury found a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 October 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Dock Hotel, by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, into the cause of the death of WILLIAM ALLEN, 88 years of age, who was found dead in bed. He was heard to get out of and into bed about four hours previous to the discovery of his death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - The Fatal Accident On Roborough Down. - The Inquiry into the death of SERGEANT MOLES, of the South Devon Militia, was held yesterday at the Mutley Barracks. Deceased and his wife went on the 12th inst. to Tavistock Goose Fair, where they dined and took tea. They left Tavistock at about seven o'clock sober, according to the evidence of a witness who saw them there. A little after eight o'clock they had a small quantity of spirit and water at the Roborough Inn, and soon afterwards left, the deceased driving the trap. Between nine and ten o'clock a cabman, returning from the fair with a party, found the deceased and his wife lying insensible in the road opposite to Sir Massey Lopes's lodge gate. Mr Langford, surgeon, attended to them, and they were taken to the Mutley Barracks, where the deceased died early on Saturday morning, having been insensible throughout his illness, with the exception of about a quarter of an hour. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 October 1870
HOLNE - A Surgeon Censured By A Coroner's Jury. - An Inquest was held at Holne, near Ashburton, on Saturday evening for Inquiry into the cause of the death of a labourer, named FRENCH, who died the previous day. The deceased and another man, both of whom were in the employ of Mr Savery, of Holne Court Farm, were, about a fortnight since, engaged in driving a young horse, when it became restive; and one of the shafts of the cart struck deceased a violent blow in the side, and jammed him against a post. Mr Kiernan, surgeon, Buckfastleigh, was called in to see him, and said he had received a shock but would be all right again in a few days. On the Sunday after the accident, however, a friend of deceased's persuaded him to seek further advice, and consequently Mr Ubsdell, another surgeon of Buckfastleigh was sent for, but not being home at the time did not see him until the next day. When he came he stated that several of the deceased's ribs were broken, and one or more of them thrust into his lungs. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", coupling with it a censure upon Mr Kiernan and Mr Savery, the former for his indiscreet advice, and the latter for his non-attendance at the Inquest.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 October 1870
TOTNES - The Strange Suicide At Totnes. - An Inquest was held at the Albert Inn, Bridgetown, on Saturday, by Mr Henry Michelmore, County coroner, concerning the death of the man who, as we stated on Saturday, was found drowned in the River Dart on the previous day. MRS SUTHERLAND, of Harberton, near Totnes, identified the body as that of her father, MR WM. ELLIOTT, a greengrocer of Clerkenwell, London. The deceased had been in a desponding state since the death of his wife, which took place about two years ago. She had received a letter from her brother in London, stating that the deceased left home without saying where he was going, and on hearing that a man had been found drowned at Totnes, she proceeded there, and found that it was her father. He was seventy-one years of age. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased Drowned himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 November 1870
EXETER - The Infant daughter of MRS SANSOM, a nurse at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, died on Monday in consequence of injuries sustained through her clothes having caught fire. The child was kept by a Mrs Kendall, of St Thomas, and while she was putting her own children to bed the deceased's clothes came in contact with the flame of a lamp. At an Inquest held yesterday afternoon a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, concerning the death of HENRY ALLEY, aged 64. The deceased was formerly a groom, and lived with his wife. He retired to bed on Monday night in good health, but yesterday morning his wife was surprised that he did not answer her call and found he was dead. The deceased had attended St Andrew's Church on the previous day. It was stated that the man and wife had 5s. a week from the parish, and that that was all they had to live on. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sad Case Of Sudden Death. - A more than ordinarily solemn and painful instance of sudden death was the subject of Inquiry yesterday before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner. The deceased was MR THOMAS LATIMER LATIMER, second son of MR ISAAC LATIMER, of St. Michael's-terrace, Plymouth, a member of the Town Council. MR THOMAS LATIMER, who has for some years past held a responsible position in connection with the commercial department of the Western Daily Mercury, of which his father is proprietor, left his home on Monday evening about nine o'clock, and in passing the house of Mr MacGuinness, in James-street, dropped in and partook of a glass of ale; at that time he appeared well and cheerful. Before he left the house he complained of pain in the nape of his neck, but after a little time this passed off, and he left the house. A few minutes afterwards a postman coming through the lane leading from Endsleigh-place to James-street, met him walking slowly, and supporting himself by the wall. He asked MR LATIMER if he was all right, and received the reply, "Yes, thank you;" but returning to the lane after a lapse of a few minutes, the postman saw him sitting on a doorstep, groaning heavily. He assisted him to Mr MacGuinness's house, where he received careful attention, and was left at his own request in a sitting room, he saying that a little sleep would refresh him, as he believed he was suffering from a bilious attack. Mr MacGuinness looked into the room ten minutes afterwards and observing that an alarming change had come over MR LATIMER'S countenance sought medical aid. Mr W. J. Square, F.R.C.S. was promptly in attendance, and stated to the Jury at the Inquest that upon his arrival he found deceased reclining in an easy chair and unconscious, in which state he remained until his death. He applied the usual remedies but feeling convinced that he would die speedily sent for his relatives. The deceased gradually sank, and died at about quarter-past eleven. At that time Mr Square felt very uncertain as to the cause of death, and therefore made a post mortem examination of the body yesterday. He found the various organs of the chest and abdomen perfectly healthy, but the blood vessels of the surface of the brain were much injected or full of blood. A large clot of blood was upon the cerebellum, and the ventricles of the brain itself were also considerably distended with blood, and it was evident that there had been disease of the brain of some standing. This represents an unusual and intense form of apoplexy, always rapidly fatal, the situation of the blood producing general, and not local paralysis. He was decidedly of opinion that sanguineous apoplexy, and nothing deleterious received into deceased's system, was the cause of death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and recorded their high opinion of the kindness of Mr MacGuinness to deceased, and the clear manner in which Mr Square had explained the cause of death. - MR LATIMER was 25 years of age, and was a member of the 2nd Devon Light Horse Volunteers.

STOKE DAMEREL - A fortnight since JAMES MILFORD, stoker, employed at the Devonport Gasworks, whilst engaged in assisting to carry a scoop of coals to one of the "retorts," was injured by the handle striking him in the abdomen, the blow being caused by the scoop coming in contact with the retort before touching the mouth. Up to Sunday last he was considered to be steadily recovering, but on that day bad symptoms set in, and he died on Monday from, as Dr Rolston certified, "Inflammation of the Bowels after Injury." At the Inquest held yesterday by Mr Bone, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 November 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, before Mr Brian, Coroner, concerning the death of RICHARD PROCTOR, aged 60. Robert Edwards, inspector of the Plymouth police, stated that about a month ago deceased came to the station-house between 11 and 12 p.m. for a night's rest. He said he was engaged in bringing wood from Beeralston to Plymouth. Witness was called about 10.30 yesterday night to the Napoleon Inn, High-street, and there saw the deceased dead. - Mr Pellow, of the Napoleon Inn, said that he had known the deceased about 12 months. He came on Tuesday night for a bed, and went to bed about ten o'clock, saying that he was very poorly. After he had been in bed about an hour, witness heard some knocking, and on going up to deceased's bedroom saw him lying on his right side with his eyes open, apparently dead. - Henry Blackmoor, a labourer of Tamerton Foliott, stated that he knew the deceased. His home was at Beer. He believed he was receiving parish pay. He did not think deceased had any other means of subsistence. - The Jury, after hearing some further evidence, returned a verdict that "The Deceased died from Want of the Common Necessaries of Life."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 November 1870
COOKBURY - Killed By A Chaff-Cutting Machine. - Mr R. Fulford, Deputy Coroner for Devon, held an Inquest on Friday, on the body of JOHN HARRIS, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Charles Saunders of Upcott, in the parish of Cookbury, who had been killed on the previous day by becoming entangled in a chaff-cutting machine, worked by water power. The machine was under the charge of Mr Saunders's son, who requiring to stop it in order to get assistance in uncoupling the shafting, told HARRIS to go down and shake the fly. Just as the belt was shifted the fly-wheel went round with a whirl, doubling deceased up round the axle, and killing him on the spot. Dr T. Linnington Ash, of Holsworthy, attended immediately, and found that the injuries which had caused death were chiefly of the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," in which the Coroner concurred, recommending, however, that for the future the key of the wheel-room should be in the custody of one person only, and that no one should be allowed to touch the fly-wheel, so long as the gear was on.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 November 1870
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of MARY THOMAS, aged 60. On Sunday the deceased, who has cohabited with a man called THOMAS, left her home, and meeting a woman named Jones they, together, drank a pint of brandy. Parting from her co-sot she is supposed to have walked into the mill-stream by Commercial-road. The man with whom she had lived becoming alarmed at her non-appearance went to the police-station and reported her absence. A search was instituted, and the body, with torn clothes and bruised flesh, was found in the stream. The Jury returned an Open Verdict, the Coroner censuring a publican named Lee for refusing to take the body into his house.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 November 1870
STOKE DAMEREL - Mysterious Death Of A Devonport Waterman. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devonport Guildhall, by Mr Bone, on the body of BENJAMIN OLDRIDGE, a waterman, which was found floating in the water near Mount Edgcumbe Park on Wednesday morning. There were marks of violence on the body, which at first led to the belief that deceased had met his death by foul means. The evidence adduced shewed that on Tuesday night deceased and his brother-in-law, THOMAS BOSWORVA, who always pulled in the same boat with him, took a soldier and a young woman from North-corner to Torpoint. They had a quart of ale there, and prior to their leaving North-corner they had had a similar quantity. About one o'clock on Wednesday morning deceased was met in Cornwall-street by Lieutenant Charles Edward Bell and Assistant-Paymaster James Bell, both belonging to H.M.S. Cambridge, who had previously engaged him and Bosworva to wait for and take them off to their vessel. Bosworva was in the Globe public-house at this time, and deceased fetched him. According to Bosworva, neither he nor OLDRIDGE was sober at this time, whilst both Lieut. and Assistant-Paymaster Bell were of a different opinion. Before embarking Bosworva asked Lieut. Bell to give them a glass of grog each, but he declined, not caring, he said, to wait whilst they drank it. [The Coroner remarked that he inferred from Mr Bell's refusal that he had a better reason for declining than he had given.] The officers were satisfied with the way in which the men pulled them off to their ship, and when on board they gave each of them some rum and water - less than a gill of rum each. This they drank, and then thanked the officers, wished them good-night, and were seen to walk steadily along the orlop deck of the vessel until they came to the ladder leading to the deck above. Bosworva says at this time they were both drunk, and he went into his boat, lay down at the bottom and went to sleep. He remembered nothing more until he awoke the next morning, when it was light, and he was then in the boat by himself. The oars were gone, and with a piece of bottom board he tried to get his way into Mutton Cove, but was unable to do so, and ultimately he was towed there by John Miller, a waterman. He was then very drunk. Just at the time he was picked up in his boat deceased's body was found floating in about six feet of water, near the rocks under Mount Edgcumbe. He was taken to Mutton Cove, and later in the day the oars of the boat, which was owned by Bosworva, were also found. Inspector Bryant mentioned that he saw Bosworva twice on Wednesday, and on the first occasion he was very drunk. He examined his boat and found blood at the bottom, with a little hair mixed with it. There was also blood on the gunwale of the boat. Mr Bryant added that the boat was in a most dilapidated condition, and not fit to be used. - Mr J. Bazeley, F.R.C.S., made a post mortem examination of the body. He found all the organs free from disease; there was a slight superficial wound over the left eye. He believed deceased died from drowning, because if he had died before he fell into the water some of the appearances on the body would have been absent. After a careful summing up by the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 November 1870
NEWTON ABBOT - Mr Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Townhall, Newton, concerning the death of ALICE EDITH WOLLACOTT, three weeks old, the illegitimate child of SARAH WOLLACOTT, found dead by her mother's side the night previous. A verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 November 1870
EXETER - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the deaths of two men lying at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. SAMUEL SALTER FROME, a young labourer, was returning from Budleigh Salterton to Ottery on Friday with a waggon and three horses, and when near East Budleigh the horses took fright. Deceased fell from the shafts of the waggon, where he was riding, and the wheels, it is supposed, passed over the lower part of his body. He was taken to Exeter, but died before he reached the hospital. Mr Ley, house surgeon, said a rupture of the intestines was the cause of death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."
The other case was one of sudden death. An elderly man named JOHN LORAM, a porter, a formerly a private in the 10th Hussars, was walking through Queen-street when he fell. He was conveyed to the Hospital, but died within a few minutes of his admission. The house surgeon attributed death to undue extension of the bladder. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 November 1870
PLYMOUTH - Inquiries were held yesterday by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, into the causes of death of two men. The first named, ROBERT LANG, 73 years of age, died suddenly in bed, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.
JOHN COLLINGS EDDY, a bargeman, received on Saturday, as we have already stated, a fearful blow in the face from the handle of a winchlock, by the giving away of the chain of an anchor which he was endeavouring to haul up. He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 November 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday concerning the death of ANNE CHUBB, 69 years of age, residing in Providence-street, Plymouth, where her husband kept a dairy. Deceased was found about seven o'clock on Saturday morning hanging to a partition in her room, by a little girl who wanted some milk. The body was warm, but life was extinct. Her husband said she was very steady, but for the last three or four months her mind had been wandering. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased hanged herself while in a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 November 1870
KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held at Kingsbridge yesterday concerning the death of MR JAMES FAIRWEATHER, of Skindle Mills, who about six weeks since was thrown out of his trap and received injuries which terminated fatally on Saturday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 December 1870
TORQUAY - Child Murder At Torquay. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner for the Exeter District, concerning the death of a newly-born male child, found in a house known as Fern Hill, on Tuesday. - The housemaid, named West, stated that ELIZABETH SMITH was Miss Trant's maid, and that they had been living together as fellow servants for the last eleven months, four of which had been spent in Ireland, returning to Torquay about a week ago. Never had any reason to suspect SMITH of being in the family way. On Thursday last she was taken unwell, complaining that she had a "boil" on her stomach. The other servants helped her in her work, and supplied poultices for this supposed boil. On Saturday SMITH became worse, and was confined to her bed. Her mistress, Miss Trant, aged eighty-two, wished the girl to have a surgeon, but she steadily refused. Subsequently, from certain appearances, suspicion was aroused, and on examination, the body of an infant was found in a box in prisoner's bedroom. Mr W. Pollard, surgeon, stated that when he first called SMITH told him that she had a boil on a part of her body which she could not have examined, and that she was getting better. On a subsequent visit, having been informed that something had been noticed, he taxed her with having been delivered; and after some time she said that she had had a miscarriage, and that the body was in the box. Witness opened it and saw the body with a ligature round the neck. The girl told him that the room door was open when she was confined; that she did not think it was born alive, because it did not cry nor move; after looking at it for half an hour she tried to put it in the box, but it slipped out of her hand; she then put a string round the neck, and lifted it into the box. This statement was voluntarily made. Witness then gave information to the police. - Dr Powell, house surgeon to the Torbay Infirmary and Dispensary, had made a post mortem examination, and the result convinced him that respiration had been established. Death had been caused by suffocation, produced, in all probability, by a piece of tape which was passed twice round the child'[s neck, and knotted in two places. - Police-Sergeant Ockford deposed to taking the body and charging ELIZABETH SMITH with concealing the birth; her answer was, "Oh dear, oh dear, what shall I do?" The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ELIZABETH SMITH.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 December 1870
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr A. B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday, relative to the death of the woman named JONES, the wife of a marine residing at 9 Market-lane, Stonehouse, who on Sunday week last fell from a window, which it was at that time thought she had mistaken for the door, and received such injuries to her head that she died from the effects on Wednesday. A witness stated that the deceased had had some liquor with her dinner, but was at the time of the accident, which occurred in the afternoon, perfectly sober. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 December 1870
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall with reference to the death of JOSIAH TAYLOR, 17 years of age, a seaman of the schooner John Ellis. On Saturday morning, when the vessel, which was on her way from Lisbon for Berwick, with a cargo of phosphate, was about 100 miles west of the Lizard, and during a breeze, the deceased, with others, went aloft to reef the topsails. Suddenly he lost his hold, and fell to the deck, a distance of 60 feet, fracturing his skull and breaking his neck. No blame was attached to anyone, as the order to go aloft was not an improper one. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed," and expressed their satisfaction at the conduct of the master of the schooner - Captain Fugh - in bearing up for Plymouth, thereby going out of his way in order to land the body.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 December 1870
ROBOROUGH - Concealment Of Birth At Horrabridge. - The Deputy Coroner for South Devon, Mr Allan Bone, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon at the Roborough Police Court, respecting the death of a newly-born male child, which had been found in the possession of a miner named Holman, on the previous Wednesday night by a county policeman. Holman had been kept in custody since that time, and Captain Cunningham, superintendent of the county police, allowed him to be present at the Inquiry on Saturday. Shortly before eight o'clock on Wednesday evening P.C. Border was on duty near Roborough Rock when he observed a man going on his way towards Roborough. The policeman followed, and when he had nearly come up to him, the man - the prisoner Holman - stooped down. Border asked him what he was doing there, and he replied, "Waiting for Bickleigh pair," meaning that he was waiting for two miners who lived at Bickleigh. The policeman then asked him what he had with him, and to this question he replied, "Nothing." This not being satisfactory he was requested to rise up, which he did, and underneath him was a bundle containing the body of a child. Holman, in answer to the constable's question as to how he became possessed of it, said "he picked it up on his way from Horrabridge." He was taken to the police-station, and on his way there he repeatedly begged "to be let go." On Thursday Sergeant Butt went to prisoner's house at Horrabridge, where he saw his wife and her sister - EMMA JANE KEMP. He asked KEMP some questions, telling her it was optional with her whether she would answer them or not. She said "she would tell the truth, that on the previous morning she left her father's house and went into that of Holman. She was confined in the path of the garden attached to the house of the latter, and she wrapped the child in a sheet which was hung up to dry. As it was quite dead she asked Holman to get rid of it for her. If it had been alive she should have taken the greatest care of it." She was then removed to the station and put to bed. - Mr R. Willis, surgeon, examined KEMP, who is about 22 years of age, and found that she had been recently confined. He also made a post-mortem examination of the body of the child found in Holman's possession, and came to the conclusion that it was born alive, and that it died from haemorrhage from the umbilical cord. He did not think the child lived more than a minute or two, and could not say that it had had a separate existence. - The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. - The prisoners will be brought before the magistrates at Roborough on Wednesday; the woman charged with concealment of birth, and Holman with being an accessory to the crime.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 December 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, Coroner, yesterday, at the Laira Hotel, on the body of MARY JANE WOTTON, aged thirty-four years, who was found dead in her bed yesterday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 December 1870
KINGSTEIGNTON - A Farmer Drowned Near Newton Abbot. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, concerning the death of MR WILLIAM HAMLYN, a farmer, residing at Preston, Kingsteignton, whose body was found on the previous day in Hackney Canal, between Kingsteignton and Newton Abbot. From the evidence given at the Inquest, which was held at deceased's residence, it appeared that the deceased left home about one o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, and went to Newton Market. At Newton he bought several articles, including a coat for himself, and sent them home. About half-past ten in the evening he called at the King's Arms, at Kingsteignton, and had some beer, but did not remain long, and after he had left the house he called for a light; on one being taken out to him by John Bowden, it was ascertained that he had lost his hat, which was found near where he was standing. Several persons who saw him at the time considered that he was slightly intoxicated. Instead of going towards Preston, the deceased must have returned in the direction of Newton, but so far as could be ascertained he was not seen alive afterwards. About five o'clock on Thursday afternoon Mr Henry Partridge, clerk to Messrs. Whiteway and Co., clay merchants, having occasion to go to the cellars, observed a hat floating on the water. A search being instituted, the body was found at the bottom of the canal. In the absence of evidence as to how deceased got there, the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 December 1870
PLYMOUTH - A child about four months old named GEORGE EDWIN RENDLE, the son of MR RENDLE, living at 25 Gascoyne-street, Plymouth, was found dead by the side of his mother early on Saturday morning; and at the Inquest held by Mr Brian, Coroner, later in the day, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.
