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Help and advice for Inquests 1875 - 1876

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths


For the County of Devon


From the Western Morning News


1875 - 1876

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living..

[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Adams; Aggett; Alford; Alway; Andrews; Anstis; Antony; Ashford; Baddock; Baker; Ball; Ballance; Balsden; Barber(2); Bartlett; Bastin; Battershall; Bazley; Beedle; Bellamy; Bennett(2); Besley; Bickham; Bidder; Bignell; Binding; Birch; Bishop; Bisney; Blackler(2); Blackmore(2); Blight; Bloomfield; Boardman; Boolds; Bowden(2); Boyle; Brooks; Brown; Bryant; Budd; Bull; Bunsell; Burch; Burgoyne; Burk; Burt; Buttle; Cannen; Cape; Carter(2); Chopping; Churchill; Clark; Clarke; Cleave; Clements; Cockrem; Cocks; Colridge; Cole; Coles(2); Collins; Comer; Cook; Cottle; Coulon; Cousins; Coves; Cox; Cramp; Creedy; Crewes; Crispin; Crocker(2); Croker; Damerell; Daniels(2); Davis; Dawe(3); Day; Dennis(2); Dewdney(2); Down; Drake; Drew; Dunkin; Dyer; Early; Easterbrook(2); Edgcumbe; Edmonds; Ellicott; Elliott; Ellis(3); England; Evens; Ferbrache; Fitze; Flynn; Folley; Foot; Ford(2); Foreman; Foster; Fowler; Freeman; Frost(2); Fudge; Gasking; Gillard; Gillham; Gilson; Gliddon; Godfrey; Goodman; Gordon; Gough; Green; Gregory; Gringer; Gulley; Hallett; Handford; Hankin; Hansley; Harding; Harkoom; Harris; Harrison; Harvey; Hatherley; Hay; Head; Heale; Hearn(2); Heath; Hellings; Helswood; Hennaford; Herbert; Hicks; Higman; Hitchcock; Hodge; Hollock; Hookway; Hooper; Howe; Hughes; Hugo; Hunt; Hurved; Huxtable; Jackman(2); Jackson; Jams; Jeffrey; Jelley; Johnson; Johnstone; Jordan; Joslin; Jury; Kelly; Kemp(2); Kent; King; Knowles; Landrick; Lang; Lean; Lear; Lester; Ley; Light; Lowe(2); Lynn; Maddicks; Maddock; Major; Mallett; Mannix; Martin; Mathews; Matthews(2); Mayne; McConnochie; McDonald; Metherell(2); Michelmore; Mills; Milton; Minhinnick; Mogg; Mogridge; Moore(2); Morrish; Muir; Murch; Murphy; Nelson; Newcombe; Nichols; Norman; Norswell; Northcote; Northey; Northmore; Osborne; Owen; Oxland; Pack; Palmer; Parker; Parnell; Pascoe; Payne; Paynter; Pearce(3); Penny; Perryman; Petherack; Phillips(2); Phipps; Pitcher; Pitman; Puckey; Putt; Rabe; Radford; Radmore(2); Rawle; Raymond; Read; Reid; Rice; Richards(3); Roberts; Robinson; Rock; Rogers(2); Rowe; Rude; Russel; Sanders(3); Scarth; Scott(2); Searle; Shapland; Sherwell; Short; Shuldham; Skinner(3); Slee; Sleman; Smale; Smith(5); Spearman; Squires; Staddon; Stanbury; Standiford; Stapleton; Stewart; Stockley; Stone; Story; Stoyles; Sturgess; Sweet; Symons; Tapley; Taylor; Thomas; Thomson; Toms; Tregillees; Trethewey; Trout; Trull; Truscott; Tucker(2); Turberville; Vallance; Van Putten; Vanstone; Vaughan; Vicary; Vickery; Voysey; Wakeham(2); Walker; Wallice; Ward(3); Ware; Warner; Waterfield; Waymouth; Welman; West; Wester; Westlake; White; Willcocks(3); Williams(3); Willis; Wills; Winnick; Witheridge; Worth; Worthington; Wotton(2); Wyatt(3); Yabsley; Zane

Western Morning News, Friday 8 January 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death Among Strangers. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Red Lion Inn, Stonehouse, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of a man, about 65 years of age.  The deceased had been lodging in the house for six weeks, and a week ago Mr Payne, the landlord, told him he must go.  He remained on, however, and complaining of being unwell, kept his room during the whole of Wednesday.  About nine o'clock yesterday morning Mrs Payne heard him cough, and at noon she went to his room, but found the door fastened.  She sent for Mr Leah, surgeon, and on his arrival the door was torn open.  The deceased was found lying in bed and Mr Leah discovered that he was quite dead.  P.C. Nicholls afterwards searched his clothes, and found a cheque book, together with £12 0s. 9d. in money.  It is supposed that the deceased was a musician named JOHN GOODMAN, and that he had previously resided at Landport.  The Inquest was adjourned until Tuesday to enable the Coroner to communicate with deceased's friends.

NEWTON ABBOT - Alleged Manslaughter By A Baby Farmer At Newton. - An Inquest was held at Newton on Wednesday night by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, relative to the death of MARGARET PHILLIPS, a child 5 months old, which had died the previous day under suspicious circumstances.  The child's mother gave birth to the deceased in Newton Workhouse, on August 1st, and on the 29th of September she left the house and placed the child with a widow named Betsy Binmore.  This woman lived in a court in East-street, Newton, and took care of several children.  Some of her young charges have lately died, but a witness named Ann Mudge, who had frequently visited Binmore, said she appeared to treat the children kindly, and to take proper care of them.  The dairyman who supplied the woman with milk, stated that she was in the habit of buying a pennyworth of scald milk every morning, and would sometimes have a pennyworth of raw or scald milk in the evening.  Mr Henry Gaye, surgeon, said he made a post mortem examination of the deceased, whose body was very emaciated.  The child was fully grown, but the ribs were shewing through the skin, the limbs were small and shrunken and the skin shrivelled.  Internally there was no appearance of fat, but the organs, as well as the brain were perfectly healthy, and in the stomach there was half a teaspoonful of thin watery fluid, with a few particles of what appeared to be bread.  In children of this age there was generally something in the intestines, but those of the deceased were empty.  He could see no trace of disease to account for death, and in his opinion the child died from want of nutritious food.  There were other children in the house under 12 months old, and there was also a little boy about four or five years of age, who looked very well.  Mrs Binmore asked him to look at another child and he did so.  This child had pretty much the  appearance of the deceased and seemed to be suffering from want of food.  The supply of milk was altogether inadequate.  After further evidence the Jury at about midnight returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Binmore.  The accused will be brought before the magistrates today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 January 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the New Guildhall, Plymouth, relative to the death of MARIA PUCKEY, aged 53 years.  According to the evidence some neighbours of the deceased heard a noise about 11 o'clock on the night of Dec. 26th, and on leaving their rooms found the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs in a pool of blood.  There was a sharp turning about half way up the stairs, and here there was nothing to lay hold of, and it is supposed that the deceased being rather fatigued with a walk she had just taken, slipped her foot and having nothing to seize, fell over the stairs.  She was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found that she was suffering from a severe wound at the back of the head.  The deceased remained under the care of the house surgeon until Friday morning last, when she expired.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended the owner of the house to make the stairs more secure.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening respecting the death of MARY KING, aged 62 years, who fell to the ground and died suddenly whilst washing clothes yesterday morning.  Previous to this she appeared to be in good health.  The deceased was a married woman, but had not lived with her husband for several months.  A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Inhumanity To A Child. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Trinity Schoolrooms, Plymouth, relative to the death of MARY ANN BELLAMY, aged 18 months, who died on Friday morning.  -  Mr E. M. Prynn, surgeon, stated that on the 5th inst., he received an order from Mr Annear, relieving officer, to visit the deceased.  He went to 40 New-street, where he saw the deceased, and found it in a very emaciated condition, and suffering from skin disease.  He told a Mrs Parnell, who had charge of it, that the child had been neglected, and that she must bring the deceased to him on the following day.  He prescribed for the deceased, and told Parnell to take the prescription to Mr Adams, chemist.  At this time the mother was ill in bed.  On the 7th inst. the child was brought to him in the street by Parnell and he told her that it was a case for admission into the Workhouse Hospital, but Parnell replied that she would take good care that the deceased should not be taken into the hospital.  Witness wrote another prescription, and gave it to Parnell, whom he told that there was very little probability of the child's living, and its only chance would be to go into the Hospital.  The deceased had been sadly neglected, and when Parnell came to him on the 8th, and told him that the child was dead, he informed her that it was his duty to bring the coroner acquainted with the case.  Witness did not say anything to the mother of the deceased, as she was too ill to be spoken to.  He had seen many emaciated children, but had never seen one so bad as the deceased, and from its size and development, he should never have thought it was 18 months old.  He had seen many children at birth much heavier than the deceased.  He had made a post mortem examination of the child, and found the stomach much contracted, and only a thimbleful of food in it.  The limbs were also contracted and the heart contained a small quantity of very thick blood.  Thickness of the blood and the condition of the gall indicated that the child had not received proper nourishment.  The deceased, in his opinion, died from disease of the intestines and lungs, combined with neglect and the want of proper care and nourishment…  If the child had had proper care and nourishment he did not think that it would have died so quickly.  The condition of the child might have arisen from want of food, or because she could not assimilate the food she received;  but it was a fact that she did not receive food for several hours previous to death.  No ordinary care could have kept the child alive after the 5th of January, when he first saw it.  -   Jane Parnell stated that she had been lodging with the deceased's parents since August last.  Deceased's father was a labourer, but he was an imbecile.  Ever since she had been in the house the deceased had been bad and emaciated.  It was in the sole charge of the parents to within the last three weeks, during which time she had had charge of it.  She had seen the mother give deceased milk "when she had it to give her," but the father had earned only 4s. since Christmas-eve, and he, the mother, and four children, including the deceased, had been living upon that sum ever since.  The parents did not make an application for relief until the deceased died.  When she (witness) had anything to eat, she gave the deceased some of it.  She had frequently told the mother about the state of deceased, and her reply was that it would get better.  Witness took the deceased to a surgeon "of her own accord," in consequence of its having been hurt by the other children falling upon its back in their play.  The deceased was neglected by its mother, who had several days dressed the deceased without washing it, and when she did wash it, it was only its face with a little drop of water.  When witness first took charge of the deceased, she stripped it and washed it thoroughly, as it was then very filthy.  The mother, who was ill in bed, complained of her doing so, "because it had not been washed all over since its birth," and might take cold.  -  By the Foreman:  During the last month or six weeks the mother had not at all times been exactly in her right state of mind;  and during that period there had not been much difference between the father and mother as to the state of their minds.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a very serious one, and it was their duty to watch infantile life, as it was greatly neglected at present;  and there were numerous cases in Plymouth of parents neglecting their young children.  Thanks were due to Mr Prynn for bringing the case under their notice, and for making such a careful examination.  He was sure the Jury had never before seen such a spectacle as the deceased presented, there being not half an ounce of fat about its body, which was a mere skeleton.  It was evident that the mother was the guardian of the child, and was responsible for the state it was in, the father being an imbecile;  and there was evidence that the child had been sadly neglected from its birth.  He feared that unless the press took notice of what was occurring there would never be a stop put to parents neglecting and starving their infant children.  -  The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against ELIZA BELLAMY, the mother of deceased and the Coroner made out a  warrant for her apprehension, but it will not be issued for a few days, as she is suffering from fever.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 January 1875
PLYMPTON - The Suicide Of A Plympton Tradesman. - An Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR WM. COTTLE, carpenter and builder, of Ridgway, who committed suicide on Monday by hanging himself.  The evidence shewed that for some time past the deceased had been depressed in spirits and had been very restless at night.  He had frequently told his aunt that he did not know what to do with himself, and about three weeks ago he complained to Mr Ellery, surgeon, of being very nervous.  Mr Ellery recommended him to take medicine, and the deceased replied that no medicine would ever do him any good.  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - The resumed Inquest respecting the death of a man supposed to be named JOHN GOODMAN, was held at the Red Lion Inn, Stonehouse, yesterday.  Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that the deceased had been suffering from congestion of the lungs and fatty degeneration of the heart and liver.  The stomach was nearly empty, but he believed that death was caused by congestion of the lungs.  From the state the deceased was in witness believed that if he had been seized with a violent fit of coughing he would have died almost immediately, but that if properly taken care of he might probably have lived longer.  Mr Rodd, the Coroner, stated that he had telegraphed to the police at Landport, to make inquiries respecting the deceased's relatives, and had received a reply that although GOODMAN'S aunt lived there she could not be found.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 January 1875
PLYMOUTH - Surgeons' Certificates Of Death. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of a child named FLORA DAWE, aged eight months, who died the previous afternoon.  -  Elizabeth Cole stated that she resided at 65 Harwell-street, and in June last a midwife named Fraser brought the deceased to her to take charge of.  Fraser stated that the child was illegitimate, and belonged to a domestic servant named MARY DAWE, who lived at London-road, Newhaven, but had come to Plymouth to be confined, and afterwards went back to her employment.  Witness had never seen the deceased's mother, who had never written to her, but she received 4s. every week for the maintenance of the child.  In June last the child was attended to by Mr Stephens, surgeon, for diarrhoea, and in November he casually saw the deceased, but did not prescribe for it.  On Tuesday morning she applied to Mr Stephens for a  certificate as to the cause of death, and yesterday he sent it;  it was as follows:-  "I hereby certify that I was called to 65 Harwell-street, Plymouth, today, and found FLORA DAWE aged 8 months dead, apparently from a fit.  I attended her in June and July last for diarrhoea, and casually saw her in the latter end of November when she was stated to have been subject to slight fits.  -  Signed W. B. Stephens, 4 Buckland-terrace, Plymouth, January 12th, 1875."  -  This certificate witness took to the registrar, who would have nothing to do with it, and told her to take it to the Coroner.  -  Jane Luston, who resided in the same house as the last witness, said that Mrs Cole always treated the deceased in a kind and proper manner.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that there was no doubt that the child died from Natural Causes, but he could not allow the case to pass over without referring to the fact of the doctor giving a certificate, although he had not attended the child since June last.  Mr Stephens was not justified in giving it, and if it had not been for the registrar they would never have heard of the affair.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and stated that they were unanimously of opinion that Mr Stephens ought not to have given a certificate.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 January 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - A Fatal Blow. - Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, relative to the death of JOHN NORTHEY, [?] who died from injuries he received at Saltash on the 4th inst.  The deceased was the captain of the barge Claselle, and whilst lowering the anchor of his [?], the handle of the winch slipped and struck him on the head.  He was taken to the Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from a severe fracture of the skull, and from this he died on Wednesday evening last.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

UGBOROUGH - A Man Crushed To Death At Ugborough. - Mr Michelmore County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Ugborough on Saturday respecting the death of JAMES MOORE, aged 74 years.  The deceased, who was a gardener, was a cripple and very infirm.  He lived at Torshill Cottages, Ugborough, and between four and five o'clock on Friday afternoon he was standing in the road, not far from his house, talking to a young woman named Ann Pulleyblank.  This young woman said in her evidence that while they were talking she heard wheels coming towards them, and she asked deceased to step on one side, and he did so.  She went on the other side of the road, and saw a covered wagon coming with two horses.  A few yards from where she was standing there was a corner, which prevented her from seeing the wagon before it had come round it.  The wagon was on the side of the road on which deceased was standing, and as it was passing she called to the driver to stop, but by this time the old man was under the wheel.  When the wagon was stopped she lifted the wheel, and the driver dragged deceased out.  Henry Newman, who was delivering bread at one of the cottages, picked him up, and with Mr Dart, carried deceased into his own house.  The driver was going at rather a fast trot, and she screamed at the very moment he reached the old man.  -  Mr W. M. Holmes, who was the next witness, said he was a surgeon practising at Ivybridge, and was called to visit the deceased.  He found the deceased lying in the bedroom with his clothes on.  He was dead.  there was a large abrasion on the left cheek, several of the lower ribs on the both sides were broken, the left elbow and wrist were fractured, and across the abdomen there was a mark as if a wheel had passed over it, so that in all probability the stomach and liver were ruptured.  The injuries were sufficient to cause death at least within half an hour.  -  Harry Newman, who helped to carry the deceased to his house after the accident occurred, stated that he could not say positively whether the driver had reins on the both horses;  but believed he had reins on the shaft horse and none on the front one.  The wheels of the wagon were about two feet from the wall, but, being feeble, the way in which the deceased stood would bring him farther off the wall than if he could have stood upright.  The driver appeared to be sober.  -  Robert Horrell, the driver, was then called, and, after being cautioned, said he was a labourer, and worked for Mr John Treeby, at Swanbridge Mill, Modbury.  On the previous afternoon he was going home from the Ivybridge railway station with a load of corn in a four wheel wagon drawn by two horses.  He was standing on the back of the shafts, resting against the corn, as he could not get in the wagon, and was jogging down round the corner at an easy trot, as he generally did at this place, when he saw an old man in the road on the right hand side, and a girl on the left.  He had reins to both horses, and the reins were in his hand.  He called to the horses, and pulled the reins on the side on which the young woman was standing and he considered there was room enough for anyone to pass.  When the young woman called he brought his horses up in one minute.  He jumped off, and the young woman said, "Oh, my God, you have killed MR MOORE."  He heard the old man groan, and found that the hind wheel was just against his stomach, and pressing him to the ground, but he did not believe the wheel had gone over him.  -  A Juryman:  You say you were trotting?  -  Witness:  You cannot call it a trot.  -  Q.:  Do you consider you were on the right side of the road?  -  A.:  I do.  -  By the Foreman:  I had not a pair of reins, but one rein on the front horse.  The weight in the wagon was about 25 cwt.  I do not think I ought to have had a drag on;  the shaft horse is a large one, quite able to keep back such a load.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Coroner to caution Hurrell against careless driving.  -  In addressing him Mr Michelmore said the Jury believed that Hurrell had been, although innocently, the cause of the death of the poor man.  They had, however, heard that he and others were in the habit of driving fast, and whilst he (the Coroner) quite concurred in their verdict, yet he gladly complied with the request of the Jury to caution him, for if, under similar circumstances, Hurrell drove over a man again, he would be held responsible.  His fellow waggoners should know what a narrow escape he had had, and should for the future exercise a little more care.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 January 1875
EXETER -  The Suicide of MAJOR VALLANCE At Exeter.  -  An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter on the body of MAJOR R. K. VALLANCE, who committed suicide on Saturday, under circumstances already reported.  The evidence bore out in the main the narrative which appeared yesterday, but information was given of additional facts which afforded a motive for the sad deed.  Mr G. F. Truscott, a solicitor, who had acted for the deceased professionally for many years, and who was also a personal friend of his, identified the body.  Deceased was about 76 years of age.  He originally practised as a solicitor in London or Brighton, and afterwards at Exeter, but retired from the profession many years ago.  In 1851 or 1852 he joined the Exeter Volunteer Rifle Corps as a private and was in course of time promoted to the rank of captain.  The witness last saw MAJOR VALLANCE alive soon after noon on Saturday.  He met him unexpectedly in the Cathedral yard, and they went from there to Mr Truscott's offices in Maddock's-[?].  Some question had arisen after the death of his wife with reference to property in which the deceased considered he had an interest and witness informed him of the result of an interview he had had with Mr Campion on the subject.  The result was unfavourable to the deceased, and though he said nothing, was evidently much excited.  He left the office with the understanding that he would call on Mr Truscott again on the Monday.  Witness, in reply to the Coroner, said that he had no doubt that deceased was temporarily insane when he shot himself.  He went home excited and committed the deed before he had the opportunity of meeting any of his friends.   But witness believed that if he had met anyone in the interval he would not have done it.  -  Hannah Beer, a domestic servant in the employ of the deceased, stated that when her master went out on Saturday morning he left instructions for dinner to be got ready for half-past one.  He returned just before one o'clock and went to his bedroom.  Five minutes afterwards witness heard a shot fired.  MR VALLANCE, it appeared, was in the habit of firing at small birds in the garden at the back of the house with a pistol, which he kept in his dressing-room.  Witness, going out into the garden asked a Mr Randall (a nurseryman, who was doing some work in the conservatory), if her master had fired from the window.  He said that he had not done so.  She then went to his room and knocked but got no answer.  Mr Randall also went to the bedroom with her, and in a smaller room which he used as a dressing-room, the dead body was found stretched on the floor.   The pistol, an old percussion arm, capable of carrying a large ball, was found lying near the left arm.  Deceased had no coat on, his waistcoat was open, and blood was flowing from a wound in the region of the heart.  The muzzle of the pistol must have been held almost close to the body, as the shirt was burning when Randall entered the room.  -  Mr Randall stated that the deceased passed through the garden when he returned from his walk, and witness wished him "Good morning," to which he replied.  Witness thought he spoke a little "grumpy" but noticed nothing else.  Mr Hartnoll, one of the surgeons who was called in, said he was of opinion from the appearance of the body and limbs that deceased shot himself while standing and that he fell dead immediately.  Both hands must have been very close to the seat of injury;  that is shewn by them being discoloured and stained with blood.  Probably deceased held his waistcoat open with the left hand and fired the pistol with the right.  The ball must have passed through the pericardium and grazed the apex of the heart which would have caused instantaneous death.  -  In the reply to the Coroner, Mr Truscott said that the nature of the communication which he made to MR VALLANCE on Saturday was such as to affect him pecuniarily and would account for a temporary depression of spirits.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was one of the [?] he had investigated for some time, the deceased was well-known and respected in the city, and being possessed of ample means.  The Jury would have to say in their verdict whether or not they considered his mind affected.  -  The Rev. J. Ingle, rector of the parish in which the deceased lived, stated that MR VALLANCE felt the loss of his wife very much and consulted him with regard to a Latin inscription which he had prepared for [?].  The rev. gentleman had also had several conversations with him in reference to the property of his [?].  He seemed very acute and intelligent.  Mr [?] had not, of course, seen him after his interview with Mr Truscott on Saturday.  The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 February 1875
PLYMOUTH - An aged inmate of the Plymouth Workhouse named DOROTHY LESTER fell down dead on Sunday.  She was subject to spasms, but, as Mr Shepherd, medical officer, could not give a certificate, an Inquest was held and a verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God" was returned.  Deceased, who was 82 years of age, was much respected.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 February 1875
TORQUAY - The Child Burning At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Townhall yesterday, before Mr H. Michelmore, the coroner, on the remains of the body of an infant found in a room at Pimlico, Torquay, under the circumstances stated in the Western Morning News of yesterday.  -  P.C. Ockford stated that about twelve o'clock on Saturday night a woman named Skinner told him that there was something wrong in a room occupied by old Mrs Ireland.  Accompanied by P.C. Hugo he went to the room.  He there saw Mrs Ireland in a very excited state.  Mrs Skinner, Mrs Milton, and other women were in the room.  He was shewn a bundle wrapped up in the rags of an old skirt, which was very smutty;  he opened it, and found portions of a child's body, and there were still on the fire a portion of the skull and other bones.  On charging her with the murder Ireland said, "A woman brought it here and told me to do it, and I have done it, and may the Lord have mercy on me."  When brought before the magistrates on Monday she said, "I will tell the truth now;  a young woman was confined in my house some months ago;  she was a servant, and the child, which was a female one, was born dead, and I have kept it in the inside room ever since.  I had a little nephew coming to see me, and I put it in the oven because I knew he would be looking about, and that is the truth."  -  Dr Powell stated that he was sent for by the police, and was shewn by them a basket containing a piece of old dress, in which was wrapped up the remains of a child's body, consisting of portions of the trunk and limbs.  The whole of the front of the child and the abdomen was gone, as also the viscera and the brain.  The bones of the skull were separated, the hands were burnt off, the right arm hung by a portion of dried skin and the leg was attached by a piece of skin.  The whole was dried and shrivelled by fire.  It was impossible to state the sex, or whether the child had been born alive.  -  Mrs Mary Ann Skinner said as she was passing Ireland's door late on Saturday night she saw a mob of boys around calling out that "Mother Ireland was mad."  At the same moment Mrs Ireland came out, and appeared out of her mind.  Witness took her back to her room, when she was horrified to find on a chair a bundle containing the remains of a baby.  On asking what she had done, Ireland could give no reply, and appeared to be completely vacant.  Upon this the police were sent for, and a search was made for other portions of the body.   -   Mrs Sarah Jane Milton, who lives in the same house, said she returned home from work late on Saturday night, and found Mrs Ireland at the door looking very strange.  On asking what was the matter, Ireland replied, "I've done it, I've done it."  Witness asked what, when she said, "I've murdered the child."  Witness enquired what child, and she said "Yours."  On proceeding upstairs, witness and Mrs Skinner found the remains as described.  -  The poor miserable looking woman was then brought before the Jury, and although cautioned that whatever she said would be taken as evidence, she volunteered the following statement:-  "I can only say I am not guilty of murder;  the child was stillborn at my room.  I do not know exactly when it was, but it was last summer;  I think about the early part of April or May.  The mother was a young servant girl, ELIZABETH HOOPER, living in Fisher-street, Paignton.  I have not heard from her.  I do not know where she is, but I heard that she was drowned at Teignmouth by the upsetting of a boat.  I did not register the birth of the child.  She gave me money to buy a box, but I did not use it.  I kept the body in a small room where people go in and out for coals.  I went in to get it out, and then a red light came in the window like a ghost, and the place seemed to be all on fire.  The earth shook under me and the people seemed as if they were falling one over another.  I cannot tell how or when it was, or whether I put it on the chair or the fire, but I dropped it.  Then I ran into the street, and run up and down, and somebody said they were going to kill me."  -  The Coroner adjourned the Inquiry for a week, so as not to interfere with the judicial proceedings before the magistrates.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 February 1875
JERSEY - The Suicide of CAPTAIN WEST.  -  Telegraphing yesterday, our Jersey correspondent states that CAPT. AUGUSTUS GEORGE WEST, R.N., who committed suicide at Jersey on Saturday last, formerly resided at Teignmouth, where he has property.  At the adjourned Inquest held yesterday, a verdict to the effect that deceased was in a high state of mental excitement when he took his life was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 February 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Deaths Of Children At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for Devonport, respecting the death of GEORGE W. N. PITCHER, aged 3 years and 9 months.  The little fellow was going to school on Tuesday afternoon, and was running across Albert-road, when he saw a horse coming towards him.  He appeared to become confused, and before he could get out of the way the horse, which was trotting, knocked him down, and struck him in the stomach with one of its back hoofs.  Medical attendance was obtained but the child died the following day.  A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - A similar verdict was brought in at an Inquiry held by Mr Bone into the circumstances attending the death of a child named PETHERACK, two years old.  Its parents live in Dockwall-street, and on Wednesday evening it was left by its mother in the cradle near the fire.  During the woman's absence it is supposed that the deceased got out of the bed and went to the fire, for on her return the child was lying upon the floor with its clothes on fire, and the cradle was burnt.  The little sufferer was taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, where it died soon afterwards.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Pensioner.  -  Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, has held an Inquiry, respecting the death of a pensioner named HENRY STANBURY, aged 45 years.  The deceased lived at 41 Treville-street, and according to the evidence of his wife, he went to bed about 7 o'clock on Saturday evening.  At midnight he rose suddenly saying "Get me out of bed, I am dying," and on his wife calling for help, a Mrs  Long came.  The deceased was exclaiming that he was dying, and that he could not draw his breath.  About ten minutes after respiration appeared to cease he jumped from the bed and fell on the floor, and is supposed that he then died.  Mr Harper, surgeon was sent for, and came about 2 o'clock.  Previous to the sudden attack of illness deceased appeared to be in good health.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 February 1875
TORQUAY - The Inquest on the body found in the room of Elizabeth Ireland, at Pimlico, Torquay, was resumed on Saturday morning at the Town Hall, before the Coroner (Mr H. Michelmore.)  Mr Carter, solicitor, said he attended on behalf of the young woman HOOPER, who, whether she stood charged with an offence or not, was ready to give all the information in her power.  Mr Superintendent Vaughan said he should call ELIZABETH HOOPER, who had been confined n Mrs Ireland's house, but whether her child was that which had been found, he could not tell.  -  ELIZABETH HOOPER, after being cautioned, said she was quite willing to give evidence.  She resided at Mrs Pattison's, Pine Cliff, Torquay, and was 24 years of age.  She knew Mrs Ireland, who lived at Pimlico.  In 1873 witness was enceinte and she was confined on the 10th of June in Mrs Ireland's house.  Previously to that she had arranged with her to give her 7s. a week, and she paid her up after the confinement.  She was in her house about a fortnight before she was confined.  Her child was born dead.  She believed it was a female, but did not see it.  She gave Ireland 10s. to bury the child at Upton churchyard, and she promised to do so.  She said she would get a box and bury it.  Witness had prepared everything for the child, but finding that she did not want it she gave some away to her cousin, and the rest she destroyed.  She remained with Mrs Ireland for a week after her confinement.  She paid Mrs Ireland £2 10s. altogether.  It was for food, trouble, attendance, and for burying the child.  She had not seen Mrs Ireland since, nor had she had any correspondence with her.  -  By the Coroner:  She took no steps to find out whether the child was buried or not.  She thought it was done.  She slept with Mrs Ireland in the kitchen, but she believed another woman lived there called Clarey.  The father of the child promised to pay all expenses, and if it had lived to have maintained it.  She saw no doctor during her illness.  The reason why she did not go to her mother's house was because the latter knew nothing about her condition.  Her mother had been in an asylum once, and the witness was afraid that if she told her of it she would drive her there again.  It was not true, as Mrs Ireland had stated, that she was confined in February, March or April of last year.  At that time she was in service with her present mistress.   -   Dr Powell, recalled, said it was possible that a child born 18 months ago could be the same as the one burnt a week ago.  -  The Coroner:  Would it have been possible for the child to have remained there until last Saturday and then have been burnt?  -  Dr Powell said that if it had been scorched shortly after birth, it could be kept without there being stench in the house, but if it had not and decomposition had set it, there would have been an offensive smell.   -   The Coroner, in summing up, said the Jury could return an open verdict, or a verdict that the child had been born dead.  He recommended them to return an Open Verdict. -  This the Jury did.  -  The Coroner commented on the existence of the house kept by Mrs Ireland.  They had heard that fortune telling was carried on there, and this young woman HOOPER had gone to the house to be confined having doubtless, been recommended by one who had been there before.  There had been at least one attempt to get a child put out of the way in an improper manner;  whether the child was born alive or not they could not say.  That this house had been in existence some time at Torquay there could be no doubt.  -  In answer to the Coroner, Sergeant Ockford said he took the body in the evening to Dr Nicholson at the Infirmary to be put into the dead house.  He (the doctor) said it would be inconvenient as the place was closed, and they would have to wake up the nurses.  He had taken the body to Dr Powell before, and he directed him to take the body to the dead-house.  The Coroner said he considered this a shameful case.  He did not know whether it was inconvenient the body should be taken into the infirmary or not, but it looked to him that they would not take the body into the Infirmary because another doctor had seen the child previously.  They were not bound to take the child in, but he had before said that the dead-house at the Infirmary would be a great convenience for bodies to be taken there.  He considered it curious that two bodies should have been taken to the Infirmary, and that one which had not been seen by a doctor should be admitted, while the other (the one now in question) had been refused admittance, although seen by a doctor.  He should write to the authorities on the matter.   -   The prisoner, Elizabeth Ellen Ireland, was subsequently brought before the magistrates (Messrs. W. B. Fortescue, W. Bridges, and W. H. Halliday), and charged with endeavouring to conceal the birth of the child by burning the body.  The evidence taken was identical with that given before the Coroner.  On the prisoner being asked what she had to say before she was committed for trial, she replied:  My intentions were not to do that, sir;  but the red light came into my window and induced me to do so.  I got so excited.  They said the house was burning.  It was the red light I saw very ghastly, like a skeleton at the bottom of the yard.  It was a ghastly head, and like the skull of a human being.  It seemed illuminated - it was like the head of an elderly person.  The people out in the street told me that all the shops and houses had suspended business, and the earth was being burnt.  The people said: "Don't hide in your own house.  Don't go into anybody's house."  I didn't know where to go.  The earth was moving with me like as if I had reels to my heels;  and I could see people on Clifton-terrace.  -  The prisoner was then committed for trial.

CORNWOOD - An Inquest was held at Cornwood on Saturday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of WILLIAM THOMSON, gardener to Admiral Parker, at Delamore.  Deceased fell down the store pit on the 25th of January last, and inflammation followed.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 February 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To A Lamplighter. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest on Saturday evening relative to the death of THOMAS LEE ADAMS, aged 33 years, lamplighter, in the employ of the Plymouth Gas Company, who was engaged in lighting a lamp in Richmond-street, when he fell from the lamp and was killed.  Thomas [?], inspector of the Plymouth Police, said that about midnight on Thursday, the deceased, who appeared to be in excellent health, came to the police-station to ascertain whether there were any reports of lamps being out.  W[?] told him that there were five, of which the lamp at the bottom of Richmond-street, was out.  -  William H. Hockaday, cabman, stated that about midnight on Thursday he drove through Richmond-street, and at the bottom of the street saw the deceased lying on the ground.  Thinking that he was drunk he caught hold of his hand, and told him to get up, and the police would take him into custody, but he received no reply.  He afterwards discovered that the deceased was dead.  -  P.C. Yabsley said he examined the lamp at the bottom of Richmond-street, and found it out, and the [?] open.  There was some wet mud upon the lamp post, and three used lucifer matches were on the ground.  It was a frequent occurrence for lamplighters to climb up a lamp-post and light the lamp without using a ladder.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 February 1875
NORTHAM - Discovery Of The Body Of A Missing Man. - On the 30th of November last a Barnstaple fisherman named JOHN LIGHT, left home for the purpose of attending to some lines he had set in the river Taw, and as he did not return search was made, and an oar and the seat of his boat were found near the sand house, but the deceased could nowhere be found. No further trace of him was discovered until Saturday last, when the body was seen floating in the water.  An Inquest was held at Northam yesterday, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.  Deceased was 63 years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 February 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death At Devonport.   -  Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquiry respecting the death of EDWIN HOLLOCK, who died under circumstances related in yesterday's paper.  The deceased had lived in a shed behind 17 Pym-street, Morice Town, and here he had died, it is supposed, some time during Sunday.  When viewed by the Jury the body, which was in a shocking condition, lay in this shed with only a rag over it, and the only articles of furniture were a table, a chair, and a small case containing straw, which formed deceased's bed.  HOLLOCK, who was 50 years of age, was a tailor, but could get no work, and consequently he had earned a living by selling firelights.  He was married, and had a large family;  but twelve years ago his wife left him, because of his miserly habits, as he used, so she states, to nearly stave her and her children.  The wife took the children and brought them up on her hardly-got earnings.  Deceased was very eccentric, and some years ago he was in the lunatic ward of the Devonport Workhouse for several months.  He was in the habit of talking to himself, thinking, according to his brother's evidence, that his mother was near him.  The boys used to throw stones at him and call after him, and he in consequence always kept locked the door of his shed.  His brother and Mr Chapple, relieving officer, often urged him to go to the Workhouse, but he said he would rather starve than do so.  The Inquest was adjourned for a post mortem examination to be made.  In the course of the proceedings the Coroner told deceased's brother, who lives at 17 Pym-street, that it was stated that he was occupying a similar shed to that in which his brother had died, and that unless he left legal proceedings would be taken against him.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Injury To A Man's Foot. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Old Guildhall, last evening, relative to the death of JOHN WATERFIELD, workman in the employ of the South Devon Shipping Company.  On the 8th instant the deceased was assisting in raising two iron girders into a cart when the chain to which they were secured slipped, and one of the girders fell on the right foot of the deceased, injuring him severely that he was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, where mortification set in and he died yesterday morning.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".  The deceased who had been an abstainer for thirty years, was much respected.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 February 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - The Sad Death Of An Old Man At Devonport. - The Inquest respecting the death of EDWIN HOLLOCK was concluded yesterday.  After Tuesday's proceedings at the Inquest the deceased's brother took the body in a donkey cart to the Royal Albert Hospital, where a post mortem examination was made by Mr J. May, jun., who found heart, liver and kidney in an unhealthy state, very much of this being produced by want of food and drinking habits.  Death was caused by disease of the kidneys and a clot of blood in one of the arteries leading from the heart to the lungs.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 February 1875
EXETER - An Unfortunate Rabbiting Party. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at Exeter, on JOHN DOWN, who had died in the County Hospital, in consequence of a gunshot wound accidentally inflicted by his master, Mr Arthey, of woodlands, Kennford.  Mr Arthey, the deceased, and others were rabbiting in a cover under Haldon a few days since.  Deceased was endeavouring to induce a ferret to go into a rabbit hole when his employer, who was a hundred yards off, fired at what he thought was a rabbit, but what proved to be a portion of the deceased's body, which he had indistinctly seen through some bushes.  The charge entered the poor man's body.  Mr Arthey dressed the wounds on the spot, and had the sufferer conveyed to the Hospital, where he lingered until Friday, when death ended his sufferings.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating Mr Arthey from all blame.