Western Morning News, Saturday 31 December 1870
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Cambridge Inn, Plymouth yesterday, by Mr Brian, Coroner, in reference to the death of MARY FOLLEY, aged 46. The deceased's husband stated that at about five o'clock that morning he heard his wife coughing a great deal, and upon obtaining a light saw blood issuing from her mouth. She soon afterwards died. It was shewn that death was caused by the breaking of a blood vessel, and a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 January 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - Strange Fatality To A Warrant Officer. - An Inquest was held at the Falcon Inn, Ford, yesterday, by the Devonport Coroner, Mr Allan B. Bone, on the body of MR JOHN HODGE, second-class gunner in her Majesty's service, who died on the previous Saturday under somewhat curious circumstances. Deceased was serving on board the Cambridge, Capt. the Hon. F. A. C. Foley, gunnery ship in the Hamoaze, and on Friday morning, at 10 o'clock, Lieutenant Jenkins, of the Cambridge, was putting half of a battalion of seamen through the sword-bayonet exercise. Deceased was one of the battalion, and stood in the supernumerary rank. The battalion first advanced, and at the word of command from the officer in charge they turned about to repel the supposed attack of an enemy in the rear. Job Taylor, able seaman, one of the men in the battalion, went about swinging his rifle, when the sword at the top of it flew off, described a kind of arch in the air, and, falling, struck into the left arm of MR HODGE. The latter had his drawn sword in his right hand, and as Taylor's weapon struck him he dropped his own sword, and caught hold of his arm with his right hand. He remained on deck attending to his drill for about five minutes and then the men were ordered on the lower-deck to clean arms. Edward Toms, chief gunner's mate, then examined Taylor's sword, and found that the spring at the hilt, which kept it fastened to the rifle, did not work well, which might have been caused by a little dirt getting into the spring; the drill was the first which had taken place since the men returned from their Christmas leave; but Taylor affirmed that he had thoroughly cleaned his sword several times during the past three weeks. Everything connected with the drill was carried out strictly, and Toms did not believe there was any negligence shewn on the part of Taylor which caused the sword to escape from its holding on the rifle. - Taylor said he was using the sword for ten minutes before it flew off, and had he thought it was not securely fastened, he could have stopped and remedied it. After the exercise was over deceased went to Assist. Surgeon Farr, of the Cambridge, who examined his arm, and found a wound about four inches above the elbow, and on the outer side of the left arm. It had an external opening of about half an inch, and a probe was passed into it about an inch and a half between the muscles and integuments. There was little or no blood from the wound, and deceased did not complain that it pained him; MR HODGE treated it very lightly, expressing his surprise that the wound was so deep. Mr Farr put one stitch into it, bandaged the arm, and told deceased to keep quiet. He asked to be allowed to go home, and this was agreed to, Mr Farr telling him if he got worse to be sure to send on board the Cambridge, and if all went well to present himself at the ship in two days. Deceased walked home to his house at Kent-road, Ford, and his wife, at his request, unbound the bandage on his arm, and did it up again, as he complained that it was at first too tight. An hour afterwards he complained of his arm paining him, he vomited and was purged. This continued until the next day, when, as he became worse, his wife sent for Dr J. Rolston, who found deceased suffering from symptoms of a severe shock to the nervous system. He was vomiting, was purged, his pulse was rapid and weak, and his extremities were cold. Deceased died at 11 o'clock on Saturday night. Dr Rolston made a post mortem examination of the body yesterday morning. The wound on the arm shewed nothing from which fatal results might be anticipated. Most of the organs of the body were healthy, but the heart was pale, soft and flabby to the touch, and its condition was such as to lead him to think that deceased was not fitted to bear any great strain or shock, as would be caused by receiving the wound which he had heard described. Deceased died of fatty degeneration of the heart, death from that cause being accelerated by the shock he must have sustained. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly, and expressed the opinion that the wounds were inflicted accidentally. Deceased was 30 years of age, and leaves a widow, but no children.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 January 1871
PLYMOUTH - Death From Drunkenness At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, on the body of CHARLOTTE CHOWN. The deceased, aged 44 years, was the wife of a butcher, and lived at 2 Willow Plot. She enjoyed pretty good health, notwithstanding that she was addicted to habits of intemperance. Shortly before Christmas she fell downstairs at her own house, and received a blow on the back of her head. Her state at the time could not be spoken to. On Christmas Eve, while intoxicated, she fell down a flight of stairs in a neighbour's house, but made no complaint that she had received any injury. On Monday afternoon last she asked a girl, named Elizabeth Searle, living in Morley-lane, to come and do her work as she was bad in her head. The deceased then appeared to be sober, but shortly afterwards Searle saw her put a bottle to her mouth, and drink off at one draught a noggin and half of neat gin. She then laid down on the sofa, and in the evening, after being partially undressed by Searle, she went into the inner room and laid on the bed. Searle soon afterwards returned to her own house. The husband, who was in the habit of attending the market every day, came home at nine o'clock on Monday evening, an d not seeing his wife he thought she was out as usual. After shaving himself he looked into the inner room, and finding the deceased on the bed partially undressed he exclaimed, "Halloa, what do you call this?" She looked round and tried to speak, but was unable to do so. He then went for Mr Jago, who had been in the habit of attending the deceased, but the surgeon having already in hand a dangerous case told the husband that he was unable to attend. MR CHOWN described the condition in which he had found his wife, and then Mr Jago said he would give him a mixture, but he would not take any responsibility, and if he (the husband) were not satisfied he must go to someone else. The medicine was taken home, but the deceased was unable to swallow any of it. A nurse was sent for other surgeons, but MR CHOWN stated she could not get any answers at their doors. The deceased, to whom the husband was uniformly kind, did not recover consciousness, and died at two o'clock on Tuesday morning. - Mr Jago stated that from what he knew of the deceased, who was of full habit, and what he had heard stated in evidence, he was of opinion that she died from sanguineous apoplexy, in all probability induced by drink. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Sanguineous Apoplexy, induced by Excessive Intemperance." The girl, Searle, aged 14 years, when asked to sign her depositions, stated that she could neither read or write.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 January 1871
BARNSTAPLE - THOMAS CHAPPLE, a man who, at the Barnstaple Quarter Sessions, was sentenced to four months' imprisonment for stealing joiners' tools, was found dead in his cell on Friday afternoon. He had not been previous indisposed. A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at the Fisherman's Arms, Richmond-walk, Devonport, on the body of BETSY ANNE STEVENS, aged 45 years, the wife of a caulker in Devonport Dockyard, living at 17 Baker's-place, Richmond-walk, who committed suicide by cutting her throat with a razor in an outhouse at her dwelling on Saturday last. The brother, husband and a neighbour deposed that the deceased had been in very low spirits for some time previous to her death, in fact, since it had been discovered that she had run into debt and had pledged her things some time ago; and it was their opinion that whilst thus depressed she had committed suicide. Deceased had an uncle who died insane. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. Deceased leaves a family of five children, of which the eldest is eleven years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 January 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - The cause of the death of ELIZABETH T. SOLLICK, four years of age, formed the subject of Inquiry at an Inquest held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, by Mr A. B. Bone. The deceased was sitting in front of a fire when a kettle of boiling water fell upon her. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner for the Exeter District, investigated a sad case yesterday. Living with an elderly couple named Mugford at Little Northbrook Farm, Countess Wear, near Exeter, was SARAH ELIZABETH LOVING, a girl about eighteen years of age, who acted as general servant. For some time Mrs Mugford had suspected her of being enceinte, and had charged her with being so; but she denied it. Her mistress, however, did not believe her denial, and gave her notice to leave. On Friday she complained of being unwell, and Mrs Mugford gave her some of Kaye's Worsdell's pills. The family retired to rest about eight o'clock, and when Mrs Mugford called the girl the next morning she received no answer. Opening the bedroom door, she found her lying on the bed dead. Mr Grigg, surgeon, was soon in attendance, and found that the unfortunate deceased had given birth to a child, which was also dead. The deaths had been caused by want of assistance at the birth. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 January 1871
EXETER - At an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday with reference to the death of MR JOHN SLEEMAN, who was found dead in his house under circumstances reported yesterday, the Jury returned an Open Verdict. Evidence was given shewing that deceased was suffering under mental aberration. The surgeon who examined the body was of opinion that apoplexy was the cause of death.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 January 1871
REVELSTOKE - The Wreck Of The Eleutheria. - Mr Alan Bone, Deputy Coroner for South Devon, held an Inquest at Revelstoke on Thursday concerning the deaths of PHILIP NOYES, carpenter, and JOHN LINDEMAN, and FRANCIS INGRAM, able seamen of the barque Eleutheria, who, with two others, whose bodies have not yet been recovered, were drowned on Monday morning. - William Butchart said he was captain of the late barque Eleutheria, 764 tons, classed A1 at Lloyds. She left Sunderland on the 3rd of January with 1,120 tons of coal - her full cargo - for Point de Galle, and had a crew of 18, all told. All went well until Sunday morning last about 5.30, when, the barque being close hauled on the starboard tack. a brig was observed on their lee bow, standing close hauled on her port tack. As the brig approached, all hands shouted, but she came on, and struck the Eleutheria with her stem on the after part of her port fore rigging, carrying away part of it, coming along and levelling everything right before her, and carrying away all the port main rigging. The brig was repeatedly hailed but made no reply. Seeing the damage to his vessel was enormous and in the impulse of the moment, he jumped on board the brig to ascertain her name, never doubting but that he should be able to get back to his own ship again. The vessels immediately separated and he asked the master of the brig to wear his ship round on the starboard tack to see if he could get on board his vessel to render her assistance. The master of the brig complied, and in doing so the bow of his vessel was stove in. She made so much water that she could not be pumped free with the pumps, and she bore up for Plymouth, taking him with them, and arriving in the Sound at 10.30 a.m. On coming into the Sound he (witness) hailed No. 5 pilot boat (Surprise), stated the circumstances to the pilot and said his ship's bearing was W.S.W. of the Eddystone, about ten miles. He asked to be taken off to her, and the pilot replied at first he would do so, but subsequently said he had no time to take him on board. At 2.30 he secured the services of the steam-tug Secret, and went out to search for the ship. He stopped on the bridge and swept the horizon with a glass, but could find no trace of the Eleutheria. The Secret went on until a quarter to 5 o'clock, when they were about two miles to the west of the Eddystone, and then the steamboat master would go no further. He (the witness) entreated him over and over again to go on, but he said he would go no further, stating it was no use. The Secret reached Plymouth at a quarter to 7 o'clock, and he made arrangements before leaving to renew the search the next morning. At the time of the collision his port and starboard lights were burning very brightly. He saw the brig five minutes before he observed a light, and the first he saw was a green one. At this time he considered the brig was from a mile to a mile and a half distant. The wind was S.S.W., blowing a fresh gale. They had a speaking trumpet on board, but it was not used. All hands were on deck, and "sung out at the pitch of their voices" when the brig came on. There was a little moon. The collision happened between showers, and when there was no rain there was no fog. At the time of the collision the Eleutheria had a foresail, two lower topsails, foretopmast and mizen stay-sails. They had a good lifebuoy at the proper place, and three boats. When he saw the collision was inevitable he ordered his helm hard down, and the ship answered. Before that he did not touch his own helm more than to keep the ship before the wind. He saw no alteration in the brig but once, and then she gave a small bit of a "wipe" off. He thought she was going to clear. She was then three of her lengths off. In going out in the Secret, the Dulvall and two other vessels spoke them, and they all said the Eleutheria's bearing was S.W. of the Eddystone, two to three miles. That must, of course, have been a mistake. Instead of that the Eddystone must have been from two to three miles west of the vessel. He thought still he was right in his reckoning that the vessel at the time of the collision was from ten to twelve miles W.S.W. of the Eddystone. - James Gordon burr, chief mate of the Eleutheria, said the captain's statement was in accordance with the facts as far as his knowledge went. He saw the captain jump on board the brig, and immediately the latter got clear he (witness) ordered the mainyard to be squared, the helm to be put up, and the ship kept before the wind. With the wreck left and the braces being fouled, they were unable to do this, and in making the endeavour the foremast went by the board over the starboard side. While the officers and crew were cutting away the wreck of the foremast the mainmast also went by the board over the starboard side. They exerted themselves to clear this, and he ordered the helm to be put down, to keep the ship by the wind, and set a sail on the mizen mast - the only one left. He ordered the carpenter to sound the pumps and the second officer to muster all hands to the pumps, but the latter were disabled by the mainmast going over the side. After some time the starboard pump was got partially to work, and all hands worked it as long as possible. The vessel shipped one heavy sea, washing one boat and the cook house overboard, breaking another boat into pieces, tearing the ring bolts and lashings on deck, and staving the longboat. He then ordered the crew to endeavour to throw everything overboard to prevent their legs being broken when working the pumps. The carpenter, in going forward, got his leg "jammed" between the spars, and it was broken. He was carried to the cabin and laid on the sofa. They kept the ship's head to sea as much as possible, all hands stood by the pump, and the ensign was hoisted at the mizen-mast "union down." About noon they saw a ship standing towards them, which he believed to be the John Armstrong. She spoke to them, and he begged the captain to endeavour to turn the Eleutheria's head round, by bringing a warp with his vessel's boat, as the boats of the disabled ship were all gone. This was done as quickly as possible, the captain of the John Armstrong heaving his ship to, and sending a boat with a small warp to endeavour to turn their head, but the warp parted in doing so. He (witness) then said he thought the ship could do no good, and that she had better proceed on her voyage, which she did. The brig Dulvall of Blythe, bore down on them, and asked what assistance he could render, and he was told that by sailing direct for Plymouth and sending a steamer he would do good, and this he immediately did. A pilot then boarded from the Surprise, pilot cutter, and he said he could get the vessel's head round with the cutter. She endeavoured to turn the head of the barque, but could make no impression on her. He then ordered the cutter to leave, and go to Plymouth and communicate with the expected steamer, to let her know the whereabouts of the Eleutheria and how she was driving. They saw no vessel after that. The pilot remained on board, and his crew went away in the cutter to Plymouth. The barque was then, he judged, from 4 to 5 miles off the Eddystone, which bore W.S.W. of them, the barque then driving in a N.E. direction. At dark they commenced to shew "flare up" lights every four or five minutes, and these were continued to be shewn throughout the night and after the ship struck. They saw the land about 1.30 on Monday morning right to leewards, and about ten minutes after the vessel struck. The mizen-mast went by the board immediately, and the vessel broke up. He called to the men to save their lives as best they could. He did