PLYMOUTH - A Peculiar Case. - An Inquiry was held by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of a fisherman named WILLIAM PASCOE.  On the 14th inst., the deceased complained of a pain in one of his arms, and on the 16th he went to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where the house surgeon, finding the shoulder greatly swollen, and treating the deceased for a broken collar-bone, bandaged the arm.  The sufferer became worse, and on the 18th he stated that there was a lump on the upper part of his chest.  His wife thereupon took off the bandage, and the deceased, on moving his arm about freely, found that the collar-bone was not broken.  Another surgeon was called in the next day, but the case was found to be hopeless and PASCOE died on the 20th.  A post mortem examination shewed that the collar-bone was not broken but there were several abscesses behind it, and the discharge from these abscesses poisoned the blood and caused death.  PASCOE was also suffering from pleurisy and congestion of the lungs.  It was explained that the bandaging had not accelerated death, and the Coroner pointed out that the Inquest was desirable in consequence of the rumours in circulation respecting the cause of the poor fellow's death.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that they attached blame to no one.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 February 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of JOHN RUSSEL, able seaman, of the Royal Adelaide, who on Monday last slipped his foot and fell from the upper deck into the coal hole, and received injuries to the head, neck and back, from which he died soon after.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 1 March 1875
LONDON - The Death of ARCHDEACON FREEMAN.  The Inquest. - The Coroner's Inquest touching the death of the Ven. PHILIP FREEMAN, Archdeacon and Canon of Exeter, who died from the effects of an accident on the North London Railway, was held by Dr Hardwicke, Coroner for Central Middlesex, at the Chalk Farm, Tavern, Regent's-park, on Saturday.  A number of clergymen and friends of the deceased were present, and the family were represented officially by the son of the late archdeacon, MR GEORGE BROOK FREEMAN, barrister;  whilst Mr J. A. Cooper appeared on behalf of the North London Railway Company.  The Jury viewed the body, which lay at the house of Mr Thomas Gambier, surgeon, Northumberland-terrace, Regent's-park, where the deceased was conveyed on the night of the accident and where he died.  -   Mr Gambier was the first witness.  He said:  About half-past ten o'clock on the night of the 18th of February deceased was brought to his surgery in a cab suffering from injuries to the legs, face, head and right hand, and blood was issuing from the wounds.  The deceased appeared quite sensible, and said he had met with an accident at the Chalk Farm Railway Station.  Witness had him conveyed up to his own bedroom, where he examined him, and where he had remained until his death, which took place on Wednesday evening last.  Deceased had sustained a severe lacerated wound on the inner side of the left thigh, causing an exposure of the bone of the knee-joint.  On the right side the thigh was also grazed and the bone exposed.  There was also a small wound over the left eye-brown, and contusions of the head and right hand.  Dr Guy and Sir Wm. Gull were in attendance towards the last, but he was in a sinking state from feebleness and fainting of the heart, which was the immediate cause of death, which was no doubt accelerated from the injuries he had received.   -   MR G. B. FREEMAN, barrister, identified the body.  The deceased had been in town on Thursday, the 18th, attending convocation.  Early on Friday morning witness received intimation that his father had met with an accident, and he went and saw him at Mr Gambier's. He was quite sensible, and said he had met with an accident at the Chalk Farm Station.  He did not blame anyone.  -   George Gregory, a porter at Chalk Farm Station, said the train in which the deceased was, came into the station from Broad-street, at seventeen minutes past ten, which was two minutes late, and, as was usual, witness went along on the off side, and locked the carriage doors.  He saw a gentleman in a first-class carriage, who said he wanted to go back to Camden Town, as they had brought him too far.  Witness neither saw nor heard any more until after the train had moved to the up platform, when, on going back, he saw a gentleman, who he believed to be the one he had seen in the carriage, between two other gentlemen, who said he must be taken to a surgeon's, as he had met with an accident.  On their taking him upstairs, witness went for a cab.  After going for a cab, he looked with a lantern, and saw spots of blood, and marks of blood as if someone had been dragged along the kerb of the platform.  -  George Kendal, another porter, said that after the accident deceased told him that he had slipped out of the train while it was going on.  He said he had come from Broad-street to Chalk-farm, and had made a mistake in the station, as he wanted to get out at Camden-road.  Witness then took him to Dr Gambier's.  -  Mr Matthew Holmes, deposed that he was on the platform at Chalk station at the time of the accident.  When the train came in, as it passed him he saw a gentleman at a first-class carriage window, and heard him shouting, "Is this Chalk Farm Station?"  The train went on, and came back to the up platform.  Witness then heard a scream.  He went towards the end of the train and near the end of the platform he picked up a book and a glove.  He then felt sure that some accident had happened, and went to the station-master's office, but he was not there.  He took two porters to the spot where he had found the book and glove, and they saw spots of blood on the kerb, and blood streaks, as if someone had been dragged along the platform.  -  By the Coroner:  The platform was lighted, but not beyond the platform.  Saw nothing whatever of the deceased, or the two gentlemen described as being seen leading him.  The two gentlemen must have picked up the deceased and taken him upstairs in the interval, while witness was looking after the station-master.  -  Francis Palmer, the chief guard of the train, said he heard nothing of any accident happening until he arrived at Broad-street on the return journey, when Stillwell, the under-guard, asked him if he heard anything at the Chalk Farm Station, and he said he did not.  If the deceased had slipped out of the carriage in any way it must have been when the carriage was beyond the platform.  -  Charles Stillwell, under-guard, said when the train returned to Broad-street the signal man, who had got into the break with him, called his attention to a noise which he had himself heard, and which he thought was a human voice or scream, and when the train drew up he jumped out, and, as is usual, waved his lantern along the length of the carriages to ascertain if any of the doors were open, and seeing none he considered all was right, and gave the "right" signal to the chief guard, who was standing with his lantern at the front break, and the train almost immediately moved on.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that he thought the only inference they could draw was that the deceased must, in attempting to get out of the train while it was in motion towards the platform, have missed his footing, and thus was dragged against the kerbing of the platform for some distance.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."   -  The funeral of the late Archdeacon FREEMAN is fixed for tomorrow at half-past eleven.  The body is to be buried between Dr Coleridge, the former vicar of the parish, and Bishop Coleridge, of Barbadoes, in the ground adjoining the chapel of Thorverton Church.  The death of the Archdeacon has cast a gloom over the parish and neighbourhood.  The minute bell was tolled, and the ringers rang a muffled peal when the sad news of his death arrived.  He was to have preached in his old parish on the night on which he died.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 March 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Death At Devonport. - Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday, relative to the death of ELIZABETH MARY M. FROST, aged 21 years.  -  Henry Whitney, bombardier 10th Brigade Royal Artillery stated that he had known the deceased for upwards of thirteen months, during which time she had appeared to enjoy very good health, and to be in good spirits.  She had been living at the house of the Rev. J. Bullen, as a servant, for a considerable time, but left about a fortnight since in consequence of being in a very desponding state, brought on, he believed, by her constantly thinking about the drowning of her father, which took place in Hamoaze on the 23rd of January last.  On Monday afternoon he went to the deceased's house, and during the time he was there he read the Bible and the deceased sat by his side.  About five p.m. she went into the next room, and upon his telling her not to stop long, she exclaimed "I will not be a minute."  She had not been gone a minute, before he heard the window of the next room opened, and being alarmed he rushed into the room just in time to see the deceased disappear from the window, and fall into the street, a distance of about twenty feet.  He immediately went down to the street, and the deceased, who was insensible, was conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where she expired on her arrival.  -  The mother of the deceased was called, and stated that previous to the death of her father, the poor girl was of a very happy disposition, but since then she had constantly said that witness would be ruined.  Mr W. P. Swain, surgeon, told her that the mind of the deceased was deranged, and that she would have to be put away, but she told him that she could not do that, adding that the deceased was very quiet, and she would look after her to see that she did no harm to herself.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, stated that they were of opinion that the surgeon who attended the deceased should be present to give evidence, and the Inquiry was then adjourned until today.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 March 1875
PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held at Plymouth yesterday respecting the death of MARY MUIR, who died suddenly whilst filling a pitcher with water, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Parents Censured By A Coroner's Jury. - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, respecting the death of ROBERT STEWART, aged eight months.  The child had since its birth been very healthy, but lately it had been suffering from the whooping cough, for which it had been taking medicine. Yesterday morning the deceased was seized with a convulsive fit and died almost immediately.  It was stated that the mother of the deceased child had been in the habit of taking out the deceased and four other children begging, and was out with him as recently as Tuesday.  The Coroner strongly disapproved of the habit of taking children about in such severe weather, and whilst sympathising with the mother on account of her poverty, remarked that if she wanted relief the guardians would undoubtedly have relieved her.  The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but at the same time, condemned the practice of the mother in taking her children about begging with her day after day, and especially while the deceased was suffering from whooping cough, when she could get relief from the parish.  They, therefore, censured both father and mother of the deceased, and urged upon the latter to discontinue the practice complained of.

STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Death At Devonport.  -  The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the suicide of ELIZABETH MARY M. FROST, aged 21 years, who had been in a desponding state since her father's death, which occurred on the 23rd of January last, was resumed yesterday by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for Devonport.  Mr W. P. Swain, surgeon, for whose attendance the Inquiry was adjourned on Tuesday, was called yesterday, and stated that he had seen the deceased twice - once at the residence of the Rev. J. Bullen, where she was a servant, and again at her own house.  She was suffering from a peculiar form of insanity, known as melancholia, and he considered it was a very bad case.  On visiting the deceased the second time he found that she was much worse, and then advised her mother to have her removed to an asylum.  He considered that temporary derangement of her mind was brought on by the sudden news of her father's death, but he had not thought that she would do any harm to herself.  He was of opinion that she would have been much safer at an asylum than at her own house, although every possible care was taken of her.  Mr Swain here observed that he believed there was a fee attached to his evidence, and requested the Coroner to hand it to the mother of deceased, who had been left a widow with six children.  He added that he hoped the Jury would take this into consideration, but the Jury - a double one - refused to give up their fees, considering that it was not a case of distress, as MRS FROST had two sons earning wages, and also had a Government annuity of £10 a year.  -  A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 March 1875
TAVISTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at Ganton Farm, Tavistock, concerning the death of a little boy named STANLEY PEARSE NORSWELL, aged 5 years.  The deceased accidentally cut his thumb with a knife in February last, and as alarming symptoms set in, Mr G. W. Northey, surgeon, was sent for on Wednesday night.  Tetanus followed, and on Friday morning the child died.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 March 1875
LYDFORD - An Inquest was held yesterday at Princetown, by Mr Fulford, County Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN PENNY, aged 48, drayman, with Mr Scott, brewer, Plymouth.  On Thursday deceased was going to Dartmoor with a load of beer, and when close to Princetown he was seen staggering about, and he was taken to the Duchy Hotel, where he was attended by Dr Power, medical officer of the prisons;  but he remained unconscious until Saturday, when he died.  The Jury returned a verdict that he died from Apoplexy.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 March 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Explosion On Shipboard. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner,. held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, relative to the death of PETER WELMAN, aged 24 years. -  David Vonwyke, captain of the steamship Stella, of Amsterdam, stated that the vessel was on a voyage from Rotterdam to Palermo, and the deceased, who was a fireman, was a native of Brielle, Holland.  On Saturday night, when the vessel was about ten miles off the Lizard, and going at full speed, he heard an explosion, which was quickly followed by a dense volume of steam.  It was then reported to him that the cap of the safety valve in the boiler had burst open, and that the deceased had been severely scalded by the boiling water.  After lying-to for two hours without steam he bore up for Plymouth, where he arrived on Sunday afternoon, and the deceased was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died yesterday afternoon.  -  Henry George Verburgh, chief engineer of the Stella, stated through Mr Holmes, interpreter, that before the vessel left Rotterdam the machinery was examined by the Government inspector, who pronounced it perfect.  At the time of the accident the pressure of steam was 55 lbs., but the boilers would stand 60 lbs.  He considered that the heavy rolling of the ship caused the cap of the valve to burst open.  -  By a Juror:  The cap was fastened down by twenty small bolts half an inch in diameter, all of which were blown out.  On the afternoon in question he observed a small quantity of steam escape from the valve, and in consequence of the pressure of steam being 60 lbs., he ordered it to be reduced to 55 lbs.  -  Philip Dichent, fireman, corroborated the former witness's statements, adding that he did not run on deck at the time of the explosion as the others did, but went immediately into the engine-room before all the steam escaped.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, spoke highly of Dichent's conduct in going into the engine-room and attending to the fire, and said he considered deceased met with his death Accidentally.  -  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Coroner's opinion.  The Inquiry lasted nearly three hours.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 March 1875
PLYMPTON ST. MAURICE - An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, at Plympton St. Maurice yesterday, respecting the death of EDWARD PEARCE, aged 67 years.  On the night of the 1st inst., the deceased was going to his bedroom, when by some means he fell backwards over the stairs, and injured his head.  Mr Miles, surgeon, was called in, but deceased never rallied and he died on Tuesday.  A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

ST. BUDEAUX - Strange Fatality At St. Budeaux. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at St. Budeaux, into the circumstances attending the death of ALBERT EDWARD COLE, aged 8 years.  The deceased went into a quarry near his father's house, and through some earth on which he was standing giving way, he fell into a pond ten feet deep.  A Mrs Moulds, who lives close by, ran out to the assistance of the poor child, but in trying to reach him she herself fell in, and sank with him.  She managed, however, to get out, but in making a second attempt at rescue she again fell in, and once more sank.  A man named Elliner now came up, but he also fell in, and all three were struggling in the water when Mr Hoskins, builder, arrived.  Mr Hoskins succeeded in getting out Elliner and Mrs Moulds, but the child was drowned.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BERE FERRERS - The Fatal Mining Accident At Beeralston. - It was stated in Wednesday's paper that an unfortunate man, named JOHN PALMER, had been killed at the Gawton Copper Mine, by a piece of rock falling upon him.  An Inquiry into the cause of the accident has been opened by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and has been adjourned until Tuesday evening next, for the attendance of Dr Foster, one of her Majesty's inspectors of mines.  This case affords another illustration of the hardships entailed by the Mines Regulation Act.  The Government inspector must attend all Inquests respecting mine accidents, but of course before he can do so notice of the Inquiry must be conveyed to him.  Some months ago the body of a man killed in West Cornwall was kept until it became exceedingly offensive, in order that the inspector might have due notice of the Inquest and when it was urged that a preliminary Inquiry might have been held for the purpose of giving a certificate for burial, the Coroner pointed out that if he had held such an Inquiry no allowance would have been made to him by the county, and consequently, he would have had to have borne the expense of a double journey.  And this is precisely what Mr Rodd has had to do in the present case.  In order that the friends of the deceased might be able to bury the body he held an Inquiry, although knowing that it must be adjourned for the attendance of Dr Foster, and as he is paid by salary he will have to pay the cost of two journeys from Plymouth to Beeralston.  An alteration of the law in this matter is very desirable.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 March 1875
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held yesterday three Inquests, the first of which was into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN SMITH, an inmate of the Workhouse.  Whilst the deceased was eating his dinner on Thursday, a piece of mat more than an ounce in weight slipped down his windpipe, and as it could not be extracted he died within a few minutes.  The deceased,  who was formerly a miller, of Exeter, was 75 years of age.

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquiry was relative to the death of SAMUEL FOLLEY, aged 30 years, who was found dead the previous morning.  THIRZA FOLLEY, wife of the deceased, stated that about half-past eleven on Wednesday night she retired to rest, leaving her husband sitting up in the room.  He had been to the Prince of Wales Inn that evening, and returned the worse for liquor.  He did not come to bed for the night, and when she awoke about half-past five the next morning she found him dead upon the floor.  Of late the deceased had been drinking very heavily.  -  Wm. Crocker, who resided in the same house as deceased, also proved that FOLLEY was addicted to drink, and said he had seen him many times the worse for liquor.  -  Mr Pearce, surgeon, stated that he had been attending the deceased for some time past for disease of the brain.  Drink made the disease much more serious than it would otherwise have been and did him a great injury.  He believed that the deceased died from apoplexy.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by heavy drinking."

PLYMOUTH - The other Inquiry was relative to the death of SIMON GORDON, aged 70 years.  -  William Andrews, master of the fishing smack Little Kit, of Plymouth, stated that the deceased was a fisherman on board his vessel, and that on Wednesday, the 24th of February, when about eighteen miles out, he ordered the deceased and another man to lower the foresail.  Just afterwards he heard a groan and upon proceeding to the bow he found the deceased lying upon the deck with his eye cut and bleeding fearfully.  At GORDON'S request he applied some tobacco to the eye, and asked him if he should bear up for Plymouth, but deceased refused, and continued his work.  On the following morning the vessel arrived at Plymouth, and after landing the fish, the deceased went to sea again, and continued to work until the Saturday, when he complained of being unwell, and he was then landed. -  Richard Runnells, fisherman, said that whilst the deceased was letting the jib sheet loose the bit struck him in the face, cutting his eye and knocking him down.  -  Mr Thomas Harper, surgeon, stated that the deceased came to him on the 2nd of March, and upon examining him, he found the mark of a wound upon the right eye, and also that erysipelas had set in, from which disease he died.

BEAWORTHY - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Beaworthy on Wednesday, concerning the death of MR J. WESTLAKE, miller, of that place. On Monday last deceased was cleaning the machinery of his mill, and in leaning across a wheel it was put in motion, and deceased was accidentally entangled in the machinery and crushed to death.  The Coroner strongly urged the necessity of taking such precautions as would prevent the recurrence of such a frightful accident.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 March 1875
BERE FERRERS - The Fatal Accident At Gawton Mine. - The resumed Inquiry respecting the death of JOHN PALMER, at Beeralston, was held yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner.  It will probably be remembered that the deceased was killed by a piece of rock falling on him whilst he was at work underground at Gawton Mine.  The rock appeared to have been loosened by an explosion, and it was being bored for a second firing when the accident occurred.  It was stated that the deceased was an experienced miner, and that he and his companions tested the rock before they began to bore it.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 March 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide By  A Lunatic. -  Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital yesterday relative to the death of ARCHIBALD MCCONNOCHIE, aged 27 years, who committed suicide on the Cornwall Railway the previous day.  -  Henry Horra stated that he had been employed as nurse, off and on, at the Hospital for nearly twelve months, but had recently been discharged.  On Friday last he was sent to the ward that the deceased was in, and where there were two other nurses.  At one a.m. on Monday he went on duty, his duty being to watch the deceased, and the nurse whom he had relieved went to sleep.  At 3.30 a.m. he fell asleep leaving the deceased in bed, and awoke half an hour afterwards, but he did not look to see if MCCONNOCHIE was in bed, and did not find him missing until about five o'clock.  The doors of the ward were not locked.  He recognised the deceased by a piece of flannel he had around his neck.  -  James Rowley, another nurse, stated that he had been with the deceased for twenty days, and his instructions were to keep all weapons out of his reach, and not to allow him to go out of sight.  Deceased was quiet and inoffensive and had never before attempted to leave.  He never knew of a patient getting away before.  -  Samuel Glover said that Horra relieved him from watching the deceased at one a.m. on Monday.  He was then perfectly sober, and did not complain of being tired.  -  Charles McShane, staff-surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, stated that the deceased, who had been an able seaman on board the Aurora, was admitted into the Hospital on the 22nd of February with a wound in the throat, self-inflicted on the 28th of January at Greenock.  He had been suffering from the effect of drinking.  When he was admitted he was quiet and inoffensive, but the wound was not quite healed, and the deceased was under constant survey.  During the time he had been in the Hospital he had been rational at times, but was generally rather morose and in consequence of that a strict survey was kept over him.  He could not say that deceased was a lunatic, but he was placed in the observation ward.  -  The ward-master of the Hospital was called, and stated that he told Horra when he went on watch to be very attentive to the deceased.  The nurses had never complained of being over-worked.  The Inquiry was then adjourned until Tuesday next for the attendance of railway officials.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 March 1875
PLYMOUTH - Found Dead In Bed. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday relative to the death of JOHN HUGO, aged 42 years, a chimney sweep, who was found dead yesterday morning.  The deceased had been in the Workhouse for some time past, but came out about a fortnight since and had been supported by his friends.  He had been living at a Mrs Marshall's lodging-house, King-street, and in consequence of his being unwell had been taking cod-liver oil.  Yesterday a woman named Lamb, who sent to the house to give him some oil, found him dead in bed.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 March 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall At Devonport. - An Inquiry was held at Devonport on Saturday by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner, relative to the death of WILLIAM ANSTIS.  The deceased, who was an officer of Excise, was passing over Mill-bridge about ten o'clock on Thursday night, when he was seen to stagger and fall, striking his head heavily on the stones.  Mr J. L. Cutcliffe, surgeon, was quickly in attendance on him and found that he had fractured his skull.  The deceased died in the course of a few hours.  It was stated that he was subject to occasional fits of giddiness, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death.  MR ANSTIS was 50 years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 March 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE. - The Suicide On The Cornwall Railway. - The resumed Inquiry into the circumstances attending the suicide of ARCHIBALD MCCONNOCHIE was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse.  It will be remembered that the deceased, who was 27 years of age, was a seaman in the Royal Navy, and had been under treatment at the Royal Naval Hospital, whence he escaped early on the 15th inst., whilst the nurse in charge of his ward was asleep.  According to the evidence given yesterday the deceased when he left the Hospital had nothing on but a white shirt and a pair of blue trousers, and a sailor's cap, being entirely without boots and stockings.  After getting clear of the Hospital he walked down St. Mary-street, and was spoken to by P.C. Loosemore, who asked him where he was going.  The deceased replied "Going home," and walked on, the policeman having no suspicion that anything was wrong as sailors are frequently seen walking through the streets with very little clothes on.  At three o'clock the same morning a constable saw him drinking at the fountain near the Halfpenny Gate, and an hour later he came across him near the Admiral's Hard.  On this occasion the deceased said "You will not have a chance to order me home again because I am going."  About twenty minutes after six o'clock a labourer, named John Clemens, went on board a [?] lugger, lying in Stonehouse Pool, for the purpose of discharging the cargo, and found the deceased standing at the galley.  Deceased followed Clemens below, and told him that he had just been discharged from the Navy.  A man named Martin, who was standing by, remarked "You have been kicked out of the navy," and to this deceased replied, "Yes; everything was bad."  he said to Martin that he wished to change his clothes, and Martin told him that Clemens could manage that for him.  Accordingly Clemens gave him some white trousers, a duck "jumper," and an old hat, in exchange for deceased's cap and trousers.  When Clemens went to breakfast at eight o'clock, the deceased was standing on the Stonehouse Quay, but when he returned the deceased had left.  The same day William Rawling, a breakman on the Cornwall Railway, ordered a man, whom he believed to be the deceased, off the rails.  On the following day Rawling was working in his garden at St Budeaux with the 2.30 p.m. train from Plymouth came along.  He noticed the deceased sitting on the railway bank and saw him deliberately lie down on the rails as the train approached.  Rawling ran towards the spot as fast as he could and the break whistle was sounded, but the deceased was run over and killed before the train could b stopped.  -  Dr Minter, Inspector-General of Hospitals, explained that besides Horra, who was on duty in the ward, there were two nurses in waiting, who could have been immediately summoned to the spot by the ringing of a bell if anything had gone wrong.  Dr Minter further stated that there were not less than fifty-nine nurses employed in the Hospital, and gave details shewing that they were not overworked.  The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that Horra was morally, if not legally, responsible for McCONNOCHIE'S death, and the Jury, in returning a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" stated that there had been great negligence on his part.  The Jury exonerated the Hospital officials of all blame and stated that they believed the arrangements to be perfect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 March 1875
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Horrabridge, on Tuesday, relative to the death of a mason, named JAMES FOOT, aged 64 years.  The deceased, who was very feeble, lodged with a Mrs Stephens, and between ten and eleven o'clock on Monday night he went upstairs to go to bed, apparently sober, but slipped when he got to the top of the stairs and fell over the whole flight.  Mr Willis, surgeon, was called in, and found the deceased lying dead at the foot of the stairs with a large quantity of blood around his head.  The deceased, who was smelling very strongly of liquor, had died from a fracture of the skull.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 March 1875
ERMINGTON - A Man Burnt To Death At Ermington. - At the New Inn, Ermington, on Wednesday, Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry respecting the death of JOHN SYMONS, aged about 60 years, who died on Monday evening from injuries received about a fortnight since.  -  Mr James Blackler stated that on the night of the 10th inst., he and the deceased, who was not the worse for liquor  came home together, and deceased went into his house by way of the back door.  Witness looked in at the window at about quarter before eleven, and saw him sitting asleep on the form.  There was no fire in the room, but a candle was burning on the table.  -  Philip Prowse said that about one o'clock on the morning of the 11th of March he heard the deceased screaming "Murder," and he ran to the house and burst open the back door.   When he went in the deceased was lying on his back across the kitchen all on fire.  There was no fire in the house nor any candle, but a candle stick was on the table, and there was grease on the floor where the deceased lay.  No one was in the house, and the doors were bolted.  Deceased said the man that did it was in the house, but he was not then sensible.  -  Mr Cornish, surgeon, of Modbury, stated that he attended the deceased, whom he found suffering from a severe shock to the system through burns.  The injuries were quite sufficient to cause death.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 March 1875
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held on Saturday by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, respecting the death of the infant child of MR W. J. EVENS, of Gasking-street.  The deceased - a boy 3 months old - had apparently been overlaid by his mother and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 March 1875
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday by Mr J. Bencraft, Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH JANE HICKS, a native of St. Breock, who for some time past has been in the service of Mr Nicklin, of Barnstaple.  It appeared the deceased, a steady, respectable young woman, called on Mary Gill, servant of Mr E. Dennis, in order that the two might, as usual, proceed to the evening service at the Wesleyan Chapel; but while at Mr Dennis's she complained of faintness and pain in her left side.  Mr and Mrs Dennis were not at home when she called;  but the former returning for a few minutes before proceeding to church, upon hearing that deceased was faint, procured some brandy for her, and directed Gill and another young woman named Berry, who was also present, to bathe her temples.  Not believing that her illness was serious, and thinking that under the circumstances it would be best left to the care of her female companions, he went to church.  Soon after his leaving deceased became worse, and was taken in the arms of one of her companions, while the other called in the neighbours and ran for Mr Gamble, surgeon;  but before he came deceased breathed her last.  Mr Gamble partly ascribed her death to syncope, and partly to fatty degeneration of the heart.  He told the Coroner it ought to be made generally known that a person seized with faintness ought at once to be laid out at full length on the ground.  Mr Gamble also stated that he found deceased was very tightly laced.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Poisoning At Plymouth.  An Unsolved Mystery. - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening into a mysterious fatality from poisoning.  The deceased was a child named FANNY WILLCOCKS, aged 3 years, and the first witness examined was her mother, MARY JANE WILLCOCKS.  The husband of this woman left her three years ago, and according to her own statement, she has since been living with a man named Day, who gets his living by travelling with a galvanic battery, and by whom she has had a child.  She stated that she lived at 50 King-street, and, including the deceased, had [?] children.  On Sunday morning, the 21st inst., she bought two pennyworth of tea at the shop of Mrs Partridge, of King-street, and when she came home she put [?] the tea into the teapot and poured some boiling water over.  Witness, Day, the deceased, and her youngest child partook of the tea, and immediately afterwards the youngest child became sick, and she and the others became so soon afterwards.  This alarmed her and she would not give the other children any of the tea, but sent to Mr Pearse, surgeon, who prescribed some medicine.  This was obtained from a chemist, and after taking it the children soon got better.  On the following Tuesday she burnt the remainder of the tea because no one should get hold of it, and the tea that was in the teapot was afterwards placed on the top shelf of the cupboard, with several basins in front of it.  When the surgeon came her (witness's) mother poured some of the tea in a saucer for him to examine, and she afterwards threw it back.  After she and the man Day were taken ill their feet and hands became much swollen.  On Friday evening last she went into the kitchen, leaving the deceased and the other children in another room.  Day was not at home at the time.  She went downstairs for a few minutes, and upon returning to her room she saw that the deceased was sick.  She asked her what the matter was, and the child told her that her brother, GEORGE, a little fellow 7 years old, had given her a drink from the teapot.  On looking round she saw the teapot on the table, and asked the little fellow what he had done.  He replied, "I gave FANNY some of the tea as she asked for a drink," and "I drank some myself."   He was taken sick himself, but he had since recovered.  Witness asked him what he did it for, and he said "I don't know."  The following morning, about half-past three o'clock, she heard the deceased singing in a strange manner, and on getting out of bed found that she was much worse.  She sent for a surgeon, who came directly, and by his directions the deceased was put in a warm bath, but she continued to get worse, and died at five o'clock that morning.  Mr Pearse, who attended the deceased, told her not to throw away the contents of the pot, but to put it aside, which she did.  Previous to making the tea she washed out the teapot with clean water.  -  By the Jury:  The teapot was not used for any other purpose.  The tank where she got the water from was over the closet, but she did not know when it was last cleaned.  -  Jane Berchell said that she went to Mr Pearse's house on Sunday, the 21st inst., when the family were taken ill.  She saw Mr Pearse, sen., who said he did not care to attend such a case after she had described the symptoms to him, but he gave her a prescription to take to a chemist, which she did.  The medicine was given to the deceased, and the others who were ill and they afterwards got better.  -  Emma Jane Partridge said that MRS WILLCOCKS came to her shop on the 21st, and purchased an ounce of tea.  It was mixed tea, and was flavoured with Pekoe.  She purchased it from Mr Tout, wholesale dealer, Union-street, who prepared it for her to sell.  She produced the canister the tea was taken from, but more tea had been put into it since she sold some to WILLCOCKS.  She had been drinking the tea WILLCOCKS bought and had not been sick.  Several other persons had had the same tea, and she had received no complaints about it.  -  Thomas Pearse, surgeon, stated that between one and two o'clock on the 21st instant he visited WILLCOCKS'S house where he found MRS WILLCOCKS, the man Day, and two children.  They were very pale and exhausted, and all four were suffering from frequent vomiting.  None except MRS WILLCOCKS was sick whilst he was there, and she was very bad.  He was shewn the contents of the teapot;  the leaves appeared to be larger and coarser than those of ordinary tea.  The sufferers presented the appearance of having been poisoned.  He directed the teapot to be set aside.  -  The Coroner:  Why did you not take the teapot away with you?   In a future case take such a thing away.  If you had done so then we should not have been here now.  -  Witness, continuing, said he did not think that poisoning would bring on the direct symptoms from which the deceased had been suffering.  He believed the immediate cause of death was a fit.  The deceased was in a very exhausted condition when she died.  -  Connell Whipple, surgeon, said that he made a post mortem examination on the 27th inst.  There were no external marks of injury, and all the internal organs were healthy, excepting the stomach and brain.  The stomach was distended by wind and contained about an ounce and a half of  greenish and highly acid liquid.  The membrane lining the stomach was much softened, and in some places separated from the tissue beneath.  The brain and its blood vessels were much congested.  He believed death was caused by an irritant poison, probably oxalic acid.  He found no symptoms of vegetable poisoning.  Any other vegetable substance would not, as far as he knew, produce such a condition of the stomach as he had described.  He found no traces of arsenic, and he believed that death came from the teapot.  He had examined the contents of the teapot and found much less acid in it than in the contents of the stomach. By the contents being exposed to the air for four or five days some of the strength would be lost.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said that the death of the child could have been prevented if a proper person had taken the teapot.  He did not think that there was criminal neglect on the part of anyone;  but he should have thought that Mr Pearse would have taken charge of the teapot, and it was his duty to have done so.  It was clear that the deceased was not intentionally poisoned.  -  The Jury returned the following verdict:-   "That the deceased died from poison, probably oxalic acid, which was most likely in the teapot, but there was no evidence to shew how it got there;  also, that the deceased partook of it accidentally."  The Jury added that it was deeply to be regretted that some person in authority had not taken due precaution to prevent the contents of the teapot from doing further mischief.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday, relative to the death of PERCY BLOOMFIELD, aged 5 months.  Elizabeth Patey said she resided in Claremont-street, and had taken care of the deceased, who was an illegitimate child, since its birth.  The mother of the deceased was the wife of a naval seaman, and paid 4s. a week for its maintenance.  On Saturday morning it was taken in a convulsive fit and died shortly afterwards.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, relative to the death of ELIZABETH SPEARMAN, a woman of ill-fame, aged 31 years.  -  Clara West stated that she had lived with the deceased at 6 Henry-street, since August last.  On Monday morning deceased arose at half-past ten, and then appeared in her usual health.  She had dinner and tea, and in the evening about nine o'clock she and witness went out.  They went to the Coachbuilder's Arms, in Queen-street, kept by a Mr Saunders, where the deceased asked for a glass of ale, and shortly afterwards fell down.  Witness could not tell whether she had drunk the whole of it before she fell.  Witness went to her assistance, but the deceased died within a minute.  The deceased was attended by Mr Square, surgeon, about nine months since for a disease in the head, that resulted in the loss of the sight of the right eye and the hearing of the right ear.  The deceased was  quiet and very reserved person.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Through Drink. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, Plymouth, relative to the death of JAMES FOREMAN, aged 37 years.  -  Frederick J. harden, lieutenant in the 16th Regiment, said that the deceased was his servant, and had been in his employ for about four years.  He left the barracks about six o'clock on Monday evening, and was then perfectly sober.  -  Mary Jane Congdon stated that she kept a refreshment-house on the Barbican, and about ten o'clock on Monday night the deceased, who was the worse for liquor, came into her shop staggering, and asked for a glass of ale.  She shewed him where he could get one, but he refused to go there, and went in the direction of the Barbican Pier, asserting that it was his way home.  -  John Bunce, fisherman, said that on Monday night, about eleven o'clock, he was standing on the Barbican Pier, and he saw the deceased standing steadily against a wall.  The deceased was at the edge of the quay, over the side of which he suddenly fell.  Witness picked up the hat of the deceased, whom he saw struggling in the water, and then, with assistance, he procured a boat, and went in search of him, but he had sunk.  It was dead low tide at the time, and there were only about six or eight feet of water at the place where the deceased fell.  There was a chain to keep persons from going to the edge of the quay.  The body was found on Tuesday morning by a fisherman named William Bunce.  P.C. Damerell stated that the spot where the deceased was standing was a dangerous one for intoxicated men.  -  Lieutenant Harden, who was recalled, said that the deceased was in good circumstances, and was in possession of three good conduct badges.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased fell into the water Accidentally, and whilst in a state of Insobriety.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - The Catastrophe At North-Hill, Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of JAMES HOWE and EDWARD RICHARD DAWE, who were killed on Thursday afternoon whilst at work on the site of the new Blind Institution at North-hill.  -  James Shovell, labourer, stated that he had been engaged with the deceased in taking down the old North-hill House, and at about half-past two on Thursday afternoon he and HOWE were taking down one of the walls.  Mr Jillard, who was the contractor, told HOWE on Wednesday not to touch the wall until the rubbish had been taken away.  Several cartloads of rubbish had been removed, but five loads remained.  Witness and HOWE put a rope around the wall for the purpose of pulling it down, and then dug out a little more from the bottom.  Witness told HOWE that they had better not take down the wall before the cart got out of the way, and HOWE remarked that he did not think the wall would fall.  Neither of them touched the wall afterwards.  He and HOWE were standing together looking towards the cart, which was being loaded by DAWE, when, happening to cast his eye towards the wall, he saw it falling.  He at once stepped back and called to the deceased, but there was no time for them to get out of the way, and the wall fell upon them.  The end of the wall struck his left hand in falling.  He raised an alarm, and a number of willing hands immediately set to work to get the deceased men out.  -  By the Jury:  When he arrived on the works in the afternoon the wall was undermined, with the exception of a piece at either end.  HOWE told witness that he had dug out the bottom of the wall in the morning.   -   Edwin Ryder said that at the time of the accident he and DAWE were engaged in loading the cart, witness being on the off side, and the first he knew of the wall falling was receiving a blow upon the shoulder from a stone, and also being cut about the fingers.  -   Joseph Jillard, mason, said that he had the contract for removing the old North-hill House preparatory to preparing the site for the erection of the new Blind Asylum.  On Wednesday he told HOWE that he would not have the wall taken down until the rubble had been cleared away, and said he would himself superintend the taking of it down.  HOWE had no right to take the wall down without consulting him.  He was not present when the accident happened, but he arrived soon afterwards and assisted in taking the men out.  He examined the wall at ten p.m. on Wednesday and it was then perfectly sound, and nothing had then been removed in the way of under-mining it.   -   William Sarah said that he was present at the scene of the accident on Wednesday night, and heard Mr Jillard tell HOWE not to touch the wall until the rubble had been removed.   -   The Crooner said it was perfectly clear that the men came to their death accidentally;  and if there was any blame to be attached it would undoubtedly fall upon HOWE, who had acted contrary to his master's instructions in under-mining the wall.   -   The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" exonerating Mr Jillard from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 April 1875
NORTH BOVEY - Strange Suicide At North Bovey. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR WILLIAM COLRIDGE, of Higher Warmhill, North Bovey,  was held at the house of the deceased by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner.  The deceased, who was a farmer, committed suicide, as already stated, on Thursday last.  The first witness called was John Cornish Cuming, who said he was a farmer living at Warmhill.  He saw deceased on Wednesday evening, April 7th, and left him all right about half-past nine o'clock.  He was in bed, and complained of his leg, but otherwise he appeared in his usual health.  He had frequently spoken of his trouble, saying that no one had got the trouble that he had.  Deceased lost his wife about nine months ago, and was left with six children.  He had been accustomed to drink a good deal, especially since the death of his wife, and when witness spoke to him about it he said he drank to drown his trouble.  -  WILLIAM HENRY COLRIDGE, son of the deceased, 11 years old, said he went to bed at about ten o'clock on Wednesday night.  He slept in the same room as his father, who was in bed at the time, not having been down for the day.  Deceased asked him to go down and bring him up the gun, for fear any rogues might break into the house.  The gun was kept loaded, and witness placed it against the wall, close to the head of his father's bed, and deceased told him to be sharp and get into bed.  Deceased was always very kind to him.  He heard a little noise in the morning, but not enough to awaken him, and thinking that it might have been caused by the gun falling along the room, he went to sleep again.  His sister was sleeping in the same room, but not in the same bed.  He got up a little after six o'clock, and saw his father dead, with the gun lying between his legs.  -  Elizabeth Arscott stated that she was the wife of a labourer, and was in the habit of going to deceased's house daily to dress his leg, and to help in the house.  She was away on Wednesday, and went up to see him at about nine o'clock in the evening.  He was then in bed, and said that he was comfortable, and would not have his leg dressed until the morning.  He had drunk lately more than he used to both cider and gin, but he was quite sober when she left him.  Three little children were in bed in the same room.  On the Tuesday he said to her when she was going to Newton, "Don't stay;  come home again tomorrow, because my trouble is more than I can bear.  I should like you to be here in the evening."  He asked her to bring him home a pennyworth of arsenic, and told her not to let the chemist know what it was for, but he stated that he was going to make a wash of it for his leg.  He asked her for it when she came home and she replied "never mind."  He troubled himself very much about the death of his wife, and about the care of his children.   -   William Arscott, labourer, said the deceased sent for him on Tuesday evening, and he remained in the house about twenty minutes.  Deceased asked him to stay and have some cider, and requested him to look after his cow, which was about to calve.  He said, "Now, Will, I find the want of a wife."  Deceased was not able to get a servant, and had been without one for three weeks.  He spoke of a man who had cured his leg with arsenic.  -  James Utting, surgeon, Moretonhampstead, said the deceased sent for him on the 28th March.  He had an inflamed leg, and witness saw him on alternate days up to Tuesday late in the afternoon, when he was downstairs.  During his whole illness he had been extremely despondent, but more especially about his leg, thinking that he would never get well, and saying he would rather be out of the world than get better.  He drank a good deal during his illness, sufficient to disturb his nervous system, but he was always quite rational and witness never saw him drunk.  On Thursday morning witness was sent for, and found the deceased in bed, lying on his back with his head on the pillow, a single-barrel gun lying on his body;  the stock of the gun was between his legs, the muzzle directed upwards.  Deceased's left hand was grasping the barrel, and his right hand was down towards the trigger.  The gun had apparently recently been discharged.  The right side of the head was blown to atoms, and the brain scattered about the surrounding furniture and walls.  By witness's advice, and owing to his extreme depression the deceased took a certain quantity of cider.  He was particularly acute in all matters of business.   -  The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased shot himself whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 April 1875
IPPLEPEN - Manslaughter By A Cabman. - An Inquest respecting the death of MARY ANN SKINNER, the keeper of a beer-house at Pimlico, Torquay, was held yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, at the Wellington Inn, Ipplepen.  -  Mrs Seymour, wife of John Rock Seymour, Ipplepen, stated that the deceased was her brother's widow, and was 49 years of age.  On Saturday night they left Torquay in a cab driven by a man named Inch for home, and upon arriving at Budleigh Barton the cabman refused to proceed any further, as he had another engagement, and was obliged to meet the express train.  He compelled them to get out of the cab, and shortly afterwards the deceased complained of being unwell, and after being placed on the roadside she expired before medical aid could be obtained.  The medical man who made the post mortem examination stated that death resulted from apoplexy, brought on by excitement.  The cabman was examined and the Jury eventually returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Inch, who was taken into custody.  The event has caused considerable excitement.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Young Woman. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of MARY COUSINS, aged 21 years, the wife of a private in the 16th Regiment.  -  Sarah Jane Rowe, residing at Millbay, said that on Monday evening she went to see the deceased, and found her sitting up in bed, looking very ill.  Whilst she was in the room the deceased took two seidlitz powders, and drank two bottles of ginger beer, and then complained of burning in the throat.  Witness asked her if she would have a cup of tea, but she refused, and on the husband of the deceased bringing in some eggs, she said that she could not eat them.  Deceased stated that it was drink that caused her to suffer in the inside;  and witness knew that the deceased was in the habit of drinking heavily, and had seen her the worse for liquor.  About midnight on Monday witness was asked by the husband of deceased to come over and see his wife, and she found her quite dead.  The Jury considered that a post mortem examination was necessary and the Inquest was adjourned until Thursday.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - The Strange Death Of A Young Woman At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, resumed the Inquiry at Plymouth last evening into the circumstances attending the death of MARY COUSINS, aged 21 years, wife of a private in the 16th Regiment.  -  Jane Murphy stated that she resided in the same house as the deceased, at 27 Millbay-road.  On Sunday her daughter was married, and in the evening a few friends came to her room, including the deceased and her husband.  The deceased remained there about an hour, during which time she had a glass of rum and a glass of gin, and when she left she appeared in her usual health.  On the following day she saw her twice, the last time being at half-past two in the afternoon, but deceased did not complain of being unwell and she was then perfectly sober.  At midnight on Monday she heard deceased's husband shouting, and upon going to his room she found the deceased apparently dead in bed.  The husband, who told witness that deceased had been drinking ginger beer freely, never informed her of his wife's illness. The deceased, however, frequently complained of shortness of breath.  -  Thomas Pearse, surgeon, said that when he was called to see the deceased she was dead, and he had since made a post mortem examination.  He found the right lung adhering to the ribs on every part, but the left lung was healthy.  The stomach, which was much distended, appeared to be perfectly healthy.  All the other organs were healthy, and the body presented the appearance of being well nourished.  -  A. P. Balkwill, chemist, said that the last witness brought the stomach and its contents for him to analyse.  He had analysed them, but could find no traces of poison.  -  Mr Pearse, upon being recalled, said that it would be possible for a person to throw off all traces of an irritant poison,   and die of the exhaustion.  There was nothing in the post mortem examination that would account for the vomiting.  He considered that the state of deceased's right lung and the vomiting, which might have been caused by the condition of the stomach, from so much liquor having been taken, were sufficient to account for death from natural causes.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said that he did not think the deceased took anything to injure herself, but that she was not strong enough to bear the constant vomiting from which she suffered.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident In A Plymouth Tanyard. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of RICHARD BATTERSHALL, aged 3 years.  -  Bertha Chivers, a girl 7 years of age, said that about dinner time on Tuesday she and the deceased were playing in the tanyard in King-street.  The deceased, whilst drinking some water near the tanpit, over-balanced himself and fell in, and in trying to pull him out she also fell in;  but after struggling hard she succeeded in getting out.  Witness ran and told a lad named Beer that the deceased was in the tanpit, and he pulled him out.  The deceased was taken to his home, where he died on the following morning.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and said they considered that the persons belonging to the yard should take precautions to avoid a similar accident.

DARTINGTON - The Fatal Accident Near Totnes. - An Inquiry was held at Tigley, Dartington, yesterday, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a waggoner named THOMAS COVES, who was killed on Tuesday night by a wagon passing over him, under circumstances already reported.  The wagon was provided with a drag and two safety chains, and the wagon was heard by those in the vicinity to stop at the top of the hill at Tigley, as if the deceased was about to put on the drag;  but Mr Griffin, the deceased's employer, said he had examined the road, and found that neither chain nor drag had been used in going down the hill.  A hedge drain ran down the hill for some distance, and the deceased appeared to have kept the wheels of the wagon in this instead of using the drag;  but he did not appear to know that this drain terminated part way down the hill, and on arriving at the spot where it ended, and finding that the shaft horse could not keep back the wagon, he endeavoured apparently to keep the wheels close to the hedge in order to stop it that way, and in doing so he got jammed, the point of the shaft, on which there was blood, striking him in the face, which bore evidence of the blow, knocking him down and dragging him some distance, the wheel ultimately passing over his body.  -  Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, Totnes, said that the bones of deceased's face were fractured, there was a compression of the brain, and also a fracture of the pelvis.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 April 1875
PLYMSTOCK - An Inquest was held at Pomphlett yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of BENJAMIN JOHN OXLAND, aged three years and six months, who had been drowned in Pomphlett Creek.  It was supposed that the child fell into the water whilst throwing in stones, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 April 1875
SHAUGH PRIOR - The Suicide Of A Lunatic. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Bugle Farm, near Shaugh, yesterday, relative to the death of BENJAMIN TOZER KEMP, aged 34 years, late greengrocer of Plymouth.  -  William Anniss, labourer, said that he resided at Shaugh, and at about two o'clock on Friday afternoon he saw the deceased walking near Collard Farm, between Plympton and Shaugh, with a plough rein in his hand.  Deceased said to witness "How do you do?" and witness answered him.  -  John Worth stated that about 7 p.m. on Saturday he was walking through Bugle plantation when he saw the deceased suspended from a tree by the neck, and on cutting him down he found that he was quite dead.  -  Charles Aldridge, surgeon, stated that he was manager of the Plympton Lunatic Asylum, and on the 5th of October the deceased was admitted into the Asylum, since which time he had three times attempted to commit suicide, and a strict watch had consequently been kept over him.  The inmates were frequently taken out to walk, and on Friday morning the deceased and two other inmates were taken out on foot in charge of a keeper.  The deceased obtained permission to go inside a  hedge, where the keeper missed him.  -  The deceased's father here remarked that he put his son in the asylum for the protection of his life, and 25s. per week was paid for his maintenance.  -  Witness:  You did not put him under my care;  his wife did.  -  MR KEMP:  He has not been looked after as he should have been;  he should not have been let go out without having a proper attendant.  -  Witness:  I had to consider his recovery as he was a young man, and it was necessary for his health that he should go out.  The man was properly controlled.  The other two patients that were with him were very quiet and harmless.  -  MR KEMP:  Proper precaution has not been taken, seeing that the deceased had three times in six months attempted to destroy himself.  -  Mr Spurrell, who stated that he represented deceased's wife, asked witness what precautions had been taken since Christmas against his committing suicide.  -  The Coroner said he would not go into this, as it had nothing whatever to do with the Inquiry.  -  Mr Aldridge, however, stated that he had told each keeper who had had charge of the deceased not to lose sight of him when he was taken out, and to keep a strict watch over him.  What more could be done?  In answer to the Coroner, witness said he believed that the keeper who had charge of deceased was a trustworthy man and when he was taken into his employ he brought a good character with him.  -  Mr Spurrell remarked that the Coroner had no right whatever to go to Dr Aldridge's before the Inquest took place.  If he wanted to send a message there were police officers to take it.  -  The Coroner replied that Dr Aldridge wrote informing him of the escape, and saying that he would be most happy to render every possible assistance, and would attend the Inquiry.  He went that morning to the Asylum and told Dr Aldridge what time the Inquiry would take place;  but not a word passed between him and Mr Aldridge about the circumstances.  -  William Morrison said that he had been a keeper at the Plympton Asylum for seven weeks, during which time he had frequently taken the deceased out for walks.  The morning in question he took the deceased with two other lunatics for a walk, and when they got as far as George-lane, KEMP asked witness to allow him to go inside the hedge.  Witness remained outside with the other two men, and when two minutes had elapsed he went inside the hedge to get deceased, and then found that he had gone.  Search was continued for a considerable time, but deceased could not be found.  He considered he was capable of looking after three men.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind, and exonerated Mr Aldridge of all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 April 1875
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of WILLIAM DANIELS, aged 1 month, son of a labourer.  The deceased was found dead in bed between its parents on the previous morning, but there were no signs of its having been laid upon or suffocated.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Strange Fatality In Plymouth Market. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of EDWARD TRETHEWEY, about 30 years of age.  -  John Goad, foreman in the employ of Mr Shillabeer, butcher, Plymouth market, said that the deceased was occasionally employed by his master, and on Thursday evening last, between seven and eight o'clock, he was removing a hind quarter of beef, weighing about 2 cwt., from the outside of the stall to the inside, when he slipped and fell with the meat upon his back.  He walked into the stall and was afterwards taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital.  -  Chapman Gibbs, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that when the deceased was brought to the Hospital he did not see anything the matter with him;  but, being informed that he had brought off some blood, he admitted him into the accident ward.  On Sunday morning the deceased had a very severe attack of delirium tremens, which continued until Monday evening, when he expired.  Deceased's death was brought on by a severe shock to the system, which had been weakened by heavy drinking.  When the deceased was admitted he was quite sober, but he had previously been drinking heavily.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Accidentally fell, but died from a shock to the system, which had already been weakened by constant drinking.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 April 1875
COLYTON - A Devonshire Woman Killed By Her Husband.  Verdict Of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at Colyton yesterday, before Mr McAulay, Deputy Coroner for East Devon, on the body of MARY FOWLER, wife of a mason.  The evidence disclosed most extraordinary conduct on the part of the husband, JOHN FOWLER, who is in custody.  On the 24th of March, FOWLER came home quite sober about half-past eight in the evening.  His wife scolded him for being so late, and FOWLER lost his temper and took up a domestic utensil lying at the foot of the stairs, and dashed it at her head.  The blow rendered her senseless, and inflicted a severe gash on the left temple, but FOWLER went to bed and left his wife lying upon the floor.  Two little girls, daughters of FOWLER by a previous wife, were in the room and implored the father to come downstairs, and stop the blood.  After some time he came down and staunched the blood by pushing some rags into the gash.  He would not fetch medical assistance nor tell the neighbours what had happened.  On the following day the woman was able to get up and call in her neighbours, who at once fetched a doctor.  FOWLER was then taken into custody. The deceased gradually got worse, her depositions were taken before a magistrate and death took place on Tuesday.  Two of the witnesses examined yesterday, Ann Braddick and Mrs  Matthews, neighbours of deceased, said that the woman told them both that the wound was inflicted by her husband "by accident," when he was in a passion.  Dr O'Meara, who attended deceased, said he found her right arm and leg paralysed, the result of an injury to the brain, in consequence of the wound on the temple, which was about three quarters of an inch long.  He treated her for the paralysis, and the patient seemed to progress favourably up to the 15th of April, when she became worse and gradually sunk.  Witness made a post mortem examination of the body, and his opinion was that death was occasioned by cerebral inflammation, caused or accelerated by the injury on the head.  -  The Jury, after a  short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against JOHN FOWLER.  Deceased was 64 years of age, and her husband is a few years younger.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JOHN SKINNER, aged 58 years.  -  Richard Blight, sawyer, said that the deceased, who was also a sawyer, worked at Mr [?] shipbuilding yard, Plymouth, and was at work for the last time on Saturday.  On Monday witness went to look for the deceased, and found him drinking in a public-house near the Market.  The following day he could not find him anywhere, but on Wednesday morning, about eight o'clock, he found him drinking in the Plough Inn, East-street.  He asked him to come to work, and he said he would, but on the way they called at the Guildhall Spirit Vault, kept by a Mr Lugg, where deceased asked for a pint of beer, and he and witness drank it.  He afterwards called for another pint and after drinking a little, he fell down insensible and remained so until yesterday morning, when he died.  William Eddy, tailor, said that deceased lodged in the same house as he did, at No. 5 High-street, and he believed that the deceased had been drinking heavily since Saturday last.  He saw the deceased on Wednesday morning between eight and nine o'clock when he appeared to be very cheerful.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes".

TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held yesterday at Tavistock before Mr Rodd, County Coroner, concerning the death of JOHN GOUGH, who received a fatal injury at the railway station under circumstances already reported.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time recommending that a competent person should have the superintendence of the crane, so that proper precaution might be taken in working it.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 April 1875
TOTNES - The Boating Fatality At Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, Totnes, by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH HOWARD PEARCE (nephew of Mr H. D. PEARCE, Devon and Cornwall Bank, Totnes), who, on Saturday evening, with three others, was in a boat on the River Dart when a Dartmouth steamboat passed by, and the boat, getting into the surge occasioned by its passage, upset.  Three succeeded in getting ashore, but the deceased, who could not swim well, swam a few yards and then sank.  His body was immediately dragged for, and recovered in about half an hour;  restoratives were tried, but in vain, life was extinct.  The principal witnesses were TERRIL W. PEARCE and Edward Edmonds (two of those in the boat with the deceased),  Robert Kelland, the master of the steamboat and George Mitchell, the captain of the Totnes Rowing Club.  It appeared that the boat in which the deceased and the others were was not safe for more than three, and therefore there is no doubt that there being four in it was mainly the cause of the upset.  -  the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning," censuring the master of the steamboat for not easing the steamer sufficiently and not returning when he saw the accident.  The captain, however, said he did not know anything of it until his attention was called to it by a passenger.  The steamer was then 300 or 400 yards from the spot.  He then saw that two of the young men were running towards the Totnes side, and the other towards the Bridgetown side.  He did not take particular notice whether there were three or four in the boat when he passed he did not stop the steamer, as he considered he could not render any assistance, as he saw a boat so near to the spot.  He considered that assistance had arrived on seeing a boat there.  It is stated that some of the Jury were in favour of a verdict of culpable negligence against the captain of the steamer.  The body of deceased will be removed to Kingsbridge today.  An elder brother of the deceased also lost his life by drowning some years since at Salcombe.  He fell off a cliff and his body was never recovered.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 April 1875
LOSTWITHIEL - JOSIAH CLEAVE, aged 17, living with his relative, Mr Sherwell, near Lostwithiel, and whose parents reside at Plymouth, committed suicide on Sunday night, by hanging himself with his scarf in the bullock's house, whither he went for the purpose of bedding the cattle.  The Inquest was held yesterday and the verdict of the Jury was that deceased met his death by "Accidentally Hanging Himself."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 May 1875
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Sudden Death Of A Local Preacher. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Venton Chapel, near Ridgway, yesterday, relative to the death of MR WILLIAM SANDERS, aged 75 years.  -  John Parsons, farmer, stated that the deceased was a local preacher belonging to the Wesleyan Methodists. About ten minutes to eleven on Sunday morning he met the deceased on the road to Venton Chapel, where he intended to officiate at the morning service.   The deceased told him he had been suffering very much during the day from palpitation of the heart, and could not walk fast, and thinking he should be late he desired witness to go on to the chapel and give out the 286th hymn.  Witness did so and after waiting some time for deceased the congregation became alarmed.  He then went in search of him and found him lying upon the road, about twenty yards from the chapel, quite dead.  Deceased, who suffered from heart disease, had often told him that he knew he should drop down dead in the road some time or other.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."  The body will be conveyed to Barnstaple today for burial.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 May 1875
TORQUAY - Concealment Of Birth At Torquay. - An Inquest was held by Dr Gaye, at the Torquay Townhall, yesterday, respecting the death of a newly-born infant, found dead on the previous afternoon at a villa on the St Marychurch Road.  It appears that SARAH BENNETT, the parlour-maid, aged about 20, who has been in her present situation three months, was taken unwell on Monday afternoon and retired to her bedroom.  Her mistress, a widow lady, named De Vere, sent for Mr Stubb, a surgeon, and it was then found that she had been delivered of a female child.  The child was dead, and he believed that it was born dead.  A fellow servant, the cook, stated that the girl had made no preparation for the child.  A verdict of Still-born was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Strange Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS LOWE, a boiler-maker, aged 53 years.  MARY LOWE, wife of the deceased said that her husband had been suffering from a pain in the chest for about six months.  She was afraid that he would die suddenly as he had been suffering from severe pains in the left side.  Christopher Bulteel, surgeon stated that on April 27th the deceased came to him for the first time, suffering from an eruption in the back of the neck.  On the Sunday evening last the deceased came to him in a state of intoxication, and he told him to go home and come again on the following morning.  He came to his house on Monday morning in a dangerous state, and witness ordered him to go home and go to bed.  Later in the day he called at the deceased's lodgings and found that he had been to bed, but had got up again and gone out.  He did not see the deceased again alive.  As witness could not tell whether the deceased died from the effects of drink or not, the Inquest was adjourned until tomorrow, in order that a post mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 May 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - The Tragedy At Devonport.  Barbarous Treatment Of Children.  The Coroner's Inquest.  -  Yesterday afternoon Mr Alan B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, opened an Inquest at Devonport on the body of WILLIAM BIRCH, who died on Wednesday under peculiar circumstances which have already been narrated in our columns.  The Foreman of the Jury is Mr James A. King.  Mr G. H. E. Rundle appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the accused.  -  Mary Hancock:  I live at 23 Pym-street, the same house as that in which deceased lived, my apartments being in the tenement.  He lived with his stepmother, ELIZA BIRCH, and she is my daughter.  I last saw the child alive at three o'clock on Wednesday, and then he was in an upstairs room of the house.  My eldest daughter, named SLANEY, who lives at 6 Pym-street, called me to see the child at twelve o'clock on that day.  He was in a back attic in bed - the one he usually occupied.  I had seen the child on the previous Monday walking about as usual.  When I saw him on Wednesday he was looking very ill, and was bruised in the face.  He spoke to me several times and said he knew me, but never said anything about the bruises.  The accused was not with the child much after I saw it, but she came in just after I got there.  I said, "ELIZA, what have you done;"  and she said, "Oh, mother, can you do anything for me?"  I then ran for assistance.  I never saw her strike the child.   -   The Coroner:  Did the mother strike you?  -  Witness:  No, never.  I never heard any quarrel with accused, and if I heard a quarrel with her and her children I went and prevented it.  I thought the child was in a dangerous condition from the bruises I noticed;  there were no bruises on the Monday.  The child was always delicate, and had sores on the toes and face.   -  The Coroner:  All the greater reason why it should be properly taken care of.   -   Witness said she sent for the doctor on Wednesday.  Her daughter had been married to JOSEPH BIRCH for twelve months.  She knew the children were ill-used, and had spoken to her daughter about it.  A fortnight ago the little girl was crying, and she scolded accused, and they quarrelled.  The neighbours came up, and witness told them they ought to interfere as well as her.  It had been talked of a long time as to how she served the children.  The child had not been out of doors since Christmas on account of bad feet, but it could walk about the room with the other children.  She heard no noise on the Wednesday morning.  No doctor had seen the child, so far as she knew, for the last twelve months.   -   John Rolston, M.D., said he had that day made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased.  He could not find any immediate cause of death, except as the result of shock, which would arise to a child of that age and generally diseased condition, from the bruises and injury appearing on examination on the surface of the body.  The child was generally bruised all over with nearly all recent bruises, one especial mark being over the left breast.  There were various bruises over the outer sides of the arms and legs.  The left elbow was very much bruised and lived, and the outer bone of the same arm was fractured, the result of considerable force.  About a tablespoonful of fluid blood was lying between the bone and skin, indicating a recent injury.  The child had a curiously swollen condition of the face and head, with an ulceration of various portions.  There was ulceration of the lips, nose, ears, back of the head, and a punctured wound over the right eye brow.  The character of the sores indicated hereditary disease.  The hands and feet bore marks of ulceration of a similar character, and this had existed for some time, otherwise the child was very fairly nourished, and the body indicated that he had had sufficient food.  Could positively say the bruises on the body were the result of violence which occurred within three days of death.  They were not of such a character as to enable him to give any opinion as to how they were produced;  whether by a fall or a blow.  The cheeks of the child were very much swollen, and had the appearance as if they had been blistered, and he thought this might be the result of disease.  In his opinion the old sores appearing on the child were not sufficient to cause death.  -  By a Juror:  Is it not possible that the injury to the cheeks might have resulted from blows?  -   Dr Rolston:  Very possibly.  The cheeks were very much bruised rather than diseased.  There were no marks of violence on the outer surface of the bone of the head.  The lungs were considerably diseased, shewing symptoms of consumption.  The heart was healthy, and there was a tablespoonful of fluid in the pericardium.  In the cavity of the bowel there was fluid of the same character.  The kidneys and liver bore the same diseased appearance as the body generally.  The stockings which the child had on were stained with blood and faecal matter.  Witness was requested to visit the child on Wednesday afternoon.  From the examination he made he found there was a mixture of bruises and disease, and he advised the removal of the boy to the Hospital, thinking him dangerously ill.   -   The Coroner:  How long do you think the child has been in the diseased condition in which you saw it?   -  Dr Rolston:  The disease was of long standing, but I cannot say how long.  The child has been ailing for a long time.  Very likely the disease appearing in the child has existed from birth; certainly it has existed for several months;  during which time the child has been ill.  The appearances do not enable me to say if the disease has existed for any length of time, or at all, in a dangerous form;  but my opinion is that the immediate cause of death was the shock to the child, diseased as he was.  That is the only way I can account for death.   -   A Juror:  If the child had been in perfect health would the violence have been sufficient to cause death?   -   Dr Rolston: I cannot tell.  I cannot say what violence would cause the death of this child.  The bruises are of course, of themselves, not of a fatal character, but are likely to produce death by the shock to the system which would result from them.  Of course the shock would be more severe to a diseased child like deceased.   -   MARY JANE SLANEY, sister of the accused, said she had heard noises in her sister's house, but she had never seen her strike the children.  On Wednesday she went into the wash-house where her sister was, and she observed that she was looking very sad.  She asked her what was the matter, and she replied, "I have beaten the boy, and I do not know what I have done to him."  Witness then called her mother and went upstairs, where she saw deceased, who was looking very ill.  He never spoke to her;  but she noticed that he was bruised about the face.  Had not seen the child for a month, and at that time he had no bruise on his face.   -  In answer to a Juror, witness said she had heard her sister beat the children, and she had interfered.  Three weeks ago there was a noise upstairs in her room, and she went up, finding her mother there.  Accused had then been beating one of the children, but she could not say which.  She had remonstrated with her, and, in reply, prisoner said, "It's no business of yours."   -   JOSEPH BIRCH, 13 years of age in August, said:  I am the son of JOSEPH BIRCH, an artificer in the Navy, serving on board the Northumberland.  Deceased, WM. BIRCH, was my brother.  He was 5 years old last birthday.  I have now living a brother aged 9 years, and named JAMES, and a sister 11 years, named ELIZABETH.  We all lived with our step-mother, who married my father last June.  We lived in Pym-street, Morice Town, and had two rooms, one the back bedroom, and the other the back garret.  Mother slept downstairs, except one night, when she slept in the room with us.  This was on Tuesday night last, and she did so that night to keep my dead brother from crying.  He cried all night and mother used to come up and beat him.  She did so on Monday night when he cried.  The last time I saw her beat him was on Wednesday morning.  I got up at seven o'clock, and saw my mother beat my brother WILLIAM with a cane and a poker.  She took him out of bed and hit him over the back with the poker and afterwards thrashed him with the cane over the head and face and hands.  She hit him across the back of his hands where the bad places were.  She caught hold of his shoulder with her teeth, lifted him up with her mouth, and then let him fall.  She kicked him along the floor.  She did this because he had been dirty.  -   Dr Rolston, in answer to the Coroner, said he noticed no marks of a bite on the child's shoulder.  -  The boy said prisoner hit his sister, too;  and she bit him on the knuckles of both hands on the Tuesday evening, when he came home sweating, and was, as she said, dirty.  -  The Coroner:  Did she hurt you very much?   -   Witness:  She made me cry.  The blood did not come;  but it did when she bit his brother and sister.  She bit his sister in the face, and the marks could now be seen.  There were marks on his hands where she bit him.  [These marks the boy shewed to the Coroner, and at his request Dr Rolston examined them, and said they might be the results of a bite, but he could not say positively.]   Witness, continuing, said she used to beat his brother every day with a poker.  She did so on Monday because he picked his face and hands;  on the Sunday because he had taken a cup out of the cupboard, for which habit she had beaten him previously;  on the Saturday for upsetting a utensil.  He never cried when he was beaten, because she warned him that if he did so she would give it to him worse for making a noise.  If his sister cried when she was beaten, prisoner would shut the door and give it to her worse.  On Wednesday morning she put a rope round his sister's neck to keep her from screeching.  Because deceased could not eat his bread and butter on Wednesday morning, she pushed a piece down his throat with his hands.  She used to feed them very well.   -   The Coroner:  Was he standing when he was beaten?  -  Witness:  He could not stand.  When my sister was bathing his bad eyes on Wednesday morning, because he could not stand mother took him up by the legs and held his head in the water.  Mother did not get drunk;  she did not drink at all.  Sometimes I used to stay away all night in the sawpit near Albert-road, because she "laced" me.  -  The Coroner said it was an extraordinary case.  The boy said there was a severe blow given to the child with a poker on Wednesday morning which knocked him down, yet the doctor did not find any mark on the back.  -  A Juror:  But the arm is broken, and the blow might have fallen there without the child seeing it.   -   The Coroner said this was a very reasonable construction.  -   The Foreman:  Is the doctor quite clear there is no mark of a blow on the back.   -  Dr Rolston said he saw no blow on the back.  There is a mark on the arm.   -  The boy said he did not tell anyone of what was passing, as the accused said if he told tales, Burns, the School Board messenger, would send him to a reformatory school.   -   Maria Gard Hawkings, lived in the house, and never saw accused beat any of her children.  Only heard crying once, and that was about three weeks ago.  Then her brother and her went up and saw the accused standing by the side of the bed in the attic.  She said she had not been striking her girl, although her mother said she had been.  Witness took her down to her room, and asked her not to beat the child again, and she said she would not.  Deceased had never complained to her about being beaten.  Could not hear a child crying in the attic from her bedroom.  Saw the child three weeks ago in her brother's shop.  Did not then notice that he had a blow in his face.  Had heard nothing about the child being beaten with a poker.  She would not be able to hear it if such a thing occurred from her room.   -   ELIZABETH BIRTH, 11 years of age, said her mother beat her on Wednesday morning because she had not attended to deceased.  She asserted that the prisoner desired her to tease the deceased on Tuesday night, and get him out of bed to fetch some tea from the table, and when he got out she beat him with a poker.  She told witness to keep every one out of the room on Wednesday morning, and then went down to wash, taking some things which the child had had on, and which were stained with blood.  Her mother had beaten and bit her;  she bit her in the face, and the mark could now be seen.   -   Martha Langmead, living at 6 Pym-street, stated that on the morning of Wednesday she went to the room occupied by the accused, the mother, Mrs Hancock, having asked her to go over to see the boy.  The little girl was standing at the door, and would not let her into the room, and then she went downstairs and met the step-mother.  She told her she had come to see the child, adding, "You have beaten it very bad this morning."  She only said, "Come upstairs," and witness did this, both of them sitting on the couch.  Witness said, "You have beaten the child very badly."  Accused replied, "Yes, I know;  can you do anything for it."  She went upstairs, and found the child lying on the bed, and then she said, "I can do nothing to this child;  it looks to me to be in a dying state;  you must get a doctor."  The child was groaning badly, and I said, "How could you do it?"  Prisoner replied, "I could not keep my hands off;  I came up this morning and saw such a mess."   -   The Foreman:  What was on the bed covering the child?   -   Witness:  I think it was a mat, but I cannot say what sort of one as I was so terrified.   -  The pillow on which the head of the deceased had rested was here produced and the slip was slightly stained with blood.  The little girl said this was a new slip, the old one, which was covered with blood, having been taken off on Wednesday morning and taken down by accused to the wash-house.  -  The Coroner said it was extraordinary that this treatment of the children had not been discovered before the fatal result.  -  Mrs Langmead said the neighbours did not like to interfere, but they talked of the matter.  -  The Coroner then adjourned the Inquiry until one o'clock on Tuesday.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 May 1875
BUCKLAND BREWER - Fatal Accident Near Bideford. - An Inquest was held yesterday respecting the death of a labourer named WILLIAM EASTERBROOK, who was killed at Buckland Brewer on Saturday.  The deceased was at work with others felling trees, and had just risen after sawing a trunk, when the dead branch of an adjoining tree fell, and striking him on the head, killed him on the spot.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  The deceased, who was about 33 years of age, leaves a wife and two children.

PLYMOUTH - Death By Drowning At Millbay.  -  Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Pier Head, Plymouth, yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM RADMORE, aged 54 years, who was drowned on Saturday night.  The evidence shewed that the deceased was a labourer at the Great Western Docks, and was occasionally employed as a stoker on board the Sir Francis Drake.  On Saturday evening he was about to go on board the steamer at Millbay-pier, and was going from the pier to the steamer by means of a ladder, when he fell upon the framing of the pier, a distance of about fifteen feet, where he lay with his legs and head under water.  A builder named Hardy, who assisted in getting the deceased up, stated that he was not in the water more than a minute, and that when he was rescued he was not dead, but although every effort was made to get him round he died within half an hour.  The wife of deceased said her husband was subject to giddiness and that she accompanied him as far as the pier on Saturday night, but did not see him fall, although she heard a splash in the water.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

PLYMOUTH - Drunkenness And Suicide. - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening respecting the death of ELIZABETH CARTER, aged 53 years.  A sad story was told by deceased's husband, HENRY CARTER.  He stated that he was a quarryman, and lived at West Hoe Cottages.  For the last fifteen years his wife had given way to intemperate habits, and during the past four months had been incessantly drunk.  She would pawn everything she could get to obtain drink, and would stop away from home for weeks together.  He had been in business two or three times, but his wife's habits had compelled him to give it up, for she had squandered over £700 in three years and a half.  During the past fortnight she had been in a desponding state, and had threatened to commit suicide by "making a hole in the water."  Her husband had tried to dissuade her from doing so, and told her to make herself comfortable in her house, but she would not remain in.  At half-past five o'clock on Saturday morning she came home drunk, and CARTER left her in the house at eight o'clock when he went to work.  He did not afterwards see her alive.  -  Thomas Noble stated that he was passing under the Hoe at about five o'clock yesterday morning and found the body of the deceased in the water near the men's bathing place.  The deceased's bonnet and slippers were lying near the edge of the water.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed herself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 May 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - The Tragedy At Devonport.  Conclusion Of The Inquest.  Verdict Of Wilful Murder.  -  The Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM FREDERICK BIRCH, aged 5 years, was yesterday resumed by Mr A. B. Bone, jun., Deputy Coroner for Devonport.  Mr T. C. Brian was present for the prosecution and Mr G. H. E. Rundle watched the case on behalf of the accused.  The depositions, which had already been taken, were read over to the witnesses, and Mrs Hancock, mother of the accused, added that she had frequently spoken to her daughter about the way in which she treated the deceased and the other children.  The boy, JOSEPH BIRCH, upon being questioned by the Coroner, stated that he saw his stepmother beat the deceased with a poker previous to his going to school on Wednesday morning last, but his sister Elizabeth, who was also called denied that he saw it, as the beating took place after he went to school.   -   The Coroner remarked that from the condition the deceased was in he should have thought it would have been more beneficial not to have removed it from the house, as it required rest and quietness.  -  Dr Rolston replied that when he was called to the house he knew very little about the case, and everything and everybody were in great confusion.  The child had been removed from the room in which it had been left, and as he did not see the bed it had previously been in, he did not know the condition the bedclothes were in.  The father was away, and as nobody was there who could pay proper attention to the child, he thought the best course to adopt would be to have it taken to the Hospital.  There was no immediate sign that the child was dying, and no apparent reason why it should not be removed.  If it had been one of his own children he should have removed it.  Dr Rolston remarked that there was an idea afloat to the effect that he was the family doctor, and that being influenced in the case, he wished to screen the woman.  This he wished to deny, as he knew nothing whatever of the family.   -   Thomas Edward Burns, one of the Devonport School Board officials, said that some time since it was reported to him that the boy JOSEPH BIRCH was absent from Morice Town Board School.  The accused told him that she could not get him to go to school, and that he would stop away from home for days together.  He saw the boy, and asked him why he absented himself from school  and he replied that two boys enticed him away.  He asked him if his stepmother ever ill-treated him, and he replied in the negative.  Witness afterwards saw the little girl, and she also denied ever having been beaten by the stepmother.  There were bruises upon her arms, and upon his asking her how they were inflicted, she stated that she fell whilst at school.  Mrs Slaney, sister of the accused, told him a few days ago that her sister behaved very badly to the deceased, and that as it made "a mess" the accused hit it in the head with her hand.  -  Mrs Slaney was called and denied that she told the last witness anything about her sister ill-treating the child.   -   The Coroner observed that it was a very material point as to the way in which the injury was inflicted, as to whether it was caused by a poker as sworn to by the two children, or by the hand as stated by Burns.   -   P.C. Landry proved that he was the first constable called to the house, and upon asking the stepmother how the deceased's face was so much swollen, she replied, "That she could not keep her hand from him."  He also stated that there were stains of blood upon the wall of the room in which the deceased was kept.   -   Mary Selfe said that she lived in the next room to that of the accused ELIZABETH BIRCH, and had given notice to leave the house in consequence of the disturbance caused by her beating the children.  She had never seen her beat them, but had told her to have more patience with deceased, as she believed it was delicate.  She had not seen the child since the middle of February.   -   JAMES BIRCH, aged 8 years, said he had seen his stepmother beat deceased with a poker.  She had beaten him with the same thing, and had kicked him in the chin.  The boy was not sworn, as the Coroner and Jury thought he was too young.   -   Mr Brian said that the deceased was found fearfully bruised and with a broken arm, and died whilst being removed to the Hospital.  The poker was then found with human hair upon it, and if the Jury were satisfied that the accused inflicted chastisement with the poker, they would be justified in bringing in a verdict of murder.  With respect to cases of trivial provocation, in which the party killing intended an injury of a less serious nature, the law provided "that the punishment must not be greatly disproportionate to the offence, and that much depends upon the nature of the instrument used and the manner in which the injury is inflicted.  If the chastisement be outrageous and the instrument such as was in its nature likely to endanger life, the party killing would be guilty of murder."   -   The Coroner, in summing up, said that the mode of punishment which the accused used was most improper.  A parent was at liberty to administer punishment, but not excessively, and if administered excessively, and death followed from the treatment, the accused would be guilty of manslaughter or murder.   -   The Jury, of whom Mr King was Foreman, after half an hour's consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ELIZABETH BIRCH.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 May 1875
DITTISHAM - Fatal Accident At Dittisham. - An Inquest was held at Dittisham on Tuesday evening by Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a child named HARRY WOTTON, aged 6 years, who had been drowned in a pond of dirty water.  -  Henry James Hodge said that about seven o'clock on Monday evening he was walking on the road towards Dittisham when a little boy told him that the deceased was drowning.  He ran towards the place, and in a field close by the village he saw deceased in a pond, in which the water was about six feet deep.  Witness could just reach him and he pulled him out and laid him on the bank, but he was then dead.  There were other small children by the pond when Sellers called him, but deceased was bigger than they were.  -  GEORGE WOTTON, a labourer, said he was the father of the deceased, and just before the accident sent him to a shop which was less than a stone's throw from the pond.  He had no reason to suppose that the deceased met with unfair play.  -  The Jury gave a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 21 May 1875
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held last evening at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, by Mr R. I. Bencraft, Coroner, touching the death of JAMES BLACKMORE, aged 63, an old and respected servant in the employ of Sir Arthur Chichester, who was knocked down and run over on Wednesday by a horse and cart in Boutport-street, Barnstaple.  Some portion of the head gear of the horse had got out of order, and deceased had unbuckled the chin strap so as to remove it, when the horse bolted.  Deceased stuck to the horse's head for about twenty yards, but it reared and plunged fearfully, throwing a man, named Barrow, out of the cart, and then set off at a pace which the deceased could not keep up with, and he was thrown down under the animal's feet receiving a kick on the temple, and the cart passed over the lower part of his body.  He was picked up in an insensible state and conveyed to the Infirmary, where he died in the course of the night from concussion of the brain and internal injuries.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Sad End Of A Sad Life.  -  Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening respecting the death of LOUISA BUDD, a woman of bad character.  It was stated in evidence that at nine o'clock on Wednesday evening she had some whiskey at the Dock Hotel, and told Eliza Matthews, the girl who served her, that that was the last time she would see her, as she intended to drown herself.  Previous to this she said a similar thing to two women named Rowe and Chaloner, and told Rowe that if she did not see her again that night she was to go to her (deceased's) daughter at Devonport, and say she was going to drown herself.  Rowe replied that this was foolishness, and paid no further heed, as she had heard her say a similar thing before.  -  A Mrs Reynolds, who keeps a house in Martin-street next to that in which the deceased lived, stated that BUDD had been for a long time ill and suffered from nervous depression, and about three months ago tried to strangle herself.  The body was seen yesterday morning floating in the water at Gill's Creek, Millbay Pier.  -  The Crooner said that this was the third case of drowning this week, and as he wanted to stop this sort of thing, he should, but for certain circumstances, have been inclined to direct the Jury to return a verdict of Felo de se.  It was an extraordinary thing that the three women who were told by the deceased that she was going to drown herself took no steps to prevent her.  -  Mr Anniss, of the metropolitan police, said that the deceased had of late given way to drink and had much altered in mind.  He did not think at times she had perfect control over her actions.  The Jury found that deceased committed Suicide whilst in Unsound Mind, and censured Rowe and Chaloner for not taking steps to prevent her committing suicide.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 May 1875
EXETER - A Fatal Cut. - Mr Hooper, Coroner for Exeter, held an Inquest on Friday evening touching the death of CHARLES WYATT, an assistant to a butcher.  On the previous Friday the deceased was cutting up a portion of a pig, when his knife slipped and cut his hand.  He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where the wound was attended to;  but the pain shortly afterwards extended to the whole arm, the sufferer became delirious and expired in a few days.  The Jury returned a verdict  of "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - Killed By A Train. - An Inquest was held at Yeoford, on Saturday, respecting the death of MR JOHN GOODWIN HUGHES, of Holsworthy, who was killed on Thursday evening in consequence of attempting to get into a railway carriage while the train was in motion.  It came out in evidence that Mr Hoyle, the station master, saw the danger to which the unfortunate man was exposed, and at the hazard of his own life, attempted by main force to drag MR HUGHES from his perilous position and nearly succeeded in doing so, but was compelled to let go his hold.  From the evidence adduced the Jury did not hesitate to return a verdict of "Accidental Death."  Mr Crosse, the Coroner, complimented Mr Hoyle, whose clothes were torn in endeavouring to save the deceased, on his brave conduct.  Mr Bromham, of Barnstaple, attended to watch the proceedings on the part of the relatives of the deceased, whose father, a retired surgeon, reside near Barnstaple.

BIDEFORD - The body of WILLIAM RADFORD, who had been missing from Bideford since the 15th inst., was found in the river above the bridge on Saturday.  It is supposed that the deceased, who was about 50 years of age, slipped from the fenders of the bridge whilst engaged in pocking mussels, and at the Inquest held by Dr Thompson, an Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 May 1875
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr E. Square, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of THOMAS BURT, aged 57 years.  -  SARAH BURT, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was a fisherman, and resided at 50 High-street.  For the last two years he had given way to intemperate habits.  On Thursday evening he returned home under the influence of liquor and from the following morning to the time of his death he complained of being unwell.  On Tuesday,, whilst going upstairs, he fell down, and died almost immediately.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 June 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - On the morning of the 4th of May an able seaman, named WILLIAM HELLINGS, fell into the water from the foretopsail yard of the Iron Duke, which was lying alongside the Devonport Dockyard, and in his descent struck against the anchor.  Two of the crew jumped into the water after him, but could not find him.  Yesterday morning Mr Wm. Farley, the master of a coal hulk, was going to his ship in a boat, and when near the dockyard he discovered deceased's  body, which was fearfully decomposed;  in fact, the head had been nearly eaten off.  On examination, it was found that the deceased's skull had been fractured.  The body was immediately conveyed to the Ferry House Inn,  Morice Town, and in the afternoon the Mayor of Saltash held an Inquest at which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 June 1875
EAST BUDLEIGH - Suspicious Death.  A Corpse Exhumed. - Mr Spencer Cox, the Coroner for East Devon, held an Inquest on Friday at East Budleigh on the body of SARAH KELLY, an aged lady, whose death occurred under peculiar circumstances.  The deceased and her husband, who were both more than 80 years of age, resided in the house of a grocer, named Algar;  and it is singular that they died within two days of each other, MRS KELLY on the 17th May, and her husband on the 19th.  MR KELLY was the owner of a little property, and after the funeral it transpired that his will had been made in favour of Mr Algar, who at first stated that the document had been made out by a Mr Baker, but afterwards admitted that he wrote it himself, but said he did so at the deceased's request.  The will bequeathed the property to MRS KELLY in case she should survive, and at her death the whole of it passed to Mr Algar. The deceased's relatives expressed great surprise when the existence of the will became known and determined to oppose it.  Another circumstance excited remark.  MR KELLY had been medically attended, but no assistance was procured for MRS KELLY, and at the funeral there was no certificate of the cause of death produced.  The vicar, Mr Adams, consented to bury the corpse on being assured by Algar that the Coroner had said an Inquest was unnecessary, and promising to produce a certificate the same evening.  On these facts becoming known painful rumours of foul play were set afloat.  So general became the scandal that the vicar wrote to the Coroner, who, in turn, communicated with the Secretary of State.  An order for the exhumation of the body was the result, and on Friday an Inquest was held upon it.  A post mortem examination, made by four medical gentlemen, revealed the fact that for so aged a person the organs of the body were remarkably healthy, and there were no symptoms whatever that poison had been administered.  The doctors attributed death to syncope.  From the evidence of Mr Algar and his wife, it appeared that the deceased had long been what they termed a "crazy woman."  her appetite was usually good, but the day previous to her death it failed.  Neither of them considered that death was so near, and they had intended to have called in a doctor on the day she died.  Algar's explanation with regard to the Will was that when MR and MRS KELLY came to live with him, in March 1874, he agreed to supply them with groceries, and lent the husband money when he required it;  and his account would shew that in this way he had advanced as much as £170.  In December last MR KELLY asked him how much he owed, and he told him "over £100," upon which deceased said that he must alter his Will in his (witness's) favour, for he could never repay him properly for his care and attention.  Witness made the Will at deceased's request, copying from an old document, which MR KELLY afterwards burnt.  There were two witnesses, but they did not know the contents of the Will.  -  Emanuel Johns, who volunteered his evidence, stated that about three weeks before MR KELLY'S death he paid him a visit.  witness sent out for some ale, and offered MRS KELLY a glass, but she refused it, saying, "I'm afraid there is poison in it."  -  The Jury, after a long consultation returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes," but desired that Algar should be censured for neglecting to call in a medical man.  The Inquiry lasted eight hours.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 June 1875
EXETER - Suspicious Case At Exeter. - An Open Verdict was returned at an Inquest held at Exeter on Saturday respecting the death of the newly-born child of SOPHIA SANDERS, a servant, in the employ of Mr Davies, draper. The girl appears to have been confined on Wednesday evening;  but although a servant who slept with her was suspicious, there was nothing sufficiently alarming for her to speak about the matter to her mistress until the Thursday.  When charged with having been confined, SANDERS stoutly denied it, and did so until the dead child was found hidden away in her box.  A post mortem examination shewed the child was born alive, and that death was probably caused by want of care.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 June 1875
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Plymouth  Tradesman. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall relative to the death of HENRY LEAR, aged 48 years, who carried on business as a tallow chandler in Whimple-street, Plymouth.  -  EDWIN CHARLES LEAR, son of the deceased, said that his father went to bed about eleven o'clock on Monday night.  At half-past six o'clock yesterday morning he heard his mother crying and he went to his father's bedroom, when his mother told him that his father was dying.  Witness looked into the bed and considered that his father was dead.  Since Friday last the deceased had complained of shortness of breath.  -  Mr W. P. H. Eales, surgeon, said that he saw the deceased casually on the previous day in his shop, and he told him that he had difficulty in breathing, and that he suffered through being so stout.  Witness considered that the deceased died from the fatty condition of his heart.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 June 1875
PLYMOUTH - Death Accelerated By Drink. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of GEORGE JACKSON, aged 65 years, who resided at Well-street.  Ellen Foale stated that she had known the deceased for several years.  A few weeks since his wife died, and since then he had drunk very freely.  Witness went into deceased's room on Tuesday morning and found him in great pain.  On Tuesday he drank a quantity of brandy, and in the evening he died.  Mr L. Lewis, surgeon, said that he visited the deceased on the previous evening, and found him lying on his left side nearly pulseless and discovered that he was suffering from a rupture of some standing.  Witness was told that the deceased had been drinking very heavily for about three weeks;  and that he had had two shillings' worth of brandy that day.  He considered that drink accelerated death.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from "Natural Causes, accelerated by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 June 1875
EGG BUCKLAND - Strange Fatality At  Laira.  -  Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Laira relative to the death of SARAH MARY HARRIS, aged 55 years.  John P. Were said that the deceased was his wife's step-mother and the wife of HENRY HARRIS, greengrocer, of Richmond-street, Plymouth.  She had for some time past been very nervous.  -  John T. Wallace, bargeman, stated that at about four o'clock yesterday morning he was walking over the embankment at Laira, when he saw the deceased lying upon the mud, face downwards.  He went to Plymouth and fetched Police-sergeant H. Hill.  -  Sergeant Hill said he found the deceased lying about two hundred yards from Arnold's Point.  On the embankment fifteen yards from this point there was an umbrella, which one of her relatives identified as being the property of the deceased.  -  Mary Ivey, residing at Friary-green, stated that the deceased visited her on Wednesday evening about a quarter before eight o'clock, when she was in very good spirits, and left at eight o'clock for Laira to see a Mrs Haythorn.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said he considered that the deceased did not commit suicide, as she had not taken off any portion of her clothes as was usually done by persons about to commit suicide by drowning.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 June 1875
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of ALFRED JAMES CHOPPING, the infant child of a private in the 11th Regiment.  The deceased, who was three months old, died in his mother's arms whilst she and the father were taking a walk together.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EGG BUCKLAND - Sudden Death Near Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at Knackersknowle yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN RADMORE.  The deceased was a labourer, 45 years of age, and was found lying in a field dead on Friday evening.  Two years ago he was tossed by a bull, and received serious internal injuries;  and since then he has complained of pain in his left side and palpitation of the heart.  Mr E. C. Langsford, surgeon, who had made an external examination of the body, stated that he found no marks of violence to account for death, and he was of opinion that RADMORE died from heart disease or aneurism.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 June 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide In A Charitable Institution. - An Inquiry was held at Stonehouse yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, with respect to the death of JOHN FITZE, 67 years of age, an inmate of the Home in St. Mary-street, established by the Little Sisters of the Poor.  The deceased was formerly a farmer at St. Dominick, but became reduced in circumstances and had to go into the Home about seven months ago.  On Monday he visited his daughter, and returned to the Home early in the evening and went to bed.  About midnight an inmate heard him go to the closet, and at four o'clock in the morning he was found there lying dead on the floor with his throat cut and a razor by his side.  A verdict of "Suicide whilst in Unsound Mind" was returned.  There are nearly seventy old men and women in the Home, and the Jurymen were taken through the Institution.  The inmates stated that they were happy there and had every comfort, and the Jurymen were so much pleased with their visit that they gave their fees to the reverend mother.