not see the five deceased men in the water. He partly swam and partly scrambled on shore, being assisted by a portion of the wreck. He thought when he sent the pilot boat away that the ship was sufficiently near the land and the Eddystone to ensure assistance. He accounted for no assistance coming by the fact that the Secret went, as he heard, too far to the westward. He told the carpenter when the ship struck that he must try to save himself, and he did crawl to the bottom of the companion ladder, but he never saw him afterwards. The two anchors were ready to let go, but the spars that had broke adrift interwove themselves with the cables, and it would have been dangerous to let them go. - Edward Glin, pilot of 25 years' experience in the port of Plymouth, who was put on board the vessel, and was one of those saved, said if any assistance had come to the barque between nine and ten o'clock on Sunday night it would have been useless. In his judgment no vessel could have come at all with safety to render assistance. - Thomas Collinson, master of the George and Richard, brig, 323 tons register, of Sunderland, bound for Alexandria, with coals, said about five minutes past five on Sunday morning, he sighted a vessel right ahead, about half a mile from his brig. He saw her first through the haze. At times there was smart rain. When he saw it was a vessel on the starboard tack he ordered his helm to be put hard up, and to be kept there. This was immediately obeyed. He saw the port light of the Eleutheria perhaps a couple of minutes before the collision. He never saw the green light. The lights of his brig were burning brilliantly, having been trimmed by the second mate at four o'clock. His helm was hard up all the time, being kept there as ordered, but his vessel would not answer properly owing to the terrific sea and the low sail which the brig had set. She answered her helm a little. He thought she was two points off the wind at the time of the collision. After the collision he thought his brig was in a foundering state. The weather was hazy at the time the vessels struck. He was the only one on the look-out, the rest of the crew working the pumps. He had night glasses and used them. - John Seagrew, chief officer of coastguard, stationed at Noss, Yealm, said it was part of the coastguard duty to watch the coast at night. Thomas Thorn had the beat on Sunday night, which included that part where the Eleutheria struck. He (witness) visited the wreck at five o'clock on Monday morning, having been called by Mr Martin, chief officer of the station west of him. They had no rocket apparatus nearer the spot than Mount Batten, neither had they any life lines or buoys. - Wm. Martin, chief officer of the station west of Noss, first saw the lights of the ship at 12.30 on Monday morning, and he passed word to Mr Seagrew at three o'clock in the morning. He should have done so before, but he could not cross the river. The force of the wind on Sunday night was, in his judgment, ten. - John Payn, chief officer of the coastguard, saw the signals of distress from the Eleutheria at 9.30 on Sunday night. He saw the vessel at 5 p.m. the same afternoon; he then saw her outline. At 9.30 it seemed that she had drifted three miles to the eastward. He sent one of his men to Mount Batten to report that he had seen a vessel, and the reply was "that it was all right; that the pilots and the authorities knew all about it." He also reported to the station east of him. The lights were about five miles from the shore when he saw them at 9.30. They must have been quite apparent to the ships in the Sound, from Mount Wise and the Hoe. He tried to lower a boat at the Bovisand station, intending to go to one of the ships in the Sound to ask her to render assistance to the distressed vessel, but the sea was so rough that he could not do so. - After a careful summing up from the Deputy Coroner the Jury found "That the deceased were found dead, being part of the crew of the barque Eleutheria, which was wrecked near the parish of Revelstoke on the night of the 15th instant, having on the morning of that day been damaged by a collision with the brig George and Richard."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 January 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Workhouse, relative to the death of a child named MARY ANN RUGG, whose body presented a most skeleton-like appearance. A double Jury, of which Mr Henry Lethbridge was Foreman, was empanelled. The deceased, who was four years of age, was the child of FLORENCE RUGG, who was tried at the last Borough Sessions for neglect of the deceased. Evidence was given by Mr Webber and Inspector Edwards of the condition of the poor child on the 25th November last, when it was taken from its mother's house, since which time it has received the greatest care in the Workhouse. - Mr J. N. Stevens repeated the evidence given by him on former occasions, adding that the child greatly improved, but that a week ago it was attacked by dysentery, of which it died. The Coroner summed up carefully, pointing out all the legal bearings of the case, drawing attention to the words of the medical witness - that in this case, independently of all other circumstances, the attack of dysentery was sufficient to account for death. - The Jury were divided in opinion, but a majority (more than twelve signed the inquisition) returned a verdict that the child did from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 January 1871
HOLSWORTHY - A Pauper Committed For Manslaughter. - An Inquest has been held at Holsworthy relative to the death of JOHN HARRIS, who in an affray with John Earle, another inmate of the Workhouse, received such injuries on the 20th as caused his death. The evidence produced was to the effect that on Friday morning last HARRIS, Earle, and a man named Piper, also a pauper, were working together by the master's direction in the garden. HARRIS was an idiot, but harmless and quiet. Some time afterwards Earle was heard to say to HARRIS, "Now thee heave thicker stone," and subsequently to strike him. In return HARRIS kicked Earle, when the latter struck the deceased two or three times on the head with an iron bolt. HARRIS was afterwards found sitting on a piece of wood holding some straw to his head, which was bleeding profusely. He said Earle had struck him, and the nurse, discovering three cuts on his head, applies some sticking plaster. Mr Pearse, the surgeon, saw the deceased, and observing that the plasters had been well put on by the nurse, simply "pressed the head with his fingers." HARRIS ate his dinner with the others, and at 4 o'clock went to bed. The doctor was sent for at 6 o'clock, but did not come. He, however, sent a powder and at 8 o'clock the master went himself to see Mr Pearse, who was not home, but his assistant Mr Euston, recommended that some brandy should be given to HARRIS and that cold water should be applied to his head and hot water to his feet. At 8 a.m. on Saturday it was found that deceased's right arm and leg were paralysed, and the doctor was sent for an hour later. He came at 11 o'clock, and saw him twice during the day. HARRIS died on Sunday, and a post mortem examination shewed that death had been caused by the blows on the head. Earle, in reply to the master, stated that he was on his way to the pig-house to bolt the door with a piece of iron, when the deceased asked him to help him. Earle replied that he could not, as the matron had told him to bolt the door; whereupon HARRIS kicked him, and he (Earle) struck him with the iron. - The Coroner (Mr Braund) in summing up, expressed the opinion that the provocation on the part of HARRIS was not sufficient to reduce the crime to manslaughter, and that a verdict of Wilful Murder was necessitated by the evidence. - the Jury, however, found Earle "Guilty of Manslaughter under strong provocation."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 January 1871
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Plymouth Railway Station. - JAMES JOHNS, a "lumber taker," employed on the South Devon railway, was, as has been previously stated, killed yesterday morning between one and two o'clock, while engaged in shunting trucks at the Plymouth railway station. Several trucks were stationed in No. 1 road near the goods shed, and there was a portion of a train with an engine attached on No. 2 road. The train was in motion, and was proceeding slowly up the line. JOHNS was between the two roads, in company with John Staddon, a "shunting porter." As the train came up, JOHNS said t Staddon, "Be careful; there is no room there. I don't want to see you killed, or don't want to kill myself." Staddon then left JOHNS, and went over on the arrival platform, and he believed that JOHNS was following him. About twenty minutes to one o'clock George Biddlecombe, the guard of the goods train, saw JOHNS standing between the lines, with a lamp in his hands, about 20 feet from the junction of the two lines. As the train was moving at the ordinary speed, Biddlecombe saw a side of a truck strike him, knocking him against the trucks that were standing still, rolling him swiftly round and drawing him along the line for about two yards. Biddlecombe, who was walking towards JOHNS between the lines, immediately ran towards him and found him motionless. He heard him moan once. He was then taken to the porters' room. - Francis Bibbings, a switchman, who was on duty, went for Dr Rendle, who came and found that JOHNS was dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at the Coroner's Inquiry held last evening at the station, the Jury believing that no blame whatever could be attached to the railway company. It was stated that the deceased was perfectly sober at the time of the accident, and that the engine driver could not see him. There were lamps on each side of the lines, in addition to the lamps which the men engaged in shunting carried. The deceased had been in the employ of the company for four or five years, and was a valued servant. He leaves a widow and two children, who will get some assistance from the provident society which is subscribed to by the officials of the company.

Wednesday Morning News, Tuesday 31 January 1871
EXETER - MRS PIDSLEY, wife of MR R. H. PIDSLEY, auctioneer, of Exeter, died very suddenly on Saturday. Her youngest child had been with his father to Wombwell's menagerie, and had remained behind to see the beasts fed. As he did not return with his father MRS PIDSLEY became greatly alarmed for his safety. The boy, however, soon returned, but the revulsion of feeling was so great that MRS PIDSLEY, who was a sufferer from heart disease, expired before medical assistance could be obtained. The Coroner's Jury, at an Inquest held yesterday, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM HALL, cook and steward on board the barque Ela Beatrice, of West Hartlepool, from Sunderland to Alexandria, died somewhat suddenly in that ship when off the Goodwin Sands on Saturday last. About 10.30 on the morning of that day Captain Charles Smith went below to consult the chart, and saw the deceased lying struggling on the sofa. He was unconscious and continued so until his death, about a quarter of an hour afterwards. The deceased joined the ship on the 18th inst. at Sunderland, and down to the time of his death appeared to enjoy perfect health. He was a native of Sunderland, and was 52 years of age. The ship came into Plymouth yesterday, and at the Inquest held in the evening a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 February 1871
EXETER - A waggoner, named JOHN DRAKE, 24 years of age, on getting off his waggon on the Topsham-road last Friday, slipped and fell under the wheels, which passed over his body. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Sunday, from rupture of the intestines. A Coroner's Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Frightful Sufferings Of A Child. - The Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) investigated yesterday a shocking case of alleged parental neglect. From the evidence adduced it appeared that on the 11th November last ELIZA CLOAD, the wife of a farm labourer, living at Uffculme, left her little daughter, a child seven years of age, at home in charge of two younger children while she went out to work. During the morning information was brought the mother that "ELLEN was burning." On hastening home she found that the child's clothes had caught on fire while she was sitting by the grate, and that she was severely burnt about the left thigh. She applied linseed oil to the wound, and sent for Mr Bryden, the parish doctor. He did not come until the next morning, but he continued his visits after that until the 28th January, when he brought a physician with him to see the child. A day or two after he recommended her removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and she was taken there last Thursday. The mother in her evidence said the doctor never dressed the wounds; she always did it. The child lay on one side for three months; she used to scream a good deal when a fresh bandage was put up. - Mr Richard Ley, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the child on Thursday last. She was in a very bad state. He endeavoured to examine her, but the stench was so offensive that he could not do so, and he was obliged to leave the ward, as were several of the patients and his pupils. The child was lying in a bundle of filthy rags. The nurses thoroughly cleaned the deceased and lotions were used to take away the smell. He then examined her wounds, and he could say that they had not been cleaned from the day of the burns. Deceased was very emaciated. There was a severe burn on the left thigh and buttock, and a slight sore between the abdomen and the thigh. The abdomen and the thigh had grown together from neglect, not having been kept properly apart. On the right side of the body there was a large wound, and there were several other wounds on different part of the body, all of which he believed to be bed sores, and to have arisen from neglect. He believed that if the child had been brought to the hospital after she had recovered the first shock she would have lived, for the burns were not deep enough to cause death. Four ribs were exposed on the right side, and he believed that the deceased died from exhaustion, bad living, and inattention. After the nurse had been examined the Coroner said that it would be advisable to have a post mortem examination, and procure further evidence, and the Inquest was adjourned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, relative to the death of ALFRED GEE, 17 years of age, cook of the ship Nonparfel. It appeared that the cause of deceased's death was shock to the nervous system, the effect of burns received by falling against a stove in the forecastle, his system, however, having been greatly weakened by long indulgence in vicious habits. A verdict in accordance was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 February 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - AGNES LIVINGSTONE, a middle-aged woman, the wife of a leading stoker belonging to H.M.S. Valorous, was yesterday found dead at the bottom of the staircase of the Steam Reserve Inn, Newpassage, Devonport, where she resided. An Inquest was subsequently held, and although it was stated that she was at times addicted to drunken habits, there was no evidence to shew whether this caused her death. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 February 1871
EXETER - Inhuman Neglect Of A Child. - The adjourned Inquest on ELLEN CLOAD, the daughter of labouring people living at Uffculme, was resumed at Exeter yesterday, before the Coroner, Mr Hooper. The child, it will be remembered, died at the hospital, and the evidence of the house surgeon shewed that it had suffered from shocking neglect. In November last the deceased's clothes caught on fire, and she was burnt on the thigh. The burns although severe were not dangerous, but the poor child had been allowed to lie at her parents' for three months in a most wretched state. When taken to the hospital a fortnight ago she had "bedsores" all over. some of the wounds were four inches square. One of them revealed three ribs, and in several of the others bones were disclosed. This was quite independent of the burns, which had healed to a certain extent; but, owing to want of attention, the thigh and abdomen had grown together. Mr Ley, the hospital surgeon, had made a post mortem examination since the previous Inquiry, and he found all the organs healthy. Death, he believed, had arisen from neglect and want of proper nourishment. Although seven years old, the body weighed only 28 lbs., and was, in fact, nothing but skin and bone. Prior to the child's removal to the hospital she had been attended by Mr Brydon, one of the medical officers of the Tiverton Union, and his evidence was taken yesterday. The child, he said, was dreadfully burnt, and he believed the injuries would prove fatal. He ordered oil dressings. She got on well at first, but screamed a good deal when the wounds were examined. He told the mother particularly to guard against the adhesion of the thigh and abdomen. The child was kept in a filthy state; and he at length directed her removal to the hospital, and wrote the relieving officer directing him to provide an easy waggon to remove her. - Mr White, the relieving officer, said he did not get the note, but he allowed her 1s. to get the child removed to Exeter. The mother employed a donkey-cart, which occasioned the child great suffering. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," appending to that verdict their opinion that death had been accelerated by exhaustion, bad living, and bad attendance; and that the conduct of Mr Brydon, the relieving officer, and the mother was highly censurable. The Coroner concurred with this expression of opinion, designating the conduct of the relieving officer as inhuman.

PLYMOUTH - THOMAS WILTON, two months old, died suddenly on Sunday whilst in bed with his parents, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was recorded by a Coroner's Jury, which met yesterday at the Cambridge Inn, Plymouth.