TOPSHAM - The Strange Fatality On The Exmouth Railway. - An Inquiry was held at Topsham yesterday by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, respecting the death of GEORGE RICHARDS, a guard on the London and South Western Railway, who was killed on the Exmouth line on Saturday night last.  In opening the Inquest the Coroner remarked that the deceased had evidently been killed by his head coming in contact with a bridge, whilst on the top of a railway carriage, but how he came in that position was a mystery.  The first witness called was Thomas May, a porter in the employ of the South-Western Railway Company, who stated that on Saturday night the deceased, who was employed as relieving guard, was in charge of the last down train to Exmouth. Witness and two other porters were in the van.  Shortly after entering on the Exmouth junction, and when about one mile from Exeter, deceased made an observation to the effect that he was going to see a young woman in another part of the train.  -  The Coroner told the witness to be careful, but he repeated the statement, and added that the deceased left the van and got out on the steps, and a few minutes afterwards he saw him on the roof of the carriage immediately in front.  -  The Coroner complained that May was giving his evidence in an unsatisfactory manner.  -  Witness added that as deceased did not return he applied the break, and, on approaching Topsham Station, took it off again.  He then heard someone calling for the guard, and on going in the direction of a first-class carriage, he was informed that there was a man on the roof of it.  This he afterwards ascertained to be the deceased, whose body was taken from the roof.  Life was then extinct.  There was blood on the side of the carriage from the roof of which RICHARDS'S remains were taken.  -  By the Coroner:  The carriages were all lit, as usual.  -  In reply to the Coroner, one of the railway officials present stated that the distance from the top of the carriages to the bridge was between three and four feet.  -  Mr Dormer, assistant superintendent at the Queen-street (Exeter) Railway Station, said that a person on the roof of a carriage could only look into a compartment by lifting the lamp, which would in all probability be perceived by the occupants.  It was most probable that if a person wished to look into a carriage from the roof he would lean over and peer into the window.  -  The Coroner asked the witness May whether he had not mistaken what the deceased said to him before leaving the van - whether deceased did not say that he was going to watch some persons?  -  Witness said he was sure he had made no mistake.  -  George Cridland, a third-class passenger by the train, said that just after passing Exmouth Junction he was looking at the shadows of the carriages, the moon at the time shining brightly.  He was in the second carriage from the engine, and he observed the shadow of a man crawling along the top of the carriage.  He saw the shadow move towards the engine, and shortly afterwards it returned to the rear of the train.  Immediately after the train had passed the Apple-lane Bridge he missed the figure, and saw it no more.  -  John Drew, another porter, who was riding in the guard's van with the deceased, stated that besides the deceased, the witness May, and himself, there were two other persons in the van - another porter and a young man with whom he was unacquainted.  When deceased left the van, the only remark witness heard him make was "I am going out;  I shall be back again in a minute."  Had he made any further observation the probability was that he should have heard it.   -  By the Coroner:  Did not know for what reason RICHARDS left the van.  Did not know if guards or other employees were in the habit of going on the roofs of the carriages to watch the occupants of them.  -  The Coroner (to the witness):  There is, indeed, a great mystery about this case, and some of you must know something more of deceased's leaving the carriage.  -  Witnesses were called who proved finding the deceased's cap near Apple-lane Bridge, and the removing of the body from the top of the carriage and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TEIGNMOUTH - The Death By Poisoning At Teignmouth. - As briefly stated yesterday, an Inquest was held at Teignmouth on Monday night by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a domestic servant, who had drunk sulphuric acid in mistake for cider.  The deceased, named ANN BURGOYNE, was 54 years of age, and was a servant to Mr S. L. R. Templer, architect.  Mr Templer being about to remove from one house to another, the deceased was engaged in unpacking some goods on Thursday last. She was told by Mr Templer not to go into a certain room, as he had some nicknacks there, but she went to the room, and feeling thirsty drank something from a bottle which she thought contained cider.  The liquid burned her mouth, however, and she threw the bottle on the table and stamped on the floor.  A clerk of Mr Templer came to her and said he would go for a doctor, but she cried and begged him not to do so, saying that she had not swallowed any portion of the liquid, but had merely burned her mouth with it.  The bottle contained sulphuric acid, and was labelled "poison," and on Mr Templer's return she told him that she had accidentally upset it.  She saw Mr Evans, chemist, and as she persisted in the statement that she had only burned her mouth and had not swallowed acid, Mr Evans gave her some oil and magnesia.  Deceased performed her duties until Monday morning, when she became alarmingly ill, and Mr McDonald, surgeon, was called in.  Her lips, tongue and throat were charred and, seeing that the case was hopeless, Mr McDonald gave the deceased some glycerine and water as a palliative.  She died in the course of the day;  and Mr McDonald stated at the Inquest that he thought she must have swallowed nearly a teaspoonful of the acid, and that she could not have recovered if she had had proper attention on Thursday.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 June 1875
MILTON ABBOT - Suicide At Milton Abbot. - A blacksmith named WILLIAM JACKMAN, 69 years of age, who resided at Milton Abbot, died at his residence on Monday last, in consequence of self-inflicted injuries to his throat and an Inquest on the remains was held yesterday afternoon, before Mr Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Frize was Foreman.  The evidence given shewed that deceased had for two months past been under the medical care of Mr Northey, in consequence of a carbuncle in the neck, and he was in a very low and desponding condition.  On the 5th inst., deceased was discovered in his bedroom, by a witness named Perry, with his throat cut;  a razor with which he had inflicted the wound, being found by his side.  Mr Northey was at once sent for, and attended to the wound, but the deceased gradually sank from its effects, until, as already stated, he died on Monday last.  Mr Northey was clearly of opinion that the deceased was in a state of Temporary Insanity when he cut his throat, and a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was returned.  The deceased, who was a bachelor, lived with a nephew, named BRIMACOMBE.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 June 1875
TOTNES - The Fatal Accident On The Dart. - An Inquest has been held at the residence of MR JELLEY, surgeon, Totnes, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, concerning the death of LEONARD ALFRED JELLEY, aged 11 years, who was drowned while bathing in the Dart on Wednesday afternoon.  A younger brother of the deceased, an intelligent little boy, who was not sworn, gave a very distinct account of the accident.  It appears that the spot in question was last year sanctioned by the Mayor as a bathing place for boys, and two posts were erected on the bank within which limits lads are supposed to confine themselves.  The spot, however, is very unsafe for boys not able to swim, as when the tide is high the water comes in over the grass, and they suddenly get from a depth of about two feet to a depth of six or seven feet, which occurred in the present case as the body was recovered in about seven feet of water.  The Jury brought this fact before the notice of the Coroner, and, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," requested him to communicate with the Town Council, and suggest that a proper gradient should be made at the spot in question.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 June 1875
BIDEFORD - An Inquiry was held yesterday by the Coroner for Bideford with respect to the death of a girl named JURY, 5 years old, whose dead body had been found in the Pill.  The deceased was seen playing near the place on Monday night, and it is thought that she fell  into the water and was drowned.  An Open Verdict was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident Through Drink. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, Plymouth, relative to the death of THOMAS WEST, a sailmaker, aged 24 years.  The deceased and a man named Jest were drinking together on Thursday from two o'clock in the afternoon to nearly eleven o'clock at night, and that from five to nearly eleven they were at the Nelson Arms, Coxside kept by a Mr Moses.  Just before eleven o'clock they rambled away from the beershop to a field known as Sparrow's field, and lay down, about fifteen feet from the edge of a precipice, seventy feet high.  During the night Jest awoke, but could not find the deceased, and after calling some time in vain, he made the best of his way home.  On Friday morning the deceased was found at the bottom of the precipice, very much injured, and he was removed to the Hospital, where he died.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death whilst in a state of Intoxication."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 June 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held at Stonehouse yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of the illegitimate son of ELIZABETH SMITH.  The child was 1 year and 9 months old, and during the temporary absence of its mother, it threw a saucepan of boiling water over itself.  Mr Leah, surgeon, examined the child after its death, and was of opinion that death was caused by diarrhoea, accelerated by the shock to the system caused by the scald.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 June 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At The Great Western Docks. - An Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, respecting the death of FRANCIS JOSLIN, coal lumper, aged 44 years.  The deceased was employed early yesterday morning in carrying coals from the steamship Camel, lying in the Great Western Docks, to a store close at hand.  The coal was hoisted in baskets from the hold by means of a donkey engine, and on reaching the deck was placed on men's shoulders and carried along a plank to the store.  There was no rest for the basket, and a man named Thomas Stevens stood on a plank to keep off and guide the baskets as they were hoisted from the hold.  Whilst this man and the deceased, who was returning from the shore, were on the plank, a basket came up too rapidly to be guided and striking the plank, turned it over, Stevens seized the chain attached to the basket and was hauled up several feet, whilst the deceased fell into the hold, and was severely injured about the head.  He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where Mr C. Gibbs, the house surgeon, found a large wound on the right side of the head.  He was of opinion that the base of the skull was fractured, and the deceased died in the course of three or four hours.  He was unconscious from the time of his admission until his death.  It was stated that the steamer left the port soon after the accident and SAMUEL JOSLIN, a cousin of the deceased, who was working near the place, stated, in answer to questions, that it was known that the vessel had to be cleared out as soon as possible, and that he was of opinion that the steam gear for hoisting was not suitable to the purpose.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", with a recommendation that more care should be observed and better appliances used for hoisting coal by steam from the holds of vessels.

Western Morning News,  Wednesday 30 June 1875
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Coxside. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, touching the death of JOHN WILLIAMS, a sawyer, for many years past in the employ of Messrs. Bayly and Fox.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased and another were cutting a piece of wood about five feet in length, on Saturday, when one of the pieces having been divided by the saw flew out with great velocity and smashed in the face of the deceased, inflicting frightful injuries.  Mr Gibbs, the resident surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated the efforts that had been made to save the man's life, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

An Inquest concerning the death of ADAM LYNN, a miner, aged 30, who was accidentally killed in Bedford Consols Mine while at work, was opened on Monday by Mr Rodd, the County Coroner, and adjourned until tomorrow.

ERMINGTON - Suicide Through Excessive Drinking. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the King's Arms Hotel, Ivybridge, yesterday morning, concerning the death of ANDREW LANDRICK, who committed suicide on Sunday afternoon.  -  The Coroner observed that the week previously the man had been drinking very hard, but from what he had heard he was not drunk on Saturday night when he went home to his house.  -  Johanna Battershill, of Woodland, Ermington, said the deceased was a journeyman mason, about 70 years of age, and lodged in her house.  On Sunday morning she saw him about half-past seven, when she gave him his breakfast in bed.  Deceased did not come down to dinner as usual, but said he could not eat any.  Witness went away by train in the afternoon, and on returning in the evening found him dead.  All last week he was drinking;  but the week previously he was at work.  On Saturday night he came home quite drunk about eleven o'clock.  The same morning he had asked witness for money for drink, which she refused, and he then said he had a good mind to drown himself.  Witness said she would knock his head off, and he replied that the devil had already taken it.  He also said the devils were jumping about inside him like a lot of old men and women.  -  Elizabeth Rendle, of Woodland, said that between four and five o'clock on Sunday evening she saw the deceased at Mrs Battershill's house hanging by a cord fastened to the latch of the door.  He was dead and lying with his stomach close to the ground.  He was very much addicted to drink, and when in drink was unconscious of his actions.  -  The Jury found that the deceased died while in a state of Temporary Insanity, brought on by excessive drinking.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 July 1875
TORQUAY - The Death By Drowning At Torquay. - An Inquest was held this morning by Mr H. Michelmore on the body of the man RICE, who was drowned on Thursday.  The only witnesses were Thomas Winser, foreman of the quarry at which deceased was a labourer, and the police-constable who assisted at recovering the body.  The former deposed that the deceased came on to work rather late yesterday morning.  He did not begin work, but sat down to eat his breakfast.  A short time after witness heard him cry out ,and went out to see what was the matter.  He saw deceased in the water, and just going down.  He threw him a rope, but it was no use;  he sank at once.  Deceased had undressed before he went into the water.  The deceased either could not swim or was seized with the cramp.  A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 July 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Boat Accident In Plymouth Sound.  -  Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of FREDERICK LOWE, aged 17 years, of H.M.S. Implacable, who was drowned about a month since through the capsizing of a boat in Plymouth Sound.  -  Dathan Hillier, sergeant of the Royal Marine boat, said that he found the body of the deceased floating between Admiral's Hard and Cremyll Beach on Saturday last, and brought it to the Admiral's Hard.  -  James Cowen, sailor boy on board H.M.S. Implacable, deposed that the deceased, who was a second-class boy, had been in his mess for twelve months.  On the 4th ult. witness, deceased, and three other boys hired a boat of Mr Bromley, Mount Wise, and went for a cruise in Plymouth Sound.  When they set sail there was hardly any wind up, and the deceased was steering.  The deceased went to the starboard side of the mainmast, and the boat immediately capsized on the starboard side.  Three of the boys caught hold of the boat, including the deceased, and the other two were swimming about.  The deceased let go the boat, asserting that he could swim, but before he had swam many strokes he suddenly disappeared.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said that the deceased met by his death through his own carelessness.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 July 1875
TAVISTOCK - Death By Drowning At Tavistock. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at Tavistock concerning the death of a lad named FREDERICK MINHINNICK, about 9 years of age, son of MR RICHARD MINHINNICK, mason.  Deceased, with several companions, was bathing in the Tavy, near Crowndale, on Monday afternoon.  His boot slipped into the water, and in attempting to reach it he got out of his depth.  His companions saw his danger, but instead of procuring help they became terror stricken and ran away, fearing to tell anyone of the accident.  Some hours afterwards the little fellow was found by a fisherman naked and quite dead floating on the water.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 July 1875
PLYMOUTH - Death By Violence Of A Plymouth Policeman. Magistrates And Coroners Inquiries.  Verdict Of Wilful Murder.  -  At the Plymouth Police Court yesterday, Henry Kitts, 22, navvy, was charged before Mr Wm. Luscomb (chairman), Mr J. B. Wilcocks, Mr A. Hingston, Mr W. F. Moore (the Mayor) and Mr Radford, with having caused the death of MR WM. BENNETT, a constable, whilst in the execution of his duty in Lower-lane. Prisoner walked with difficulty into the dock, and trembled violently all the time the case was proceeding.  He was accommodated with a seat in the dock.  The court was crowded.  Mr Luscombe told the prisoner that the charge was, in reality, one of wilful murder, as the officer was in the execution of his duty.   -   Susan Foster said she was a single woman, and lived in a downstairs room at 5 Lower-lane.  Prisoner had lived with her for about ten months.  He went to work on Thursday at a quarter to six in the morning and came to dinner at noon.  He went away again just before one o'clock, and witness had had no quarrel with him.  He came home again about four o'clock, when she was in the Napoleon Inn having a glass of ale, which had been given to her by a woman for whom she had scrubbed a room.  She had only been there two or three minutes when prisoner came in.  He asked her if she was coming home and she replied, "Yes;  I am only having a glass of ale, which was given me by a young woman."  Prisoner then went out and witness followed him.  When they got to their room, prisoner said she had no business in the public-house drinking, and shoved her in the shoulder.  He shoved her a second time and she fell, knocking her head against the bedpost, or else cutting it with some portions of plates which prisoner had thrown on the ground and broken.  She bled a little from the wound in her head. He never struck her, and he was not tipsy.  She called out to someone in the house, but they would not interfere.  Her sister, who was there, told the prisoner that he should not strike her, but should leave her if they could not live comfortably together.  He replied that she had no business to be drinking, as he maintained her.  Did not tell Superintendent Wreford that she fell against the fender.  She had only two glasses of ale, but not being accustomed to drink, lately it went up in her head.  She never called "murder," nor did she fetch the policeman, who came into the passage and went upstairs after prisoner.  At that time she was in the room, and then she went to the hospital.  She never spoke to the policeman;  she heard someone say that prisoner had gone into the garret, and heard someone outside say prisoner was ill-using her.   -   Mr Phillips (magistrate's clerk):  did you tell the Superintendent that you complained to the policeman that prisoner had been ill-using you?   -   Witness:  Did not remember that, but she would not swear she did not say it.  She told the Superintendent she had been ill-used.  She was very much hurried at the time, and did not know what she was doing.  She saw the policeman fall over the stairs, after hearing scuffling upstairs.   Never told the policeman that prisoner had threatened to murder her.  Did not remember telling Mr Wreford so, as prisoner never intended to murder her.  There was blood in her room and on her clothes, but not in the passage.  She insisted that she had told the whole truth, but the chairman told her she had prevaricated.   -   Prisoner, although informed that he could ask questions another time, said he must ask a few then.  He asked Foster, who was drunk, to come home from the Napoleon, and she said she would not.   -   Witness:  I was not drunk.   -  Prisoner:  Yes, you were.  -   Witness:  I was not.  Ask the landlord.   -  Prisoner said she told him she would come home when she had a mind to.   -  Witness:  I did not.   -  Prisoner:  it is a falsehood;  you did.  When I came home there was no fire, and nothing to eat.  I brought home money for her to buy food, as I always did when she asked me.   -   Witness said there was a fire in, and she had just scrubbed her room out.   -   Prisoner persisted that there was no fire and nothing to eat.  What he had for dinner had been given Foster, whose sister's children he had been looking after.   -  Witness:  It is not true.  The less you say the better.  -  Mr Luscombe:  He is asking you questions.  -   Witness:  He is telling falsehoods.   -  Prisoner:  This is not the first time she has been so.  I have tried her, coaxed her, and "walloped" her, but with no effect.   -  Witness:  He has ill-used me before.  Three months ago I was in the Hospital with two ribs broken, caused by his violence.   -  Prisoner remarked that he was drunk then.  She told him on the previous day that she would light the fire;  but she only put a few sticks in, and he had to light it again.  When he lit the fire he gave her 1s. 6d. to buy some food;  but she put the money down again, and would get nothing for him, although he had bought and cooked an egg, which she had eaten.   -  Witness denied all this, although she would not say prisoner had not put the money on the table without her noticing it.   -  Prisoner said that was all he had to say.  Witness had always been very bad to him;  and although he got a little home for her, it was all of no good.  -   Witness:  He did not get a home for me;  I had one when he first came.  -  Mary Williams, widow, living in the same house as prisoner, heard quarrelling between Kitts and Foster on Thursday evening, and she heard Foster say, "I will have him took up."  Foster went up to a policeman and said "I give him in charge;  she how he has cut me," pointing to the back of her head.  The policeman then came into the house, and went to the top of the house, over three pairs of stairs, in pursuit of prisoner.  They came down to the middle of the last flight of stairs, and then scuffled, both eventually falling to the landing outside her door.  The policeman was underneath, and she went to the window and called for assistance, saying "Or else there will be a murder."  A man named Harvey came up and separated them. Did not hear Foster call "Murder," but saw her fetch the policeman.  Did not fancy she was drunk;  believed Kitts was very sober.  Although passionate when drunk, he was at other times a quiet, inoffensive young man.   -   Thomas Harvey, shoemaker of 7 Lower-lane, heard a disturbance about seven o'clock on Thursday evening, and saw Kitts and Foster fighting outside their door.  They were separated and the woman, who was bleeding very much, said she would have Kitts taken up, and at once went to the deceased who had just come to the corner of the lane.  The deceased came to the house and went upstairs after prisoner.  Witness, hearing scuffling, went up over the stairs finding the constable lying on the landing with prisoner on top of him.  Witness hauled Kitts off, and told the policeman to get up, which he did, and all three then walked over the stairs.  The policeman when in the lane collared prisoner and witness laid hold of him on the other side.  They went a few steps and then prisoner laid down;  witness thinking he was going to kick out caught hold of him by the throat, but finding that he seemed to be in a fit undid his shirt collar.  he got up again and walked quietly until he got into St. Andrew-street, where he again laid down.  BENNETT said to witness, "You had better hold him down;" but prisoner said he would go quietly, upon which witness replied, "We will give you one chance more."  Prisoner replied, "All right;" and witness informed him if he came any tricks with him he would give him what he wanted.  He got up and walked four or five steps, when BENNETT said, "I am licked;  I cannot go any further."  Prisoner replied, "Go and sit down and I will go on quietly with Tom."  The constable went into a butcher's shop and witness took prisoner to the Guildhall, having the assistance of P.C. West.  When he went over the stairs he found the policeman jammed up against the wall, with prisoner upon him;  but he could not swear that the prisoner was kneeling on his stomach.  Prisoner was sober, whilst Foster had been drinking.    -   Frank Twitchell, keeper of the Swan Hotel, St. Andrew-street, took deceased into Mr Barratt's shop.  He turned very pale and gasped for breath.  He ran for some brandy and a Mr Thorne gave some to deceased, but on taking it he immediately vomited.  Witness unbuttoned his shirt and deceased said, "I am sinking, give me air!"  He died five minutes after he was brought into the shop.   -   Superintendent Wreford proved that deceased was a constable of the borough, and that he had a beat on Thursday in which Lower-lane was situated.  Witness charged prisoner with causing BENNETT'S death, and he said, "Is he dead?"  Witness replied "Yes!" upon which prisoner cried very much, and said, "Well, sir, we falled over the stairs both of us from the garret stairs;  it is all that woman's fault."  Witness afterwards went to the room occupied by Foster and prisoner and found a quantity of blood about. On the landing there were proofs of a scuffle having taken place, the plaster being knocked down and some of the woodwork broken.  -  Prisoner was then remanded until today, when the case will be completed.  The Inquest.  The Inquest was held last evening at the Guildhall.  There was a double Jury, of which Mr R. Monk was chosen Foreman.   Mr E. Square watched the case on behalf of the friends of the deceased. -  The Coroner, Mr Brian, explained to the Jury that it was an important point for them to consider whether the deceased was acting in the execution of his duty, and whether the accused knew that he was a police-constable, and was so acting.  He had asked the Mayor whether he could permit Kitts to be present at the Inquest to ask questions of the witnesses, and he had received the following answer:-  "Dear Sir, - I appear doubtful whether there is any authority but that of the Secretary of State to order the attendance of a man who is a prisoner on remand, at a Coroner's Inquest.  I trust that the ends of justice will not be interfered with by my not taking the responsibility of ordering the removal of the man Kitts from the borough prison today.  Yours truly, W. F. Moore, Mayor."   -   Susan Foster, the woman with whom Kitts has been living, was the first witness called.  She cried very much at the beginning of her evidence, and stated that when she returned home from the Napoleon Inn, Kitts complained of her going out for beer, and of there being no fire in.  She took a basin to get Kitts some potted fish, but he knocked the basin out of her hand, and told her that he would get his supper himself.  He then knocked her down and she called for a Mrs Glassby to come to her assistance, but Mrs Glassby said she would not interfere.  She did not remember falling on the fender.  Witness told Kitts that if he struck her again she would give him in charge.  She saw a policeman - the deceased - coming towards her door but she did not remember asking him to go into her house and take Kitts into custody.  Deceased went in because the people in the lane were calling out that Kitts was ill-using her.  The policeman went into her house and stood at the bottom of the stairs, and some person said that Kitts had gone upstairs.  The constable asked her what  Kitts had done to her, and she replied, "He has struck me and I will give him in charge;" and the police-constable immediately went upstairs.  She was crying at the time.  About two months ago Kitts threw her out of bed and broke two of her ribs.  She called out loudly when he was ill-using her.   -   Mary Williams gave similar evidence to that given by her before the magistrates, and, in reply to a Juryman, stated that Kitts must have thrown the constable over the stairs, or he would not have fallen.  -  Thomas Harvey, who came to the rescue of the deceased, was next examined, and then Thomas Kittle, a porter, residing at 3 Lower-lane, was called.  He said that he saw Foster throw some dung at Kitts, and just afterwards Kitts went indoors.  Foster's sister then told her to give Kitts in charge, and Foster went towards the deceased, and they both returned to the house together.  The police-constable went upstairs and soon afterwards he heard a woman call out, "For God's sake come in;  he is killing the police-constable."  Witness was about to enter the house, when he saw deceased jump over the last two or three stairs.  Kitts and Harvey came just behind him.  Kitts caught hold of the policeman, and about four or five yards from the door gave him a wrench, and threw him right over on his back, and then fell upon him.  Harvey picked up Kitts and witness picked up the deceased.  When deceased got up he turned two different colours, red and white.  Just afterwards Kitts felt exhausted and faint;  and witness unbuttoned his collar.   -  By the Foreman:  It was a very heavy fall;  Kitts threw the constable right over on his right shoulder.   -   Mr Wolferstan, surgeon, said that about half-past eight on Thursday evening he saw the deceased at the Guildhall.  He was quite dead.  He had made a post mortem examination.  There were no external marks of violence, but there was a good deal of after-death discolouration.  Deceased was a well-built and rather heavy man.  His internal organs were healthy, with the exception of his heart, which was large.  There was some degeneration of one set of valves, and of the blood vessel adjacent.  There was no injury of the skull.  Over the hinder part of the surface of the brain there was a considerable quantity of blood, sufficient to account for death.  He died from effusion of blood on the brain, which was probably caused by a fall.  It sometimes occurs naturally, but very rarely to a young man.  It was such an injury as would be caused by a fall from a stair-head on a hard substance;  a wooden substance would be the most probable, as the skull was not fractured.  The condition of the heart was not in any way connected with the death.   -   William R. Smale, a carpenter, residing at Ebrington-street, Plymouth, said that he saw the deceased in charge of Kitts, who was held by Bennett and Harvey.  The deceased, who was in a weak and faint condition, said, "I am done for;  I can go no further;" and Kitts then remarked to Harvey, "I will go quietly to the station with you, Tom."  The deceased was taken into a butcher's shop, and witness helped to place him on a chair and put his right hand under his head.  The deceased appeared to be in pain and witness asked him whether he had been kicked, and he replied, "No, no;  I am choking;  give me air."  Some gin was given to him, and he kept it in, and soon afterwards took a little brandy.  He appeared to be in a dying condition, and said, "I am a ruined man;  I am dying."  About ten minutes afterwards he died in witness's arms.  -  By the Coroner:  He was dressed in his uniform.   -   Supt. Wreford stated that the deceased had been in the force since November 1873.  it would be part of his duty to suppress an affray if he witnessed it.  If a person came to a police constable bleeding it was his duty to go and take the assailant in custody if it was desired.   -   Mr J. Eastlake, solicitor, said that he had been requested by the friends of Kitts to appear on his behalf, and he wished to know whether the Coroner would permit him to do so?  -  The Coroner:  I think it is rather out of order;   you ought to have spoken at the commencement of the Inquest.  -  Mr Eastlake:  Would the Jurors allow me to say a few words to them?  -  The Coroner:  Have you a written retainer from Kitts?   -   Mr Eastlake:  That's no odds of yours.  -  The Coroner:  I beg your pardon sir.  -  Upon the Jurymen stating that they thought the proceeding rather out of order, and that they did not want to have their time wasted, Mr Eastlake withdrew.   -   The Coroner, in summing up, said that there were three things to be considered.  1st, whether Kitts used violence towards the officer;  2nd, whether the officer was in the execution of his duty when he received such violence;  and 3rd, whether Kitts knew that the deceased was a police-officer.  If they thought that these points had been proved their verdict according to law must be wilful murder.  He was sorry that they should have had to hear such an amount of evidence in the absence of the prisoner.   -   The Jury after a short consultation returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 July 1875
TORQUAY - Popular Vengeance At Torquay. - A "scene" occurred at Torquay on Tuesday night.  A widow woman, named CROKER, having died somewhat suddenly on Monday afternoon, and it being reported that the man she cohabited with, named Buckpit, had been in the habit of ill-using her, an Inquest was held on Tuesday evening, lasting over five hours.  Although the medical evidence was clear as to the woman's death being due to natural causes, and although it was plainly shewn that there was not one mark of violence on the woman's body, nevertheless a crowd of women outside the Townhall, where the Inquest was held, came to an opposite conclusion and determined to wreak their vengeance on the man Buckpit.  At half-past ten, when the Jury concluded their Inquiry, Buckpit slipped out of the Townhall, with a pack of yelling hounds after him, made his way through the yard of the Union Hotel, and managed to reach his lodgings before the infuriated women could reach him.  The verdict of the Jury was that the woman died from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 July 1875
TORQUAY - The Fatal Gas Escape At Torquay. - The Inquest respecting the deaths of ANN MOGRIDGE and ALLEN MOGRIDGE, her granddaughter, aged thirteen years was held last evening, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, at Edenhurst, Torquay.  Mr Powell, surgeon ,said he was called by the police Sergt. Board to visit Edenhurst on Sunday afternoon, and having entered a bedroom by a ladder he saw two females lying on the bed.  The place was full of gas and he was obliged to leave.  The door was then forced open, and there was a rush of gas.  The females were side by side quite dead.  There were no marks of violence.  He attributed death to suffocation, caused by an escape of gas.  there was a small paraffin lamp in the room and some matches on a chest of drawers.   -   ELIZABETH MOGRIDGE, the daughter of the elder deceased, said her mother and daughter left Ellacombe at eleven on Saturday night to sleep at Edenhurst, which they were taking charge of for Mr Livingstone.  As they did not return home in the morning, witness went between ten and eleven to the house, but could get no answer, and then one of her lodgers named French, accompanied her with the like result.  On Saturday evening witness received the key of the back door from Mr Fouraker's son, a plumber.   -  Police-sergeant Board, stated that there was a rush of gas when the bedroom was burst open.  He sent for Mr Fouraker, the plumber, and Mr Manley, the house agent, and while they were there he found the end of a gas pipe unplugged, and from which the gas was escaping.  It was over the bed where the deceased lay.  No plug could be found in the room.  The elder deceased, in his opinion was not a woman likely to commit suicide.  He saw Mr Manley and Mr Fouraker go down and turn the gas off.  There were no indications that the pipe had been plugged.   -   Mr H. Manley, house agent, stated that Mr Bovey, painter and Mr Fouraker, gasfitter, had been employed by Mr Livingstone, the owner, to do sundry work, and witness had given instructions to the latter about making some alterations in and additions to the gas service.  No alteration whatever was made in the room where deceased slept.  the gas was cut off in the month of May, and it was again put on last Friday by his (witness's) order so that Mr Fouraker might try the joints.  He believed Mr Fouraker was present when the junction was made.  The new joints were tried in the presence of witness, and in some cases the flooring was raised, but there was no smell of gas.  The gas was kept on during the night to test the joints.  Every bracket was taken off to allow the painters to go to work, and the pipes were all plugged.  He did not examine the deceased's room because he could not get in.  -  Robert Norcombe, in Mr Fouraker's service, deposed to having taken down the brackets and pendant two months ago, and plugged the end of the pipe.  He asserted that he remembered perfectly plugging the pipe end in the deceased's bedroom.   -   Mr James Fouraker said he knew that the gas was connected on Saturday, and witness with Mr Manley went through the various rooms to try whether it was on.  It was not on and the gas man was sent for and he found that there was no gas going through the meter.  After some water had been poured off the gas came on.  The only bracket not examined was that in deceased's room.  Witness tried the door twice during the week but it was locked, and as brass caps were put on other places where ordered, he concluded that to this pipe, which was also to have a brass cap, the cap had been fitted.  He saw the elder deceased on Saturday and asked for the key of the house to examine the pipes, telling her to be careful because the gas would be on until Monday morning.  He said nothing about her own room because he believed it was all right.  Considered that the plug might have been removed by a blow in making the bed.   -   The Coroner, having reviewed the evidence, said that whatever might have been the cause of the escape there had been no criminal intention, and the only question was whether there had been any negligence.   -   The Jury came to the conclusion that the deceased died from inhaling gas, and they thought there was carelessness on the part of Mr Fouraker in not making a particular examination of this room.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Brunswick Inn, Plymouth, concerning the death of GEORGE HATHERLEY, aged 15, who was in the habit of getting a living by cleansing and selling fish.  -  The Coroner said he had ordered the Inquest so that if the Jury thought a post mortem examination necessary it might be made.  -  ELIZA HATHERLEY, of Castle-street, mother of the deceased, said the boy was healthy, but was affected a little on the chest.  He was out hawking on Friday.  He left home about nine o'clock in the morning and had breakfast before he went.  She saw him again at half-past three, when she gave him threepence to get some dinner.  He came home between five and six, complaining of being sick.  He went to bed and fell asleep.  He vomited three times, but slept soundly until late the next morning, and then drank three cups of tea.  At half-past eleven witness saw him lying with his head against the wall, and told him to move his head to the pillow.  She spoke to him, but he did not answer, and died within a quarter of an hour afterwards.  At half-past eleven witness sent for a doctor - Mr Eccles - but no one came until Mr Meeres arrived, just after the boy had died.  He then fetched another doctor.  Deceased was in a death club.  -  Thomas Fry who worked with the father of the boy, said he was with the deceased all day on Friday.  he seemed hearty and well in the morning.  He saw him go into an eating-house in the afternoon after his mother had given him threepence and he afterwards had apples and gooseberries.  Deceased complained in King-street that he was sick and vomited considerably.  He walked home by himself and witness never saw him after.  -  Evidence was given shewing that it was possible the deceased might have had conger at the eating-house on Friday afternoon, and also that he had been out until three o'clock on Friday morning.  The doctor told the parents he thought the boy died from English cholera.  -  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.  The Jury did not think a post mortem examination necessary.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 July 1875
PLYMOUTH - A Fatal Fall. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, relative to the death of JOHN WHITE, porter, aged 71 years.  The deceased was engaged on board the smack Intrepid, now lying at the Barbican, Plymouth, and on the previous evening, as the deceased was leaving the smack, and passing up the ladder which communicated between the vessel and the shore, he fell on the deck and received injuries to the back of the head.  When he was picked up he was sensible, but before he arrived at the South Devon Hospital he became insensible, and remained so until he died, about an hour after his admission.  Upon being examined by the house surgeon, Mr C. Gibbs, it was discovered that he had received severe injuries to the back of the head and neck;  and there was  severe wound at the back of the ear, from which a quantity of blood flowed.  The deceased had, at times, complained of giddiness in the head.  At the time of the accident the deceased was perfectly sober.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 August 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Inquest respecting the death of JOHN STOCKLEY, petty officer of the Swiftsure, who died from injury received at Keyham, was opened at Stonehouse on Saturday when the body was formally identified by Commander H. G. Andoe, and the Inquiry was adjourned until today.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Gig Accident. - Mr Thompson, Coroner for Bideford, held an Inquiry on Saturday respecting the death of RICHARD COX, aged 69 years.  The deceased was a herbalist and was well-known in North-West Devon, but he resided principally at Launceston.  He had been visiting Bideford, whence he had driven with his wife to Shebbear and was driving over Torrington Common on the return journey when the horse fell and he and his wife were thrown from the conveyance.  MRS COX was unhurt, but her husband complained of great pain in his arm and shoulder.  He, however, drove back to Bideford and the next morning sent for a medical man, but the arm and shoulder were then so much swollen that they could not be examined.  Mortification afterwards sent in and from this he died.  -  Mr E. Rouse, surgeon, stated that he examined the arm after death and found a frightful fracture.  The bone was broken two inches above the elbow as if cut through with a saw.  He believed that if a medical man had been sent for sooner the deceased's life might have been saved.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 August 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse relative to the death of CONSTANCE HOSKIN THOMAS, aged 55 years.  MARY SKINNER, lodging-house keeper, Emma Place, Stonehouse, stated that the deceased, who was her sister came from London on Tuesday last on a visit.  She was very fatigued and upon going upstairs she mistook the turning and fell over a flight of stairs.  Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that on Wednesday morning last he visited the deceased and found her suffering from a lacerated wound on the left side of the head, but discovered no injury to the skull.  Concussion of the brain had been caused by the fall.  She remained under his treatment up to Monday morning when she died.  Death was caused by concussion of the brain and shock to the system.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News,  Friday 6 August 1875
SALTASH - Mysterious Death At Devonport. - At Saltash yesterday, the Mayor opened an Inquest respecting the death of an elderly woman whose body had been found floating in Hamoaze.  Jane Ann Goodman stated that between five and six o'clock yesterday morning she was in a boat off Northcorner, and saw the body of the deceased floating in the water.  It was dressed in a dark frock and a spotted jacket.  She believed that the deceased was between 50 and 60 years of age, and did not think that the body had been in the water longer than eight or ten hours.  -  P.C. Sutton said the body was handed over to him at Northcorner.  He had not searched her clothes, but he found upon deceased's left hand two gold rings, one of which was a keeper.  He also found a steel brooch and a pair of sleeve links.  -  The Jury thought it advisable that the Inquiry should be adjourned until today in order that the clothes might be searched, and that a post mortem examination might be held as there were several bruises on the body.  -  In the evening the clothes were taken off, and the name of "LETITIA JAMES" was found marked upon a white piece of tape on a flannel vest.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 August 1875
SALTASH - The Mysterious Death At Devonport.  -  The adjourned Inquest respecting the death of LETITIA JAMES, who was picked up drowned in the Hamoaze was held at Saltash yesterday, before the Mayor (Mr J. Martyn).  -  John Lower Clark, surgeon, said he had examined the body, with the view of ascertaining whether there was any external injury or evidence of violence.  He found none.  there were all the signs and indications of drowning and he apprehended her death arose from that cause.  Believing this firmly he had not made any internal examination, as the external marks indicated the cause of death but too plainly.  He had had the opinion of a medical friend who concurred in his view, after he had personally made an examination.  The Jury could still have what was called a post mortem examination if they liked, but he thought it unnecessary. A Juror said that when he saw the body the day before there were some slight bruises about the neck and chest.  -  Mr Clark said he was positive there were no marks of violence on the body.  There were a few faint marks which were probably caused in the water after death.  They were not unusual on the bodies of drowned persons.  He saw the name of the woman written in ink on her flannel vest.  -  SAMUEL HOSKYN, a marine pensioner living at Stonehouse, identified deceased as his sister.  He last saw her about 18 months ago.  She belonged to Boscastle, but he did not know where she had been living since he had last seen her.  He was not aware she was in the neighbourhood until he heard that her body was picked up.  Deceased was 54 years of age and had two sons, with whom, however, she was not friendly.  Her husband, who had been a captain of a vessel and resided at Boscastle, died about two years ago.  Witness did not know deceased was affected in her mind, or that she was in indigent circumstances.  The Inquest was adjourned until Thursday next to get further information.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 August 1875
SALTASH  - An unexplained Fatality. - At the adjourned Inquest, held at Saltash yesterday, respecting the death of MRS LETITIA JAMES, Mr Brown, of a temperance hotel at Plymouth, and Mr Stevens, ship-broker, Plymouth, threw some light on the deceased's whereabouts on the day previous to her dead body being found;  but how, or by what means, she came into the water there was no evidence to shew.  Mr Stevens, who was present on behalf of CAPTAIN JAMES, son of the deceased, stated that about two years ago MRS JAMES was possessed of "2,000 but what had become of the money no one at present could tell.   The deceased complained of having a bad face the last time she slept at the temperance hotel, and seemed to be a little nervous about it;  but whether that made her so despondent as to lead her to commit suicide, there was no evidence to offer.  A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 August 1875
BISHOPSTEIGNTON - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Bishopsteignton yesterday respecting the death of JOHN EARLY, aged 17, the son of a labourer.  Whilst bathing with a companion in the Teign on Saturday evening the deceased was carried out of his depth and drowned.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DITTISHAM - Drowned In The Dart. - An Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a boy named WM. JOHN HEATH, aged 10 years, the son of a widow living at Dittisham.  On Sunday evening the deceased was bathing in a mud creek of the Dart, at a place called Lane Scott, and got out of his depth.  A boy named Wallis swam to his assistance, but the poor lad was drowned.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 August 1875
EXETER - The Inquest on the body of the young woman BIDDER who drowned herself in the Exe at Salmon Pool was held yesterday and resulted in a verdict of Temporary Insanity.  The deceased's father stated that his daughter's self-accusation of leading an immoral life was groundless.