EXETER - A young woman, named ELIZA BREWER, is in custody at Exeter, on a charge of concealing the birth of her illegitimate child. The accused was a domestic servant at Sir John Bowring's. On Saturday night the dead body of a female child was found in a box in her bedroom by a fellow servant. Mr Stonard Edye, surgeon, saw the body and made a post mortem examination. He was of opinion that the child, which was very much decomposed, had been born a fortnight, but that it was not born alive. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Stillborn." The prisoner will be brought before the justices.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Affray In Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The carpenter RICHARD UNDERHILL, who, as we stated yesterday, was knocked down in King-street on Saturday night by Edward Hallett, an engineer's apprentice, living at 31 Flora-street, and was lying in a precarious condition, has since died. Hallett was yesterday morning brought up at the Plymouth Petty Sessions, before the Mayor (Mr R. C. Serpell), and Mr J. B. Wilcocks, magistrates, on a charge of striking UNDERHILL, and thereby causing his death. The evidence shewed that about twenty minutes past eleven o'clock on Saturday night, Hallett and UNDERHILL were seen by a labouring man, named William Hodder, in the Prince Alfred public-house, Cecil-street. They were talking together, but were not quarrelling. A few minutes afterwards Hodder told UNDERHILL it was time for him to be home. He replied he was not going yet. Hodder then discovered that the conversation between the two men was about a man named Hallett, and heard Hallett say to UNDERHILL, - "You are very glad that Hallett is ...... ." Some place was mentioned, but what Hodder could not tell. Hodder again advised UNDERHILL to go home, when, pointing to Hallett, he said he was telling a parcel of lies. UNDERHILL looked viciously at him, was about to drop a dog he had under his arm, and had uttered the words, "Although you are big, I can ....," when Hodder stepped between them. Hallett said if UNDERHILL struck him he would not strike him again. Hodder then left them. They then appeared to be sober, and to know what they were about. A short time subsequently Hodder saw them again in Cecil-street. They then appeared to be having some words. He saw UNDERHILL drop his dog, raise his right hand and strike Hallett, he believed, in the breast. There was a person near who exclaimed to Hallett, "Give it him, he has struck you;" whereupon he struck UNDERHILL, who was on his defence at the time. UNDERHILL then took off his coat, and gave it to Hodder, who told him he had better not fight. UNDERHILL took no notice, and Hodder put the coat in the public-house. When he came out he saw them in a fighting attitude. He saw Hallett aim a blow at UNDERHILL, but whether it "came home" or not, he could not say. At all events UNDERHILL staggered and fell backwards. Hodder and Alfred Toop, carpenter, of 5 Wyndham-street, went immediately to Underhill, who was insensible, and paid every attention to him. According to Mr Toop he was then lying with the lower part of his body in the gutter and his head on the kerb stone. There were a few drops of blood about the road, which was thought to have come from his nose. UNDERHILL appeared to recognise the mention of his name, but answered questions with a moan and a nod of the head. He was then put on a chair, his face was washed, and he became sensible, and he was taken to his home, 3 Gloucester-place, Hallett, with others, assisting in carrying him thither. Toop asked Hallett why he struck UNDERHILL. Hallett replied that he had been knocked down twice by UNDERHILL, and that then he knocked him down. Hallett added that UNDERHILL had been throwing up things about his (Hallett's) father. UNDERHILL was found to be seriously ill. Hallett was apprehended by Police-constable Rodd about 10.30 on Sunday night at his house. He said he had knocked UNDERHILL down, but he had been struck first. - Mr Supt. Thomas applied for a remand for a week. - Hallett asked for bail. - The Mayor said it was a very serious charge, and bail could not be granted. He was then remanded for a week. - Last evening an Inquiry was held by Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner, in the Guildhall, before a double Jury. Similar evidence to that adduced before the Magistrates was given. The additional evidence given was that of Jane Baker, a married woman, who lived in the same house as the deceased, and who chiefly attended him until his death, at five minutes before three o'clock yesterday morning. He never recovered sensibility. - Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, who also attended the deceased, deposed that he was called to see him at half-past three on Sunday afternoon. He found him quite insensible, with paralysis and rigidity in all the limbs. He was breathing heavily, and had the symptoms of compression of the brain. There was a slight bruise over the nose, but he could discover no other mark of external violence. He considered the case hopeless from the first. Since his death he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He found on removing the scalp a distinct fracture of the skull, extending from the back of the head to about half-way down the frontal bone. This injury was sufficient to occasion death, and might have been caused by a fall backwards on a hard road. - In reviewing the case to the Jury, the Coroner pointed out that the man Hallett, who was seriously implicated, was not present. To his mind and it must appear so to the Jury, it appeared to be a very un-English kind of proceeding. It was an almost invariable rule that when an examination had been gone into against prisoners that they had been always present, and had an opportunity of asking questions. It was not his fault that Hallett was absent. He had written to the Mayor asking for Hallett to be present in the custody of one of the borough police, as the Inquest would be held within the precincts of the Guildhall, where the prisoner was confined. He also added in his letter that he need scarcely point out how undesirable it was that evidence similar to that given before the justices should be taken in the absence of a party likely to be seriously affected thereby. The application, he also wrote, was not made to raise a controversy concerning a question of privilege, but simply that justice might be done, and that the prisoner might not be prejudiced by absence from the Inquest. At six o'clock that evening he received a reply from the magistrates' clerk, by order of the Mayor, simply stating that Hallett had been before the justices and had been remanded for a week. That, Mr Brian continued, was the answer he got to his appeal. It would be superfluous for him to comment upon it. - Several Jurymen expressed displeasure at such an abrupt reply. After a short consultation they returned a verdict of "Manslaughter." - Hallett is a powerful young man, about twenty years of age; UNDERHILL was a small man, and was about 45 years of age. He is described by those who knew him as a "quiet and inoffensive man."

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 February 1871
FALMOUTH - Strange Occurrence At Falmouth. - A somewhat strange affair has occurred at Falmouth. On Saturday last a young woman, apparently about 22 years of age, arrived by the 1.15 p.m. train, and obtained lodgings at Florence-terrace. She conducted herself in a very creditable manner, and there was nothing unusual in her behaviour, but on Wednesday morning her bedroom door being locked, and no reply being given to repeated knocks, access was obtained by the window, when she was found lying on the floor and dead. An empty bottle, which had contained prussic acid, was discovered in the room, and at an Inquest held on Thursday the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had died from taking poison, but that there was no evidence to shew the state of mind she was in at the time. The deceased stated that her name was ISABELLA VAUGHAN, and it is believed that she belonged to or near Exeter.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 February 1871
WINKLEIGH - A Boy Shot Dead. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. Fulford on Friday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PICKARD, 11 years of age. It was stated in evidence that the boy, whose parents reside near Winkleigh, asked the wife of a labourer to lend him a pistol belonging to her husband. She refused, but the deceased took the pistol away, the woman being in bed ill. Some time afterwards he came to his parents and told them that he had been shot, and that he had seen smoke issuing from a stable. It is supposed, however, that the unfortunate boy was carrying the pistol in his pocket when it exploded the charge, which according to Mr Dingley, surgeon, consisted of powder simply, entering the lower part of his body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The pistol has not yet been found.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 February 1871
EXETER - The fatal effects of an excessive use of intoxicating liquors was exemplified at an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday on THOMAS STAMP, whose body was picked up in the Exe. A verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide while labouring under Temporary Insanity was returned, and it was stated in the course of the Inquiry that deceased had been suffering from delirium tremens for a week prior to drowning himself.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 February 1871
EXETER - The Mysterious Disappearance Of A Lady From Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cowley-bridge Inn, Exeter, on the body of MRS ANNE DICKER, 40 years of age, whose body was found near Stafford's Weir, in the river Exe, on Wednesday. Deceased was the widow of a clergyman, who had served as a missionary on the West Coast of Africa, and who died about five or six years since. In 1865 MRS DICKER was placed in the Wonford Asylum, Exeter, and Mr Thomas Lyle, M.D., the resident medical superintendent of that establishment, noticed then that her state of mind generally was one of depression, whilst her general bodily health was good. She was not at all violent. She left the Asylum in 1865 with the consent of her friends, but returned in a month. During the last two or three years she repeatedly wrote to the commissioners in lunacy, maintaining that she was sane, and urging that she should be discharged from the Asylum. The commissioners wrote to Dr Lyle, but he did not then feel so satisfied with her state of mind as to discharge her. On the 28th of September, 1868, the commissioners who inspected the Asylum, after a conversation with the deceased, made a note in a book recommending that she should be allowed to leave, but with this Dr Lyle did not concur, and she did not go. After this deceased gradually got better, and in 1870 again urged that she was in a fit condition to leave the Asylum. Before consenting to this Dr Lyle allowed her to go out whenever she pleased to call upon her relatives, and then return to the establishment. This went on for some months, and as she continued well, on the 14th of September last deceased finally left the Asylum and went to her friends. On the 26th of November she went to the house of Mrs Townsend in Friars Walk, Exeter, where she stopped until the 21st of January last, when she removed to 3, Southernhay. During her stay at Mrs Townshend's she was very quiet, but appeared much depressed. On one occasion when Mrs Townshend asked her what troubled her, she said "perhaps she would tell her one day." On the morning of the 26th of January she came down to breakfast at nine o'clock and then wore a brown dress. She left the house at ten o'clock the same morning, and as the ladies who occupied the premises - Miss Allen and Miss Mayo - knew she had been invited to visit her cousin, Miss Medland, at Hill's Court, nothing was thought at her going out in that way. She did not return that night, and inquiries at Hill's Court on the following morning led to the discovery that she had not been there. Her bedroom was then entered, and it was discovered that the brown dress which she had worn at breakfast was hanging up behind a door, and a black one, with white spots, taken away. Her watch and chain, purse (containing money), and keys were also found in the room. Every possible inquiry was made, and advertisements giving a description of MRS DICKER were issued; but nothing was heard of her until Wednesday. At about twelve o'clock on that day William Sirey, of Stoke Canon, who said he was employed "in looking after the river Exe," whilst walking in the marshes near Stafford's Weir, noticed something white between two elm trees, and on going to the spot found it to be the body of a woman, clothed in her under garments only. She was lying on her back, with her knees bent up, one shoulder resting against a railing and the other against a tree. Near her head was found a red flannel petticoat, but no other garments could be seen, nor had any been found, although a very careful search was subsequently made. The body was a considerable distance from the river, and had not been in the water at all. On her finger were found her gold wedding ring and keeper. The body was much decomposed. - Dr Lyle said he saw deceased in December and she was then very sadly depressed, and he advised her to take a little medicine. She had been with her husband at Sierra Leone, and had had a fever there, and he had often thought that the climate must have affected her. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead," it being the general opinion that deceased had died of cold, one of the Jurors remarking that "a more bitter night than that of the 26th of January he had never known. " - Deceased has two daughters, one aged 18 and the other 14.

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 February 1871
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Barbican, Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of WILLIAM PEARSE, land surveyor, 73 years of age, who resided at Varna Cottage, Stonehouse. - A waterman named Burns stated that shortly before ten o'clock on Thursday night he was standing on the Barbican pier when a man - the deceased - passed him, and went to the top of the old steps. Thinking this was a person who had previously engaged his services he went towards him, when the deceased suddenly reeled, fell over a few steps, and then head foremost into the water. Witness in running after him also fell into the water, but he caught hold of the deceased and shouted for help. P.C. Yabsley came immediately to his assistance, and took the deceased to the Barbican station. He appeared to be in a stupor, and was quite unconscious. Mr J. N. Stevens, surgeon, was sent for, and after a "rather long period" came and examined the deceased, whose pulse was full and quick. Mr Stevens ordered him to be taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and a cab was accordingly sent for, but before he was half way to the Hospital, deceased expired. By a Juror: Mr Stevens did not stay at the Barbican station for more than two minutes. The deceased was not in the water for longer than half a minute. - P.C. Yabsley gave corroborative evidence. When the deceased was brought to the station he appeared to be in a fit. Witness went for Mr Stevens, who arrived at the station about twenty-five minutes after he (witness) left his house. The deceased recovered a little, and said he lived at Yealmpton. - George Craton, armourer to the Plymouth Volunteer Corps, saw the deceased the same evening as the accident. He was quite sober and appeared to be in perfect health. - John Nicholls Stevens, surgeon, stated that when P.C. Yabsley came to his house he was weighing out medicine, but he went shortly afterwards to the Barbican. The deceased's pulse was quick and full and his heart was beating in a proper manner. He did not think quite twenty-five minutes elapsed between the time he was called and when he saw the deceased. - R. Anderson, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, saw the deceased shortly before 12 o'clock on Thursday night. He was lying on a bed, and was quite dead. Witness subsequently made an examination of the body. There was nothing on the brain to account for death, but the vessels of the heart and chest were somewhat congested. This would be quite consistent with drowning or suffocation. Sudden immersion in the water might prove fatal to a man of deceased's age. - The room having been cleared the Jury discussed at some length the advisability of censuring Mr Stevens, but the majority were against such a course, and ultimately a verdict was returned that the deceased died from Shock to the Nervous System, caused by sudden immersion in the water in consequence of an accidental fall. The Jury also expressed themselves very greatly pleased with the conduct of Burns and Yabsley.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 February 1871
DARTMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Dartmouth on Saturday by Mr J. M. Puddicombe, Coroner, relative to the death of JOHN PEEK, 79 years of age. The deceased complained on Thursday night of being rather unwell, and on Friday morning a relative going into the room to call him and his wife found that the former was dead, and had been so for a considerable time, the latter lying by his side asleep. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Visitation from God."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths At Plymouth. - The circumstances attending two sudden deaths formed the subjects of Inquiry at two Inquests held on Saturday by Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner. The first Inquest was at the Harvest Home. JOHN CROSS, 39 years of age, ostler at the inn, went to bed on Friday night in apparently good health, and was found the next morning quite dead. His body, which was partially out of bed, was covered with blood, and there was also a pool of blood on the floor. It was shewn that death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel, and a verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes was returned.
The second was held at the Dock Hotel on HARRIET CULVERWELL, 69 years of age, who resided at 7 Bath Cottages. The deceased's husband went to bed on Friday night at nine o'clock, and extinguished the light, leaving his wife, who appeared in her usual health, sitting in an arm-chair. He awoke at one o'clock, and finding that the deceased was not in bed, he searched for her, and found that she was still sitting in the chair, her head resting on her right shoulder, and quite dead. She was of somewhat intemperate habits, but, according to her husband's statement, had never had a day's illness. There was no suspicious element in the case, and a verdict similar to that in the previous Inquest was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 February 1871
PLYMOUTH - Another Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Another sudden death has occurred at Plymouth. A man named CHARLES TIPPER, 47 years of age, belonging to Mr Luscombe's boarding gig, entered the boat yesterday afternoon in apparently excellent health and spirits. The gig shortly afterwards left for the Sound, and when she had got just outside the Cobbler Buoy, the deceased placed his oar across the boat and leant upon it. Mr Williams, the chief boatman, inquired if anything was the matter with him, and he replied, "I never felt such a thing in all my life before; I was giddy and for the time as blind as a bat." About a minute and a half after Mr Williams asked the deceased if he was better, and he replied in the affirmative, and resumed pulling, which he continued until they reached the vessel they were sent to. Mr Williams boarded her, and during his absence TIPPER'S head was observed to drop, and he would have fallen if one of the boatmen, named Harding, had not caught him. Mr Williams was called, and he directed the men to pull for the shore; but before they had got half way to the Barbican TIPPER died. An Inquest was held later in the day, and in summing up the evidence adduced the Coroner (Mr Brian) referred to the advisability of a place for the reception of bodies provided nearer the Barbican than the present dead-house. The Jury found that the deceased died from the Visitation of God.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 March 1871
TORQUAY - A Young Woman Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held at the Clarence Hotel, Torquay, yesterday, on SARAH COLES, aged twenty-three, who died on Sunday from the effects of burning. The deceased, who was a servant at Normount, was cleaning out the kitchen on Saturday, and was moving backward towards the stove, when her clothes caught fire. She was so frightfully injured that she died on Sunday afternoon. Jane Ham, her fellow servant, exhibited much intrepidity in putting out the fire with a blanket, for which she was complimented by the Coroner and Jury. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 March 1871
ST. MARYCHURCH - An Inquest was held by Mr Michelmore, Coroner, at Babbicombe, yesterday, on RICHARD FORD MATTHEWS, whose body was washed ashore on Oddicombe beach on Wednesday morning. The deceased, who was a labourer, and forty-five years of age, left his home on the 18th of January, and has not since been seen alive. It is presumed that he fell into the sea under Walls Hill, and his body became embedded in the sand, from which it was dislodged by the strong swell during the last few days and thrown up on the beach. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 March 1871
PLYMOUTH - A housemaid named DAW, living at Cromwell Lodge, Higher Compton, Plymouth, complained on Tuesday of being in great pain, and subsequently told a fellow servant that a baby was in the closet. Upon a search being made it was discovered that the child had been pressed down the pan so tightly that the syphon had to be broken, and the masonry taken away to get the body out. Before DAWE informed the servant respecting the child being in the closet it was not suspected that she was enceinte. At an Inquest held on Thursday Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, stated that he did not think the child had had an independent existence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 March 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday at Devonport on RICHARD HOSKINS, a mason and builder. Deceased had been depressed in spirits for some time past, owing to the death of a son, and marriage of his only daughter, who had taken charge of his home. He was heard to say that he would destroy himself as life had become a burden, and he was found in an outhouse yesterday morning hanging from a beam quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - A Child Drowned At The Hoe. - A girl, about thirteen years of age, named ANNIE LAPTHORNE, living with her father and mother in Finewell-street, Plymouth, was drowned last evening off Pebbleside steps, at the Hoe. She and others were on the steps looking at the strong waves rushing in on the beach, when she was knocked off the steps by one of them, and while on the beach was carried off by a succeeding wave. An elderly gentleman took off his coat and made two attempts to rescue the child but was unable to do so the waves carrying him against the wall. The body of the child was recovered about nine o'clock, and the Coroner's Inquest will be held today. When the father and stepmother of the deceased were made acquainted with the circumstances they were under the influence of intoxicating liquors, and appeared but little concerned in the matter.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 March 1871
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At chemical Works In Plymouth. - Mr William Harvey's cement and chemical manufactory, Plymouth, has been the scene of a very lamentable accident. PHILIP CANNAFORD, a steady and intelligent man, but rather careless, was employed in manufacturing sulphate of ammonia, work which eight years' experience had made him minutely acquainted with. In order to make this substance the gas liquor from the gas house is brought by pipes into tanks in the ammonia house. Sulphuric acid is then let in by a sealed syphon, and its contact with the gas liquor frees sulphurated hydrogen. this is heated in the tank, but it is possible, under careless management, that some may escape and float into the ammonia house. CANNAFORD was at work early last Saturday morning in this house, with a boy assistant named William Turner. He sent the boy on an errand, and when the latter was returning he looked into the window of the house, and saw CANNAFORD sitting down on the ground, leaving against a pan, just under the window. His eyes were shut, and his head was on one side. He was quite insensible, and appeared to be dead. He was taken to his home near Deadman's Bay, where he was attended by Mr Square, jun., surgeon. At the Inquest yesterday, Mr Square said he found the deceased totally unconscious with violent spasmodic contractions of nearly all the muscles of his body. His pulse was very rapid and his respiration very quick and laboured. His skin was of a dark, almost copper colour, from lividity. He was sweating an extremely acid sweat. The only treatment Mr Square could give him was fresh air. He tried to give him some brandy, but could not get him to swallow it. The deceased died on Sunday evening. Mr Square explained that the only thing that could have saved the deceased at the time he first saw him was the inhalation of oxygen, but there was no apparatus in Plymouth for applying it to the lungs of the deceased. It would have taken several hours to make a rude apparatus, and by that time it would have been the wrong treatment, because he would have passed through the stage at which it was necessary. He believed the death of the deceased was caused by chemical decomposition in the blood, from the inhalation of some noxious gas. Sulphurated hydrogen and carbonic acid gas combined were sufficient to produce a fatal effect. - Mr Harvey stated that the works were considered rather healthy than otherwise. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from the effect of Poisoning of the Blood, which was entirely the result of an Accident."