PLYMOUTH - Singular Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday concerning the death of HENRY WITHERIDGE, aged 53 years.  -  George Cowel, lime-burner, stated that the deceased was a carpenter, and was working upon the roof of a limekiln in Cambridge-street on Tuesday afternoon.  Witness was engaged in burning limestone in the kiln and during the time deceased was on the roof there was a little vapour arising from the fire.  About half-past five the deceased asked witness to hand him a ladder, which he did, and about twenty minutes afterwards the deceased was found lying on the ground, having fallen from the roof, a distance of about twenty-five feet.  -  MARY ANN WITHERIDGE, wife of the deceased, proved that her husband complained to her on Tuesday morning that "the dust and heat arising from the kiln had almost roasted him."  -  Mr C. Gibbs, surgeon, stated that when the deceased was admitted into the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on Tuesday evening he was insensible, and remained so until the following day, when he died.  Witness examined deceased when he was admitted, and found a contused wound in the back of the head.  He attributed death to either apoplexy, or poisoning from carbonic acid, and not to the fall, as he believed the fall was caused by deceased being overcome by inhaling the fumes.  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

YEOVIL -  Strange Suicide Of A Barnstaple Gentleman [Special Telegram.].  Yeovil, Thursday Night.  - An Inquest has been held here this evening before Dr Roybrants on the body of MR HENRY TURBERVILLE, of Barnstaple, a gentleman of independent means.  Deceased, who was about 50 years of age, has been paying his addresses to a young lady living in Yeovil, and has frequently visited the town, recently staying at the Chough's Hotel.  On Tuesday he was ill, and Dr Aldridge was called in, as deceased was suffering intense pain.  Chloric chloroform was sent for.  While the doctor stepped outside the bedroom door to speak to the messenger on his return, deceased took about a drachm and a half of cyanide of potassium, which he had hidden under his pillow.  He told Dr Aldridge what he had done, and a powerful emetic was at once administered, but before it could take effect sufficient poison had been absorbed to cause speedy death.  The Inquiry was adjourned for a post mortem examination.  It is said that deceased has left several thousand pounds to the young lady referred to, and a considerable sum to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 August 1875
YEOVIL - The Strange Suicide AT Yeovil. - MR HENRY TURBERVILLE, otherwise HENRY JOHN BLACKMORE, who committed suicide at Chough's Hotel, Yeovil, was a man of very eccentric habits, and for some time lived at Braddiford, near Barnstaple.  He was a son of the REV. JOHN BLACKMORE, formerly rector of Ashford, near Barnstaple, and a brother of MR R. D. BLACKMORE, barrister, of London, the author of "Lorna Doone," an Exmoor tale.  MR TURBERVILLE was himself the author of some poems, also of some doggerel verses respecting various parish matters at Pilton.  Deceased was much annoyed on the death of his father about fifteen years ago at receiving only a life interest in a sum of money, although ample for his maintenance.  He lived in the greatest of estrangement from the other members of his family, and assumed the name of TURBERVILLE in consequence.  It is believed that he could not have died possessed of the money that he is alleged to have disposed of.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 September 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Ivybridge. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Plymouth Guildhall, relative to the death of JOHN ROBERTS, labourer, aged 74 years, who was employed at the Ivybridge Paper Mills, and who died in consequence of his arm being crushed in one of the machines.  He was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died from mortification.  Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 September 1875
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of an illegitimate child, aged two months, named ERNEST COCKS, found dead in bed by its mother on Monday morning.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 September 1875
SALCOMBE REGIS - The Fatal Boat Accident Off Salcombe. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Salcombe on Thursday, respecting the death of WILLIAM PUTT, who was drowned by the sinking of a boat whilst he was fishing.  Wm. T. Pope, a fisherman, stated that he saw the deceased outside the Bar, sailing in towards the harbour, with a line in tow.  The wind was fresh and very squally, and the deceased had a fore and mainsail set.  His boat being faster than that of MR PUTT'S, witness pushed him, but some time after he heard the deceased shouting, and on looking round, saw the boat on her side, with her gunwale just out of the water.  The deceased appeared to be standing up and holding on to the side of the boat.  Witness could not get to the deceased in time to render assistance, and the boat went down.  -  John Osborn said that Pope informed him of the accident, and he went out to see for the deceased, and found the sprit of the sunken boat shewing just above the water.  On looking down he saw the deceased sitting in the stern of the boat, and he then took a  gaff and caught him by the arm, lifted him up, and took him into his boat;  life was extinct.  -  Wm. Cook stated that he got the boat up and found the sheet made fast, and that it would have taken some seconds to unfasten it.  The boat belonged to witness's brother and was almost new.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 September 1875
BARNSTAPLE - The body of the young man, BOYLE, who was drowned at Barnstaple on Thursday last through the capsizing of a boat, was recovered on Sunday about 250 yards from where the accident took place.  At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 September 1875
TOTNES - The Suspicious Death At Totnes. - An Inquest was opened yesterday at Totnes by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of WILLIAM COMER, whose body was found in the Dart on Sunday.  The first witness called was Ann Foot, with whom the deceased had been lodging.  She last saw him alive on Friday afternoon, when he told her he was going to the races.  Deceased was in the habit of getting drunk;  he was also subject to fits.  She had seen him shake dreadfully, but had never seen him fall down in a fit.  He was a very quiet man.  He had been working on the railway at Hempston Quarry, but was turned off his work a week ago.  He had told her he was very sorry to be disgraced and turned off his work by means of the drink, and he must do better in the future.  Deceased had had other work since.  -  Charles Young, who described himself as a professor of legerdemain, residing at Horse Ferry-road, Westminster, said he attended Totnes Races and knew the deceased.  He was walking with George Gepson on Sunday afternoon by the bank of the River Dart.  The tide was very low, and they were looking for fish, when they saw the body of a man in the water.  The water was so low it scarcely covered it.  He sent Gepson for the superintendent of police, who was soon on the spot, and witness assisted in getting the body out of the water.  When it was taken out he identified it as that of deceased, whom he had known as "Sailor Bill."  He did not see the deceased on the course at all this year.  -  James Powell, of St. Stephens-by-Saltash, stated that the deceased was his brother-in-law.  He had formerly been a sailor, and was on board H.M.S. Galatea, but was invalided home from the Cape.  A brother of the deceased, also from Saltash, was present, but being subject to heart disease, he was advised not to see the body.  The Inquiry was adjourned until Friday for the production of further evidence.  It is stated that the deceased was seen on the race course at half-past ten on Friday night.  

Western Morning News, Friday 10 September 1875
YEOVIL - Strange Suicide At Yeovil.  [Special Telegram.]  Yeovil, Thursday Night. - At Yeovil yesterday the Inquiry into the death of MR HENRY TURBERVILLE was resumed.  The deceased, who committed suicide at the Choughs Hotel, was about 50 years of age, and resided near Barnstaple.  He travelled a good deal, and while staying at the Choughs Hotel a few months ago he was fascinated by a fair Yeovillian.   He proposed and was accepted, and he thereupon executed a Will in her favour, leaving her about £19,000, and naming her father who was the custodian of the document) sole executor.  On the 17th ult. MR TURBERVILLE took about a drachm and a half of cyanide of potassium.  Whilst ill in bed at the Choughs Hotel a medical man, who had been called in, saw him almost immediately afterwards, and judging from appearances thought the deceased had taken poison.  He charged him with so doing.  He confessed at once and said he fully intended to commit suicide.  When asked how he obtained the poison he declined to tell, but said he had carried it about with him for a considerable time.  An Inquest was opened on the 18th ult., when evidence was taken as to the defendant's eccentricities and illness.  An adjournment was granted in order that a post mortem examination might be made, and when the Jury met again on Monday, the 30th ult., they were informed that the stomach of the deceased had been sent to London for analysis, and an adjournment until today was agreed upon.  -  The first witness called was Dr Aldridge, of Yeovil, who described deceased's symptoms and treatment.  -  Professor Bernade, of St. Thomas's Hospital, London, produced a lengthy analysis of the stomach, and gave it as his opinion that death did not result from the cyanide of potassium.  -  Dr Wells, of Crewkerne, gave an outline of the result of the post mortem examination, and Mr McMaggs, chemist, Yeovil, stated what medicines deceased had ordered at his shop.  The verdict of the Jury, which was delivered at about ten at night, was "That death resulted from deceased having, while in an Unsound State of Mind, taking cyanide of potassium, thereby increasing previous exhaustion, which resulted in death."  -  Deceased is a brother of MR R. D. BLACKMORE, author of "Lorna Doone," and had changed his name in consequence of family disagreements.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 September 1875
TOTNES - The Supposed Murder At Totnes. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM COMER, whose body was picked up in the water on Sunday last, was resumed yesterday at the Guildhall by Mr Hy. Michelmore, the County Coroner.  John William Peters, labourer, Littlehempston, said he saw the deceased in a drinking booth from about seven p.m. on Tuesday, the 3rd, inst., the second day of the races.  He did not appear to be sober.  Deceased was very quiet if kept without drink, but was occasionally a little wranglesome when in drink.  Had seen deceased in a fit;  he would first be taken quite [?], and then turn black in the face and fall down.  When down he would be quite quiet;  sometimes he would [?] half an hour, and sometimes more, before he got [?].  He would not have the fits so bad when sober as when he had had drink.  -  Mary Ann Helms, wife of the landlord of the Steam Packet Inn, Totnes, said she had a booth at the Totnes racecourse, and on Friday night she served the deceased and a labouring man who was in his company with a  glass of beer each, for which deceased paid.  It was about nine o'clock, and the two left the booth together.  Saw no marks nor blood on his face.  William Ash, mason, said he saw deceased in the booth talking with two other men.  One was dressed like a railway porter, another was dressed in black.  Anyone leaving the booth in the dark might walk into the lake if they took the wrong turning.  Several people fell in during the evening.  The depth of water was about three feet.  -  William Harris, a ganger on the South Devon Railway, stated that he saw the deceased on the [?] afternoon, between 12 and 1 o'clock, in the road near the railway station.  Deceased was waiting to be paid the money due to him from the Railway Company. He had been discharged for intemperance.  His coat was very dirty behind and witness called his attention to it;  whereupon deceased said he knew it.  When he turned round he saw that he had a heavy blow over the left eye and blood was oozing from the blow, which extended towards the ear.  Blood was also oozing from the left ear, and from a place near it. Deceased said he had had a fall and knocked his head in the fall.  Witness thought that about £1 5s. 9d. was coming to the deceased.  Zerina [?], wife of an engine driver, living at Globe Cottage, Totnes, said she saw the deceased fall down outside her door between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the morning of the 3rd instant.  He lay perfectly still for  about ten minutes, when two men who were passing picked him up, and sat him on the wall of the garden.  Saw no trace of injury upon him.  He lit his pipe while sitting on the wall, and then got up and walked away.  Mrs Foot, recalled, stated that the deceased came home to dinner about one o'clock;  he had no cut or bruise then.  -  John Hains, surgeon, stated that he made a post mortem examination, assisted by Mr Wallis and Mr Hains, his son.  He found a contused lacerated wound under the left ear, and there was considerable haemorrhage from this.  The countenance was livid, which arose from gra[?]. There were two slight lacerated wounds over the external surface of the right orbit, and three slight lacerated wounds over the right cheek, and one of the front teeth had been broken off quite recently.  No water was coming out of the mouth and nostrils.  On removing the scalp he found a clot of blood over the right orbit and all the vessels of that part of the scalp were distended,.  There was great effusion of blood under the scalp over the left temporal region.  On the removal of the top of the skull he found the membrane thicker and rather paler than they ought to be, and a long fracture extending through the temporal bone, and through part of the parietal bone extending into the occipital.  The heart was larger than usual.  There was no water in the stomach.  The lungs were congested and gorged with blood and there was no appearance of water or frothy matter in the lungs or bronchial tubes.  -  The Coroner:  If he had died of drowning there would have been water in the bronchial tubes?  -  Mr Hains:  Certainly.  -  Q.:  Was it such a fracture as would have occurred by a fall?  Witness did not think so.  He believed that death was instantaneous and that the cause of death was injury to the skull.  The features were placid, which would not have been the case if he had struggled, or if he had died from a blow in a fit. The wound was quite different to what it would have been if he had fallen on a stone;  it was as perfectly round as if made with a pair of compasses.  -  The Coroner remarked that if the deceased had fallen into the water on the racecourse the body must have passed through the trips before coming down to the spot where it was found.  Was it likely, he asked that the blows were caused by going through the trips.  -  Mr Hains replied certainly not. The small blows on the cheeks were probably caused after death by coming against stones or something else, but the other blows were inflicted before death.  By a Juror:  He did not think a man's fist could have caused the blows behind the hear.  He believed it was inflicted by some heavy instrument.   -   The Coroner said the superintendent had stated that there was no further evidence to be adduced and he should not be doing his duty if he closed the Inquiry at this stage, for there appeared to be no doubt that the poor fellow had been murdered.  The evidence also had been very contradictory, and they must try to get the railway porter and the other man who had been seen with him in the booth, and also the men who picked him up in the road in order to find out whether or not he had received the injuries stated by Harris in his evidence.  -  The Inquiry was then adjourned to the 24th instant.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 September 1875
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of an old woman named CLARK.  It transpired that she occupied a room in a house in Prospect-street, and was 75 years of age.  She was of very eccentric habits, and had been unwell for some time past.  On Wednesday last, as she was not heard moving about in her room the door was opened, and she was found quite dead in her chair.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 September 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Disaster In Hamoaze.  Coroner's Inquiry.  -  An Inquest was held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, last evening, by Mr R. Sleman, Deputy County Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOB HITCHCOCK, private in the Royal Marines, one of the ten men drowned in Hamoaze by the sinking of a wheel-boat on Thursday evening last.  -  William Easton, a naval pensioner and fisherman, residing at Saltash, said he was below Cremyll fishing on Sunday evening, and shot a seine about sixty fathoms from shore;  and when the seine was hauled ashore, the body of the deceased was found in it.  He took the body in a boat, and carried it to the Admiral's Hard, at Stonehouse.  If he had found the body further up the river he should have taken it to Saltash.  He shot the seine at nine o'clock, and found the body at half-past.  The body was very close to the spot where the accident occurred.   -   Benjamin Tucker, a colour-sergeant of the Royal Marines, identified the body.  -  Charles George, a staff-sergeant in the Marines said he was in the boat when she left Cremyll on the evening of the 9th inst.  Shortly after she left the beach he noticed water coming in over the stern.  They were then from forty to fifty yards from the land  The corporal in charge of the boat - Corporal Furness - saw it too, and asked that the washboard might be passed him, so that he might ship it, and prevent the water from coming in.  The washboard could not be found.  He was aware that officers sometimes used this boat in other parts than between Stonehouse and Cremyll;  on this occasion they had superior boats - cutters.  -  The Coroner:  If the Government provide boats that are not fit for officers they are not fit for men.  -  Witness said he did not make any imputation concerning the seaworthiness of the boat.  There were sixty-six men he was told, in the boat, which would carry more than that, but besides the men there was a lot of luggage.  -  The Coroner said the evidence of Mr George had startled him.  It was not like an ordinary boat;  it was one that the officers did not care to go in, in that part of the water, and yet there were sixty-six men and a large amount of luggage in the boat.  -  A Juror:  Is it not usual for a commissioned officer to be in the boat?  -  A.:  No.  -  The Coroner remarked that they would come to that when they came to Corporal Furness, and would know whether he was a competent officer to manage the boat.   -    A Juror:  Is it usual to have a commissioned officer in the boat?  Witness did not know that it was.  -  The Coroner said there was something that Corporal Furness thought he could get the water out with, but that could not be found.  There was certainly fault somewhere.  -  A Juror:  Ought not the washboard to have been put in place before leaving?  -  Witness said he did not know.  He was the last to jump in the boat, and had been there only five minutes when she sank.  He considered the boat was as seaworthy as any other of the divisional boats.  Corporal Furness was the responsible man.  -  A Juror:  Did you try to put her about?  -  Witness replied they did try, but had they tried to back her they would have run her aground.  The boat was made to carry a certain weight.  -  The Coroner said there appeared to be an immense amount of luggage beside the men.  -  Witness believed the boat was registered to carry ten tons.  It had been said that there was confusion on board, but this was untrue, as the men were perfectly orderly and there was no confusion of any sort.   -   John Harris, a private, and one of the party, said he did not observe that the boat was over-loaded, nor did he hear anyone complain that it was.  -  Thomas Furness, a corporal in the Marines, said he was put in command of the boat's crew by the Commandant.  There were tables, chairs, a wagon, tents, and men in the boat.  He did not know how many men he took over from Stonehouse.  When they started to come back he thought they had forty-five men in the boat, but he now believed there were more there.  He could not get the washboard, because, he believed, it was jammed under a wagon, but he did not think that would have kept the water out.  According to Colonel Gwyn's statement the boat had had 100 men and four horses in her.   -   A Juror:  How can anyone tell whether the boat was overloaded when she was loaded aground?  -  Witness said no one could. He had had charge of this boat for three years.  He could not reject any men who were coming into the boat if a non-commissioned officer ordered them in.  He had heard the boat was of nine tons burthen.  The boat went in the Dockyard once a year to be overhauled.  -  A Juror:  How can you account for the water coming in on this occasion?  -  Witness said he had to push off the boat from shore, and he could not tell the trim of the boat until he got her afloat.  He had to get thirty yards out before the rudder could go down, and when he looked round he thought the boat too heavy a stern, and called out for the men to go forward, and put the boat round at the same time.  He had never known officers go in the boat with the men.  -  A Juror:  Is the boat dangerous?  -  Witness:  It is a very dangerous boat.  No one can handle her unless he has had a deal of practice.  If we had been caught in a squall we might have been driven down to the shore.  If the wind caught the stern of the boat it would turn her round unless she was carefully managed.  -  A Juror said he should like the Commandant to be present.  He might send a thousand men on board and Furness, being a corporal, could not refuse their coming.  -  The Coroner said Furness might explain it away as he liked by his nautical terms, but the fact stood that the boat was dangerous.  There was another fact - that no one was responsible for the landing of the boat.  There were two strong facts.  Then they elicited that the boat was used for the men, and not for the officers.  They must come to the conclusion that if the officers had safe boats the men should have them too.  They had facts enough to come to a strong conclusion that there was carelessness, and if representations were to go from them to the Government on this point it would stop a dangerous practice.   -   A Juror said the boat was not unseaworthy, but the difficulty was with the steerage.  -  Corporal Furness:  In rough weather.  -  A Juror:  But this was not rough weather.  -  The Coroner said his impression from the first was that the Government - he could hardly tell what to say, for he could hardly term it a Government offence - was responsible, and he thought it would be best to adjourn to that they might see the boat, and see what further evidence could be obtained to illustrate the facts.  He believed there was gross carelessness somewhere.  -  A Juror said Mr Coffin, the messman, and the people who sent the luggage should be there to tell what weight was in the boat.  -  The Inquest was adjourned until Thursday, and in the meantime an examination of the boat will be made by an independent authority.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 September 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Last evening the Mayor of Saltash (Mr Martin) opened an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, into the Circumstances attending the death of EDWARD CROCKER and HENRY FUDGE, privates in the Royal Marine Light Infantry, who were also drowned by the sinking of the wheel boat.  After Corporal Daniells had identified the bodies, the Inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday next.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Disaster In Hamoaze.  The Adjourned Inquest.  Verdict Of Censure. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOB HITCHCOCK, and a further Inquest respecting the deaths of FREDERICK ALWAY, SAMUEL SLEMAN and JAMES VICKERY, was held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, before Mr Richard Sleman, Deputy Coroner.  -  The Deputy Coroner said he had written a letter to the colonel commandant of marines, who had replied, stating he was anxious to have a full Inquiry.  -  John Bowden, a marine, said he swam out of the boat when she was about to sink because she was so heavily laden.  He had never seen the boat so heavily laden before.  He had seen as many men in her before, but not so much gear.  He helped to put a good lot of gear in the boat at the time, and he thought it a good load to take over.  He did not see anyone in command on the beach.  The men kept putting in the gear until it was all in, but there was no one giving any command or direction.  There was no commissioned officer in charge of the working party, but Sergt. Daniels was in charge of them.  There were non-commissioned officers in charge of each of the three parties that were in the boat - the working party, the fatigue party and the crew - but there was no officer in command of the whole.  He could not say whether, had the washboard been shipped, the accident would have been prevented.  There was a four-wheel wagon on board.  There were several men sitting on it and several men were sitting on the chairs that were on board.  He thought to himself when the boat was loading that if the boat got across the water she would be "a lucky boat," and he got ready to go overboard if anything occurred.  -  At this stage the Jury inspected the boat, which was lying at the Lifeboat House, Longroom.  The Jury found that on sixteen people standing in the stern of the boat her freeboard astern was reduced from 18 to nine inches.  -  On the return of the Jury the body of CHARLES PENNINGTON, private, was identified.   -   Henry George Prigg, ship and boat-builder, said that by the desire of the Coroner and Jury, he inspected the boat on the 14th instant.  He measured her in different sections, and according to his calculations he found 8 1.2 tons would put her down one foot, equally fore and aft.  At the sides she would then have 1 ft. 3 in. freeboard.  The transom would be only three inches above the water.  In his opinion one half the tonnage - 4 1.2 tons - in the stern of the boat would sink her.  There was a washboard that fitted in grooves, but being very open at the bottom it would assist the boat but very little.  It was merely for keeping off the spray.  It was too slight to be of any service in keeping out the sea.  His opinion was that the boat sank by being too heavily laden in the after part.  He calculated there were five tons weight of men beside all the wagon and gear.  What he had seen of this would be about 2 ½ tons weight.  -  The Coroner:  In every respect except the washboard, do you consider the boat a trustworthy one?  -  A.:  No; the transom being so low, a body of men in her with the least moving, or with any wash, would cause her to fill.  -  The Coroner:  How many would make the boat dangerous?  -  A.:  I should not like to go with more than sixty men in her.  Five tons of men moving from amidships to aft would sink her immediately.  A body of men moving a little would cause her to fill very quickly over the transoms.  She was in a good state of repair, but the transom was too low.  She was safe with five tons, but not with any weight above that.  He thought the washboard would have been of little effect had it been used, though the boat might have gone a quarter of a mile farther before sinking.  If it had been daylight the men would not have congregated so much at the stern, and the boat might have got across.  There ought to have been an experienced man to have told the men where to go.  -  By a Juror:  Had the transom been six inches higher the accident might not have happened.  He thought that a boat of this sort certainly ought not to have taken luggage and men together.  -  A Juror remarked that they could not tell if the men could have moved forward because they did not know whether or not the men were packed together in all parts of the boat.  -  Penrose Charles Penrose, colonel in the marines, said the boat was built by Mr Hicks, of Stonehouse, in 1866.  She was considered capable of carrying sixty men completely equipped, and six men as winchmen, the weight being 5 ton 15 cwt.  On the journey when the accident occurred she had 66 men on board weighing 4 tons 15 cwt., and there were 2 tons 6 cwt. forms (18), tables (6(), tressels for tables (12), chairs for officers (36) and soup cans (2), with plate and other things, making up the weight named.  He wished to correct a statement that had appeared in the papers, that the boat was always without an officer.  Only on three occasions had the boat been without an officer.  The men went across in three parties, and tried to come back in one, which was certainly not foreseen.  It was considered they would come back pretty much as they went over.  -  The Coroner:  That being the proper thing, why did they deviate?  -  Witness:  I don't know.  The Corporal should have brought them over.  -  The Coroner:  then the blame, if any, is attributable to Corporal Furness?  -  Witness:  Yes, and the conclusion the court of Inquiry came to.  I believe the boat was overloaded and the weight badly distributed.  I believe if the weight had been properly distributed the boat would have been brought over properly.  -  The Coroner said as far as the Jury had gone they had come to the same conclusion.  -  Witness said that if there was any danger apparent it was the duty of the senior officer to interfere.  In this case it was Sergeant George's.  It was the Corporal's duty to see he did not take too many.  -  A Juror:  the corporal said he had no authority to refuse any number of men.  -  Witness:  He had sole control of the boat.  -  The Coroner:  You don't think the baggage should have come with the men?  -  Witness:  I don't say that, but the boat was overloaded, and the weight badly distributed.  -  A Juror:  Corporal Furness said that if he interfered with men coming into the boat when they were ordered to do so it would be at his peril.  -  Witness:  He should have interfered had he reason to believe there was any risk.  -  A Juror:  She is a dangerous boat, Corporal Furness said.  -  Witness: That is a farce.  She is not.  - A Juror:  there is no one responsible.  No one holds himself responsible.  -  Witness:  Every commissioned officer was in charge of his party, but the senior commissioned officer was responsible.  I hold Corporal Furness responsible for his boat, but Sergeant George, being the principal non-commissioned officer, it was his duty to have stopped it.  -  The Coroner:  The Government does not make any provision for men drowned in this service?  -  Witness:  No.  -  The Coroner:  Is there any provision for the officers?  -  Witness:  There is for the officers' widows under certain conditions.  If they had served ten years the families would get it.  -  The Coroner:  But a private under ten years or not would not get it at all.  -  Witness:  No.  -  The Coroner:  Sergeant George seemed to be a sharp man, who committed himself, and wanted to retrace his steps, for he said first there were sixty-six men he believed in the boat, and afterwards that he was told there were.  -  The Coroner said to his mind the case was perfectly clear, but what the verdict would be the Jury would have to decide.  Although Furness was in charge of the boat, he was not sufficiently in charge to prevent its being over-loaded.  They had the evidence of men who were in the boat, and were afraid she would sink.  It was evident from what they had heard all parties who were in the habit of going in boats, the colonel, and, above all, Mr Prigg, that they attributed the accident to over-loading.  It was evidently not a case of manslaughter, and he did not think they could bring it in accidental death.  If they believed, as the colonel wished them to believe, they might bring it in as homicide, not culpable homicide, that was to say, Furness permitted the men to come on board, and the boat went down. He probably acted ignorantly, for he could not imagine he would have done it wilfully.  It would be hard, however, to fix the blame on Furness.  They would agree with him that the management of this boat affair had not been taken proper care of by the authorities.  Furness, in trying to manage the boat had difficulty in fixing the rudder.  If he had to fix the rudder and attend to the washboard he had pretty much to do, without knowing whether the boat was overloaded or not.  The real blame, although they might put it off on Corporal Furness, rested with the authorities.  He did not say anything of the order or disorder the men were in, for he believed many of the men knew better than they did as regarded getting drunk.  If they permitted men to go in a boat which would carry a certain amount of tons, the responsibility would come back on the Government. It was a monstrous thing that ten men should be drowned in the middle of summer through a boat being overloaded, and not known to be so until it got in deep water, when the men were drowned.  They should not permit Furness to be the scapegoat.  They could not call the death an accidental death, for it resulted from overloading the boat.  Some department ought to be responsible in the end.  It was a monstrous hardship that men who risked their lives for the service should not have pensions, which were granted to those who were able to take care of themselves.  He thought there should be a representation made to the Government that when men were drowned through no fault of their own the Government should provide for their families.  -  Mr Hamilton Whiteford said he had been instructed by Mr W. Eastlake to appear on behalf of the Port Admiral, and would be happy to communicate any representation the Jury might wish to make.  Mr Eastlake subsequently appeared in person.  -  The Jury, after consultation, returned their verdict.  They were unanimously of opinion, after carefully weighing the whole of the evidence, that the death of the deceased had been caused by negligence on the part of Penrose Charles Penrose, commandant of the Plymouth division of Royal Marines, and Staff-Sergeant Charles George, of the above-named corps, he being senior non-commissioned officer present at the embarkation.  They also exonerated Corporal Thomas Furness from all blame, considering he did his utmost to save life.  It was the wish of the Jury that this verdict should be sent to the Admiralty.  The Coroner was also instructed to represent to the Admiralty the injustice of the widows being deprived of a pension.

STOKE DAMEREL - Last evening the Mayor of Saltash (Mr Martin) opened an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD CROKER, and HENRY FUDGE, privates in the Royal Marine Light infantry, who were also drowned by the sinking of the wheel boat.  After Corporal Daniells had identified the bodies, the Inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday next.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 September 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Disaster In Hamoaze. - More Bodies Recovered.  Inquest At The Royal Naval Hospital.  -  Mr Deputy Coroner Sleeman held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Saturday, on the bodies of ROBERT HAY and THOMAS BROWN, two of the marines drowned by the sinking of the over-laden boat off Cremyll on the 9th instant.  Mr Simon Hyne was chosen Foreman of the Jury.  Mr E. G. Bennett appeared for Mr W. Eastlake as representing the Admiralty.  -  Prior to the commencement of the business, Mr Sleeman suggested that at a future Inquest it might be well that the widows and orphans of the deceased should be represented.  They certainly had a moral, and he did not see why they should not have a legal, claim upon the Admiralty for proper provision.  -  James Williams, waterman, of Foss, near Millbrook, deposed to picking up the body of HAY that morning at six o'clock as it was floating past his house and to towing it direct to the Hospital.   William Lewis, private R.M.L.I., now a patient in the Hospital, identified the body of HAY, who was a single man; and one of the boat's crew.  He said:  I was with him in the boat on September 9th, being one of the fatigue party.  The accident happened about half-past seven in the evening.  After the boat sunk I made the best of my way to the shore.  I had no idea myself the boat was about to sink until the water came in at the stern.  Furniss was managing the boat, and put the helm down to turn the boat round.  The men were orderly, and I was helping, hauling on the rope from the wheels to turn them.  -  By the Jury:  A non-commissioned officer was in charge of us, and ordered us into the boat.  I and others had brought the gear down by order of a non-commissioned officer.  I do not know his name.  We put it in the boat.  It had all been brought down on the wagon - two loads.  It was a corporal who was in charge of my fatigue party - the officers' mess fatigue party.  I saw one civilian on board the boat;  but I do not know what became of him.  I swam the greatest part of the way ashore, and was picked up by a waterman.  As a rule when a shooting party goes over a commissioned officer is in command.  -  Robert Warren, waterman, living at Devonport, picked up the body of BROWN, at a quarter past four on Friday afternoon, near the Circe, and towed it to the Admiral's Hard, Stonehouse.  -  James Gill, private, R.M.L.I., identified the body, BROWN was close alongside of me in the boat.  When it went down I swam ashore.  I saw the water coming in over the bow of the boat.  Then there was some confusion, and as I went to jump off a man knocked me back among the chairs.  It took five minutes to get the boat off after she was loaded.  I had been in her twice before;   then she was not so heavily loaded.  The tide was coming in, and it was nearly high water.  -  On referring to the tide tables, however, it appeared that the tide had only been on flood about an hour.  -  By the Jury:  Sergeant Daniels had been in charge of our party, but had left us.  When the luggage was put in the boat, we all got in without anyone ordering us - we were getting in the wagon.  I did not see any commissioned officer on the beach.   -  Colonel Penrose said:  I am colonel-commandant of the Royal Marines, Plymouth division.  On September 9th the annual rifle meeting of the division - the second ay - was held at the Mount Edgcumbe range.  There was a large number present, with officers' friends and others.  Mr Coffin, the officers' messman, supplied the provisions which were taken over at half-past ten in the forenoon.  With the provisions there went over the servants and a fatigue party.  At nine o'clock the wheel-boat had taken over the tents, forms and chairs, and a party of twenty-two men who were to pitch these tents, and take these things up to the ground.  At half-past ten she went with Mr Coffin and his party, and at one with the band.  At half-past six, as I was returning, I met her going back to Cremyll empty.  The gear brought back in the evening was under charge of the fatigue party of Sergeant Daniels.  The guests commenced to leave about a quarter past five. When I left the ground about a quarter past six the tents were standing.  Daniels was in charge of the fatigue party that got the gear down, but not having done something that he had been told to do, he was ordered back to do it.  Daniels' special duties ceased when he put his gear on board, but he should have marched his men back to the barracks.  He would have done this, but he had forgotten to shut some gate or other and was ordered back.  If he had not been ordered back by a commissioned officer he would have continued in charge of the men.  The charge then devolved upon Corporal Furness, who was in command of the boat.  I consider that a commissioned officer had a right to order Daniels, under the circumstances, to do what he did, leaving his other duties unperformed.  Sergeant Daniels was in charge of the fatigue party, under directions.  He was under the orders of a committee of officers who carried out the match, and it would be his duty to obey any order given to him by any member of that committee.  The functions of that committee ceased on the ground when the shooting was over, but they had other duties subsequently.  -  Q.:  Are you aware who gave Sergeant Daniels the counter order?  -  A.:  I believe Capt. McMeekan did so, the senior member of the committee, who is at Walmer at present.  There has been an official court of Inquiry into this affair, the report of which has gone to the Admiralty.  The weight of the men in the boat that day was four tons fifteen cwt;    that of the gear two tons six cwt.  The number of men was sixty-six.  That does not include anyone who had no right there.  It includes Sergeant George.  He was the senior non-commissioned officer present, but was not in charge.  The person in charge of the boat was Corporal Furness;  and if he considered his boat was being over-loaded he ought to have appealed to the senior non-commissioned officer present.  The officer who took Sergeant Daniels from his duty did not commit an act of indiscretion in doing so, because it was Furness's duty to look after the boat.  It was also his duty to prevent civilians from getting into the boat.  I instituted the Inquiry.  The court was composed of the colonel of the division and two captains.  The men who were before the Court of Inquiry were Corporal Thomas Furniss, Sergeants Charles George, John Pardon and A. Daniels; and Corporal Cowen.  The boat was built in Stonehouse by Mr Hicks from drawings supplied from the dockyard;  and was planned to carry large detachments to the rifle range - sixty men completely equipped and six men as winchmen.  The boat was over-loaded that night and the weight was also badly distributed.  I think but for this last she might have come over safely.  Furness had received his appointment from his knowledge of the boat, and I should not have interfered with him if I had been there.  If he had appealed to me about anything being too much, I should have ordered it out;  and Sergeant George would have had precisely the same authority as I had.  Corporal Furness was solely responsible in the first instance, because of his superior knowledge of the boat, and I should have deferred to him.  If he had said it was safe I should have gone.  Furness might have seen the moment the boat got afloat how she was.  If he had ordered the men forward I believe she would have been quite safe.   -  By the Jury:  Would it not have been the duty of Capt. McMackan, if he saw the boat over-loaded, to have called attention to it?  -  A.:  It would have been the duty of any officer to call attention to that.  Corporal Furness had the right to object, if he pleased;  and as a matter of fact a corporal has refused to take the men put in the boat.  If a captain marched 100 men into the boat Corporal Furness would have had the right to say he would not take more than sixty.  I don't believe if a commissioned officer had been there the thing would have been different.  I did not expect that the luggage and the men would have been brought back at one time, because they went over at twice.  There were four members of the committee, but neither had a superior authority.  These men in the boat were made up of four different parties, who came together accidentally, and not by intention.  If Furness had objected to take so many, the senior officer present would certainly not have taken the responsibility upon himself.  Furness was precisely in the position of a navigating lieutenant, who is responsible unless he protests to the captain that he disapproves of anything, but who shifts the responsibility if he protests.  In this case I believe Furness erred in judgment.  The widows of these men will get a year's pay and there is a scheme, not yet matured, however, for giving them pensions.  Four of the men were married.  -  Corporal Furness:  On the 9th of September, I was at Cremyll beach, about seven o'clock, in charge of a boat belonging to the Government, generally used to take men over to Mount Batten.  I have taken three or four squads there.  I have been in charge of her since June;  and have been employed in the boat about three years.  I was also employed in another boat.  This wheel-boat is very awkward to handle.  I had orders on the 9th to go over to Cremyll;  but no orders after one o'clock, when I was to be at the Hard to take the band over.  I had no distinct order to bring the men and luggage back, but I thought it was my duty to do so.  The boat went over four times.  About seven o'clock, a quantity of luggage was put on board the boat by the men, while I was minding the boat.  I held the boat with another man while the wagon was being put in.  I had no means of knowing what was the weight of the luggage.  I reckoned that altogether I had 6 ½ tons.  I calculated on 45 men, and thought the boat would carry them right enough.  I never knew for certain what the boat was calculated to carry, nor have I never been told by anyone in authority above me.  I have heard say it would carry nine tons.  I have never seen a lot of luggage coming back with a number of men.  I had no suspicion that the boat was over-loaded, and no means of knowing that the boat was over-loaded.  I never had any orders myself to resist anyone coming in the boat or anything of that kind. There was no unusual difficulty in getting the boat off.  The rudder is difficult to ship.  The water did not come in directly we floated, but it was about 150 yards off - or not so much when I saw the water coming in at the stern.  I then asked for the washboard;  but no one seemed to know what it was.  It is always unshipped, and stowed forward when the wagon is taken in.  If the washboard had been in its place the boat might have gone 300 yards, and sunk further out, as I should not have seen the water coming in.  It is very lucky it was as it was.  The men had nothing to do with me, only the boat.  I do not consider I had power to prevent anyone coming on board if I thought the boat over-loaded.  If I had refused a sergeant he might have reported me, and I might have got reduced.  If three or four men had come down to get in I had no power to stop them.  The boat is difficult to handle and I consider her dangerous.  She won't answer her helm in rough weather.  -  By the Jury:  I have never had instructions from any officer as to the proper number of men to be taken in the boat.  I was never in charge of the boat previous to June 30th.  Previous to that Corporal Hill was in charge.  He never gave me any instructions.  The corporal before that - Corporal Jones - said the boat would carry nine tons.  It would not be left for me to say there were too many men in the boat.  I have never had reason to believe the boat was over-loaded.  I did not see anyone on board who was unconnected with the service.  I have seen 130 in the boat going to Batten.  Nobody gave any orders about getting the boat off.  No party ever enters my boat without being in charge of an officer of some kind.  It was not in my discretion to say I would go two journeys instead of one.  If fifty more men had been marched down, I should have taken them on board, if there had been room.  If I had thought there was danger, I should not have ordered the men out myself, but should have appealed to the senior officer on board.  -  Sergeant A. Daniels:  On the morning of the 9th inst. I was sent to the rifle range at Mount Edgcumbe in charge of a working party, who took over various articles for the use of the officers who were going to fire at the range.  After the articles had been left on the range I marched the men I had charge of to the boat at Cremyll, which conveyed them back to barracks.  At 5.30 p.m. the same day I marched my working party to the Admiral's Hard, and they were again conveyed to Cremyll in the wheel-boat.  The men then went to the range ground and brought a portion of the articles to the beach.  I then marched the men back again, and brought the remainder of the things to the beach.  I then found that the first load had been placed in the boat.  The other articles were placed in the boat, and Capt. McMeakin then told me to go up to the Park Lodge with a key.  I asked Capt. McMeakin if I should send a corporal to do it instead of myself, as I had charge of the working party;  but he replied "Let the corporal take charge of the men, and take the key up yourself."  Capt. McMeekan also told me to return in the ferry-boat.  I was under the orders of Lieut. Seager on the range.  I was absent about twenty minutes with the key, and upon returning found that the boat had sunk.  If I had not taken the key I should have taken passage in the boat.  -  By the Foreman:  I was senior non-commissioned officer in charge of all the fatigue parties.   -  The Coroner:  This key could have been taken as well by the corporal as by Sergeant Daniels.  -  Private Bowden:  I was one of the working party on the 9th inst., and helped to push the boat off from the beach.  I also helped to load her, and after she was afloat I thought that if she went across she would be a lucky boat.  I had never seen her so heavily laden before.  -  Staff-Sergeant George:  I went over to Mount Edgcumbe on the morning of the 9th, but not in the wheel-boat.  When I came back I came as a passenger, not as an officer.  I was the senior officer there, but I was not in charge, and had no command over the men.  My command and duties had finished for the day when I left the range.  If Sergeant Daniels had been in the boat it would have been his duty to exercise command.  If I had seen any gross breach of discipline, or a refusal to obey orders, I should have interfered.  [Witness then described the occurrence as already details.]  -  The washboard could not be found.  I rendered Furniss all the assistance I could.   -   By the Jury:  The number of men in the boat would not have filled her without the waggon.  Corporal Furniss did all that was in his power when the water came in.  -  The Coroner, in summing up said the case was a most extraordinary one.  As to the cause of death there could be no doubt the men met their death by drowning;  that was clear, but how these men came by their drowning, that was another matter;  and the Jury would have to decide whether there was responsibility attaching to anybody.  He imagined no one could say that these deaths were deaths caused by manslaughter, or that there was a legal offence - anything like felony.  The deaths were not accidental, but he thought that the proper designation would be deaths from homicide or misadventure.  To his mind there had been negligence somewhere, he did not say gross negligence, but negligence, and that hardly attributable to an individual.  It had been attempted to be shewn that responsibility rested with the corporal in charge of the boat;  but they had it in evidence that the boat was dangerous, and it was cutting it too fine to expect that this one man, without proper knowledge of the capabilities of the boat, could be expected to manage the boat and command the men.  He hoped Furness would not be held responsible;  but that the verdict would be one that would induce the authorities not to do it again.  That Daniels should have been sent away for a key by Capt. McMeekan, when anyone else might have gone, was a great error of judgment. Let the Jury do their best;  and if their verdict happened to be wrong, it would not hurt anybody, and, indeed, it could be rectified by the Jury which had to sit at Saltash.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation in private, returned the following verdict, "That the said THOMAS BROWN and ROBERT HAY, on the 9th day of September, 1875, being with other marines in a certain boat, commonly called the marine wheel-boat, then floating in the Hamoaze, came by their deaths by the said boat sinking in the Hamoaze;  the cause of such drowning the Jury consider was homicide by misadventure."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 September 1875
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday respecting the death of the infant male child of MR GEORGE BLIGHT, engineer, Princess-street, which had been accidentally suffocated by being wrapped in the bed-clothes.  The child, which was a very weak one, and which was only 20 days' old, was found by its mother lying dead by her side.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 September 1875
PLYMOUTH - The Case Of Drowning In Sutton Harbour. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Trinity Schoolrooms, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of FREDERICK FAWKES KENT, aged 8 years.  The evidence went to shew that the deceased was last seen alive by a boy named Sprague on Wednesday afternoon, on the slip adjacent to Southside-street, and that Sprague told him not to get into a boat which was close until he returned.  About five minutes past five the deceased's body was found floating in the water quite dead, and being carried away by the tide.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time requesting the Coroner to make a strong representation in the proper quarter that the steps in question was extremely unsafe, and that either the wall or steps should be repaired.