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Disclosures At A Coroner's Inquest. - A case of shameful brutality was brought under the notice of a Coroner's Jury at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, when an Inquest was held concerning the death of HANNAH LAPTHORNE, 14 years of age. - Henrietta Rogers, a playmate of the deceased, stated that they with two or three other girls were playing on the steps at Pebbleside, under the Hoe, shortly after 4 p.m. on Monday, when a wave came in and carried deceased off. Witness heard her cry, "Catherine, Catherine - Hetty, Hetty, come and save me," and a man ran down, threw off his coat, and rushed into the water. At this time the deceased was struggling near some pieces of timber, about 30 feet from the steps, and the man's effort to reach her were fruitless, the water knocking him back against the wall. The witness then proceeded to the deceased's residence to inform her parents of the occurrence. they were not at home, and she went to a beerhouse at the bottom of Finewell-street, which she knew the deceased's father frequented. Here she found him and his wife - deceased's stepmother - sitting at a table with a pint of beer before them. The witness, who was crying, went up to LAPTHORNE and said, "Your HANNAH'S drowned;" to which the miscreant replied, "Let the little ...... go." He was drunk at the time. In continuation the witness stated that the deceased, who had no frock on, told her that her stepmother had pawned the garment, and the poor girl appeared to be vexed that her clothes were so ragged. - Mr Williams, Coroner's officer, stated that he went to deceased's home on Monday night, and found the stepmother crouching in a corner. He told her to get up, which she did, with the assistance of another woman, but she was so intoxicated that she could not stand without holding to the table. He went away and returned shortly afterwards, by which time the body had arrived. He saw deceased's father, and said to him, "This is a pretty state of things; here's the mother beastly drunk, and you're very little better." LAPTHORNE replied that he could not help it, and, leaning over the body, observed, "I may as well die too." Witness then went to look for the mother, whom he found crouching behind the door of an empty room. He said to her, "You have pawned the child's frock for a shilling;" and she replied, "Well, what of that? Yes, I did it to buy food." - Mr Brian, the Coroner, in summing up, said the case was the most deplorable and disgraceful that had ever come before him, the more so because it did not seem to have the slightest effect on the parents, of whose culpable negligence they had had evidence. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and severely censured the parents for their neglect of the child, and their disgraceful conduct. The man and woman were both present, and appeared little concerned at the tragic occurrence. In fact, when asked if they wished to say anything, they made statements so evidently false as to elicit cries of "shame," and to induce the Coroner to observe that he was glad he had not sworn them. LAPTHORNE is a quarryman and has been in the receipt of 17s. pr week for the last three months. A neighbour present stated that the deceased had been supported by a brother, her parents having thoroughly neglected her.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 March 1871
PLYMOUTH - Singular Death At Plymouth. - The circumstances attendant on the death of RICHARD TREVELOR, cattle drover, formed the subject of an Inquiry at an Inquest held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday by Mr Brian. The deceased, who was 31 years of age, resided at 27 Richmond-street, and a neighbour named Charlotte Parker stated that on the evening of the 2nd instant she was called to deceased's room by his wife. She found a quantity of blood on the floor, and was informed by deceased's wife that he had crept under the bed, whence witness and her niece pulled him. She asked deceased, who was intoxicated, what was bleeding, and he replied, "It's my finger," at the same time holding up his right hand, from which a great quantity of blood was coming. Witness washed the hand, and applied sticking plaster. He went to work on Monday and Tuesday last, and on the latter day, Mr Jackson, surgeon, called and gave him a prescription. On Wednesday morning he was very ill, and Mr Jackson was sent for. Mr Jackson, on his arrival, scolded them for calling him out of his "warm bed" at six in the morning for such a "foolish matter," and then told deceased to pen his mouth. The latter muttered through his teeth that he could not, and endeavoured to do so with both his hands. Mr Jackson, then, having procured a spoon, tried to force deceased's mouth open, and said to him, "You can open your mouth if you like." MRS TREVELOR remarked "If he could he would see", and Mr Jackson replied that he could do nothing with him, he would not open his mouth, and said he would return in company with another gentleman and chloroform him. Deceased had had a fit of convulsions before the arrival of Mr Jackson, and cried out "Oh, my back." Mr Jackson returned at one p.m., but deceased had been removed to the hospital under Mr Eccles's direction. - Louisa Cragg, niece of the last witness, corroborated a portion of her evidence, and said on Saturday morning deceased was intoxicated and ran after his little boy, upsetting the table and cutting his big toe slightly by the side of the nail. Witness bound it up for him. The deceased was a tolerably healthy man, but she had heard him complain of pains in his back. - Harriet Pratt, acting nurse of the accident ward at the South Devon Hospital, stated that the deceased was received shortly after noon on Wednesday, and was put to bed and attended to by the house surgeon. His jaw was firmly set, but as he had lost one of his teeth, a little brandy and water was supplied to him through the aperture. Witness heard him say, "I fell I am dying." He died at a quarter past 3 o'clock. - George H. Eccles, M.R.C.S., stated that on Wednesday he was attending a person living opposite to the deceased, when he received a very urgent message asking him to come and see a dying man. He went immediately, and found deceased in bed, lying on his back, with a peculiar fixed smile on his countenance, and perspiring profusely. He told him to pen his mouth, and deceased opened his teeth just far enough for a double sheet of paper to have been passed between. Witness examined him, and found the muscles of his body rigid, but not quite so much as is usual in such cases. There was a jagged wound across the top joint of the fourth finger of the right hand,, from which a humour was exuding, and a considerable quantity came out on a slight pressure. He asked deceased the cause, and deceased murmured that he was carrying half a bullock on Thursday week last and slipped and split his finger. The deceased fancied he had cut a vein, as it had bled very much. Witness incised the finger, ordered a turpentine injection, and powdered calomel to be thrown between his teeth, and caused him to be removed to the hospital. Witness thought that deceased's death was caused by tetanus, induced by the cut on his finger, and aggravated by intemperate habits. Witness was not aware before the Inquest that deceased was being attended to by Mr Jackson. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Tetanus from a cut on the finger caused by a fall."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 March 1871
SOUTH TAWTON - An Inquest was held by Mr R. Fulford, at South Zeal, on Thursday, on WM. COOMBE, ten years of age, who was killed by being crushed between two waggons on the Okehampton Railway, now in course of completion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 March 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, on a man named TOZER, found drowned at the Hoe. The deceased when last seen alive, at 6.30 on Monday morning, stated that he was going to work, but from his recent conduct it seemed that he was of unsound mind. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The deceased was 58 years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 March 1871
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr A. B. Bone held an Inquest at the Queen's Arms Inn, Stonehouse, yesterday, on WILLIAM GLANVILLE, aged 55, pork butcher, Edgcumbe-street, who about ten days since, when riding from Liskeard to Lerrin, was violently thrown, and received injuries which proved fatal, by his horse running against the pole of a mail phaeton. It was stated that the deceased was blind in one eye, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr T. C. Brian, relative to the death of a child named WILLIAM JOHN HUGHES, son of a labourer in the Victualling Yard. The child fell about four months ago, and a few days since a swelling appeared on his back, and although medical assistance was obtained he died on Monday. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 April 1871
PLYMPTON - A charge of concealment of birth was preferred against an unmarried woman named MARY ANNE MARTIN, a domestic servant, at the Roborough Petty Sessions yesterday. Mrs Adams, the prisoner's mistress, charged the girl with being enceinte, but the latter denied it. Mrs Adams, however, told her she had better go home, and MARTIN left on the 5th March, returning on the 19th. The body of a child greatly decomposed was found in a tub in Mrs Adams's coal cellar, and at an Inquest held at Plympton on Saturday the Jury returned an Open Verdict, the body being too much decomposed to allow of any certainty as to whether the child was born alive. Prisoner was committed for trial.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 April 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - Starved To Death. - Mr Allan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Devonport Guildhall, on MARY ANN CHAPMAN, 33 years of age, who had been married twice, her second husband being at the present time a private in the 2nd (Queen's) Regiment. - ELIZABETH ANN LOUTH, aged 13 years, daughter by the first marriage, stated that she and her mother lived in an upstair room in a court at the back of 12 Queen-street. They were maintained by the money obtained on rags and bones which she (LOUTH) picked up on the parish quay. She generally made about 2s. a week, 1s. of which went for rent. Her mother, who was partially blind, had been ill for a long time, and was obliged to keep her bed for two months. She never applied to the parish for relief. When she (LOUTH) went away to pick up rags and bones her mother always made her lock the door, and take the key, as she was afraid that if the neighbours came and saw her they would get her removed to the Workhouse. The deceased told her if people asked her whether her mother had a doctor she was to say "Yes." About two months ago the husband, CHAPMAN, paid three visits to the deceased, who complained that she wanted nourishing food and clothing. On the first occasion he gave her 6d.; on the second, a pint of porter, half of which he drank himself; and on the third, two pennyworth of potted conger and two pence. Last Sunday her mother grew worse and died. - On being asked by the Coroner if she went to school, LOUTH said twelve months ago she attended the Naval and Military Free Schools, and her mother paid a penny a week. At that time they lived with her (LOUTH'S) grandmother, who maintained them by picking up rags and bones. - Elizabeth Julian saw the deceased about a month ago, and on asking her if she had a medical man she replied "Yes." There was no bedstead in the room. Deceased lay on the floor. The bedding consisted of a tie filled with straw and flock, an old quilt, and two black skirts. She saw in the room a pound of treacle and a half-quartern loaf just cut, one candle and a small quantity of coals. Deceased told her she had not applied for relief, because she would rather die than go into the Workhouse. - CHAPMAN, the husband, stated that he was sent out to the East Indies in 1866, and after he arrived there he had to spend a lot of money in clothes. In 1867 he sent home to the deceased 30s., and asked her to send out "the marriage lines," as he would try to get her on the strength of the regiment. She sent out word that she did not want to come. For more than two years he never heard from his wife. While he was in the East he drew his pay, which he spent in tobacco and other things he required. He arrived home on the 28th November last, and on finding out the deceased he asked her whether he should try to get her on the strength of the regiment. Her reply was that she did not want to have anything to say to him. Two days afterwards he went away on a six week's furlough with £4 in his pocket. The last two months he had been in the hospital, and was still under the doctor's care. - Mr Bazeley, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, said there was a tubercular disease in the left lung, with slight adhesions from old pleurisy. Deceased had not, however, disease to any extent. Judging from the condition of the body, which was emaciated, with very little fat, he thought that if she had been supplied with proper food and medicine, under favourable circumstances, her life might have been spared for some time. The cause of death was want of proper nourishment, coupled with the disease which existed in the left lung. - The Coroner thought from the evidence the woman was in a proper condition to provide for herself, because she had been living with her daughter, whom she might have instructed to apply for parochial relief. - The Jury found that the deceased died from Want of the proper Necessaries of Life. They said they could not censure the husband, because when he went to the deceased she said she did not want to have anything to say to him. - The Coroner told CHAPMAN that he had had a very narrow escape. It was the duty of a husband to provide proper necessaries for his wife, and if the deceased had been in such a condition as would have prevented her from applying for parochial relief, it was clear there would have been a verdict of manslaughter.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 April 1871
TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening by Mr H. Michelmore, at Higher Holcombe Farm, Teignmouth, on JOHN WILCOX, retired grocer, aged 58, who lodged at the farm, the occupier of which is Mr Brimage. The deceased left the London Hotel at about quarter to eleven o'clock on Wednesday night, arriving home at half-past eleven, at which hour Mr Brimage, who was in bed, heard him fasten the door. Shortly after midnight Mr Brimage heard one of the chairs moved in the kitchen, but thought little of the occurrence, as the deceased was accustomed to take refreshments before retiring to rest. Between five and six o'clock on Thursday morning some farm labourers upon entering the kitchen found MR WILCOX dead and rigid, hanging by a flag from a hook in the ceiling, and did not attempt to cut down the body until the arrival of Police-sergeant Coles. It was evident that the deceased, who for some time past has been in a desponding state of mind, had retired to rest, but had shortly afterwards risen to carry out his fatal intention. It is supposed that the noise heard by Mr Brimage was caused by the deceased kicking away a chair found close to his feet. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 April 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death From Shooting At Milehouse. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Britannia Inn, Milehouse, on RICHARD JOHN FRANCIS CRUMP, aged 14 years. On the previous day (Good Friday) James Wedlock, confectioner, living at Rendle-street, Plymouth, erected a "shooting gallery" in the path field, behind Rose Cottage, Milehouse, and left it in charge of Elizabeth Hannah Gibbs, his servant, who was accustomed to the management of such an apparatus. Firing commenced shortly before midday, and was continued until between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. At that time Sergeant Walter Thompson, 2nd (Queen's) Regiment, had four shots, the rifle being loaded each time with powder, sufficient to fill the gauge of a powder flask, and a bullet. The last ball fired went through the target and entered the head of the deceased, who fell upon the ground insensible. He was picked up by Richard Partridge, a carpenter, and carried to the Britannia Inn, where he died shortly before six o'clock. At the request of the Coroner, John Eva Pearce, smith and fitter, in the employ of Mr E. Couch, Fore-street, Devonport, had made a careful examination of the shooting gallery. Many parts of the tube, he said, were eaten out with rust and wear. The target box, which was about two feet square, fitted into the end of the tube. In the middle of the box was a round iron plate, and in the centre of this plate was a hole which was called "the bull's-eye." Behind this hole was another plate of iron called "the striking plate," which worked on a pivot, and to which was attached three bells fixed on a stem of iron, and which stem was inserted into the rod of the striking plate. On the top of the box was a square piece of wire netting, with a square hold in it, about two inches in size, through which the rod of the striking plate passed. There was no protection for the bells, which were above the wire netting. The box, the outside of which was wood, appeared to be thoroughly worn out, being patched in all directions. Had the box been in perfect order the accident could not have happened. The wire netting should have been a fixture, whereas it was moveable. Had it been fixed, firing would have been perfectly safe. Owing to its being moveable, whenever a rifle was fired the force of the shot would move the wire netting, and the striking plate being in consequence put out of position allowed a shot entering the "bull's-eye" to pass out through the end of the box. Taking the condition of the machine as he found it, he considered that an accident was probable. - The witness, on being cross-examined by Mr T. C. Brian, who watched the proceedings on behalf of Wedlock, who was in custody, said he had never constructed shooting galleries, but had often examined them. The box seemed to have been constructed in the usual way, and the iron plates were about the ordinary thickness - half an inch. The striking plate was a good deal larger than the "bull's-eye". The plate, therefore, might be very much out of place, and yet a shot might make the bells ring. The shot, however, would have to go through the "bull's-eye" to make them sound. Whilst there was enough of the plate to cover the "bull's-eye" there was no danger of the bullet passing out at the back of the box. He thought every shot was calculated to displace the striking plate a little after once being moved, and each successive shot a little more. Both plates in the box were perfectly strong enough for tall the purposes intended. - The servant, Gibbs, said Good Friday was the first day that the machine was worked by Wedlock, who purchased it from a man named Brewer. Saw Wedlock put on the wire netting, but could not tell whether he fastened it. During the day the bells rang several times, which indicated that the bullet had entered the "bull's-eye." When the last shot was fired by Sergeant Thompson she did not hear them ring. - Partridge, who picked up the deceased, said there were in the field at the time three shooting galleries, besides roundabouts and whirligigs. - Mr Brian contended there was not sufficient evidence to shew criminal negligence on the part of Wedlock, who put up the machine in full and perfect confidence and belief that it was fit for the purpose for which it was intended. Had anything happened immediately after the gallery was erected, it would have borne out Mr Pearce's opinion that an accident was probable, but the firing lasted four hours, and the bells rang several times. An accident, then, at the time it commenced was rather improbable. He submitted that no impact by firing would have the effect of drawing the striking plate one way or the other, and that it was more likely some mischievous person tipped it on one side, and thus allowed the bullet to pass through the box. - The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that they should not allow any feelings of disgust arising from the scandalous, he had almost said blasphemous, desecration of one of the most solemn days of the year to influence their judgment with regard to the verdict. They had simply to consider whether Wedlock, who brought the shooting gallery into the field for the purpose of its being used, took the trouble to acquaint himself with its proper condition. The circumstance of his having been so recently in possession of it did not, in his opinion, make any difference. It was Wedlock's duty to have satisfied himself that it was safe. If, after the evidence they had heard, they believed the youth died in consequence of a bullet from that machine striking him, and if they also believed that the shooting gallery was in such a defective state as to make it probable that an accident would happen, then he thought their verdict must be manslaughter. If they had any substantial doubt - if they thought the machine was fit and safe for use - then it would be one of accidental death. He was sorry he could not find any law affecting the disgusting practice of sporting on that solemn day - Good Friday. He confessed it would have been a great satisfaction to him if all the parties in the field on the previous day, who were engaged in promoting these unseemly and scandalous sports, could have been brought before a proper tribunal and punished. There was no doubt that the man Wilcox would hear from his lessee, that the terms of his lease had been violated by allowing shows to be erected in the fields on Good Friday. - The Jury, after a quarter of an hour's private consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Wedlock, who stands committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant. - Mr bone said he would be willing to take bail, Wedlock in £40 and two sureties in £40 each. - Wedlock was brought up at the Devonport Guildhall on Saturday morning, and charged with causing the death of RICHARD CRUMP, in a field at Milehouse, by having a defective shooting gallery there on the 7th of April. - Mr Brian appeared for the prisoner. - Mr Superintendent Lynn said he was at Milehouse on the previous day, and saw the boy die. Afterwards witness came to the police-station, where he found the prisoner, who said he did not know that the shooting gallery was defective, as he had bought it from a man named Brewer, and that was the first day he had used it. There was a young woman named Gibbs present, who said she was in charge of the gallery, and he (Mr Lynn) asked her if it were in the same state while she were using it as prisoner left it? The prisoner answered, "I erected it in the morning." - Wedlock was then remanded until this morning.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 April 1871