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 September 1875
TOTNES - The Murder On Totnes Racecourse.  Close Of The Inquiry.  -  Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, yesterday resumed the Inquiry respecting the death of WILLIAM COMER, a labourer.  It is supposed that the deceased was murdered on the Totnes racecourse, on the night of September 3rd (the second day of Totnes races).  His body was found in the Dart on the 5th, and upon it were marks of blows sufficient to have caused death.  The medical evidence conclusively shewed that COMER was killed by a sudden blow, and that he was not drowned.  On a previous occasion a witness swore that he saw cuts and blood on deceased's head at noon on the 3rd, but the evidence of other witnesses seemed to conclusively shew that this could not have been the case.  The first witness called yesterday was George Gepson, a pugilist, who stated that he had a booth on the racecourse, and was almost sure that he saw deceased in the booth on one day of the races.  He (witness) left the course between eight and nine o'clock on the night of the 3rd, and slept at the Dart Inn.  On the 5th he was walking by the side of the Dart, when a man named Young, who was in his company, pointed out the body of the deceased, which was in the river, and he (Gepson) ran for a policeman.  -  The Foreman of the Jury asked why instead of running for the police, he did not raise an alarm, and get the body out and see if life was quite extinct.  -  Witness said there was no boat there, and he thought they had no right to do so.  He was also much afraid of the water.  -  Thomas Algar, in the employ of the South Devon Railway Company, said that about 1.30 p.m. on the 3rd he paid the deceased £1 5s. 9d. for work done for the company.  The deceased was in company with a young man named Honeywill, also in the employ of the railway company.  I saw no marks on his head.  -  Thomas Pinhey, a mason, saw deceased in a fit between eleven o'clock and noon of the 3rd, and remained with him until after he recovered.  There was then no cut or mark on his head, and, indeed, deceased, who sat down in the road when first attacked, went back so easily that if there had been an egg on the road he would not have broken it.  -  James Clarke, superintendent of the borough police at Totnes, said he received information from Gepson of the body being in the river.  He afterwards searched the body, and found 4s. 5 ½d. in one of the trouser pockets.  All his clothes were in perfect order.  -  Mrs Foot recalled, said she got dinner for deceased on the 3rd.  He had his pay before he came home, and gave her 6s. for his lodgings and 3s. to get some food for him.  -  The Jury, after a consultation of about half an hour, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."  -  The Coroner said he quite concurred in the verdict.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 September 1875
SHALDON - The Bathing Fatality At Teignmouth. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Shaldon on Saturday respecting the death of ARDEN AVERY SHAPLAND, solicitor, of Epsom, about 35 years of age.  The deceased, who was a widower, was drowned on Saturday the 18th instant, and his body was picked up on Friday.  -  William Allan Tucker stated that he was a farmer, living at Waye Barton, Ipplepen, and the deceased was his brother-in-law.  On the 18th instant he drove to Teignmouth with his wife, a lady friend, the deceased, and Mr Westwick, and soon after their arrival at Teignmouth he and Messrs. SHAPLAND, and Westwick went to the beach, where they engaged bathing machines from a man named George English.  The deceased, who was no swimmer and Mr Westwick were in the water before him.  He did not see any ropes and was certain they went in without any.  English cautioned him about the state of the water and desired him not to go out very far.  He went into the water about three minutes after his friends, and as it was rough did not go out very far.  Seeing that his friends were far out he considered that they must be drowning, and immediately shouted "For God's sake save them, there are two men drowning."  He saw several there, but he spoke to no one in particular.  He became so excited he scarcely knew what happened, and when he got on shore he could see no one.  He saw a boat going out, and begged the inmates to do what they could, for it was no use for him to go out.  All this time no rope or other appliance was produced for saving life, and he knew it was useless for him to attempt to swim out to them.  They looked to be out three parts the length of the pier.  -  By a Juror:  The machine proprietor merely said the sea was rough and advised him not to go out far.  -   William Courtenay Snell, a boatman, said that English came to Powderham-terrace and called, saying, "Have you any boats here?"  Witness replied, "Any amount of them.  What are you requiring?"  and English said that two gentlemen were drowning.  Thomas Elliott was with him.  Hearing this they and a man named Symons took a boat to the beach and launched it, and when just about to start Mr Tucker held up his hand, and said, "Don't you go;  they are gone."  Symons replied, "That be bothered;  we will go and see if they are or not;" and Mr Tucker then said, "If you find them anywhere they are at the end of the pier."  On getting near to the end of the pier someone called out from the shore, and beckoned witness to the right.  Witness stood up and saw the head of a man in the water.  They went towards him and just caught him by the wrist as he was going down for the third time.  They could not take him into the boat, but held him up and dragged him until they got him into shallow water.  The sea was very rough.  The under current on the Teign beach was very strong at times, and on the day in question it was unusually so.   -   George English, bathing guide at Teignmouth, stated that he cautioned all three and told them that it was a very heavy sea, and that if they went swimming they would never come back.  The machines were ten or twelve feet from the edge of the water.  On that day there were ropes on to the machine.  The shortest rope was twelve feet, and he was quite sure there were hand ropes to each machine.  After they had been out a little time he heard them crying for help, and on looking out saw only one head.  They were about 100 yards off, and he ran for a boat.  He (witness) could swim a little.  There was a large lifebuoy on the beach, presented to them by the Local Board, but the breakers would have knocked them back a hundred times if they tried to throw it out  -  By the Foreman:  At that time of tide he could have walked out as far as the pier;  deceased was 100 yards beyond that.  -  By the Coroner:  About four or five minutes elapsed between the cry and the launching of the boat.  The Local Board placed a boat there about two years ago and a man was kept with it.  It was too heavy and had been removed. A light boat would not answer.  The ropes they now had were of no use occasionally at low water, because they could not get nearer the water than 10 or 12 feet.   -   Thomas Brown Westwick said he could swim a little, and went into the water with the deceased.  He received no warning from English.  The deceased went in first and witness followed until within twelve feet of him, when the water reached to his chest.  A wave knocked the deceased over and when his head came above the water again, he called out, "Tom, give me a hand."  he went towards him, and in another stroke would have reached him, when deceased went down for the last time, for as witness was proceeding towards him the sea carried him farther out.  Did not see any rope to the machine he used, if so it was out of sight.  He should think the machine was 30 feet from the water.  Had he been cautioned as to the under current he would not have gone out.  He asked English if they were going to let the machine down nearer the water, and English answered "No, as if they did the sand was so soft they would not be able to get it up again."   -  Wm. R. H. Jordan, clerk to the Teignmouth Local Board, deposed that the bye-laws of the Board directed that bathing machines should be let down as near the water as bathers desired, and that each machine should have a hand-rope six yards in length,  with a cork at the end.  In October, 1873, the Local Board adopted a bye-law requiring the keepers of bathing machines to keep a boat at the spot for the purpose of saving life, but the Local Government Board disallowed the bye-law, on the ground that the bye-law was "not within the 10th and 11th Vic., cap. 89, sec. 69."   -   The Coroner in summing up said it would be for the Jury to consider if MR SHAPLAND'S life could have been saved if hand-ropes had been there and if the machines had been drawn down two feet into the water.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," but added that the bathing guide should be censured for his breach of bye-laws and in not having the machine two feet into the water.  He should also have watched the bathers.  -  English was then called in and censured by the Coroner.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 September 1875
TOTNES - The Perils Of Infancy. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Totnes yesterday, respecting the death of LEWIS EDWIN MARTIN,  the illegitimate child of ANNA JANE MARTIN, a domestic servant at Dartmouth, aged about 21 years.  The mother of the deceased was called, and stated that the child was about 9 months old and that her mother had had it to keep since it was 5 weeks old.  It had lately been suffering from teething, and she came to see it on Thursday last, hearing it was unwell, and found it suffering from diarrhoea.  The child was then with a Mrs Cose, as her mother was away from home.  Her mother had it back again on Saturday and it died on Sunday.  She paid her mother 4s. per week for the keep of the child.  -  Elizabeth Cose, a widow, said she had the child from MRS MARTIN to take care of on Monday week last, and on Thursday she sent for its mother as the child appeared to be very bad.  On Friday a neighbour of MRS MARTIN'S came and saw the child, and said it was no worse than it had been, and she had better wait until MRS MARTIN came home on Saturday before she sent for a doctor.  -  MARY MARTIN, the child's grandmother, said she went to the Eye Infirmary last Tuesday and arranged with Mrs Cose to take the child while she was away.  It was unwell a few days before she left, but she thought that this was owing to teething.  When the child was brought home she saw it was bad and put a poultice to it and gave it some brandy in a little milk, and thought she would send for the doctor in the morning if it was not better.  About four o'clock on Sunday morning the child was worse, and she sent for Mr Wallis, surgeon, but it died a few minutes before he came.  About three weeks ago she gave the child a grey powder for the diarrhoea, but it did not do it any good, and she had not given it any other medicine since for the diarrhoea.  -  Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, said he found the child dead when he came to the house.  He had since made a post mortem examination, and found no marks of violence.  The cause of death was undoubted diarrhoea.  If the diarrhoea had been stopped there was nothing to cause death.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but considered that the grandmother was to blame for not calling in a medical man before.  -  The Coroner then censured the grandmother, telling her that although shew as not criminally culpable, yet she was very much to blame for not obtaining the assistance of a medical man.

TORQUAY - An Inquiry was held by Mr Michelmore at the Torquay Townhall on Monday night into the cause of the death of ERNEST, the illegitimate son of JANE COOK.  The mother, who described herself as a dressmaker, living at No. 1, Market-street, stated that the child was born in the Newton Workhouse a year and nine months ago.  After remaining there a month she went to live with a Mrs Simms, in Ellacombe, and put the child out to nurse with Mrs Burridge.  As the latter took a situation, the infant was put with Mrs Benson, who had it nearly twelve months, and then it was transferred to Mrs Setters, who, having children of her own, kept it a month of two.  Ten days ago it was handed over to Mrs Uran, in whose house it died.  She gave 3s. 6d. per week for the maintenance of the child, which was weak and teething.  She saw the child on Tuesday and Friday, but did not notice anything wrong about it until last Saturday morning, when Mrs Uran sent for her.  Seeing  that the child was ill, she sent for Mr Powell, surgeon, and went herself for Mr Gill, surgeon. The child died soon after eight o'clock.  -  Mrs Uren, a widow, said she had one other child to nurse beside that of JANE COOK, and had a daughter twelve years old and a grown up son.  She had three rooms, for which she paid 3s. 2d. per week, and she received 2s. per week from the parish, 3s. 6d. from JANE COOK, and 4s. for the other child, and her son earned 10s. per week on the quay.  She had had fifteen children of her own, and ten had died under three and a half years old.  Witness at first denied that any child had died at her house lately, but on being questioned admitted that an infant died at her place twelve months ago under precisely similar circumstances.  She fed the deceased on bread and milk, and took in sixpennyworth of raw milk daily.  -  Mrs Setters explained that she could not keep the deceased as she had other nurse children. This and the last witness spoke to the fact of the child being weak.  -  Mr Powell, who had made a post-mortem examination, said the child was fairly nourished, considering its diseased state;  the cause of death was due primarily to the tubercular disease;  and secondly to cerebral effusion.  There was nothing in any way suspicious, and there was food in the stomach.  The Coroner censured the mother for putting the child out to nurse instead of caring for it herself;  and made some severe strictures on Mrs Uren, whose house was found in a very filthy condition.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 October 1875
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, respecting the death of HENRY JOHN ENGLAND, private in the Royal Marines.  In accordance with a recent regulation, the Admiralty were represented, Mr H. Whiteford appearing on behalf of Mr Wm. Eastlake, deputy judge-advocate of the fleet.  The deceased was serving on board the Indus, and on Thursday he slipped and fell from the main to the lower hatchway, receiving injuries from which he died in the course of an hour.  Dr Dunlop, surgeon of the Indus, stated that the deceased died from concussion of the brain, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  ENGLAND leaves a wife and three children, and the Jury gave their fees to the bereaved family.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 October 1875
LITTLE TORRINGTON - An Inquest was held at Little Torrington respecting the death of HENRY HANDFORD, aged 13 years.  On Wednesday evening the deceased jumped on a traction engine passing along a road in order to have a ride, but slipped and fell off, and was crushed to death by one of the wheels.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TEIGNMOUTH - Fatal Accident Near Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of FREDERICK ALFORD, 11 years of age.  On Friday last the deceased, accompanied by Richard Hore and Richard Loram, two other lads, was taking a horse, belonging to Mr Wm. Hore, farmer, of Ringmore, to a field, when the deceased caught hold of the tail of the animal, causing it to kick.  The deceased was kicked in the forehead, knocked down, and rendered unconscious.  He was taken to his house and Mr Hugo, surgeon, was sent for and advised his removal to the Teignmouth Infirmary, whither he was conveyed.  Mr Etheridge, the resident surgeon, examined him and found that he was suffering from a fracture of the left frontal bone.  The brain was lacerated and protruding at three places.  After treatment there appeared to be a slight improvement;  but a change for the worse set in on Sunday morning, and he died in the afternoon.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT - Strange Death At Newton. - Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, touching the death of HARRIET HEAD, aged 26 years.  Elizabeth Winsor, a married woman, said that the deceased was her sister, and had been living with her at No. 1, Court, Wolborough-street.  She had been in service at the Globe Hotel, and she was confined of still-born twins about three weeks ago.  There had been a dispute between her and her lover, who had intended to marry her.  -  HARRIET HEAD, mother of the deceased, said her daughter had been in private service at Reading, and had been obliged to leave there on account of being subject to hysterics.  Since then she had been living at the Globe Hotel as a servant and had been there about a year and a half.  She had been keeping company with a young man named Willcocks.  -  Jeffery John Drake, surgeon, stated that he attended the deceased at her confinement, and the twins were about 4 months children.  He saw her three days after her confinement, and left her quite well.  He could not give a satisfactory explanation of the cause of death.  The Coroner, at this stage, ordered a post mortem examination of the body, and the Inquiry was adjourned until the evening.  -  Mr Drake stated that he had made a post mortem examination, assisted by Messrs. Gaye and Burgess, and found the heart, the brain, and the various organs healthy, but there was a slight effusion of blood on the right side of the head, and the cerebellum was full of coagulated blood.  This had caused death, the deceased having died of apoplexy of an extra-ordinary character.  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, and the Coroner cautioned Willcocks as to his behaviour with young women.

LYDFORD - Found Drowned Near Lidford Waterfall.  -  Yesterday Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at the Manor Hotel, Lidford, on the body of SAMUEL HARDING, a tailor, aged 51, who was found dead in the river Lid on Saturday.  The body was seen that morning lying in a shallow part of the river, about 200 yards below Lidford-bride, and it had probably been washed down by a mountain flood.  It had been in the water six or seven days, and there was a mark of violence on the right side of the head;  but in all probability this had been caused by accident.  Deceased was discharged from the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the 23rd September last.  He was seen at Lidford village a fortnight ago, when he said he was going to Okehampton;  but that he could not work in consequence of having something the matter with his hand.  The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 October 1875
PLYMPTON - An Inquest was held at the London Inn, Plympton, on Tuesday evening, by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, on the body of MARIA CANNEN, who was found dead in her house in the parish of Brixton, the previous day.  Mr Mills, surgeon, of Plympton, made a post mortem examination of the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 15 October 1875
ROBOROUGH - At Roborough yesterday Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry respecting the death of EDMUND DAMERELL, aged 57 years.  The deceased, who left the Workhouse about three months since, was found dead in bed, and the medical testimony being to the effect that the deceased died from heart disease, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 October 1875
PLYMOUTH - A Fatal Boating Accident. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of WALTER JOHN BOOLDS, a sailor boy, whose body was found floating outside the Great Western Docks yesterday morning.  -  John Frederick Shields deposed that on the afternoon of Sunday the 10th inst., he, the deceased and a boy named Hipps, all boys belonging to H.M.S. Impregnable, hired a boat from a man named Webber, at Richmond-walk, Devonport, and then sailed away for the Sound.  There was a fresh breeze blowing at the time;  but Webber did not prohibit them from going outside Devil's Point.  When the Hoe was reached the wind was blowing half a gale, and this alarmed them so that they let go the sail and tried to take the mast down, but failing they steered the boat for the shore.  The mast then fell over the side, and capsized the boat, throwing all three into the water.  Witness swam to the shore, which was about 150 yards distant, and was followed by the deceased, who sank in the attempt.  He left Hipps clinging to the boat, which was bottom up.  When witness reached the shore he saw a corporal of the Royal Marines, who stripped and swam to the spot where the deceased went down, and two other sailor boys rescued Hipps.  -  By the Jury:  The deceased was steering the boat, and Hipps had charge of the "sheet."  -  Edward Stroud, master at arms on board the Impregnable, said that the lad Hipps had been in the Royal Naval Hospital ever since the occurrence, and was now delirious.  In answer to a Juror, witness remarked that the boys were not fit to be trusted with a sailing boat.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said he considered that Webber ought to be censured, because he made no inquiry as to where the boys were going with the boat, or whether they were able to manage it.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that the conduct of Webber, who lent the boat, knowing the state of the weather, was very reprehensible, and that it was very desirable that those boats should be placed under some restraint and duly licensed.  They further appended to their verdict that the act of the corporal of Marines and the two sailor boys who swam from the shore to rescue the drowning lads was one of very great bravery and they recommended that it should be brought under the notice of the Royal Humane Society.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 October 1875
EXETER - Sudden Death In  A Court Of Justice. - Some excitement was caused at the Castle of Exeter yesterday, during the holding of the County Quarter sessions, by the report that a man had dropped dead in the witnesses ante-room.  The report proved true.  The deceased was GEORGE GILLHAM, of Berry Pomeroy, who was to have appeared as a material witness in a fowl-stealing case.  He fell ill suddenly, while waiting for his case to come on, and was at once taken to the Devon and Exeter, but he died before he reached that institution.  Mr Hooper, Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Topsham Inn last evening, when medical evidence was given, shewing that death resulted from Natural Causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 October 1875
BRAMPFORD SPEKE - A Mysterious Death. - Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Brampford Speke, near Exeter, respecting the death of a Tiverton woman named BEEDLE, who had been missing from her home since the 8th inst.,. when she left late at night in a state of intoxication without bonnet or shawl.  On Wednesday her body was washed from the river into some marshes at Brampford Speke, and when examined by a medical man some contusions were found about the head, which led him to suppose that deceased had met her death through violence.  During the Inquiry a post mortem examination of the head was made, but there was no fracture of the skull, and the medical man expressed himself of opinion that death was caused by drowning.  The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 October 1875
TAVISTOCK - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at Tavistock last evening on the body of a child named HARRY METHERELL, 4 months old, who was found dead by the side of his mother in bed on Saturday morning.  A verdict was returned of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 November 1875
TOTNES - The Fatal Accident At Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Totnes by Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL WOLLACOTT DREW, about 50 years of age, an able seaman of the brigantine Sarah Maria Ann, of Teignmouth, and a native of that town, who was drowned on Monday night by falling over the quay at Totnes, while going from the shore to his ship.  -  William Sanders, the master of the vessel, proved that the deceased was an able seaman.  -  Samuel Williams, an ordinary seaman on board the same vessel, said he was in the company of the deceased.  They left the ship about half-past eight, and went to the Steam Packet Inn, for the purpose of having a glass of beer.  They left the inn again rather before half-past nine.  In passing down the river he took hold of deceased's arm, as deceased was rather near-sighted, and it was very dark, and just before coming to the steps at the end of the wall dividing the quays, deceased pulled away his arm, saying he could see his own way.  Witness cautioned him not to go too near, and just as they came by the steps he heard deceased fall into the river.  He obtained assistance, and an immediate search was made;  but the body was not recovered until after the lapse of an hour, when it was picked up between fifty and sixty yards from the spot.  -  Evidence was given that the deceased was perfectly sober when the accident happened.  -  The landlord, Thomas Helms, said he cautioned the men not to go by the way of the steps, but up the Avenue.  This advice they at first adopted, but not exactly knowing the way they turned, with the intention of going back to the ship the way they came.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and this being the second life lost at the spot in question, the Jury made a presentment of the dangerous and unprotected state of the landing steps and the continuance of the wall which divides the quays so near to the edge of the river, and requested the Coroner to forward the same to the proper authorities (the Governors under the Endowed Schools scheme), in order that the steps might be fenced, and three or four feet of the wall taken off to widen the passage at the same spot.  Complaint was also made by the Jury of the want of a light and the Coroner undertook, at their request, to communicate with the Town Council with the view of their having a lamp fixed at the spot in question.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 November 1875
GREAT TORRINGTON - An Inquest was held at Torrington on Wednesday respecting the death of WILLIAM CARTER, an inmate of the Workhouse, and a native of Yarnscombe.  Deceased who was 75 years of age, cut his throat with a clasp knife, and the Jury returned a verdict that he committed Suicide but that there was no evidence shewing his state of mind at the time he did so.

ASHBURTON - Fatal Mine Accident. -  An Inquest was held at Ashburton yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a young man named JAMES WILLCOCKS, who, as was stated at the time, received serious injuries on October 23rd whilst working at Bulkamoor Mine.  A hole had been blasted the previous evening, and, although cautioned against doing so, deceased struck the rock and earth overhanging the place where he was standing, and a large quantity of heavy stone and rubbish fell upon him, inflicting fatal injuries.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  The deceased, who had not long left the Royal Navy, was a volunteer, and the Ashburton corps attended his funeral which took place yesterday.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 November 1875
EXETER - Fatal Boiler Accident Near Exeter. - An important Inquest was held on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier, South-street, Exeter, before the Magistrates Clerk (Mr Barton), who acted as Deputy Coroner on the body of SARAH DENNIS, aged 54, who was accidently killed at the Bridge Mills, Silverton, by the turning over of a boiler of esparto grass.  -  Mr Gidley, the Town Clerk, watched the case on behalf of Mr John Matthew Drew, the owner of the mills.  -  Mr Dennis Lowring, of Silverton, was present on behalf of the friends of the deceased, and attributed the accident to some neglect on the part of someone or other.  A plan of the boiling-room was put in as evidence.  The Home Secretary has been communicated with.  -  Thomas Southcott, foreman of the mills, stated that the body now lying at the Devon and Exeter Hospital is that of a single woman named SARAH DENNIS, aged 54, who was employed on the mills to assort esparto grass after it had been boiled.  She resided about one mile from the mills.  Witness had known her about five years.  He last saw her alive on Thursday last.  Deceased was at work with five other females in the room.  Some men were also there.  All the females were injured and were immediately removed to the Hospital.  The case of the deceased is the only fatal one, but several others now lie at the Hospital in a precarious state.  Three men turn the screw to tilt over the boiler when it is emptied of its contents by being drawn off. The boiler cannot be tilted unless turned by a travelling worm.  At the time of the accident the liquid had been boiling about three hours.  The usual time was five.  The travelling worm had full power to check the boiler at any point.  He cannot give any cause as to the boiler tippling over, or can he tell how the accident happened.  The boiler had never accidently turned over before.  When it is full of water it is evenly balanced.  The worm is the only thing to check the boiler.  The handle of the travelling worm is out of the way of accident.  The capsizing of the boiler may be attributed to the vibration of the boiling.  There is no check power upon the 'worm.'  The boiler turned over to where the women were sitting.  -  Mr Commings, house surgeon to the Hospital, stated that the least injured of the females will not be well until a fortnight, and the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until the 29th inst., when it is hoped that this person will be present to give evidence.  The examination of the two witnesses occupied nearly two hours, and excited great interest by those present.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 November 1875
EXETER - The Late Fatal Boiler Accident Near Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper opened an Inquest yesterday on AMELIA ROCK, aged 62, the second of the victims of the recent boiler accident at Silverton. The other three sufferers are progressing favourably.  -  The first witness called was Ann Clapp, niece of the deceased, who identified the body as that of her late aunt.  She was 62 years of age, and was a worker at Mr Drew's paper mills, Silverton.  Deceased was unmarried and previous to her death had resided at Bradninch.  Witness last saw her alive on the night of Thursday, 11th inst., at the Hospital, whither she had been removed from Silverton.  Deceased was then in bed, suffering from severe scalds.  Witness was also employed at the same mill as her aunt.  Witness was called to see the deceased shortly after the accident, and accompanied her on her removal to the Hospital.  -  Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the institution on the night of the 11th inst.  She was suffering from severe scalds, principally on the legs and lower parts of the body.  She lingered on until Saturday afternoon, when she died from injuries received, and the shock sustained by the system consequent upon them.  By the Coroner:  The three survivors were doing well, and witness considered that one of them would be sufficiently well to attend the adjourned Inquest on the 29th inst.  -  The Coroner thereupon adjourned the Inquest to the 29th instant, on which day the adjourned Inquiry on the body of the other victim, DENNIS, will also be held.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 November 1875
OXFORD - The Suicide Of MR J. W. SCARTH. - It transpired at the Coroner's Inquest on the death of MR J. W. SCARTH, who destroyed himself by a pistol shot at the Clarendon Hotel, Oxford, on Sunday last, that deceased was the son of MR JAMES SCARTH, of Exmouth, and was 29 years of age.  He was a land agent, and had lately been in business, residing at Wroxton, near Banbury.  The father had come to Oxford on Sunday last, hearing that he was unwell.  The deceased had complained a great deal lately as to press of business and matters connected therewith, and had also suffered from a fall which had occasioned injury to his head.  A verdict was returned that deceased had destroyed himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 November 1875
EXETER - Suicide Through Over Study. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of JOHN PALMER ZANE, son of the landlord of the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwell's.  MR ZANE, father of the deceased, said his son would have been 17 years of age next month had he lived.  He assisted him in the business, and had done so for some years.  Deceased had been rather low spirited during the last week;  but he usually enjoyed good health.  He recently complained of having a severe headache, and would sometimes say that he could hardly see anything before him, but still this caused no particular anxiety.  Of late the deceased had been reading a great deal, and was continually studying a dictionary.  He would at times appear to be deeply thinking, but when spoken to on the matter would reply that it was nothing.  He was perfectly happy at home.  He did not wish to go from the place he was engaged in.  He could be trusted to any amount, and had nothing to worry him that witness was aware of.  Witness last saw him alive about half-past four o'clock, and he was then in the bar bottling spirit.  An hour afterwards witness went into the cellar to shew some cider casks to a person named Joint, who wanted to buy some, and seeing someone on a ladder, he concluded that it was his son taking something from the top of one of the casks.  he suddenly saw a rope round his neck, and upon further examination deceased was found to be quite dead.  -  In reply to questions, witness said that nothing unpleasant had happened to deceased during the day.  The books he used to read were principally on poetry and history, and he was continually studying the dictionary, from which he was constantly taking and writing words.  The books were not of an exciting nature.  Deceased had seemed in low spirits about a week, and in his (witness's) estimation he overtaxed his brain.  He was always a good son.  -  Mr Joint said he had had some conversation with the last witness about cider casks, and accompanied MR ZANE to the cellar.  He saw deceased on a pair of steps, and MR ZANE on seeing the rope round his son's neck said to witness, "For God's sake take out your knife and cut the rope."  He did so, but found that the poor young fellow was dead.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity, caused by over study."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 November 1875
PLYMOUTH - Death Accelerated By Drink. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CROCKER, brewer, aged 50 years.  -  P.C. Chapple stated that on the 1st inst. he was on duty at the back of the market, and about half-past six in the evening he saw the deceased, who had been drinking, with a quart measure under his arm.  The deceased went into the "show," and whilst going down some steps he slipped his foot and fell over the steps, cutting his head very badly.  The head bled freely, and witness took him to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was attended to by the house surgeon.  The owner of the "show," - William Hurford - told witness that the fall was a pure accident, and that deceased's head must have come in contact with the pewter measure that he was carrying under his arm.  -  John Brewer, landlord of the Plough Inn, stated that CROCKER was in his employ as brewer, and about half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 1st inst. he was sent an errand.  He was not the worse for liquor, although he was addicted to drink, and had been drinking.  -  Mr C. Stibbs, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital stated that when CROCKER was brought into the Hospital he was suffering from a severe cut over the left temple.  He was evidently a man who had drunk heavily, and the third day after his admission he was seized with a severe attack of delirium tremens.  Deceased died from the cut in his head, but death was accelerated by his drinking habits.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 November 1875
PLYMOUTH - A Child Suffocated. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Fortescue Hotel, Mutley, into the circumstances attending the death of an illegitimate male child, aged about five weeks.  MARY ANN ROGERS, the mother, said that the deceased had not been registered or baptised.  About eleven o'clock on Saturday night last she retired to rest with the deceased, who was lying in her left arm, and when she awoke on Sunday morning she found that the child was dead.  The deceased's head was under the blankets, and there were several marks on the face.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from "Accidental Suffocation."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In Keyham Factory. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN ANDREWS, aged 45 years.  William Walters, assistant boilermaker in Keyham Factory, stated that the deceased was employed on the "travellers" at work in the boilermakers' shop and on the morning of the 11th inst. the deceased had charge of the lower traveller whilst witness had charge of the centre one.  Between 9 and 10 o'clock he heard the deceased cry out, and when he looked towards him the deceased help up his right leg with the foot off, and exclaimed, "Oh, my God, this is a pretty job."  Deceased was then at the end of the centre traveller in the doorway at the head of a pair of steps, and his foot was caught between the end of the traveller and the wall, and was dragged completely off.  He did not blame anyone for the accident.  -  Henry Parkhouse said that he saw the deceased standing in the doorway, when the centre traveller came up and caught the foot.  The boot deceased had on was quite sound.  -  Walter Reid, staff-surgeon in the Royal Naval Hospital, stated that when the deceased was admitted into the Hospital he was suffering from collapse, but not from loss of blood.  The right foot had been torn off, and the tendons and muscles were dragged out with it.  The leg was amputated below the knee, and the deceased was progressing favourably until Friday last, when he grew worse and died on the following morning.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and one of their number asked the Coroner if he would make a recommendation that in future all such cases should be taken to the nearest Hospital.  -  The Coroner replied that he had only to deal with the present case, and that he should not make any recommendation.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 November 1875
EXETER - The Late Accident At Silverton Paper Mill. -  The overturning of an esparto boiler at Mr H. Drew's paper mills, Silverton, about a fortnight since resulted in the death of two of the six sufferers within a short time after the accident.  A third - MARTHA WALKER, a married woman, aged 42, died yesterday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and in the afternoon an Inquest was opened.  -  FRANCIS WALKER, husband of the deceased, said that he was a farm labourer, and resided at Silverton.  His wife previous to her death worked as a grass-sorter at the Silverton Paper Mills.  she was so employed on the 11th inst., the day on which she received the injuries, which had since resulted in her death.  Witness on returning from work in the evening heard that his wife had been scalded by some caustic liquor being thrown over her from the boiler;  but did not see her until the following Sunday, when he visited her at the Hospital.  In answer to inquiries he then made, the deceased said she did not believe the accident was caused by anyone's neglect.  -  Mr Comming, house surgeon at the Hospital, deposed that the deceased was admitted to the institution on the night of the 11th inst.  She had been severely scalded about the lower parts of the body, and especially the legs near to the knees.  She never rallied from the time of her admittance but expired late on Monday night, from tetanus, combined with the shock to the system resulting from the scalds received.  -  The Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until the 29th inst., upon which day the Inquests upon the two other women will be resumed.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 November 1875
PILTON - A Child Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held at Pilton, Barnstaple, last evening, on a child named ELIZA GREGORY, 6 years of age, daughter of poor parents, residing at Pilton, who had died from injuries received by burning the previous evening.  The child had been left in the house with another about the same age, the mother having gone out to speak to a neighbour;  and it being tea time, the child, in endeavouring to put on the kettle, set her pinafore on fire, and in an instant was enveloped in flames.  She rushed out into the passage, and there fell down on her face; and was fearfully burnt all over her body.  She was found in that condition by a neighbour attracted by the cries, and the flames were smothered, but the mischief had been done, and the child died in a few hours.  A verdict of "Accidentally Burnt" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 November 1875
EXETER - The Recent Mill Accident At Silverton. - The adjourned Inquiry into the deaths of MARTHA WALKER and AMELIA ROCK, two of the women who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, in consequence of being scalded by boiling caustic soda, in an accident at the mills on the 11th inst., was resumed yesterday, at Exeter, before Mr Coroner Hooper.  One of the half dozen women who were injured, Emily Quant, was sufficiently recovered to give evidence.  She stated that one of the boilers of boiling caustic soda, in the room in which she and her companions were working, turned over without warning, and discharged eight or nine hogsheads of burning liquid over the room.  All the women were immersed, and, as previously announced, three have died.  Other evidence went to prove that the boiler which turned over had been in use in the mills about eight months.  It was made by Messrs. Taylor and Bodley, of Exeter;  and Mr Taylor said it was of similar construction to many other boilers in the various paper mills in the county.  It had a perforated false bottom, and was hung upon hollow trunnions.  There was a worm-wheel attached, and when the boiler was required to revolve motion was given it by means of this worm-wheel.  Mr Taylor could not account for the accident in any way;  but with this case before him, recommended some means for locking the boiler when revolving.  The only suggested cause of the accident was made by Thomas Southcott, the foreman at Bridge Mills, and endorsed by Richard Sanders, the engineer. They considered it possible that on the steam being turned off from one boiler by the machine, that there was a greater pressure on the other, and that the vibration to which one of the witnesses had spoken had put the worm in motion.  -  During the Inquiry Mr Learing, a nephew of the first woman who died, stated that in consequence of a communication from him the Home Secretary had directed the factory inspector, Mr Buller, to inquire into the cause of the accident, and he had a copy of his report;  but the Coroner did not think it material.  It corroborated in the main the facts as above recorded, and exonerated Mr Drew, the owner, from blame.  -  The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" and a similar verdict was recorded by another Jury, who at a later period of the day inquired into the death of the third victim, SARAH DENNIS.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 December 1875
PLYMOUTH - Accidental Suffocation. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of ALFRED W. NELSON, assistant master at the Rev. H. Marriott's school, Gascoyne-place, Plymouth.  The deceased retired to rest on Monday evening last at his lodgings, in Hoe-street, and on Tuesday morning he was found dead in his bed.  Mr Hingston, surgeon, was called in, and stated that his opinion was that the deceased, whilst asleep, was seized with a fit and was accidentally suffocated.  The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from Accidental Suffocation whilst in a Fit."

Western Morning News, Friday 3 December 1875
PLYMSTOCK - An Inquest was held at Plymstock yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR ELIAS HODGE, farmer, who was found dead in bed that morning.  Evidence was given by Mr Mould, surgeon, and in accordance therewith, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 December 1875
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Thursday respecting the death of MARK KNOWLES, a porter employed at Messrs. Allsopp's stores, Queen-street.  -  ELIZABETH KNOWLES, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was 38 years of age, and about a week ago complained of a pain in the chest.  She advised him to call in a doctor, but he refused, saying that he did not consider it necessary.  He always had a cough, but that had not increased of late.  The deceased went to his work as usual on Wednesday morning.  He did not complain, but, on the contrary, said he was better.  -  Thomas Davey, a cellarman, employed at the same stores, stated that he was with the deceased all day on Wednesday.  Deceased made a good dinner, and did not complain of being ill.  About four o'clock he was bringing a basket of rubbish from the top stairs, when he suddenly dropped it and went into the allowance-room.  He then complained of great pain in the chest, and commenced knocking it.  The deceased was taken to his home in Castle-street, but he expired before arriving there.  -  The evidence of the several witnesses was consistent with death having resulted from natural causes, and that the most probable cause was disease of the heart.  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the testimony.

TEIGNMOUTH - Sudden Death At Teignmouth. - The adjourned Inquest respecting the death of ANGELINA GODFREY, who was found dead in a room in which she resided at [?] Northumberland-place, Teignmouth, on Sunday last, was held this evening.  Police-sergeant Knight stated that he had made a further investigation of the room, but found nothing more than the ordinary household furniture, with food, and 2 ½d. in cash.  -  SARAH WALLACE GODFREY, sister of deceased and residing in Torquay, said the deceased was of very eccentric habits, and would do as she pleased.  About eighteen months ago she came to Teignmouth to live for the benefit of her health, and prior to this she resided with her (witness) in Torquay.  Witness was the owner of the cottage in which deceased was found, and the adjoining front house.  Deceased had a monetary interest in their house at Torquay.  She came to Teignmouth to reside at the consent of witness, but not in accordance with her wish.  Witness frequently visited her.  On such occasions she was accustomed to pay the accounts deceased was owing and leave her some cash, besides which she received the rent from Mr Wills, who occupied another portion of the house, and which amounted to 4s. weekly.  -  Maria Wills corroborated the statements made by the previous witness as to deceased's eccentricities and mode of living.  She also stated that on Sunday last she, as usual, took deceased some dinner, and called to her (she never went in her room), but received no answer.  Her husband also called, with like result.  He then went for P.S. Knight.  -  William Henry Rawlings, surgeon, deposed to having made a post mortem examination, as requested by the Coroner, and said he concluded that deceased died from disease of the heart, accelerated by abnormal pressure, brought on through the deformity of the spine.  -  The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.  -  The Coroner remarked that a woman possessing the means of deceased, ought not to have been allowed to have lived in the manner she did, and it was wonderful that in a town like Teignmouth, with its medical officers, overseers, &c., that such a woman should be residing there without is being known by the public generally.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 December 1875
BERE FERRERS - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Beeralston on Saturday respecting the death of SUSAN HURVED, aged 5 years.  On November 20th, the deceased was taking some ashes from a grate when she set her clothes on fire and was burnt so severely that she died on Thursday night.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 December 1875
NEWTON ABBOT - Starvation At Newton. - THOMAS BRYANT, a painter, died in No. 4 Court, East-street, Newton, on Tuesday night.  His habitation was a mere hovel, and he had been living there for a considerable time past - ever since the death of his wife.  He had not been seen out for several weeks, and on Tuesday night his only companion (his son, a boy about 12 years of age) gave an alarm that his father was dead.  It appears that applications for relief were made to the parish authorities only a few hours before his death.  An Inquest was held last evening, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Inflammation of the Lungs, accelerated by want of food."

PLYMOUTH - Immorality And Neglect. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of an illegitimate child named HENRY WILLIAM HOOKWAY, aged 7 months.  The first witness called was Connell Whipple, surgeon, who stated that by the request of the coroner he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased.  He found no marks of violence on the body, but the child had not been kept sufficiently clean.  It suffered from an hereditary constitutional disease, which required extra and increased care, food and treatment, the two former of which he did not think it had received.  He did not consider the cause of death was the want of sufficient food, and was not certain that with the greatest care the child would have lived any great length of time.  The disease might possibly have existed without the person who had care of the child knowing it.  The wasted appearance was due in a great measure to the disease and not to want of food.  If the deceased had had better nourishment the disease would not have made so much headway.  -  Elizabeth Parkhouse stated that she resided in Grosvenor-street, and in May last ANN HOOKWAY (a widow) mother of deceased, came to her house to be confined.  She told witness that she came from the North of Devon, that the father of deceased was a business man of the town, and that she came there to be confined privately.  The deceased was born on the 18th of May.  -  Sarah Richards deposed that she resided at 33 Stillman-street, and had been in the habit of taking care of children. She received the child about four months ago, and ever since she had had charge of it, it had been very unwell and wasting away, but she had not taken it to a surgeon, nor had she had any advice.  She had always kept it clean, but she admitted that the surgeon told her that it was very dirty.  The child was taken ill on Tuesday week last, after it had been vaccinated;  it became worse on Saturday night, and died the following morning.  The morning the deceased died she went to Mr Harper, surgeon, who vaccinated it, to get a certificate of death from him, although he had not seen deceased during its illness.  -  Eliza Gorman said that she was the sister-in-law of the mother of the deceased, and that the mother resided at Mill-street, Bideford, and kept a dairy, and had four legitimate children.  Her husband was a shipwright, but he had been dead some time.  When the mother came to Plymouth witness sent her to the witness Parkhouse, who consented to take her in.  The mother paid 4s. a week for the maintenance of the deceased. Witness last saw the child about a month ago, and she was then told it was very well.  MRS HOOKWAY constantly asked her in her letters how the deceased was.  -  In answer to the Coroner, witness said that it was no difference to her whether the deceased was thriving or not.  The Coroner condemned the system of keeping young children that was carried on in Plymouth.  In the present case a MRS HOOKWAY got into trouble and not wishing the people of Bideford to know her condition, she came to Plymouth to be confined.  She left the town soon afterwards, leaving behind the deceased;  and she did not care how it was looked after.  The child was diseased, and its state required especial attention, which, however, it did not receive.  He did not think that the Jury could make anyone criminally liable, but he thought that there was neglect on some persons' part, and that they ought to be censured.  -    The Jury after consulting for upwards of half an hour, returned a verdict "That the deceased died from Natural Causes;  but, at the same time they considered that the conduct of the mother (MRS HOOKWAY) and Eliza Gorman deserved to be severely censured, although they did not hold them to be criminally responsible; also that great blame was due to Sarah Richards, for not taking that care of the deceased that its condition required; and they strongly urged her to give up the system of taking in children."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 December 1875
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of an illegitimate child named ANN MILTON, aged 4 years.  It was stated that the deceased whilst returning from the Board School in Howe-street, on the 19th of November, was knocked down by a cart, which was being driven by Edmund Hitchcock, and the wheels passed over its right leg.  The deceased was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found that there was an abrasion of the skin about six inches in length, extending across the knee joint, and in spite of the treatment it received, it died on the Tuesday from exhaustion, caused by the large amount of discharge.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" exonerating the driver from all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 December 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr A. B. Bone, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport last evening relative to the death of ELIZABETH WARNER, a middle-aged woman.  -  THOMAS WARNER, a marine-store dealer, carrying on business in Morice-street, stated that of late his wife had given way to excessive drinking.  On Saturday night last he and the deceased went to bed at their usual time, and upon awaking the following morning he found his wife lying by his side dead.  He asserted that he never got drunk, but admitted that he struck the deceased about two months since.  A woman named Yeo deposed that both deceased and the husband were addicted to drink, and that the latter continually ill-used his wife.  About a fortnight ago she saw him knock her down, and strike and kick her until she became insensible.  He was then very drunk.  -  Mrs Ann Gooding said that she had constantly heard deceased and her husband quarrelling and had seen the latter strike deceased.  She had seen the deceased lie upon rags in the store, and sleep whilst in a state of intoxication, and had told her when sober that deceased was injuring her constitution and told her not to do [?] otherwise it would cause her death.  Deceased replied "Well, when I am dead you will have to bury me."  Witness bought some rum for the deceased the day before her death and the deceased drank the whole of it raw.  Charles Gooding said he heard the deceased make a peculiar noise early on Sunday morning, and afterwards heard her cry out "Lord have mercy on me."  -  Mr J. L. Cutcliffe, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body.  The liver was diseased and it presented the appearance of the habitual use of spirits.  The heart, lungs and kidneys were congested but apoplexy was the cause of death.  There was a slight wound upon the forehead and there were bruises upon the back of her hands.  The brain was very much congested, but there were no marks of ill-usage.  The Coroner recalled WARNER, who persisted in saying that he had not struck his wife for two months.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead," adding that "Death was accelerated by heavy drinking."  -  The Coroner told WARNER that the Jury were unanimous in their opinion that he had stated nothing but what was utterly untrue, and he should be more careful for the future.  The Jury were also of opinion that Mrs Gooding was then in a state of intoxication.  He (the Coroner) had heard that she had a large family, and if they copied her example it would be a very bad one.  He advised her to give up drink.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 December 1875
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of WILLIAM JAMES EASTERBROOK, aged four months.  The mother of the deceased stated that she found the child dying by her side in bed.  It was believed that convulsions were the cause of death, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 December 1875
DAWLISH - Death From Burning At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at Dawlish on Saturday last by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of CHARLOTTE MARTHA BICKHAM, who died from the effects of burns received on December 18th, through the bursting of a jar of black grate varnish, which had caught on fire.  The brother and sister of the deceased were severely burnt at the same time, and as they were too ill to leave the house to give evidence, the Jury heard the brother's statement at his residence.  He said that on hearing a slight hissing noise from the jar of black varnish, which he had placed on the kitchen fire, he took it off, and when near the door the jar burst, and the flames spread. The deceased, seeing witness struggling among the flames, went to his rescue, but ran against the door and closed it.  Afterwards, in getting out of the room, she was severely burnt.  His other sister, who was sitting at the table, was also severely burnt in getting out.  Witness threw several buckets of water over the flames which then subsided.  The jar was of brown earthenware;  there was very little fire in the grate at the time.  -  WILLIAM BICKHAM, a younger brother, although not present when the accident occurred, gave a similar account as detailed to him by the deceased.  He also stated that the jar had been used for the same purpose for the past nine or ten years.  -  Mr Parsons, surgeon, said the younger sister ran to him for medical assistance, which he rendered to both.  He despaired of the life of deceased from the first as she was very delicate.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Burning."  The Coroner expressed sympathy  with the brother, but dwelt on the incautious and too prevalent practice of placing this kind of varnish in earthen jars on the fire, and said he hoped that this accident would be a caution to all accustomed to use it.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 December 1875
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, relative to the death of THOMAS EDWARD STADDON, aged 17 months.  ELIZABETH STADDON, mother of the deceased, stated that she resided in Frederick-street, and on Sunday last whilst lying on the bed the deceased stretched out his arms and died.  He had always been very delicate.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident In Cattewater.  - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, relative to the death of H. VAN PUTTEN, aged 40 years.  Thomas J. Stevens said that he was agent for the steamship Denia, Captain Clarke, from Glasgow, and that the deceased, who was a seaman on board, was a native of Holland.  On the afternoon of the 15th inst. the deceased and two other seamen were in a boat for the purpose of weighing the kedge of their vessel, which was lying in Cattewater, when a barge came into collision with the Denia, and jammed the boat.  The deceased stood up, either for the purpose of "fending off" the barge or jumping into it, and he thus got crushed between the two vessels.  The two other seamen sat in the bottom of the boat, and thus avoided injury.  When the barge got away, the two men found that the deceased was overboard and very much injured.  They got him into their boat and conveyed him to the Hospital.  The barge was beating up Cattewater, and there was an easterly wind and a flood-tide.  The same day the men of the barge came on board the Denia, and told those on board that the name of their vessel was the John Jane, of Torpoint, and that they were grieved to hear that an accident had happened.  From what witness had heard, and from what he knew of the strength of the tide and the position of the Denia, he thought that the barge might have been carried against the Denia.  -  Mr C. C. Gibbs, surgeon, at the South Devon Hospital, said that he examined the deceased, and found his left upper jaw broken and the lower jaw broken in two places.  The breast and collar bones were also broken and most of the ribs on the right side.  The left lung was pierced by the ribs and from the first he saw that the case was a fatal one.  Deceased was sensible up to the time of his death, which occurred on Monday night.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attaching no blame to the men on board the barge.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 December 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - A Family Poisoned At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, the newly-elected Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Devonport Guildhall on Friday, relative to the death of SUSANNAH ELLEN PARNELL, aged about four years.  It was stated that the deceased and her parents resided in James-street.  On Thursday last the grandmother of the deceased made some broth for the family's dinner, and into this she put a quantity of parsley, which was taken from some which had been used a few days previously by the family without any ill effects.  After it was cooked the mother of the deceased, who had been recently confined, and who partook of a small quantity, said that it was sour, and asked the nurse (a Mrs King) who was attending her to taste it.  This the nurse did and shortly afterwards vomited and became very ill as did also MRS PARNELL.  At noon the deceased, her grandmother and a charwoman had some of the broth for dinner and the child remarked that it was very peppery.  She immediately afterwards complained of being unwell and soon became worse, but did not vomit.  At ten o'clock the same night she was seized with a fit and died.  A surgeon was sent for, but he did not arrive until after death.  The grandmother and charwoman, who also partook of the broth, were very ill and the former now lies in a very precarious state.  The father, who was a dairyman, did not partake of the broth.  -  Mr James Bennett, surgeon, said that the father of the deceased came to him at eight o'clock on Thursday night and asked him to come to his house, saying that several of his family were very ill.  Thinking PARNELL was the husband of one of his patients who resided in Pembroke-street, he went there, but found he was mistaken, and he then returned home and waited until ten o'clock when PARNELL came again and he immediately went with him to the house where he found the grandmother very ill and the child dead.  From the appearance of the latter he believed that she died from the effects of an irritant poison.  In answer to a question witness said that monkshood, which bore a resemblance to parsley, would cause similar symptoms, but he could not say that that was the exact cause of death.  He had examined some of the remaining parsley, and found nothing amiss with it.  The Coroner considered it necessary that a post mortem examination of the deceased should be made, and that the grandmother, if she had sufficiently recovered, should attend and give evidence, and he therefore adjourned the Inquiry until tomorrow (Tuesday).

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 December 1875
STOKE DAMEREL - The Poisoning Of A Family At Devonport. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SUSANNAH ELLEN PARNELL, aged 3 ½ years, was resumed at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr James Vaughan).  -  Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, stated that by the request of the Coroner, he had made a post mortem examination  of the deceased, whom he found in every respect a well nourished and fine child.  In his opinion the child died from arsenical poisoning.  He found a small quantity of arsenic in her stomach.  He had analysed some fluid which had been given him and also the broth remaining in the saucepan, and was perfectly satisfied that both contained a large quantity of arsenic.  Still he would advise the Coroner to take the opinion of a public analyst, for he thought it would be more satisfactory to the Jury.  He gave his opinion as a medical man.  He was not accustomed to constant analysis, and if it should turn out that some person was criminally responsible he would not like to take the responsibility upon himself.  He was assisted in his examination by three other surgeons (Messrs. Thom, Moore and Guard), and they all concurred in his opinion that death resulted from arsenical poisoning, and also that the broth and fluid contained large quantities of the same poison.  He had examined the parsley and tasted it, and found nothing amiss with it.  -  A Juror:  The Jury were told on Friday by one of the witnesses that the deceased never vomited, and you say in your evidence that the gullet was congested, very likely from constant vomiting.  Can you explain this?  -  Witness:  I was told by the mother of the deceased that the child vomited continually, and when it did not vomit froth issued from its mouth.  The deceased did vomit.   -       WILLIAM PARNELL, father of the deceased, stated that he was a dairyman, and carried on business in James-street.  On Thursday afternoon the deceased was taken ill and vomited very much.  He went to work and upon returning at seven o'clock the deceased was very much worse.  His wife, the grandmother, the nurse (Mrs Gill) and the charwoman, who partook of the broth, were also very ill.  He immediately went for Mr Bennett, surgeon, and told him that all his family were very ill and asked him to come to his house.  Mr Bennett said he would come shortly and upon witness asking him what he called shortly, Mr Bennett replied "I will be there before half an hour."  He waited until eleven o'clock and as the surgeon did not arrive he went for him again, but during his absence the child died.  Mr Bennett attended his wife in her confinement and therefore knew where he lived, but on the present occasion witness again told him where he resided.  Mr Bennett did not come until midnight, and then he gave the sufferers no medicine or advice.  The grandmother and witness's wife were then very ill.  Mr Bennett promised to call again the following morning, but he did not put in an appearance until four o'clock in the afternoon.  He did not use arsenic in his business, but some months ago some poison was bought to kill vermin in the house.  -  The Coroner said that MRS VEAL, (the grandmother) was still very ill, and he thought it advisable that her depositions should be taken and the Jury therefore proceeded to the house where her evidence was taken at her bedside.  She stated that on Thursday last she made the broth of which the family partook.  It contained meat, turnips, and water, and after it was cooked parsley and bread were put into it.  She was alone in the room all the time it was cooking, but she did not examine the saucepan to see if there was any sediment in it.  No person assisted her in making the broth and she could not account for anything getting into it.  The saucepan was kept in a cupboard upside down, with the cover off.  She partook of the broth as well as the others, but none of them ate the meal.  The meat was purchased on Saturday week last, and cooked on the following Thursday.  Witness gave the deceased the broth to partake of.  She had never sent for any poison to destroy vermin.  -  Mary Collings, the charwoman employed at MR PARNELL'S, deposed that about three months since she was told by MRS PARNELL to purchase some poison for the purpose of killing vermin in the house.  She did so, and the same night she spread the poison - which was a paste - upon bread and butter and hid it in the room.  She did not collect the remains the following morning, but she threw away the bottle the poison had been in.  She had never bought any arsenic.  -  Upon returning to the Guildhall, the Coroner said that he had made a searching Inquiry, and had come to the conclusion that the deceased child was accidentally poisoned by arsenic, which had got into the broth in some mysterious way.  There was not one tittle of evidence to shew who placed the arsenic in the broth and under the circumstances they could do no other than return a verdict of Accidental Poisoning.  He was perfectly satisfied with the analysis of Mr Laity, and he knew that if they employed a public analyst the result could be no other than to confirm Mr Laity's opinion.  -  The Jury then retired, and after a long consultation returned the following verdict:- "That the death of the deceased child was caused by Arsenical Poisoning, but there was no evidence to shew how she came by it, or how it was administered."

Western Morning News, Monday 3 January 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday evening concerning the sudden death of MATTHEW BALL, a fisherman, of Mevagissey.  It appeared from the evidence of Mr Kendall, landlord of the Ring of Bells, Woolster-street, where deceased died, and where the Inquest was held, that deceased came there the previous day, and complaining of being slightly unwell went to bed.  Mr Kendall attended upon him as late as half-past 10 on Friday night, and left him apparently comfortable.  The next morning when deceased's brother came to call him the man was quite dead.  The Jury, of whom Mr Wheeler was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.  Deceased was a fine strong man of about 50 years of age.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 January 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On A Railway. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of MR GEORGE TRUSCOTT, aged 47 years, builder, of Colebrook, Plympton St. Mary.  -  Thomas Warren, policeman on the South Devon Railway, stationed at Laira, said that about five minutes after the mail train passed Laira on Saturday night he heard groaning, and upon proceeding towards the sound he found the deceased lying upon the rails with both legs cut off.  Deceased was conscious and upon being asked what his name was he replied "TRUSCOTT," and said he resided at Colebrook.  Witness asked him how he came on the line, and he said he had not been on the line.  Witness then telegraphed to Plymouth and received a reply that an engine should be sent out, but a spring cart was procured before it arrived, and in this the deceased was conveyed to Plymouth.  Witness did not hear or see the deceased on the line previous to the accident.  -  John Northcote, inspector on the South Devon Railway, stated that he had examined the spot where the deceased was found, and should imagine that the deceased got over the fence which was near and that he then fell down.  By thus getting on the line he could reach Plympton much quicker.  -  George Westaway, driver of the mail train, proved that the train was a quarter of an hour late in starting from Plymouth on Saturday night and that the speed in passing Laira was about thirty-five miles an hour.  He did not see the deceased nor did he fell that the engine passed over anything.  -  Mr C. C. Gibbes, surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that shortly after nine p.m. on Saturday the deceased was admitted into the Hospital, and upon examining him he found that his right leg had been torn off just below the knee and the left just above the ankle.  He had a contused wound on the upper part of his head about an inch long, and from the symptoms it was thought that the base of the skull was fractured.  The deceased was not in a fit state for him to undergo amputation, and he gradually sank, and died on Sunday morning. He told witness that he had been on the line, but had no business there;  and upon witness asking him further questions respecting the accident, he replied "Don't bother me."  -  The Coroner said that the deceased had no business upon the line, and that he was using it as a short cut.  It was evident that he was run over by the train, and that there was no one to blame.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that the railway authorities were deserving great praise for the promptitude and energy they took in the matter, and that the surgeon of the Hospital was also deserving of praise for the attention he paid to the deceased.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 January 1875
LYDFORD - Dartmoor Convict Prison. - An Inquest has been held respecting the death of a convict named JOSEPH FROST, whose antecedents from childhood appear to have been unexceptionally bad, whilst his conduct in the prisons he had been confined in is reported to have been villainous.  He was undergoing a sentence of ten years' penal servitude, having previously been convicted of wounding the medical officer of a prison where he was confined, and sentenced to five years' penal servitude.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 January 1876
DARTMOUTH - Suicide At Dartmouth. - Mr Prideaux, Coroner for Dartmouth, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of MARY STANDIFORD.  The deceased, who was 77 years of age, cut her throat in three places with a razor, and although it was evident from the first that she could not recover, she lingered for a week, and died yesterday from exhaustion.  Mr Hawkins, a cutler, stated that about two months ago the old woman bought a new razor of him and said she wanted it to cut her corns with.  He identified the razor with which she cut her throat as the one he sold her, and added that although he asked eighteen pence at first, he let her have it for sixpence.  A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the First and Last Inn, Plymouth, last evening relative to the death of JOHN HENRY EDGCUMBE, aged 42 years.  -  MARY ANN EDGCUMBE, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was a labourer in the employ of Messrs. Burnard and Lack, manure merchants, Cattedown.  On Saturday he went to work and returned at four o'clock, and whilst he was having tea he complained of a difficulty of breathing.  About half-pat five he went out, and upon returning remarked that "he had hardly breath enough to crawl home".  Witness put a poultice on his chest and then went for a surgeon, but upon returning she found her husband dead in bed.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - A Fatal Fall.  -  Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Stonehouse into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH MATHEWS, aged 65 years.  -  John Pine, labourer, stated that on Monday, the 27th ult., he was about to leave a beershop in Newport-street, kept by a Mrs Baker, when he observed the deceased, and a Mrs Wollacott playing together.  Whilst walking through Mrs Baker's passage the deceased fell down and Mrs Wollacott fell upon her.  He did not observe whether the deceased was drunk or not.  -  Emily Wollacott, residing at 24 Newport-street, stated that on the afternoon of the 27th ult. she went as far as Mrs Baker's public-house with the deceased and her husband.  They were about to enter the house when the deceased fell down and she fell upon her.  The deceased and her husband were in liquor but not drunk.  -  Mr T. Leah, surgeon, said that on the evening of the 28th ult. he went to see the deceased, and found her suffering from erysipelas of the face, which, no doubt, was caused by the fall.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 January 1876
EXETER - Fatal Use Of Chloral By An Exeter Lady. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday afternoon on the body of MISS JESSIE RAWLE, 35 years of age, who it appeared had died on the previous day from an overdose of chloral.  The deceased, a handsome, well-built lady, about 35 years of age, was step-daughter to MR W. KENDALL, justice of the peace, with whom she resided.  From the statements made by Mary Ann Dimond and Harriet Chamberlain, domestic servants, it appeared that for about two years the deceased had been in the habit of taking "Hunter's solution of chloral" in order to soothe pains in the stomach;  and Dimond spoke to having often found the lady lying on the sofa and on the floor in an unconscious state.  On Monday MISS RAWLE was rather depressed, and complained of the pain.  She asked Dimond to let her have a bottle of chloral, which had been brought on Saturday, and an hour or two later Dimond noticed that the bottle was half empty.  About half-past one the servant found MISS RAWLE lying on the floor in her room and thinking she was asleep as she had so often seen her before, took no notice.  Subsequently the servant placed a pillow under the deceased's head, and covered her with a blanket to "make her comfortable."  Finding at the expiration of an hour and a half or more that MISS RAWLE did not wake, the servants at last became alarmed and sent to the club for MR KENDALL, who at once ordered a medical man to be fetched.  Dr Perkins found that MISS RAWLE had been dead more than an hour.  Search was made for the bottle of chloral, but it could not be found;  but on the mantel shelf there was a wine-glass half full of liquid which Dr Perkins found to be water containing 25 grains of chloral.  He was subsequently shewn one of several empty chloral bottles.  The directions on the label stated that from half to a whole teaspoonful might be taken by an adult.  this being an indefinite quantity he had written to the makers, asking the strength of the solution, and had received a telegraphic reply to the effect that each drachm contained 25 grains of chloral;  a full bottle would therefore contain 300 grains of the drug.  The witness estimated that deceased probably consumed in two hours 125 grains, fifteen to twenty-five grains being a sufficient dose.  As much as fifty-one grains had been taken at a time;  but it took several doctors four hours to bring the patient to consciousness.  The immediate cause of death in this case were congestion of the lungs and apoplexy.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Case Of Voluntary Starvation. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr Brian, held an Inquest last evening concerning one of the most remarkable cases of unnatural death that it has ever been our let to record.  The Inquest which lasted nearly four hours, was held at the Seymour Arms, North-street, the name of the deceased being FRANCES JANE BESLEY, aged 39 years.  The Jury visited the deceased's room, the top room of a respectable house in Gasgoigne-street, which they found in an extraordinarily filthy state, and the corpse was fearfully emaciated and in a horrible condition - covered with living filth.  Mr Bennett, solicitor, watched the Inquiry on behalf of MR H. BESLEY.  -  Mary Fear stated that she was a charwoman, and lived in Gascoyne-street.  She had known the deceased for about seven years, and of late the family consisted of the deceased, two brothers, and her father.  For the last few weeks the deceased had frequently sent for witness to go after articles of food and drink for, but witness had not seen her for about a fortnight.  On the last occasion when witness saw the deceased she was in her brother HENRY'S room;  she then looked very thin and had a handkerchief over her head.  On Saturday night last witness bought the deceased some rum and an orange, and she then gave her 6d. for herself.  She did not see the deceased, as when she gave her the above-named articles deceased only just put her hand outside the door.  Beside the orange and the rum and some tea and sugar, witness had not fetched the deceased anything for a fortnight.  Witness had never been in the deceased's room, and she had not fetched her so much food of late as formerly.  Witness knew that the deceased was out of the house about two years ago, and then she came to her house.  She did not know whether the deceased had had any fire in her room, and she had not been aware it was in such a filthy state as it was at present.  Within the past few days the deceased's father had ceased to reside in the house and of late no servant had been kept.  When witness took the orange and rum to the deceased the room was in total darkness.  She believed deceased understood what she was doing.  She always appeared very clean except on the last occasion when witness saw her.  Witness often purchased small quantities of spirit for the deceased.  When witness last saw her she appeared to be in trouble about some property that was about to be sold, and also appeared to be in trouble about her friends wishing her to go to Australia against her desire.  Witness occasionally pledged articles for the deceased, and did so a fortnight since;  she pawned some plate, for which she received 2s. 6d.  -  Ann Jewells said that she had resided in the same house as the deceased - 1 Gascoyne-street - for six months, but during that period she had only seen the deceased once, but had frequently heard her walking up and down the stairs.  Witness often took a cup of tea to the deceased who occupied the attic, and something to eat, and she received it by putting out her hand from the door, but never shewed her face, nor opened the door wide enough for witness to look in.  On Sunday witness asked deceased through the door if she would have a cup of tea, and she replied "that she did not wish to be disturbed."  Witness went after some spirit for the deceased on Saturday and gave her something to eat.  She never saw deceased take any meals with the remainder of the family. -  By the Foreman:  She did not know whether unkind feeling existed among the deceased and other members of the family.  Witness always believed her to be in a sound state of mind.  -  Mr W. H. Pearse, M.D., deposed to having seen the deceased twice during the past two years, the last occasion being about eight months since in her house.  Deceased then came to the stairs and witness gave her some directions respecting her father, who was ill.  She was orderly dressed and appeared to understand what he said.  When attending the father he had heard deceased talking with her brother HENRY.  On Sunday week last MR HENRY BESLEY, at witness's request, removed the father to a Mrs Langford's house in order that he might get his food regularly and be kept clean.  About three o'clock on Monday afternoon witness was called to the house and upon entering the deceased's room he found her lying on the bed, with her feet resting upon the floor.  He believed she had been dead some hours;  she was quite cold.  Deceased was insufficiently clad, she having no linen upon her person.  In order to examine the deceased he placed her upon the bed.  He found no marks of violence upon the body; but she was almost in a state of nudity, and was in a very emaciated condition.  Death must have resulted from want of proper food and from the cold.  Deceased was insufficiently clad for the inclemency of the weather,.  There was plenty of bedding in the room to shelter the deceased from the cold.  The reason he ordered the deceased's father to be removed, was that both the son ROBERT and the deceased were unable to attend to his wants, and administer food.  He could never get the deceased to come into the room while he was attending MR BESLEY, senr.   -   MR HENRY BESLEY stated that he was a draper's assistant;  his place of business was in Bedford-street, but he slept at 1 Gascoyne-street.  Witness had never complained of being unwell, but she was a person of very peculiar habits.  It was her own desire to live in the room in question.  Witness had several times wished the deceased to leave the house, so that he might place her in better lodgings, and had offered to pay for them, but she refused to leave, and declined all interference on his part.  He had several times endeavoured to enter her room, but she would not allow him, and in fact locked the door against him.  About eighteen months since witness last looked into the room, and it was then in a very filthy state.  he remonstrated with her about it and told her to get a woman to clean it, witness telling her that he would pay for it.  The deceased promised to get it done, but did not do so. Witness was not aware, however, the room was in such a filthy or disorderly condition.  He did not consider his sister was an imbecile, in fact he looked upon her to take charge of his brother.  Witness last saw her on Thursday, when she appeared in her usual health, and did not make any complaint to him.  His brother, and the deceased were in the receipt of rents amounting to £30 per annum clear.  The £30 was only for food and not for the purchase of wearing apparel, coal, or anything else.  On Friday last the deceased asked him for some money to pay the charwoman, which he gave her.  Deceased always kept away from his society, and only came to him when she wanted anything, but if he had had any idea of the result that had taken place he should have undoubtedly forced an entrance into the room.  Witness was not aware that the deceased had sent things from her room to pawn.  There was some uneasiness on the part of the deceased and his brother some short time since about his selling the property, but they were both satisfied with witness's arrangements.  Of late it seemed to him that the deceased took to drinking spirit, and by night she appeared to be under the influence of what she had taken.   -   By the Foreman:  There was another room in the house in which the deceased could have lived had she been willing to do so.  When witness spoke to deceased about the condition of her room, she always told him she had thoroughly cleaned it.  Witness saw that the money he left the deceased was not appropriated to a proper use, and therefore stopped giving it her, telling her that he would settle all bills.  There was plenty of food in the house for his brother and deceased to partake of, and they generally took it at a late hour at night or the small hours of the morning.  Witness always took his meals at his business.  -  The Coroner, when about to sum up, was interrupted by Mr Bennett, who said to MR BESLEY, that as the remarks of the Coroner might be painful to him, that it might be better for him to leave the room.  MR BESLEY then left and Mr Brian said that he did not in anyway intend to hurt MR BESLEY'S feelings, but after the course that had  been adopted he might speak more strongly than he had intended.  He observed that the parties came to his office, including MR H. BESLEY, knowing that he was not aware of what had taken place, and asked him if they could not have the body removed, and upon asking the reason he was told that the place where the deceased died was rather dirty.  He told MR BESLEY that he should not allow the body to be removed and went to see it, and on perceiving its shocking condition immediately had the room locked.  If he had consented to MR BESLEY'S request probably the body would have been cleaned and placed in a coffin, and there would have been a different complexion thrown upon the case, and they would never have known of the filthy state in which deceased died.  So long as he was in office he should do his duty fearlessly among all classes.  What had happened ought never to have occurred.  The poor woman must have suffered fearful agony during the inclemency of the weather before she died.  In this case, however, he did not see that anyone was criminally responsible, as the deceased was an adult and able to look after herself.  The question then was how did the deceased come to her death.  Whether it was for want of proper food and nourishment, or otherwise, this was for the Jury to consider.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict "That the deceased was Found Dead, and had died from Starvation, Exposure and cold, and that the condition of her room was caused by her negligent, peculiar and apathetic conduct."  -  Mr Cousins, the Foreman of the Jury, presented the thanks of the Jury to the Coroner for the fearless and searching Inquiry which he had caused to be instituted in the melancholy case.  MR BESLEY said that he quite concurred with the remarks.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 January 1876
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, respecting the death of MRS ISABELLA MORRISH, wife of MR F. A. MORRISH.  The deceased lady had enjoyed good health, but on Wednesday evening she died suddenly after only a few minutes' illness.  Medical evidence attributed the cause of death to heart disease and a verdict in accordance with this evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 January 1876
DARTMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held at Dartmouth on Friday evening by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of RICHARD PITMAN, who was found drowned at Sand Quay on Friday morning.  Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased was to have been in attendance on H.M.S. Britannia as ferryman until 11 p.m. on Thursday, and that a little after 9 p.m. he conveyed a seaman on board in his boat.  This seaman observed that PITMAN was the worse for liquor and he was not seen afterwards until picked up dead on Friday morning.  It is conjectured that he was in the act of mooring his boat when he over-balanced himself and fell into the water.  He was a strong, hale man, of middle age, and was an expert swimmer, but when found, his arms were across his chest, leading to the supposition that he rested on the side of his boat after falling into the water, but that being the worse for drink and the cold benumbing him, he relaxed his hold and sank.  The boat was found close to the spot where the body was afterwards picked up.  The deceased, who leaves a wife and four young children, was a native of Guernsey, and entered the Royal Navy about twenty years ago.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 January 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Miserable End. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at Stonehouse, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of a pensioner named DANIEL MADDOCK.  The deceased has for some time past been residing in Fore-street, and has earned a livelihood by playing a violin in brothels in Fore-street.  He had been unwell since Tuesday last, and the people residing in the house with him had been unable to procure him medical attendance.  The deceased went to bed at the usual hour on Thursday night, and yesterday morning he was found dead in bed.  It is believed that the deceased died from want, and consequently a post mortem examination was ordered by the Coroner.  After evidence had been taken respecting the identity of the body, the Inquiry was adjourned until Monday.  [Note; Later Inquest report gave the name as MANNIX].