HARBERTON - An Inquest was held last night at the Maltster's Arms, Harbertonford, by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on JAMES ANDREWS, who was killed on Monday evening by being thrown from a dray. The evidence adduced was in accordance with the facts detailed yesterday. The position of the barrels in the drag led to the supposition that the deceased must have been jerked out. At the place where the accident happened two deep gutters cross the road, and the sudden jerk caused by crossing the gutters was supposed to have been the cause of the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that a representation should be made to the highway authorities that the spot in question was dangerous to travelling, and that the gutters should be carried under the roadway.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 April 1871
ST MAWES - CAPTAIN FOGWILL, of the Royal Tar, of Brixham, which had put in at St. Mawes, for orders, was accidentally drowned by walking over the pier when proceeding to join his boat. The body was recovered in about 45 minutes, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on Thursday, when a verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned. The deceased leaves a wife and five children.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 April 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, on CHARLOTTE HOCKING, found dead in her bed on the night of the 15th inst. The deceased was a woman of very intemperate habits, and a verdict was returned that the deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by intemperance.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 April 1871
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Inquiry into the death of WILLIAM HILL, stoker, belonging to the Indus, who, as we yesterday stated, was found dead in the mud in Stonehouse Lake, close to the shore, on Monday morning, was held yesterday by Mr Bone, Coroner, and a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned. One of the toll collectors at the Stonehouse Bridge, named Henry Lang, heard a gurgling noise, as if someone was drowning, between one and two o'clock on Wednesday morning of last week. He looked over the bridge, and went down the slope between the bridge and the brewery, but could see no one, and he did not hear the noise repeated. The Coroner called attention to the great need of some fence, or barrier, to prevent persons from going down this slope. He was sure that if the attention of the lord of the manor were called to it, he would do what was possible to make it safer.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 April 1871
PLYMOUTH - A man named TEMPLETON, aged 62 years, residing in Plymouth, died suddenly in bed yesterday morning. He had not been seriously indisposed. An Inquest was held, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - A painful case was investigated by the Devonport Coroner yesterday. HENRY MOORE, who had formerly been in the Metropolitan police, from which he was invalided, committed suicide by hanging on Thursday, in consequence, it is supposed, of depression of spirits caused by being told that he would never recover from his illness. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Workhouse yesterday on JOHN MAYNE, aged sixty-nine years. The deceased was admitted in the hospital ward about a month since suffering from a carbuncle, and if anything he asked for was not given at once he would grumble, and say he would throw himself out of the window. On Wednesday he went to the closet, and a few minutes afterwards thrust himself through a small window, and falling on an earthen pan, received a severe wound on the right temple, which proved fatal. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 April 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest on MINNIE KING ATWILL, aged four months, who, as was stated yesterday, was found dead in bed by the side of her mother, who resides at the Post-office Inn, Plymouth, was held by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday, and after evidence shewing that the deceased was very delicate, and subject to convulsions, had been received, a verdict of "Suffocation from Accidental Pressure" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Harvest Home, Plymouth, yesterday, by Mr T. Brian, Borough Coroner, on a man named HILL. Mary Askell stated that on Saturday, between 7 and 8 p.m., she saw deceased walking up Week-street rather unsteadily, and upon going to him he told her that he had been running. He was taken to Mr Cole's stores, and died in a few minutes. Mr Cole, china merchant, said the deceased, who had been in his employ for the last thirty-three years, was very intemperate, but he had not noticed him intoxicated for the past fortnight. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 April 1871
PLYMOUTH - The injuries sustained by the boy - GEORGE ROWLAND, aged 8 years - who fell over the rocks at the ladies' bathing place at Plymouth Hoe, on Wednesday, proved fatal; and at an Inquest held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended the erection of a fence to prevent boys climbing the wall.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 May 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Brian, Plymouth Coroner, on HENRY BURN, labourer, aged 64, who died suddenly from heart disease, whilst working at the Prince Rock limekilns. Deceased told his wife an hour or so before his death that he never felt better in his life. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 May 1871
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident To A Marine. The Jurisdiction Of Coroners. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, yesterday afternoon, by Mr A. B. Bone, County Coroner, on the body of a private in the Royal Marines, which was found floating in the Hamoaze on the previous day. Mr Nicholas James Wood, carpenter of the Terrible, observed the body in the water a hundred yards north of Keyham, and he took it n tow. On the great coat which it had on was, "A. SHERRIFF, R.M., 1866." The body was taken to H.M.S. Indus, and by order of the commander of that vessel to the Naval Hospital. - The Coroner said, on the night of the 21st March last a marine named SHERRIFF, while on duty as sentry on board the Agincourt, fell over-board and had not since been heard of. There could be no moral doubt that this was the body of the poor fellow, but the fact of names being on the clothes, and nothing else, was not a legal identity of the body, and the only verdict that the Jury could return was that the deceased, who was not known, was found drowned. - One of the Jurors said there was no doubt in his mind that it was SHERRIFF'S body, and if the Jury could return a verdict to that effect whatever money or effects he had would be restored to his relatives. - The Coroner said they must be bound by the law .. (hear, hear) - and the suggestion of the Juror could not be carried out. - A verdict as suggested was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 May 1871
PLYMOUTH - ELLEN LASHBROOK, 13 months old, daughter of a wheelwright residing at Laira, near Plymouth, was scalded on Saturday night by boiling over of water in a kettle. The child died on Monday, and at an Inquest held by Mr Bone, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Shocking Accident Near Barnstaple. - Early yesterday morning JOHN SMITH, aged 26, went to the Playford paper mills, where he was employed, and, it is thought, opened the cover of the manhole of a revolving boiler. Through this the steam rushed with great force, hurled SMITH to a considerable distance, fracturing his skull and severely scalding him. He appears to have been the only man on the premises, and as he staggered towards Barnstaple, a Mr Vickery residing in the first house on the road heard the poor fellow's groans, and, getting out of bed, dressed and went to seek a conveyance to convey the sufferer, whose skin in several parts was peeling off, to Barnstaple. No less than three persons who were applied to refused a conveyance, but the fourth, Mr Allen, immediately acceded to the request. The poor fellow, who had a wife, and child, subsequently died in great agony in the North Devon Infirmary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed great disapprobation at the unfeeling manner in which the parties refusing their conveyances acted. The Coroner, Mr I. Bencraft, concurred in this censure, and said it was scarcely credible such cold-hearted people could be found in the present day. The individuals referred to are a dairyman named Laverton; Wm. Harding, a labourer in the employ of Colonel Harding; and a nurseryman named Ireland.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 May 1871
EXETER - Mr H. W. Hooper, the Exeter Coroner, held two Inquests last evening on children who had met their deaths by accident. In one case the grandchild of MR HANCOCK, a brickmaker, of St. Sidwell's, fell into a stagnant pool of water, and was not discovered until she was quite dead.
In the other the infant son of a man named HORWILL, living in Bartholomew-street, had his head injured by a mangle which his father was working, and died in a few hours. The child had crept into the room unnoticed, and got between the end of the mangle and the wall. In both instances verdicts of "Accidental Death" were returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 May 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, relative to the death of a lad named GEORGE HENRY JEFFERY. Mr Worth, farmer, Bugle Farm, near Shaugh, stated that on Monday week the deceased was driving the horses attached to the machinery for crushing corn. Witness was in an adjoining compartment attending to the crushing, when suddenly the machine stopped and he heard a shriek. On going out he found that the deceased had entangled one of his legs in the horse gear. Mr Ellery, surgeon, Ridgeway, was promptly in attendance, wrapped the wound up, and ordered the lad to be taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. There was no danger if the deceased had kept in the right path, but according to his own statement he stood on the wheel of the horse gear, and touched the horses with the whip when they jerked him off, and his leg came in contact with the wheel. - Dr Anderson, surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that on Tuesday, the 9th of May, the deceased was admitted into the Hospital with a fractured leg. All went favourably until Thursday, when the deceased had slight fainting fits, and gradually got worse until he died on Monday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 May 1871
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest on a woman named JANE TAMLIN, aged 43 years, the wife of a tailor, was held yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr Brian, Coroner. The deceased had been in delicate health, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 May 1871
SALCOMBE REGIS - The Mysterious Affair At Salcombe. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Michelmore, on ZENAS SHARIZER DREW, a lad about 10 years of age. It has been previously stated that the deceased on Saturday last went out in a boat with a man of unsound mind, named Steer, who returned without him, and that a pilot named Jarvis subsequently found the boy's body in the water, being attracted to the spot by seeing a hat, which it was proved the deceased had been wearing, on a rock. Jarvis asserted that it was impossible for a boy to reach the spot where the hat was found. - Samuel Clark, labourer, stated that on Saturday morning Steer and a lad about eight years of age came into Spray Cove, where the witness at that time was at work. Steer invited witness to come down to the boat, and they had some bread and butter and cider together. Steer gave the deceased, to whom he appeared very kind, a piece of bread and butter, and then sculled away with him. Witness subsequently saw Steer go up the harbour alone. - Richard Cook, miner, deposed that he met Steer near the spot where the deceased was found, and the latter said to him he was looking for a little boy whom he had lost somewhere, and had been calling for ten minutes. - Joseph Winsor, mariner, was spoken to by Steer upon his return to Salcombe after the cruise he had taken in company with the deceased. He said in conversation, "I am a curious old fellow, and there is mischief belonging to me." - P.C. Matthews found traces of two persons walking through the wood near the place where the body was picked up. Saw a mark as if someone had slipped over the cliff. - J. M. B. Langworthy, surgeon, had examined the body. There were two wounds on the head, just above the right ear, and two slight bruises on the arm, caused, he thought, by a fall, and not by a sharp instrument. Considered it dangerous for children to ramble about with Steer, who was not responsible for his actions. - Police-Sergeant Knight said the cliff above the spot where deceased's body was found was very dangerous. It was overhung with ivy, upon which in some places a person might step and imagine he was about to tread upon firm ground. - Steer was called, but his manner appeared to convince all present of his insanity, and the Coroner gave the man's son instructions to carefully watch him. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 May 1871
BIDEFORD - The Suspected Infanticide At Bideford. - An Inquest on the newly-born male child which, as was stated yesterday, was found decapitated and minus one leg in a house in Honestone-lane, Bideford, was held yesterday. The evidence shewed that ZENA MAYNARD, thirty-six years of age, domestic servant to Mr Murray, Rowenna, Westward Ho! was suspected by her mistress of being enceinte, but she denied such was the case. On Tuesday last she performed her work as usual, but in the evening Mrs Murray observed that she was looking unwell and believing that she was about to be confined caused her to be conveyed to the residence of her aunt at Bideford. Information was given to the police, and upon Superintendent Vanstone visiting her she at once admitted that she had been delivered of a child at Rowena, and upon being asked for the body shewed the mutilated remains, stating that the child was born dead, and that she cut off with a knife the head and a leg, which she burnt in the stove at her mistress's house. - Dr Ackland expressed the opinion that the child had lived, and had had an independent existence, and the Inquest was adjourned until June 16th.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 June 1871
SOWTON - Concealment Of Birth By A Widow. - At the Woodbury Petty Sessions yesterday, ELIZA HAY, the mother of eight legitimate children, the proprietress of a dairy at Sowton, near Exeter, was charged with concealing the birth of an illegitimate child. For some time past rumour had alleged that the prisoner, whose husband died two years ago, was enceinte, but she stoutly denied this to the rector, the Rev. Preb. Sanders. On the 3rd June, when the dead body of her child was in her bedroom, she again denied to Mr Sanders that she had been pregnant and consented to submit to a medical examination. This examination was made by Mr Gibbs, surgeon, of Topsham, and he came to the conclusion that MRS HEY had not recently given birth to a child, and gave a certificate to that effect. On the night of the 1st of May, a midwife, named Harris, was sent for by the prisoner and found that she had given birth to a fine male child. She told the woman that her mother and sister were coming next morning from Cullompton and would take away the child. Mrs Harris left before daylight. One of the prisoner's daughters in the morning heard the child cry, but it was not seen alive afterwards. On the 5th Detective Hurson went to the house of the prisoner, who admitted that she had given birth to a child and that it was dead, and shewed him the box in which she had placed the body. She stated that after the nurse left she gave the baby some brandy, and when she awoke in the morning she found it dead. Later in the day Hurson apprehended her on the charge of murder. - Mr Somers, a surgeon, of Broadclist, proved that death arose from suffocation. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held, at which the Jury returned an Open Verdict, and afterwards the charge of murder was abandoned. - The Bench committed the prisoner for trial to the assizes, but accepted bail. Mr W. Friend prosecuted, and Mr Toby defended.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 June 1871
PLYMOUTH - JOHN TUCKER, a farm labourer, of Hooe Meavy, aged 35 years, who a month ago was knocked down by a train while trespassing on a railway viaduct near Horrabridge, died at the South Devon Hospital on Tuesday. An Inquest was held yesterday, when the railway officials were entirely exonerated, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 June 1871
BIDEFORD - The Infanticide At Northam. - The adjourned Inquest on the illegitimate male child of ZENA MAYNARD, domestic servant, who had been residing at Rowena, Westward Ho! prior to the birth of the child on the 23rd of May last, was resumed yesterday at the Bideford Townhall. The woman, who appeared to be in a weak condition, was present, and after the reading of the evidence of Police-Sergeant Vanstone, who stated that she confessed to him that she had cut off the head and one of the legs of the child and burnt them in a stove, and that when he apprehended her she gave up the rest of the remains, which she had concealed in a house in Honestone-lane, Bideford, the prisoner admitted that the statements were quite correct. The evidence of Dr Ackland went to shew that the child was born alive, but Sabina Slater, who slept with the prisoner, stated that she did not hear a child cry, and had it done so she must have heard it. Prisoner asserted that the child was stillborn. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder," upon which the Coroner remarked, "How could you bring in that verdict?" Two of the Jury, asserting that the verdict was theirs, protested against the Coroner making any such observations, and the latter then said, "I think the child was destroyed some way or other." This, however, was not the only difficulty. An attempt was made to alter the manner in which the Jury had couched their verdict, and in which the murder was stated to have been committed at Northam, in which parish Westward Ho! is situate. Again the Jury protested against the Coroner's interference, and insisted upon their written verdict being recorded. The accused will be brought before the County Magistrates on Monday.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 June 1871
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held by Mr Michelmore at the Torbay Infirmary, Torquay, on REGINALD GEORGE PEDERICK, aged three years and nine months. Deceased in endeavouring, on Tuesday afternoon, to pull some field flowers from some grass which was in a timber waggon, fell under the wheels and was crushed to death. No blame could be attached to the man in charge of the waggon, as he was walking by the side of his horses and knew nothing of the accident until he heard a shriek. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 June 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Vosper's Arms, Devonport, by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner, on THOMAS BERRYMAN, superannuated joiner in the dockyard, who committed suicide that morning by hanging himself in his room. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 3 July 1871
SOUTH HUISH - The Lamentable Death Of A Lady Near Kingsbridge. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MRS BALKWILL, who was found dead early on Thursday morning, was held by Mr Michelmore on Friday evening, at the deceased's residence, South Huish, near Kingsbridge. Mr Joseph Earle, of Alston, was elected Foreman of the Jury. - George Brown, commissioned boatman in the Coastguard, stationed at Hope Cove, stated that on his round on Wednesday night he had to pass Thurlestone Sands. He passed at one o'clock in the morning, and saw nothing particular then, but on passing again at twenty minutes to three o'clock, when it was just getting light, he saw something white lying in the wash of the sea and moved by the motion of the waves. He went towards it, and discovered it to be the dead body of a female lying on her face and hands. It was then about high tide. He took the body a short distance up on the sands, to prevent the waves taking it away. Knew MRS BALKWILL, but did not then recognize her features. she had on a nightdress, a knitted cap on her head, and a flannel jacket, boots unlaced, and stockings. Getting assistance from a man who lived at a limekiln nearby, they unhung a door at the kiln, laid the body on it, and placed it in a cellar, the door of which he (witness) locked, and took the key in his pocket. He went to Hope Cove, and informed his officer of the occurrence. The officer sent to Malborough and informed the police of it. On returning to the cellar where the body was he met a man, who told him MRS BALKWILL was missing. He then recollected that the features of the corpse resembled MRS BALKWILL. Saw no trace of footmarks on the sand leading him to suppose that a struggle took place. - MR HENRY BALKWILL, husband of the deceased, was the next witness. He was led into the room in an almost unconscious state, apparently overwhelmed with grief by his irreparable loss. In answer to the Coroner's questions he stated that he was married to the deceased on June 1st. They went away together after marriage, and returned to that house (South Huish) on the 23rd. He never had a quarrel with his wife. They lived happily together. She appeared to be in good health lately, and on Wednesday night was apparently quite well. They went to bed together at ten minutes past ten, and she was then very cheerful. They talked together about a quarter of an hour after they were in bed. He went to sleep before his wife. Awoke next morning at half-past five o'clock and found his wife was not in the room. He took no notice of it, thinking that as they were to have company that day she had got up early to make preparations. She was very nervous about this party for several days previous and appeared to be afraid that it would not pass off all right. He dressed leisurely, and hearing someone in the stairs, who he thought was his wife, spoke, and was replied to by the servant. He asked her where her mistress was, and she replied that she did not know. He then went downstairs, looked in all the rooms, garden, outhouses and all the premises, but could not find her. The front door he found unlocked and unbarred; the night previous he had locked and barred it. Sent for Mr Jellard, a neighbour, who continued the search, and he sent also for his (MR BALKWILL'S) brother, who rode away and soon came back with the fatal news. Had never known his wife to walk in her sleep. She had never by word or deed given him the least idea that she meditated self-destruction. - Thirza Skedgell, the servant of MR BALKWILL, said she had lived with MR and MRS BALKWILL since their return after marriage. During the past week her mistress appeared quite happy, and on Wednesday night MRS BALKWILL told her she expected company, and wanted the work done early. Witness got up the next morning at six o'clock, and went about her work. She heard no noise during the night, but shortly after she came down her master called, and asked if her mistress was down. She looked in the parlour and kitchen, and told her master that she was not down. The front door was closed, but unlocked and unbarred. Had known deceased for the last six years, but had never heard that she walked in her sleep. - MR THOMAS ADAMS, of Hope Barton, brother of the deceased, stated that she was extremely nervous. Five years ago, when she lived with him, she was very much frightened by a man knocking at the door at night. From this fright she never recovered. She had told him that she had passed sleepless nights; that was two or three years ago. Saw his sister the day before this sad occurrence; she then appeared quite happy. Had never known her walk in her sleep. - The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned as their verdict "That the deceased was Found Drowned on Thurlestone Sands, but how, or by what means, there was no evidence to shew." - It should be mentioned that there was nothing of a pecuniary nature to trouble the deceased lady's mind, as she had not only a comfortable competence settled upon her, but her husband was also a well-to-do young farmer.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 July 1871
PLYMOUTH - Manslaughter By A Woman At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday on JAMES RIBLEN, a labourer, who resided in Queen-street, Plymouth. - Bessie Trenoweth, wife of an assistant relieving officer, deposed that the deceased was of intemperate habits. She saw him on Monday morning, when he left her house to look for work. She last saw him at the Hospital on Tuesday evening, when he was quite sensible and recognised witness. She asked him "how he came by the accident," and he said "The woman knocked him down." On witness leaving RIBLEN asked her to come and see him on Thursday with his wife. He had then no fear of death. Deceased's wife was blind; she (witness) had never seen him come home "beastly drunk." - Emma Scown, keeper of the Cadogan Inn, King-street, stated that deceased called at her house on Monday afternoon, and had two glasses of ale. He was slightly under the influence of drink. Whilst deceased was there a woman named Emma Creed, accompanied by another woman, came in and asked RIBLEN for a glass of ale. He refused to give her one, and she accused him of owing money at Millbay. Deceased then used abusive language to Creed, who gave him a slap in the face. Witness got between the deceased and the woman, and parted them. Deceased shortly afterwards left and Creed followed him, the other woman remaining behind. A few minutes afterwards Creed passed the house in the custody of a policeman. Creed was quite sober. - James Ley, a baker, residing at 161 King-street, saw deceased walking up the street and a woman running after him. The woman caught deceased by the collar of his smock-frock, which she pulled over his head and struck him all around the head. She then pulled him into the gutter and on to the curb, where he fell, his legs seemingly being doubled up under him. Witness was of a decided opinion that the deceased fell from the woman's treatment and not from intemperance. After he fell the woman caught him by the collar and pulled him in further on the pavement. She struck him several times, and then walked rapidly away. Witness seeing deceased trying to get up went across the road to assist him. He caught him by the arm and endeavoured to get him up, but could not. RIBLEN said, "Oh, my leg," twice, and witness put his hand down and found the leg was completely broken, the upper part of the bone projecting from the lower. With the help of two policemen deceased was brought into witness's shop, where his leg was placed on a chair. A cab was called, and deceased was taken to the hospital. - In answer to a Juror, witness said he might have prevented deceased falling, but he did not know the circumstances. He was aware the deceased and the woman were not man and wife, as he was acquainted with MR RIBLEN. - In answer to the Foreman, witness emphatically declared that the woman struck deceased the instant before he fell, and that he fell from the force of the blow. - Mr Brian (the Coroner) here strongly commented upon the absence of Creed at the Inquest. Owing to this circumstance the last witness was unable to swear if she was the woman who maltreated deceased. - Robert Lamerton, a policeman, stated that he saw the deceased walking up the street. Just afterwards Creed came out of the house, ran after deceased, and struck him. Witness saw deceased fall and Creed bending over him, but could not say if she struck him on the ground or not, as her back was turned towards him. A minute afterwards Creed walked away, and he then, with Mr Ley and P.C. Wall, helped to take deceased into Mr Ley's shop. Witness ran after Creed, whom he overtook, and brought he back to where the deceased was lying. He asked her if she knew what she had done, and she replied, "I don't know, and don't care;" and on witness telling her that RIBLEN'S leg was broken, she replied, "Oh, his leg is no more broken than mine is." Creed was brought up on Tuesday, before the sitting magistrates, and remanded until Monday. Witness also stated, that whilst in Mr Ley's shop deceased told him to take "that woman" into custody. - Wall, police-constable, gave evidence corroborating that of the last witness. He also deposed that he saw deceased in the Hospital, where he (RIBLEN) told him that the woman followed him, knocked him down, thumped his head against the stones, and stepped upon his leg. - Sedley S. Woolferstan, surgeon, stated that he was sent for shortly before six o'clock on Monday evening, and on arriving at the Hospital found the deceased, JAMES RIBLEN, in the accident ward. He examined him, and found that he had sustained a compound fracture of the left leg. There were two small bones from the upper wound, a fragment of each protruding. Witness was certain the upper two wounds resulted from a protrusion of the bone, and the lower one was probably caused in the same manner. He set the leg, having to enlarge the upper wounds before he could return the bones. Believed that deceased had been drinking, but he answered all questions very rationally. Thought that the chances of deceased recovering were very small. RIBLEN had passed a bad night on Monday, and had delirium tremens. On Tuesday night he was in a very precarious condition. Shortly afterwards he commenced to sink rapidly, and died about twenty minutes to eight yesterday (Wednesday) morning. - Richard Harrison, house-surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that when the deceased was seized with delirium tremens he was almost unmanageable. Witness on making a post mortem examination of the deceased, in conjunction with Mr Woolferstan, found the brain congested, and it bore symptoms of old disease, and the heart was considerably diseased, the disease partly being of old standing and structural, and partly functional. The liver and kidneys were all organically diseased. The stomach was empty. The injury to the leg was a compound fracture, very severe. The extreme purple appearance of deceased arose probably from loss of blood. Looking at the general statement of the deceased, he was of opinion that the compound fracture of the leg might very probably cause death; it was doubtless accelerated by it. - Dr Woolferstan, recalled, stated that he considered the immediate cause of death was disease of the heart, but if he had not received any injuries in the leg, deceased would have lived for some time longer. - The Coroner, in summing up, strongly animadverted on the absence of the woman CREED, now in custody, which he said was unworthy of the English law. If the Jury considered the fracture of the leg accelerated the death of deceased they must return a verdict of manslaughter. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Emma Creed.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 July 1871
PARKHAM - The Murder In North Devon. - The Inquest on ANTHONY CLEMENTS, whose murder we have already announced, was held on Saturday. The deceased, a labourer, 82 years of age, lived at Goldworthy, in the parish of Parkham, about six miles from Bideford. He was the sole occupant - his wife died twelve months ago - of one of two thatched cottages, separated from each other by a thin partition. A labourer and his wife resided in the adjoining premises. The cottages, which were at least half a mile distant from any other dwelling-house, were held under a lease by the deceased; who, although in the receipt of 2s. a week poor relief, possessed, it was thought, a great deal of money. For some time past the old man has expected to come into possession of a considerable fortune, and he has been to London once or twice, it is said, with a view to obtain it, in company with a known fortune-teller of Bideford. Nothing, however, resulted from it. Deceased was missed and last seen alive by his neighbour, Mary Short, on Wednesday, the 28th of June. She stated that the old man was accustomed to come into her house to have most of his meals, and on that day he came in and said he was going to Hartland to see someone who owed him some money, and asked her to change a sovereign, which she could not do. He next asked her to change half a sovereign, and as she could not comply with his request he borrowed 2s. from her. About two o'clock in the afternoon Mrs Short went into the garden behind the cottages, where he had gone to pick some gooseberries, to give him a shilling, a part of his relief, which had been brought, and she says that there she saw a strange woman who had on a sealskin jacket. She was "biggish," but her back was towards her, and consequently she did not see her face. A quarter of an hour afterwards the deceased brought in the key of the garden gate to Mrs Short, and asked her to take care of his donkey, as he thought of going to Hartland by the carrier. He went out and she heard him in his own house "lock upstairs and down," but did not hear a second person, nor did she see him leave for Hartland, where it is known he did not go; neither did she see anything of the woman she saw in the garden. Shortly after midnight on Thursday she was awoke, she said, by a smash as if earthenware was broken in deceased's bedroom, and she then heard a groan. She heard no scuffle or voices. She awoke her husband, and told him; but he replied it might be someone outside. From that day up to last Friday Mrs Short does not appear to have said anything about the noise or the groan, although she felt distressed at deceased's long absence, as he had never been away from home before during her residence in the house. On Friday morning she told a man named Samuel Lewis, who was passing, that she was distressed at deceased's disappearance, and induced him to look into the bedroom window, which he did by means of a gate, and there he thought he saw the old man on the bed. Further assistance was obtained, and access was obtained through the window. A man named Pearson and deceased's eldest son were the first to enter, and a ghastly sight was presented to them. On a bed (there were two in the room), close to the thin partition separating the room from that in which the Short's slept, the old man lay on his right side, with his head, which appeared to be a mass of coagulated blood, hanging over. The fragments of an earthen ware article, which had been smashed, were lying by the bedside. The face was quite black, and decomposition had set in. He had on a pair of fustian trousers, stockings, waistcoat, and neckerchief. The forehead and left temple were greatly bruised. Above the left ear were marks of violent blows. The skull was broken in four different places. The blows had apparently been inflicted with a circular instrument, such as a hammer. The bones of the skull were beaten in, and a fracture extended from the middle of the forehead to the crown of the head. The blows appeared to have been struck while the old man was in a sitting position, and their force was so great that the blood had spurted out and splashed the ceiling and the partition as if ejected from a syringe. The room was undisturbed, but no money was found, with the exception of three pence, which deceased had in one of his pockets. There were a few red gooseberries in the bed, as if placed there by accident or design. There was no blood about the bedroom, nor on the fragments of earthenware. The key of the front door was searched for, but could not be found, though the door was locked and not bolted. On the upper stair there were large spots of blood, which appeared to have been accidentally wiped by the sweeping of a dress, and on the side of the wall close by the top stair was a large spot of coagulated blood, as if it had been shaken from something. The motive of the crime appears to have been to obtain the little money the murdered man was supposed to possess. The Inquest was held at the New Inn, Parkham, by Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner. Mr Superintendent Rousham watched the case for the police. In addition to the evidence to the effect of the preceding statement, Edward Pearce, miller, Parkham, who was one of the first to enter the room on Friday, said the bed clothes were partially thrown over deceased. There was no blood on the clothes, which looked as if they had been thrown over the old man after he had been killed. Deceased's arms were folded. - SAMUEL CLEMENTS, son of the deceased, stated that he met a man named Jolliffe, who said Mary Short was in distress to think that deceased had not returned from Hartland, where witness understood he went the Wednesday fortnight previous. He went to his father's cottage, and Mrs Short said she was afraid his father was dead. Witness went up to the window and saw deceased, and said so. Mary Short exclaimed, "Don't say so, don't say so; if you do I shall die." - By the Jury: He was accustomed to sleep the side on which he was found dead. He was not in the habit of taking out the key of the door, but used to bolt the door. - Dr Ackland, of Bideford, who examined the body, said he found the deceased lying in a mass of coagulated blood extending as far as his waist. The forehead, left temple, and the upper half of the face, were greatly swollen, and bruised of a bluish black colour. On dividing the scalp and dissecting the parts down to the skull, a large quantity of dark blood was found, occupying the whole half of the head. Above the left ear there were marks of violent blows, which had broken the skull in four places, the bones heaving been beaten in. From the fractures a fissure or crack extended as far as the middle of the forehead, and another in an upper direction to the crown of the head. These injuries had evidently been the cause of death. In reply to the Jury he stated that there could be no doubt that the deceased was murdered, and said the blood on the stairs had been wiped with a cloth, or swept by a dress or something of the kind. - The Inquest was adjourned until Saturday next.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 July 1871
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Jubilee Inn, Exeter-street, into the circumstances attending the death of CATHERINE JANE WARE, aged 40 years, the wife of a labourer, living in Friary-street, Plymouth. Deceased died suddenly on Saturday night whilst in a greengrocer's shop purchasing vegetables. She had been in indifferent health for some time, and taking these circumstances into consideration, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 July 1871
PARKHAM - The Murder In North Devon. Additional Particulars. The Resumed Inquest. - The police, under the direction of Superintendent Rousham and Detective Hanson, have been very active during the last few days in collecting additional particulars concerning the murder of ANTHONY CLEMENTS. The police on Saturday morning discovered in a field not twenty paces from the cottage of the murdered man a common mason's hammer about four or five pounds in weight, on which were a few grey hairs and what appeared to be spots of human blood. It appears to have been placed in the hedge in which Mary Short was accustomed to hang her clothes, and was sworn to by a son of deceased as the property of his father. - The adjourned Inquest was held at Horns Cross on Saturday. The Coroner (Mr J. Toller, of Barnstaple) said he considered it somewhat singular that when Mary Short, the neighbour of deceased, saw the murdered man in company with a woman in the garden she did not, with a woman's curiosity, ascertain who that woman was. Referring to her statement, that on Thursday night, the 29th of June, between the hours of twelve and one, she heard the crash of earthenware and a groan, and drew her husband's attention to the circumstance, he remarking that it might be someone in the road, he (the Coroner) asked whether it was probable that anyone would have been in the road at that time of night. Mary Short said she heard nothing more than the crash and the groan, but they would have thought that with her haring quickened she would have heard the stealthy steps of the murderer: the rustling of the dress, supposing it was a woman, and the unlocking and locking of the door, but still she heard nothing. The unfortunate man went, she imagined, to Hartland, but she made no inquiry as to his prolonged absence. - The woman in custody, Izet Williams, was present at the Inquiry, and appeared very calm and collected. On the evidence of Mary Short being read the prisoner asked her questions as to her knowledge of her, and the replies of Short went to shew that they were intimately acquainted. The last question was, "You know me well?" Short: "I should not know you if your back was towards me." Mrs Short was previously cautioned by Superintendent Rousham, who had charge of the case. - LUCY CLEMENTS, about 15 years of age, deceased's grand-daughter, gave evidence to the effect that on the 28th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock she was passing the cottages occupied by her grandfather and Mrs Short. She looked into the house of the latter and saw tea things on the table. Did not see anyone in the cottage besides Mary Short. I went on a little further and saw a woman come out of grandfather's garden door. She went into grandfather's kitchen. She had on a black hat made of straw and trimmed with black velvet, a dark jacket with wide buttons in front, and a grey linsey dress. I did not speak to her, nor she to me. When she saw me she turned her head towards the wall. Grandfather was with her. He came from the garden. He went into his own kitchen after the woman. Don't know if he shut the door. I went on. I looked back, and saw Mary Short come out of her cottage and look after me. I arrived home about twelve o'clock. I saw mother, and said to her, "Who do you think I saw with grandfather?" She replied "I don't know, my dear." I said, "I think 'tis Mrs Williams." Mother replied, "How do you know that, my dear?" I said, "It is the same woman I took into Bideford last summer in grandfather's donkey-cart." - Witness was requested to look around the room to ascertain if she knew the woman. "I think it is that woman, sir," she said, pointing to Mrs Williams. Superintendent Rousham: Look well, witness. - Witness: Yes sir; that is the woman I saw with grandfather. I have no doubt about it. - Cross-examined by Williams: I was not far from the woman, not the length of the table. I saw the woman's face before she turned it to the wall. - Q.: Was it me? - A.: Yes; it was you. - Q.: Could Mrs Short see if anyone was in ANTHONY CLEMENTS'S cottage? - A.: Yes, if the door was open. I did not see very much of the woman's face. She looked at me first, and when I looked at her she turned away. I saw all her face. - ANN CLEMENTS, mother of the last witness, gave evidence corroborative of that of her daughter's, so far as the conversation between them is concerned. In continuation she stated that shortly after the death of deceased's wife her (witness's) daughter conveyed the prisoner to Bideford in deceased's donkey-cart. She heard the murdered man then say to her daughter, "LUCY, if anyone ask you who it is, say it is Mrs Luxton." - Robert Heal, of Parkham, carpenter, said on the 28th of April last he was passing ANTHONY CLEMENTS'S cottage, and was called in by him. The deceased said, "Well, Robert, I have wanted to see you for some time. I was minded to have something done about giving away my things. I was thinking I would have a "deed of gift" made. My children have served me very bad, and what I have got left I shall give to other folks. There is my old friend in Bideford, and my neighbours." He did not mention names. Deceased asked him when he could come in and do it for him, and witness replied that he could not tell him when. They parted, and witness did not call upon him again. He did not know Mrs Williams. - Robert Barrow, brewer, Bideford, saw prisoner in Bideford about the 28th or 29th of June last. She was dressed with a light hat, and, he thought, the dress she was then wearing. - Bartholomew Parkhouse of Bideford, labourer, on the 28th or 29th of June saw the prisoner on Bideford Quay. She had on a white hat and seal skin jacket. - Thomas Lee, of Goldworthy, farmer, stated that, that morning, at the request of the police, we went to cut a hedge belonging to his farm, and about eighteen or twenty paces from the house of the murdered man, at the end of Mary Short's cottage, was the gate. The hedge was high from the road, and low from the inside of the field. Mary Short came into the field; she had some towels on the hedge drying. She said, "I will pick this in out of your way," and "You will spoil all my hanging of clothes here." After cutting two or three feet he found a hammer. It was an ordinary mason's wall hammer. there was a mark by the side of the hedge. The hammer could not have been placed in the hedge from the road. - JOHN CLEMENTS, labourer, Parkham, son of the deceased, identified the hammer as having belonged to his father. - William Hurson, detective officer of the county police force, found spots, apparently of blood, on the handle of the hammer, and what appeared to be some grey hair. There were also spots on the hammer itself. - Dr Ackland, of Bideford, had made an examination of the hammer. On the top were a number of hairs, some white, and others whitish brown. On the side of the hammer were two spots, which appeared to be blood. On the middle of the handle were three or four stains similar to those produced by blood. The injuries which caused the death of ANTHONY CLEMENTS might have been inflicted by the weapon produced. He believed the stains to be blood, but they should be subjected to a further test. He examined one of the hairs under a microscope of high power, and it had every appearance of being human hair. - Superintendent Rousham said he had several more witnesses to call, and in a few days he hoped something decisive would turn up. He therefore asked for an adjournment, which was granted.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 July 1871
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on MISS FANNY SOLOMON, aged 11 years, whose death has already been announced. It will be remembered that the deceased, the daughter of an Exeter tradesman, on Thursday afternoon was going through a narrow street, near the Guildhall, when a painter's ladder fell on her. She was immediately taken to her father's house. About 24 hours afterwards concussion of the brain set in, and she lingered until Sunday morning, when she died. She was unconscious from the time of the accident to her death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" and recommended that the Local Board should take steps by widening the street to prevent a recurrence of such accidents.

EXMINSTER - Fatal Gun Accident At Exminster. - A fatal accident, caused by the incautious handling of firearms, occurred at the Devon and Exeter Boys' Industrial School, at Exminster, on Sunday. The victim was a servant girl, named ANGELINA WERE, employed at the institution. It seems that on Saturday evening the schoolmaster, Mr F. T. Dickson, who had been shooting birds in an orchard attached to the institution, placed his gun -which was loaded and capped - in the entrance hall, behind a glazed double door. Being at the moment called to attend some visitors, the fact that he had placed the gun there escaped his memory until the following morning, when he noticed that the weapon was not in its usual place in his study. He then ordered one of the inmates of the school - a lad named George Ash, about 15 years of age - to fetch the gun and bring it to him. Scarcely had the boy left the room than a report was heard, and directly afterwards Ash ran in with the smoking gun in his hand, looking fearfully pale, and exclaiming in broken accents that the gun had gone off and hurted "ANN," as the deceased was known in the house. Mr and Mrs Dickson and several other persons, at once went to her assistance, and found her lying on the steps, with a frightful wound in the head, from which blood was flowing fast. Dr Kingdon, of Exminster, was called, and he ordered her removal to a bedroom, where she lingered for an hour and a half and died. The wound was a large one; the scalp was driven in, the base of the skull was fractured, and a portion of the brain had been blown out. An Inquest was held on the body by Mr Coroner Crosse yesterday afternoon. The evidence adduced shewed that the occurrence was a pure accident. The boy Ash stated that when he took up the gun, he lifted the hammer to see whether or not there was a cap on the nipple. At the moment the deceased, who was on the steps outside the hall door, spoke to him; he looked up suddenly, the hammer slipped through his fingers, and the gun went off. In the course of the Inquiry it came out that the deceased and Ash had frequently had trivial quarrels, but they had always become friends again very shortly afterwards, and on the very morning of her death the unfortunate girl had given him some of the dripping which she received as a "perquisite" from the kitchen, to spread upon his bread - a fact shewing that the two were then on the most friendly terms, as the boys generally have to eat dry bread with their porridge at breakfast time. - The Coroner observed that the conduct of the master in leaving a loaded gun in such a place, and sending a boy after it instead of fetching it himself, was very reprehensible. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - Mr J. Trehane, jun., Solicitor to the institution, appeared to watch the case for the managers.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 July 1871
A man named RICHARD DART, aged 61, whilst in a hay field at Waybrooke farm, on Wednesday, fell from a waggon on his back, and sustained injuries which resulted fatally on Saturday. A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 July 1871
CREDITON - THOMAS GREENSLADE, aged two years and five months was drowned in a mill cistern, at Fordton, Crediton, by, it is supposed, accidentally falling in, in an endeavour to reach some apples floating on the water. At the Inquest it was stated that the path leading to the tank was not fenced, and was accordingly very dangerous, but it was promised on behalf of the owner of the mills that something should be done to prevent a recurrence of such an accident. "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 July 1871
STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Drowning At Devonport. - The body of a man belonging to the Army Service Corps was discovered at 5 a.m. yesterday by a labourer named Richard Wood lying on the mud in Joll's Canal, at the bottom of Tamar-street, Morice Town. Later in the day an Inquiry was held at the Ferry Inn, Newpassage, by Mr Allan B. Bone, Coroner for the Borough of Devonport. The principal witness was a constable named Squires, who stated that he saw the deceased, MICHAEL HEANEY, at 40 minutes to one yesterday morning at the end of John-street, Morice Town, when he heard the landlady of a public-house refuse to give him any ale, as he had no money. Deceased then went away in the direction of Tamar-street, but at 1.30 am., upon arriving at the Tamar Inn, he saw deceased sitting on the ground with his back against a post quite near the water. Witness ordered him off, and deceased got up, staggered a little, and walked away. He was slightly under the influence of drink, but on being spoken to he replied, "All right," and seemed quite capable of taking care of himself. Deceased walked by the side of the canal, and witness followed and caught him by the shoulder, saying, "You shall not go that way any further, you will be very likely to fall into the water." The deceased replied, "I shall not do that," and turned up an ope leading into John-street, Morice Town. Witness never saw him afterwards. - Sergeant-major Richardson stated that he had known deceased 13 years. HEANEY had been in the service 25 years, and had two medals, but no good conduct stripes. The last time he saw him was on Monday evening. He ought to have been in barracks at 10 o'clock that night but at a quarter past ten he was reported absent. Deceased was a very quiet man, and not addicted to excessive drinking. - Mr R. Wood and P.C. Brooks gave evidence relative to the finding of the body, on which no marks of violence were visible, and stated that the canal was in rather an unprotected state. There were chains, but they were not fastened in some places, as carts had to pass for unloading the ships in the canal. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 August 1871
SALCOMBE REGIS - Death From Morphia Near Sidmouth. - A gentleman named WALL, aged thirty-three, living at Salcombe Regis, near Sidmouth, who was in the habit of taking morphia, sent the other day a prescription to a chemist named Webber, for a mixture containing a small quantity of that narcotic. Having received the medicine he took a dose of it and went to bed. Meanwhile the chemist discovered that he had put a scruple instead of a drachm of muriate of morphia into the mixture, and immediately despatched a messenger to obtain possession of the bottle, but too late, half of the quantity taken being enough to kill an habitual morphia taker. Everything was done by the medical men who attended MR WALL, but he did a few hours afterwards. "Death by Misadventure" was the verdict at the Inquest, and the chemist was admonished to be more careful for the future.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 August 1871
TEIGNMOUTH - Yesterday an adjourned Inquest was held at the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, on the body of MARY JORDAN, who died on Friday night last, at Brook-street, Teignmouth. It appeared that the deceased was taken ill at six o'clock on Friday evening, when Dr Workman was sent for and prescribed for her, but she died at half-past 11 the same evening. An Inquest was held on Saturday night, when a post mortem examination was ordered. From this it appeared that a small blood vessel had burst on the brain, and a verdict was returned yesterday of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 August 1871
EXETER - Near the Quay at Exeter, at a place called Haven Bank, there are several large timber yards, through which a public thoroughfare runs, at a few feet from the water's edge. On Sunday afternoon a boy named GEORGE BELWORTHY, about eleven years of age, mounted a piece of timber to look at some boats, when it toppled over and rolled down the bank towards the river, passing over the luckless lad, and crushing the life out of him. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held by Mr Crosse, Coroner, who expressed a hope that the owners of the yards, policemen, and adult passers-by generally would in future do what they could to prevent children playing with the timber, as this was not the first fatal accident that had occurred at or near the spot in question.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 August 1871
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Suicide Through Jealousy. - Mr Crosse, Coroner, held an Inquest at St. Thomas, Exeter, yesterday on EPHRAIM LUKE, who committed suicide on Monday evening by jumping into the river Exe, just below the city. The deceased who was a married man, 27 years of age, was in the employ of Mr Lang, corn merchant. He was seen struggling in the water, and a policeman and three other men went to his assistance in a boat; but the body was not recovered for ten or twelve minutes, and all efforts to restore life were then unavailing. Deceased, it appeared, was jealous of his wife, and had just accused her of being unfaithful to him, alleging an improper intimacy with a man lodging in his house. The wife denied it, and left the house and the husband following her, saw her speak to the lodger. He immediately afterwards went to the river and drowned himself. He had been in a desponding state for some time. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide while in an Unsound state of Mind.

PLYMOUTH - Singular Suicide At Plymouth. - The circumstances attending a somewhat strange suicide were investigated at an Inquest held at the Plymouth Guildhall. A young man, named FROST, was found dead, and hanging from a beam in an empty room of the New London Inn. Upon him the portrait of a female was found, and on the back was written:- August 7th. JANE E. FROST. - May she feel her heart full of sorrow now I am dead and gone. I have written to Emma and mother today." - Emma Skelton, the young woman referred to as "she," stated that she had been engaged for sixteen months to the deceased, who told her on Sunday that that would be the last time she would see him, but that she had done nothing to offend him. The letter he spoke of she received on Monday. The father of the deceased said his son had for some time been in a desponding state, the result, he believed, of a blow from a stick. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 August 1871
NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at the Newton Townhall by Mr H. Michelmore, on JOHN MULLINGS, labourer, who hanged himself in Birdwell-court, East-street. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 August 1871
HIGHWEEK - The Inquest on JOHN HORWELL, who was killed on Tuesday night by falling under the wheels of a waggon of which he was in charge, was held yesterday at the Swan Inn, Newton Bushel, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was only 20 years of age, and was the sole support of his aged mother.

EXMOUTH - Melancholy Tragedy At Exmouth. - About midnight on Wednesday MR WALTER SHRIMPTON, station-master at Exmouth, Mr Nankivell, draper, Mr Bickford, Chemist, and Mr Maynard, watchmaker, of the Strand, who had been spending the evening together, were in the house of the last mentioned. Mr Maynard, according to custom, placed his stock in a box, preparatory to removing it to his bedroom. After the jewellery was placed in the box, MR WALTER SHRIMPTON jocularly remarked, "Let's garotte him, and take away his watches." Mr Maynard, entering into the joke, went into a room adjoining the shop, and returning with a breechloading revolver in his hand pointed it at MR SHRIMPTON, observing, "This is what settles garotters!" Mr Bickford exclaimed, "Don't point it, it may be loaded," and Mr Maynard replied, "Oh, it is not loaded," but he had no sooner spoken than the pistol exploded. MR SHRIMPTON said, "Oh, George, you've shot me!" and it was ascertained that a ball from the pistol had entered MR SHRIMPTON'S body, near the right shoulder, and striking the collar bone had turned aside and entered the lungs. He was taken to his residence, and Messrs. Turnbull and Langley, surgeons, were quickly in attendance, but MR SHRIMPTON after rallying a little expired shortly before two o'clock. The deceased was greatly respected and the sad affair has cast a gloom over the town. MRS SHRIMPTON was away from home at the time, but she was immediately telegraphed for. Deceased, who had no family, was about 35 years of age. - At the Inquest held yesterday afternoon Mr Maynard, who appeared deeply affected by the sad occurrence, stated that he and the deceased were great friends. Witness met him at the billiard-room on Wednesday, about a quarter after ten o'clock. They played together, and were very friendly. They left there about twelve o'clock, and went to his (witness's)( shop. He proceeded to take down his watches, and the deceased said something about burglary in a jocular manner. Witness remembered he had the revolver, and he thought he would shew MR SHRIMPTON the action of it. Deceased said, "Let's garotte him;" and witness replied if the revolver were loaded he should be able to fire six shots before a man could garotte him. The pistol then exploded, and the deceased said he was shot. He stood for a few minutes and then fell. Witness was not quite certain when he last used the pistol, which he was in the habit of keeping loaded in his bedroom. He might have fired off the pistol three weeks ago, and he must have reloaded it then, for he had not touched it since. - Mr John Langley examined the deceased, and discovered a wound on the right side of his neck; it lay downward between the right collar bone and through the right lung. No ball could be felt, as it probably was buried in the substance of the left lung, and it was not wise to make further search for it. The symptoms generally were those of a gunshot wound. The deceased died two hours after the accident. The cause of death was Suffocation from effusion of blood in the cavity of the chest. Deceased said it was an accident and that he forgave George (Mr Maynard). A verdict of "Homicide by Misadventure" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 August 1871
SHALDON - The Sad Occurrence At Shaldon. - On Saturday morning an Inquest was held at the Crown and Anchor, Shaldon, by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on DAVID SMITH, who, as was stated in Saturday's Western Morning News, was drowned on Friday afternoon. MRS SMITH, the wife of the deceased, said her late husband was a schoolmaster at Brixton, London. He bathed on the beach whilst she remained on the rocks. He was an excellent swimmer, and she saw him swimming, but after a while she lost sight of him, and found that he had altogether disappeared. Previously he did not call out, or make any sign of being in danger. Her impression was that the body of her husband was not in the water longer than half an hour, but other evidence made it almost certain that it had been there about two hours. MRS SMITH was deeply affected by her loss. - A fisherman, named Scown, deposed to finding the body. It was first seen by Captain Beer; then a number of fishermen joined hands and brought it to the shore, near the targets of the rifle corps. - As the deceased entered the water opposite to Clifford's tunnel, his body must have drifted 500 yards. As the deceased made no sign of distress before disappearing, it was suggested that he might have been seized with the cramp, or some kind of fit; but the roughness of the sea and the strength of the undertow (the tide having just turned) are quite sufficient to account for the catastrophe. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 August 1871
DARTMOUTH - Dead and hanging by his neck in a cellar at the back of the Town Arms, Dartmouth, a man named CHARLES SAUNDERS, 63 yea