Western Morning News, Monday 24 January 1876
ASHPRINGTON - Alleged Cruelty To A Mother.  A Man And His Wife Committed For Manslaughter.  -  Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday evening respecting the death of ELIZABETH ELLIOTT, aged 73 years.  The deceased had been twice married, and on the death of her second husband she went to live with her son by her first husband.  This son, who is named JOHN HANNAFORD, is married, and keeps the Maltsters' Arms, at Tuckenhay, in the parish of Ashprington, and it is stated that when his mother went to live with him she had about £100 belonging to her.  MRS ELLIOTT died on Tuesday morning, and the charges made by her neighbours were so serious that the policeman stationed at Ashprington laid the matter before the Coroner, who instructed Messrs. Hains and Wallis, surgeons, of Totnes, to make a post mortem examination of the body.  At the Inquest Susan Camp stated that the deceased had complained to her of having been kept short of food, and that she had seen the HANNAFORDS ill-treat the deceased.  -  Mary Clements another woman living near by, corroborated this evidence.  -  Mr Hains, surgeon, stated that he and Mr Wallis had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found it emaciated to a very great extent.  There were recent scars, which appeared to be remains of old wounds, upon the legs, arms and chest.  Every organ of the body was perfectly healthy, but there was not the slightest trace of food inside, and the whole body was devoid of fatty substance.  The brain was healthy, but there was an accumulation of serum in each lateral ventricle, and this was the immediate cause of death by producing apoplexy.  -  Mr Albert J. Wallis corroborated Mr Hains's testimony, and in reply to the Coroner's Jury, both witnesses expressed their opinion that the accumulation of serum was caused by debility and that the cause of the debility was want of nourishment.  -  HANNAFORD and his wife, after being cautioned, denied having treated the deceased cruelly, or having kept her short of food.  They called a young man named Hockings, who works near the place, and who stated that he had at times seen the deceased taking her meals.  -  The Jury, after an absence of twenty minutes, returned as a verdict that the deceased died from Neglect and Want of Proper Care.  -  The Coroner said he quite concurred with the verdict, which was tantamount to manslaughter.  -  HANNAFORD and his wife were then committed for trial at the Assizes on a charge of Manslaughter and the Coroner accepted the bail of two sureties in £50 each.  The Inquiry lasted from four until half-past ten.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 January 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Miserable End. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Stonehouse yesterday, respecting the death of DANIEL MANNIX, a naval pensioner, aged 50 years.  -  Elizabeth Charge, residing in Water-lane, stated that the deceased resided in Water-lane, stated that the deceased resided in Lane's-court, High-street, and on Saturday, the 15th inst., he complained of being unwell.  On the following Monday evening he was looking ill, and she told him to go to bed, but he refused, and went to a brothel in Fore-street to play his violin.  The deceased asked her to look after him and told her that he would give her his pension if she would do so.  She promised to see him the following day about the matter, and did so, but advised him to go to the Royal Naval Hospital or the Workhouse.  She then went to Mr Bignell, the relieving officer, and told him that there was an old man very ill in Fore-street and that he had no person to look after him.  She also told him that the deceased was destitute, and in a very deplorable state.  Mr Bignell advised her to apply at the Royal Naval Hospital, which she did;  and the surgeon told her that he could not admit the deceased unless he had an Admiralty order, which she would be able to obtain through the Pension-office:  an Admiralty order had been applied for, but she had not yet received it.  On Thursday morning witness asked the deceased whether she should get Mr Leah, surgeon, but he declined, saying that he would wait for the order.  When she left the deceased on Thursday night, just after eleven o'clock, he was very unwell.  He told her that he would sooner have beer than meat, as his appetite was quite gone.  The deceased was found dead in his bed on Friday morning.  -  By a Juror:  The relieving officer (Mr Bignell) never offered to go to see the deceased after she told him all she knew about the case.  -  Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination and found that the deceased had been suffering from inflammation of both lungs, which undoubtedly caused his death.  The stomach was perfectly empty.  From what he knew and had heard of the deceased's habits, he believed that he was unable to take food.  If the deceased had received medical treatment on the Tuesday he would have had a better chance to recover.  -  Mr R. Nelson, surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, stated that he had an indistinct recollection of the witness coming to him and telling him that the deceased was very ill, and wanted to be admitted into the Hospital.  he told her to apply to the Pension-office, where she would get the required information.  In an urgent case the principal medical officer might admit a patient.  Pensioners residing at their own homes had no claim on the Government for medical treatment.  -  Mr T. Leah, surgeon, was recalled, and, in answer to Mr Bignell, stated that if he had visited the deceased, he should, on finding him to be a naval pensioner, have sent him into the Royal Naval Hospital.  He did not think it to be his duty to attend naval pensioners, because they were not considered paupers.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 February 1876
EXETER - Drink And Death. - A melancholy case was investigated by the Exeter Coroner yesterday, in which drink and neglect had evidently a good deal to do with the wretched end of the deceased.  The victim, ANN NORMAN,  was a widow, aged 67, who lived with her son JOHN in two rooms in Cricklepit-lane.  The son stated in his evidence that early on Sunday evening he came home and made his mother, who was in "bed," a cup of tea.  He then went out again, returning at half-past ten, and sitting up until just after midnight when he heard his mother calling, but he did not answer her until a quarter of an hour later, when he asked if she would take a cup of tea.  Receiving no reply to his question, he went into the room where the poor woman was lying dead on her "bed," which turned out to be only a bundle of straw.  Witness explained that his mother was in receipt of 3s. a week from the parish, and said he paid her 11s. a week for his food.  He did not know what she did with the money, but thought she was in the habit of drinking.  She had got rid of his bed and her own too, and that was the reason she was obliged to sleep on straw.  Witness had for some time slept on the floor.  He added that one of the relieving officers had threatened to get her removed to the Workhouse if she did not keep her room in a cleaner state.  A woman named Davey, who went for the doctor, told the Coroner that she believed deceased indulged in intemperate drinking, though she had never seen her drunk.  Mr Perkins, surgeon, proved that death resulted from congestion of the lungs.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes," but censured the son for not having taken the management of affairs more into his own hands and seen that his mother was better cared for.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, relative to the death of JOHN BADDOCK, aged 54 years.  The deceased was a porter employed by a commercial traveller, and on Tuesday morning he left his lodgings, 8 Finewell-street, to go to work;  but on the way he fell, and cut his eye.  He was then brought back to his lodgings;  but refused to have a surgeon sent for. Yesterday morning a neighbour went to his room to give him his breakfast, and then found him dead in bed.  After the fall the deceased complained of shortness of breath.  -  P.C. Thomas said he saw the deceased fall near Bedford-street.  He was perfectly sober, and witness believed that he was suffering from a fit.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Strange Deaths At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening relative to the death of JOHN METHERELL, aged 59 years.  -  EMMA METHERELL, wife of the deceased, stated that she resided at Stonehouse, and on Monday morning the deceased left about eight to go to Launceston, but he did not return again.  -  John Screech said that he was standing at the tramway terminus, Union-street, on Monday evening, when he saw the deceased, who was about to get on the tram car, fall heavily upon the ground.  The car was stationary at the time, and deceased seemed to be sober.  Witness raised him from the ground, and then found that he was unconscious and was bleeding from the mouth.  On going towards the tramcar he walked in a peculiar manner.  -  Mr C. C. Gibbes, surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Hospital about eight o'clock on Monday evening.  He smelt very strongly of liquor, and was partially unconscious and upon being asked his name he gave an unintelligible reply.  About an hour afterwards he became more conscious and told the nurse that "he was all right," but said nothing more.  He remained in a drowsy condition but at seven o'clock the next morning he became worse, and died a few hours afterwards.  The deceased was first treated for drunkenness, but when he got better he was treated for concussion of the brain.  METHERELL, in his opinion, was a cripple, and could not walk properly.  When he was admitted he (witness) observed traces of blood, but he did not think it arose from a cut in the mouth, but from internal injuries.  He could not say what the exact cause of death was, but he believed it resulted from internal injuries.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Workhouse into the circumstances attending the death of a pauper named BRIDGET VOYSEY, aged 81 years.  It appears that on the 18th of December last the deceased on getting out of bed fell on the floor and fractured her left thigh bone which caused death.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 February 1876
LAMERTON - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest on Saturday at Lamerton on the body of JAMES JACKMAN, who died from injuries received in driving a wagon from Tavistock to Lamerton on the 15th of March last.  His right leg was broken by the wagon passing over it, and death ultimately resulted from the accident.  The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - The Late Accident On The Tavistock Railway.  Fatal Results. - An Inquest was opened last night by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, on the body of HENRY SKINNER, cattle dealer, aged 33, who died from the effects of injuries received in a railway accident on the Tavistock Railway on the 9th instant.  Mr C. E. Compton, traffic superintendent, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company.    -   Elizabeth Glanville, wife of a dockyardman, residing at 1 Tavistock-place, Plymouth, said deceased had lived in the house for nearly nine years.  He went away about eight o'clock last Wednesday to attend Tavistock Cattle Market, and about one o'clock that day was brought home in a cab.  With difficulty he got over the steps, and she asked him what he had done.  He said the train had run off the line at Tavistock, that he had hurt his back and could hardly walk.  Mr May, surgeon, was sent for, and he ordered castor oil to be given to deceased.  Later in the day Mr Whipple and Mr May were both fetched and they attended him regularly until his death, which took place on Monday night.  Mr Whipple, surgeon, was also called in, and said the case was a bad one.  Deceased, shortly before his death, said "I was sitting with my arms folded when I was jerked forward and then backward, coming against the seat and knocking my back."   -   Richard Lavers, cattle dealer, went to Tavistock on Wednesday last by 8.20 a.m. train, occupying a seat in the carriage next the engine - a third-class.  Deceased was there, and three or four Devonport butchers.  Deceased and witness were sitting with their backs to the engine.  All went well until the train came near Tavistock Station.  The train was going slowly, when he felt a sudden jerk which lifted him off his seat.  he felt two or three more jerks, and then the train stopped.  All the passengers in his compartment were more or less thrown off their seats.  They got out.  Immediately after the accident he saw deceased standing near the train.  He was looking white and said he had been hurt.  Next saw him an hour afterwards in the Cattle Market Inn, Tavistock.  He seemed to be in great pain and said he was suffering greatly in his back and stomach or head.  He said "I am a lot worse than people take me to be, and I shall go home."  Before the accident deceased appeared to be quite well and cheerful.   -   Henry Stoyle, cattle dealer, who was in the compartment with deceased, said after the accident he saw him with his hand to his back as if he were in pain, and deceased said he was hurt right across the loins.  The shock was not a considerable one, but thought it was quite enough to cause an injury to a passenger if he were thrown forward and backward.  Witness was thrown against another passenger.  -   George Venton, driver of the engine Hawk, which was attached to the train, said when a quarter of a mile out of Tavistock, and when the speed of the engine was considerably slackened, he felt something wrong.  He looked over the right side, and saw the leading wheels of the engine off the rails.  All the other wheels jumped off directly and this caused a jerking of the engine and the carriages behind.  The engine ran thirty yards before it was stopped, and became embedded in the roadway.  The engine was quite off the rails, and the two leading carriages were also off.  He went back to where the engine went off, and could clearly see a diagonal line across one of the rails, shewing where the leading lefthand wheel went off the rail.  This was at the points.  Did not think the points were exactly closed.  When he looked at the points he saw a man examining them, and he closed them.  Could see the mark which the flange of the wheel had made between the points and this shewed they were open.  The points should have been pinned.  If the handle had been pinned, the points would have been closed.  Looked at the points, and when the handle was pinned they were closed up properly.  The man who was examining them said the pin could not have been in.  If closed, and not pinned, the points would not have been opened by the approach of the train.   -   James Ray, guard of the train, heard the break whistle blow just outside Tavistock Station.  Knowing something was wrong, he applied the break and the train was brought up.  Witness was in the last carriage and felt no jerk before the train stopped.  Could not say if the points were opened or closed at the time the train approached.  The carriage he was in and three trucks behind did not leave the line and passed the points.  They must have been closed to allow this to be done.   -   The Inquiry was then adjourned until Friday next, in order that a post mortem examination might be held.  Mr Compton promised, at the request of the Jury, to take them over the Tavistock line and shew them the spot where the accident happened and the working of the points.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - The Late Accident On The Tavistock Railway.  Verdict Of Manslaughter.  -  The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY SKINNER, cattle dealer, aged 31 years, who died from the effects of injuries received in a railway accident on the Tavistock Railway on the 9th inst., was resumed by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, last evening, at the Guildhall.  Mr C. E. Compton, traffic superintendent, together with Mr Margary and Mr Whiteford, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company.  Mr R. G. Edmonds appeared for the widow of the deceased.  The Inquiry had been adjourned in order that a post mortem examination might be made, and that the Jury should be taken over the Tavistock line, and shewn the spot where the accident occurred.  The Jury were conveyed thither in a special train and Mr Compton explained the working of the points, and shewed that if the points were half open in all probability it would cause an accident.  The station-yard had been cut up of late to admit of the new signals being placed there, and he believed that a stone must have found its way between the points and the rail.  After the evidence of the previous witnesses had been read, the Coroner remarked that he had found very great difficulty in getting the deceased's fellow passengers to come forward and give evidence.  When they were spoken to about the matter, they all said that they  knew nothing whatever about it.   -  William Gale, stationmaster at Tavistock, was called, and stated that on the 9th inst. a porter told him that the 8.20 a.m. train from Plymouth was off the line.  He proceeded to the spot, and found the engine and two of the carriages off the line.  All the passengers were out of the train;  and he collected the tickets.  Witness inquired if anyone had been injured, and the reply was "No."  Almost all the passengers went to the cattle market.  He then examined the points where the engine had left the rails.  He found the points closed, but did not notice whether the handle was pinned.  He could not say whether any person had been at the points after the accident, and before he arrived.  It was the duty of William Tubbs to attend to the points at the time of the arrival of the Plymouth train.  The train in question should have come in upon the line of rails nearest the cattle market and the points where the train went off ought to have been closed.  By the Foreman:  He did not remember seeing the deceased that morning.  -  By Mr Whiteford:  It was Tubbs's duty to see that the points were correct.  If there had been anything the matter with the points, it should have been reported to him (witness), but no such report was made to witness.  -  Mr Edmonds:  Supposing the points to have been shut and the handle to have been pinned, how could the engine injure the points?  -  Witness:  I suppose the injury to be caused by the engine entering on the points.  If the points were only partially closed the effect would be to throw the engine off the line.  He did not think it necessary to put the pin in the handle if the points were properly closed, but the pin would make them more secure.  He had known instances of trucks being safely shunted in the goods yard over points which were never kept pinned.  -  John Barrow, contractor, stated that he was at the Tavistock Station on the morning in question and saw the engine stop and on going there he found the engine and two carriages off the line.  He afterwards examined the points and found them closed, but the pin was out of the handle.  The tongue of the switch was slightly bent.  He believed he was the first person to go to the points after the accident, and at the centre of the points he saw a mark as though a wheel had gone across it.  He had never told anyone that he found the points open.  No one touched the points whilst he was there.  -  By Mr Whiteford:  One carriage and three trucks passed safely over the rails.  -  By Mr Edmonds:  He could not suppose that if the points had been partly opened they would have shut by the engine jumping over them.  He could not think how the engine could have gone over the centre of the points if they had been properly locked.  -  By a Juror:  He did not open the points until some person came up;  and then he did so, to see how they would work.   -   John Henry S. May, surgeon, said that he was called to see the deceased on the 9th inst., and found him in bed, breathing with great difficulty.  The deceased told him that he was thrown from his seat whilst in the train and afterwards was thrown back and his back had been injured.  He also complained of severe pain in his ribs.  Witness prescribed for him, and saw him again the next day, when his condition was the same.  On Friday evening deceased's friends expressed a wish to have further medical advice, and the following day both Mr Square and he saw him.  The deceased, however, became worse, and died on Monday evening.  He and Mr Square had since made a post mortem examination and found that death resulted from inflammation of the left lung.  The right lung was reduced to one-third its natural size.  He connected this with the accident and believed that the injury led to inflammation, which ultimately caused death.  -  By Mr Whiteford:  There were no external injuries, and there was nothing in the condition of the deceased, either in life or in the post mortem, that would have led him to attribute death to external violence if he had not been informed of the accident.  The usual cause of inflammation of the lungs was a cold, but he could not say that the deceased was suffering from a cold.  It was in the range of possibility that a cold caught on the journey might have alone caused the death, but it was his opinion that that was not the sole cause.   -   Wm. J. Square, F.R.C.S., said he was called on Saturday, the 12th inst., to see the deceased, and was present at the post mortem examination.  He had no doubt that deceased died from inflammation of the left lung, caused by the injury.  -  By Mr Whiteford:  If he had been told that the deceased had taken a journey in a third class carriage that morning and afterwards felt unwell, he should have attributed death to ordinary causes.  Apart from the information he received and the subsequent post mortem examination, there were no symptoms which would have led him to believe that inflammation arose from other than natural causes;  but the deceased was a person with a predisposition to that kind of disease, and an accident of this kind would in every way be likely to bring about a climax.   -   Mr Whiteford, the company's solicitor, asked to be allowed to call Mr C. Bulteel, the surgeon who was present at the post mortem examination, on behalf of the railway company, but Mr Brian declined to hear Mr Bulteel, as he was not present with his (the Coroner's) authority at the post mortem examination.   -    William Tubbs, the pointsman, was called, but acting upon the caution given him by the Coroner, he declined to be examined.   -  The Coroner, in summing up, said it was in evidence that in the early part of the 9th instant, the deceased was in the train on his way to Tavistock, apparently in good health and high spirits;  just before they arrived at Tavistock an accident took place  - the engine ran off the rails - and in the jerking that took place, shook the deceased, who afterwards complained of being unwell.  He was then taken back to Plymouth, where he was attended to and eventually died.  The Jury had to consider how the accident happened.  They had heard the evidence of the engine driver, who said that the points were open;  and the evidence of Barrow, who found them shut.  The question was whether they were open or shut;  but it was clear that the handle of the points was not pinned.  Tubbs had charge of the points, and if he omitted to do his duty he would be criminally responsible.  -   The Jury, after an hour's consultation, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against the switchman, William Tubbs, who was on duty at the points at the time of the accident."  -  The Coroner, in addressing Tubbs, said that the Jury had carefully considered the case, and found that he was the legally responsible person.  They were not unanimous in the verdict, but more than twelve of them had agreed.  He must consider himself under arrest, and would be committed for trial at the Assizes, which take place next month.  -  Mr Compton asked what bail was required?  -  and the Coroner replied £100 on the part of the prisoner and two sureties in £50 each.  -  Bail was tendered and accepted, and the Inquiry, which lasted several hours, then concluded.  The deceased was insured for £1,000 with the Railway Passengers' Assurance Company by Mr Gedye, the local agent.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening relative to the death of GEORGE MATTHEWS, aged 66 years.  -  William Gray, licensed victualler, High-street, said that the deceased came into his house about half-past ten on Friday evening and ordered a glass of ale.  He partook of a portion of it, and witness soon afterwards noticed him apparently laughing;  but upon looking closely at him found that he was in a fit, and he died within five minutes.  The deceased's nephew, George Salter, stated that the deceased was a labourer, but was a cripple.  He did not think the deceased died from want, although his means were exceedingly small.  Deceased was sober when he went into the public-house.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A second Inquiry was held by Mr Brian, at the Brunel Hotel, Millbay, later in the evening, respecting the death of THOMAS EDWARD MILLS, aged about 60 years.  -  Albert Wait, landlord of the South Devon Inn, Millbay-road, stated that the deceased had lodged in his house for a short time and he believed him to be an actor.  On Thursday the deceased obtained a recommendation, which was signed by Mr J. R. Newcombe, for admittance into the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital.  Deceased took it to the Hospital and he was told that he could not be admitted then, but in all probability he would be on the following Wednesday.  On Friday last deceased went to his room and as he did not come down witness went to the room in the evening, and found him in bed quite dead.  Deceased never told him where his friends resided, but he said that he played at the Plymouth Theatre thirty years ago.  The deceased had very little money, but had not wanted for anything whilst in his house.  When deceased first came there he went to Mr Newcombe, who gave him 10s.  -  Alice Stone, servant at the South Devon Inn, stated that deceased complained to her on Friday afternoon of being unwell, and of having a severe pain in his chest.  The deceased had often said to her that he wished he could get into the Hospital.  -  John Williams, the Coroner's officer, said he had seen Mr Albert Newcombe, who told him that his father knew nothing whatever of the deceased, but had given him 10s. and signed a recommendation for admission to get into the Hospital.  Mr Newcombe had received a letter from Mr Sothern, who was in America, recommending the deceased to him if he could in any way employ him.  -  The Coroner remarked that it was clear the deceased was in a state of poverty, but he was pleased to find that he had fallen into the hands of Mr Newcombe and Mr Wait, two good Samaritans.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 February 1876
TEIGNMOUTH - The Suicide At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Dawlish Inn, Teignmouth, last night, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of JOHN YABSLEY.  -  MARY YABSLEY deposed that deceased was her husband, and 47 years of age.  She last saw him alive on Tuesday morning, when he left the house,  as she considered to go to his field.  He had been low-spirited for the past fortnight, had taken but little food, and had not been able to sleep, which she attributed to a bad cough.  He was in difficulties, and had a bill of £40 to meet on Thursday.  -  John Bond, of the Black Horse Inn, West Teignmouth stated that on Tuesday evening he found the deceased in a linhay in the corner of the field, hanging by a rope to a beam.  His hands were cold and stiff.  He had known deceased for some years, and for the past fortnight he had noticed a difference in him.  He particularly noticed a strangeness in his manner on Tuesday morning, and heard him say he had not been able to sleep, and was not very well.  -  The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the "Deceased hanged himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Friday 25 February 1876
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, Coroner for Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Bishop Blaze Inn, respecting the death of a tinman named WILLIAM RUDE, aged 76 years.  Mary Endacott, with whom the deceased lodged, stated that he was in his usual good health up to six o'clock on Wednesday evening.  After tea he engaged in cheerful conversation with several neighbours, and was in the act of filling his tobacco pipe, when he was noticed to suddenly turn pale and totter.  A doctor was instantly sent for, but the old man died within a few minutes of the medical man's arrival.  Mr Toswill, surgeon, said he could hardly decide whether the cause of death was heart disease, apoplexy, or aneurism, but it was evidently the result of natural causes.  A verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 February 1876
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Tramway Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquiry respecting the fatal tramway accident in Union-street, Plymouth, on Thursday afternoon was held last evening by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner.  The deceased, named EDWIN J. BUTTLE, was 7 years old, and was son of a coach trimmer living in Flora-street.  When coming from school on Thursday afternoon the deceased and another boy hung on to a waggon, and the driver made a cut at them with his whip, causing BUTTLE to fall off into the road.  His companion shouted to him that a tram car was coming and the deceased tried to cross the road, but was knocked down by the horses and the car passed over his legs, causing a simple fracture of both thighs, and a compound fracture of both legs.  He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, but it was seen that the case was hopeless and the poor child died three hours after his admission.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated the driver and conductor from all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 March 1876
DAWLISH - The Sudden Death At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at Dawlish yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JANE EDMONDS, who died suddenly on Monday morning.  GEORGE EDMONDS, cordwainer, stated that the deceased was his wife, and was 58 years of age.  She had never complained of any severe illness, but he had frequently heard her complain of slight pains in the stomach.  On Monday morning at a quarter to seven she called their son (who slept in an adjoining room) to go to work, and shortly after this witness dressed.  Deceased then seemed to be in her usual health.  He lighted the fire downstairs, and made tea, and on taking a cup upstairs to his wife, he found her dead, lying on her right side with her hands over the pillow.  Medical assistance was at once procured. -  Arthur Daniell Parsons, surgeon, stated that he made a post mortem examination of the body.  The heart was enlarged, the walls thickened and the valves hard and incompetent, the lungs were congested and the kidneys, brain and all other organs depending on the action of the heart were more or less congested.  The cause of death was Disease of the Heart of long standing.  The Jury returned a verdict to this effect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 March 1876
PLYMOUTH - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall relative to the death of ISAAC FERBRACHE, aged 49 years, captain of the Guernsey mackerel boat 270, who died suddenly on Tuesday.  The evidence shewed that the deceased had been continually drinking since Thursday, when the vessel arrived at Plymouth, and was also drinking heavily before the vessel arrived, in fact he had scarcely been sober since he left Guernsey.  On Tuesday afternoon a man, John Le Page, belonging to another Guernsey vessel, went on board FERBRACHE'S vessel and saw the deceased, who was lying in his bunk very unwell.  Witness advised him to go to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, which he did, but upon arriving at the door he fell down and died shortly afterwards.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Excessive Drinking."

ST. BUDEAUX - Strange Suicide At St. Budeaux. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at St. Budeaux on the body of an old man named JOHN GASKING, 76 years of age.  The deceased was a labourer, but without regular employment.  He left his home on Tuesday afternoon at half-past three, and at half-past six he was found in Butt's-head Wood, near a garden which he occupied, suspended from a tree by a switch of hazel, which must have been cut at some distance and carried to the place.  One end of this switch was tied to the branch, and the other formed the noose through which the poor man must have put his head;  he was suspended by it in a kneeling posture, and quite dead.  The Jury, of whom Mr Earl was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 March 1876
BERE FERRERS - Sudden Death At Beeralston. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Beeralston yesterday respecting the death of MR GEORGE PEARCE, draper.  The deceased, who was in delicate health, drove in a pony and trap to Black Down on Thursday last, and the pony fell.  MR PEARCE was not hurt in the fall, but was affected by the shock and exposure to the rain that was falling at the time.  He got home all right, but some time afterwards complained of being unwell and died in the course of a few hours.  It was stated that the deceased had been suffering from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Shock and Exposure."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 March 1876
PLYMSTOCK - Fatal Accident In Plymouth Sound. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Bovisand Fort by Mr R.R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of GEORGE THOMAS HARKOOM, aged 22 years, who was found drowned in Plymouth Sound on Monday afternoon.  -  The father of the deceased stated that his son was a waterman and resided at Plymouth.  He could not recognise the deceased because the body was so decomposed, but he identified the clothing he had on.  -  Robert Charlick, a waterman, said that on the morning of the 31st of December, witness, deceased and deceased's brother left Plymouth in a boat named the Emily to go to a passenger ship in the Sound.  About noon they attempted to board a ship which was coming in at the western end of the Breakwater, and at the time it was blowing half a gale of wind.  The sails of their boat were set and as they neared the vessel the fore brace fouled the masthead of their boat, and capsized it, throwing all three into the water.  The deceased sank with the boat and witness was in the water twenty minutes before he was picked up, and he was then very exhausted.  The ship, which was the Enterprise, of London, Captain Phillips, from London to Canterbury, was going five knots an hour.  -  By the Foreman:  They called to the Enterprise, but they did not stop, neither did they pick them up.  -  William Pyne, naval pensioner, residing at Devonport, stated that he was attending to the Breakwater fort on Monday morning, and when between Bovisand Fort and the eastern end of the Breakwater, he found the body, which was very much decomposed, floating in the water.  He took the body in tow, and landed it at the coastguard station.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 March 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident To A Cartman. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Longroom Inn, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES COLLINS, labourer, aged 24 years.  -  William Pearce, forage dealer, stated that the deceased was a cartman in his employ, and about two o'clock yesterday afternoon he sent him with a horse and wagon to fetch some straw lying at the Longroom shed.  The horse, which was a young one, had been worked by the deceased for about six weeks, and he (witness) had never heard of its having run away, but it was very possible that the sticks in the wagon shifted and touched it, and made it start off.  The deceased was walking at the side of the horse in Durnford-lane, when the animal made a sudden bolt and ran as far as the Longroom stables, and the deceased ran with it.  -  Richard Hooper, groom, stated that about two o'clock yesterday afternoon he was in his stable at Longroom, when he heard a noise.  He looked out of the stable and saw the horse stopped just outside.  The deceased was lying on the ground apparently dead with his head against the coach-house door.  -  T. Crisp, groom, said he saw the deceased running with the horse, with both reins in his hand.  He (witness) attempted to stop the horse, and was nearly run over.  The horse then ran against the wall and the deceased was jammed between the wagon and the wall.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the deceased's widow and children.  -  The deceased's employer (Mr W. Pearce, forage Dealer, Stonehouse), will receive contributions for the widow.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 March 1876
RAMSGATE, KENT - Fatal Accident On Shipboard. - An Inquest has been held respecting the death of EDWIN FORD, aged 18 years.  The deceased served on board the schooner Castle Baynard, of Plymouth, Captain Reeby, and on Friday last when the vessel was on her way from Ramsgate to Dunkirk, and during a heavy gale, he fell from aloft to the deck.  The distance was considerable, and the poor fellow was unconscious when picked up.  He rallied a little, however, but died in the course of a few hours.  The Castle Baynard afterwards put back to Ramsgate, where the Inquest took place, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  The deceased was a native of Plymouth, and was much respected.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Devonport relative to the death of CHARLES GREEN, naval pensioner, aged 44 years.  -  George Besley, labourer, stated that on the previous afternoon the deceased complained to him of being unwell and shortly afterwards he fell down insensible.  The deceased had been out of employment for fourteen weeks and had been at work only an hour.  -  JEMIMA GREEN, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband complained of being unwell about a month ago, but not since.  Although he was out of work he never wanted for food, as witness had saved some money.  Mr Cutcliffe, Surgeon, considered that the deceased died from Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 March 1876
EXMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday, respecting the death of MR ISAAC DEWDNEY, of Stoke Canon, whose body was found in the river on Tuesday.  The deceased was missed from his home on the morning of the 21st ultimo, and had not since been heard of.  There being no evidence to shew how deceased came by his death a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 March 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, respecting the death of SAMUEL RABE, private in the Royal Marines, who died suddenly on Wednesday on board his ship, the Indus.  Medical testimony shewed that death resulted from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse on Saturday evening, relative to the death of JOHN SHORT, aged 65 years.  -  Henry Drew, master of the Workhouse, stated that the deceased was appointed chief attendant in the male imbecile ward about sixteen months since, and during the time he had been in the situation, he had carried out his duties faithfully and honestly.  The deceased, who was a naval pensioner, had never complained of being unwell since he had been in the House.  -  Christopher Reeve, assistant attendant, said that after the deceased had his dinner on Saturday he went into the yard, and whilst there he was called to come to the ward.  He got as far as the door of the ward when he sat down, and he then fell on his side and vomited.  Mr Thomas, surgeon, who was in the house, was called, and just as he arrived the deceased expired.  Witness was always with the deceased, who was a man enjoying very good health and never complaining of illness.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 March 1876
SIDMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Boy At Sidmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Bedford Hotel, Sidmouth, yesterday, by Mr C. J. Macaulay, Deputy Coroner, respecting the death of HARRY CHURCHILL, 9 years of age, who died on Tuesday last.  It was supposed that death was caused by injuries inflicted by another boy some years older.  -  E. Charlton Fox, surgeon, deposed that on Saturday last he saw the deceased, and found him suffering from partial paralysis of the lower limbs, and with all the symptoms of paraphrenitis, and there was also complete stoppage.  The lad did between three and four p.m. on Tuesday last.  He made a post mortem examination, and found that deceased had suffered from intense paraphrenitis, to which cause he attributed death.  He found no external marks of a blow, the only symptoms indicated being internal ones.  -  Fanny Perry, 10 years of age, stated that she attended the All Saints' School, and in the afternoon of the 13th instant she saw deceased in the schoolyard and also Harry Turner, who struck him across the back with four sticks, one thick and three thin ones.  The deceased did not cry, but laughed, as though he were not hurt.  -  William Henry Drewe, 9 years of age, gave corroborative evidence of the striking of deceased by Turner, who is 15 years old.  He added that he heard the deceased say whilst in school in the afternoon that he thought something was the matter with his side.  -  EDWARD CHURCHILL, a gardener, father of the deceased, said that on the 16th instant his son complained of being unwell, and stated that Turner had kicked him in the side but did not say when it occurred.  The deceased had always enjoyed good health.  -  HARRIET CHURCHILL, mother of deceased, said her son complained of headache on returning from school on the Monday, and asked to go to bed.  The following morning he appeared better, and continued going to school until Thursday evening, when he complained of a pain in his stomach.  -  The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, of "Death resulting from Paraphrenitis and Inflammation of the Bowels."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 April 1876
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Young Woman. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening, relative to the death of EMMA SWEET, aged 28 years.  Edward Gould, labourer, stated that he resided in Salem-street, and the deceased had lodged with him for some months past.  Previous to the deceased coming with him she lived at the Modbury Inn as a servant, but left on account of a quarrel between the landlady and herself.  He took her in as she was destitute, and she remained with him for a few weeks and then went into service again.  At Christmas last the deceased left that situation, and he took her in again, and he had supported her ever since.  He told her last week that she would have to look for a situation and leave his house, but this did not seem to depress her.  She had very little clothes and she was entirely destitute.  On Thursday afternoon the deceased partook of her tea, and soon afterwards she complained of being unwell, vomited and then expired.  The deceased lived in the same room as his family - four children - his wife and himself.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed gratification at the kindness shewn by Gould to the deceased, who was not related to him.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 April 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquiry was held at Stonehouse yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of GEORGE JOHNSTONE, able seaman, on board H.M.S. Gorgon.  The deceased was found dead on Saturday, and on a post mortem examination being made by Mr Wey, surgeon, R.N., a piece of meat about an inch long was found in the windpipe.  A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation after Vomiting" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Fatal Fall Of Two Feet. - Mr Brian held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday on the body of RICHARD MADDOCK HARVEY, a plasterer, who died in the South Devon Hospital from injuries received on the 2nd December last.  While working on a scaffold only two feet from the ground, the plank broke and HARVEY was thrown forward, his comrade falling upon him and injuring his spine.  Unable to work, HARVEY went home and was thence removed to the South Devon Hospital.  There it was found that the spinal cord was inflamed.  The injury acting on a weakened constitution, medical skill was of no avail, the softening of the spinal cord extended to the brain, and HARVEY died on Friday last.  At the Inquest the evidence of Dr Gibbs was clear and conclusive that death had resulted from the accident, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - The Scurvy-Stricken Ship At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Brunswick Inn, Plymouth, last evening, regarding the death of JAMES BURK.  -  William Henry Clement, master mariner, of Plymouth, said he was captain of the vessel Emily Flinn, barque, 1,009 tons, now lying in the Sound.  She arrived on Saturday night from Moulmein, in Burmah.  She was laden with a cargo of teak timber and was bound to Plymouth for orders.  The crew numbered twenty, all told.  They had been on the voyage 169 days.  When she left Moulmein all the crew, including the deceased, were in health.  At the time of leaving all necessaries were on board, including lime juice and a superior kind of salt provision to that which men generally got on board ship.  The medicine chest was properly fitted when they left Cardiff.  The deceased was an A.B.  The crew had slight jungle fevers the day after leaving, but all sailors were liable to that.  There was no outbreak of scurvy on board, and they were free of any exceptional illness until march 3rd, when an Italian was taken ill with what proved to be scurvy.  This was in latitude 25 deg. 45 min. N., and longitude 40 deg. 59 min. W.  He continued ill until the arrival of the ship at Plymouth, and was now in the South Devon Hospital, together with three others landed from the ship, and also suffering from scurvy.  In reference to the log he could say, however, that the Italian was suffering from other causes beside scurvy.  Deceased was taken ill on March 7th, with what witness believed to be erysipelas, for which he was treated.  Deceased desisted from work by witness's orders, and was placed on the sick list.  He gradually got worse and died on March the 30th.  This was at 7.15 a.m., lat. 49 N., long. 6 deg. 50 min. W.  Before his death witness did not have the impression that deceased was suffering from scurvy.  Three of the men in Hospital were taken ill afterwards and two he believed were suffering from scurvy.  What the other was suffering from he could not say.  Witness was suffering from scurvy, and he had been told by Dr Fox that he was suffering worse than any other man on board.  Everything was done for the deceased, who made no complaint.  He said, however, that he had only soup to eat, but he could have had corn-flour and arrowroot, but as the sugar had run out he refused to eat these things.  There were four now in Hospital, and in fact all the crew had got a slight touch of the scurvy - some more and some less - so Dr Fox said.  -   Dr Fox recommended that all the men except the steward should come on shore for two or three days and go to the Sailors' Home.  The entry in the ship's log for the 30th March respecting the death of JAMES BURK was as follows:-   "Went to the forecastle, having been told that JAMES BURK was much worse, and found him breathing very short.  Asked him if he was in any pain.  He said "No."  Asked him if he could describe his symptoms.  He said he had a nasty cough at times, and that something kept rising in his throat.  Also that his spittle was very thick.  Saw that he was smoking and at 7.15 a.m. he died in the arms of Mr Henry Coleman, the chief officer.  Cause of death not known.  Have been treating him for erysipelas."  Deceased exhibited none of the well-known symptoms of scurvy throughout his illness.  Since February 8th all the crew had had a double allowance of lime juice.  There was no particular reason for this, except that the ship had been a good while at sea.  The only cause to which he could attribute the amount of illness on board the vessel since they left Moulmein was bad water and dirt in connection with the steward of the ship.  Witness himself was taken ill three days out of Moulmein.  The steward was dirty in his cooking habits, and otherwise too.  In December last witness found some beef had been cooked in a copper kettle which witness told the steward not to use, as he thought it was not fit to use.  The water on board had been obtained from the river at Moulmein, excepting 900 gallons in a tank, which was procured at Mauritius.  All other vessels at Moulmein were watered in the same manner.  The food on board was of the best kind and he did not connect the sickness with the food or the condition of the vessel.  Deceased was 36 years of age, and native of Cardiff.  On the arrival of the vessel at Plymouth Mr Edlin, the surgeon, came on board, and saw the body of deceased, which he examined externally.  Mr Edlin was of opinion the man had died from scurvy and erysipelas.  The crew had never during the voyage complained of the quantity or condition of the food.  They complained only of the steward.   -   John Isaacs, able seaman, gave corroborative evidence.  There was nothing to find fault with in the provisions, but there was in the cooking.  The water was very good for the part of the country it was got from. Witness did not know whether the steward was asked to come on shore to attend the Inquest, or whether he had been prevented from coming.  Witness attended the Inquest voluntarily.  Steward and witness were not on friendly terms.  Deceased had every attention.  After the complaint about the cooking the steward was more sharply looked after and the cooking was better.   -  One of the Jury said that the illness seemed to have come on after the steward had been taken to task, and there seemed to be no cause why the scurvy should have broken out.  As the case was a decided one against the cook, it was desirable that the latter should be called.  -  The Inquiry was then adjourned until Wednesday evening, the Jury regretting the statements made that evening were made in the absence of the steward.  They wished the whole of the crew and the steward to be present on that occasion.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 April 1876
PLYMOUTH - The Scurvy-Stricken Ship At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, resumed the Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES BURKE, seaman of the Emily Flinn, of Liverpool.  Mr T. J. Stevens represented the owners of the Emily Flinn.  -  William Heinricks, seaman on board the Emily Flinn, stated that after leaving Moulmein there were five laid up at one time from scurvy.  -  Joseph Smith, JAMES BURKE, and others.  Witness himself had been ill, but had never given up.  They had not enough food on the voyage home;  only as much as would keep them alive and no more.  There was plenty of salt meat, but it was too salt to eat.  This was for twenty-three days.  They had fresh meat after the salt was exhausted, but had not a full allowance all the time.  They made what they had last out - some ate it and some did not.  They had plenty of good water.  He thought the scurvy was caused by too much salt provisions and not enough fresh.  Lime juice was regularly served out.  As a rule, William Ford cooked all the provisions.  The men were in the habit of putting bread scouse into the oven, with fat taken from the galley.  For about two months the meat, after it was baked, came out black.  The men did not speak to the captain, but told the cook (or steward) of the fact;  and he said the blackness was caused by coal dust getting into the casks.  -  By a Juror:  He did not get more than half a pint of lime juice at a time during the voyage.  Some days he had it without sugar.  the crew had not a full allowance of pease, but they had rice and flour instead.  -  Klaus Rasmussen, a Dane, and ordinary seaman on board the Emily Flinn, said that the provisions were good, but they had to go on short allowance.  They had been to sea two months when the allowance was curtailed, and about a fortnight afterwards they were put on full allowance again.  When the crew was on short allowance they had a pound of beef or pork per day.  The water was good, considering the country it came from.  The meat was brought from the galley black for two months during the voyage.  There was no one sick during this time.  He used to go to the galley to put his scouse in the oven.  He had often taken fat from the galley when the cook was not there.  When they were short of provisions five of the crew were sick.  During the last fortnight of the voyage they had no flour.  The bread was good.  They got beef and pork up to the last day of the voyage.  sometimes he had a double allowance of lime juice, but on several days he had none at all.  -  By a Juror:  He attributed the outbreak of scurvy to the salt provisions, and not from the fat taken from the copper in the galley.  They had fresh meat two or three times during the voyage.  Two pigs were killed on the voyage home, but they only had one meal from one of them, the other pig was thrown overboard.   -  William Ford, steward of the Emily Flinn, after being cautioned that he need not say anything unless he desired to do so, stated that the provisions were of fair quality, and they had vegetables on board.  There was sufficient water, and always plenty of bread.  The pease ran short in the middle part of the voyage, and rice was served out instead. About a month before they arrived at Plymouth he was taken ill.  Complaints were made to him about the meat being dark on the outside after it was baked, and he said, "Shall I pare it off?"  to which one of the crew replied, "No, if you do the men will say they have not got their allowance."  He cooked the captain's meat in the same way as he did the men's.  He was not aware that the copper he used had been condemned.  His attention had never been drawn to the condition of the copper at the time he was taken sick.  The captain had once complained to him about his dirty habits in cooking.  The captain did not tell him in December not to use the copper in cooking the meat.  Witness had been sick two or three times during the voyage.  he never used the copper after he was told it was condemned.  He attributed the outbreak of the scurvy to so much scouse and salt fat being eaten.  He gave fat to the men when they asked for it, and it was taken without his permission when he was not there.  This was done all through the voyage.  he had not seen so much wet scouse in any ship he had been in before.  He had said to some of the screw, "If you eat so much scouse you will get the scurvy."  He did not think the captain knew that the men had so much of the fat.  After he ceased to use the condemned copper the meat was black once or twice.  There were two boilers, one of copper and the other of iron.  The copper one was condemned.  The meat was black when cooked in the iron copper, as well as when cooked in the copper one.  The men never complained of his dirty habits in cooking.  He did not see anything the matter with the condemned copper.  -  By a Juror:  The men did not have a full supply of meat the whole time;  they went on short allowance for about three weeks.  He had been cook in a vessel on a six months' voyage from Hongkong, and in that passage they had fresh meat once in three weeks.  In the present voyage they had fresh meat seven or eight times.  The galley had never been inspected by any officers of the ship during the voyage.   -   The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the vessel was well found, and he did not see that there had been any neglect on the part of the captain.  There was plenty of salt meat, lime juice, water and bread;  and if it was needed there was sufficient lime juice for a double supply for each man.  There  was nothing extraordinary in the provisions running short, and when the crew was on short allowance they received 1 lb. of meat instead of 1 ½ lbs.  It was clear that the captain did not know that the men were taking fat from the galley and using it for scouse to such an extent as they had been doing.  He did not think that dirty habits in cooking would have caused scurvy, and he pointed out that the disease broke out after the condemned copper had ceased to be used.   -   The Jury, after a short consultation, returned the following verdict "That the deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by a long voyage and the excessive use of so much salt provisions."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 April 1876
PAIGNTON - Fatal Accident Near Paignton. - An Inquest was held at Paignton, yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOSEPH ROWE, carter, who died on Saturday from the effects of an accident that occurred on the previous evening.  The deceased was returning from Staverton, whither he had been to fetch a new cart, and had nearly reached Paignton, when, whilst standing up in the cart, he turned to speak to a passer-by, overbalanced himself and fell out, breaking the spinal cord.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 April 1876
DODBROOKE - Kicked To Death By a Horse. - An Inquest was held at Dodbrooke yesterday by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR J. WAKEHAM.  The deceased, who was 83 years of age, resided with Mr Cole, of Washbrook Mill, near Kingsbridge.  On Sunday morning a mare belonging to Mr Cole foaled and in the afternoon the deceased went to the field where the mare and colt were.  The colt was lying down and the deceased was trying to lift it, when the mare dashed at him, knocked him down, and kicked him as he lay on the ground insensible.  The occurrence was witnessed by Mr Luscombe, and Mr A. Pound, of Kingsbridge, who were several fields off.  They immediately ran to his assistance and found him groaning and helpless.  With the assistance of others they carried him to Washbrook Mill, where he died yesterday afternoon from the injuries received.  A verdict in accordance with the evidence was given.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 April 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Murder At Devonport.  Apprehension And Confession.  A Triple Murder Intended.  Magisterial Examination And Coroner's Inquest.   -  News of a horrible and cold-blooded murder startled the inhabitants of Stoke and of Devonport yesterday morning.  The coolness and the precision with which it must have been planned, and the celerity with which the crime was accomplished, have added to its terrible character, which is increased, if possible, by the cruel callousness of the murderer, both before and after the deed.   -   WILLIAM ISAAC ROBINSON is a man of middle age, has been in the navy - we believe as a petty officer - and discharged therefrom with a pension, and he has for some time past kept a wood and coal store at the back of No. 66, Albert-road, Stoke, where he lived with his wife and family.  He had three children - two girls - and so far as can be ascertain would appear to have been a kind father to them.  But there was one great failing in his character, his fondness for drink.  He appears to have been an habitual drunkard, and latterly his potations have been even deeper than usual.  His children were all young and his wife a woman of middle age, who is now expecting to be shortly confined.  In addition to receiving a pension and carrying on the wood and coal store, ROBINSON was employed to clean out the Stoke Public Schools every morning.  These schools are situated very near the Royal British Female Orphan Asylum, and ROBINSON appears to have been in the habit of allowing a female domestic employed in his house to clean out the schools every morning of the week, excepting Monday mornings, when he attended to that duty himself.  In a cottage adjoining to his residence lived his wife's sister and mother, and there seems to have been an impression in his mind that his relations were concerned in some peculations from the store, although he states that he always gave his wife his wages and pension.  This statement, of course, cannot be accepted, because it is clear that ROBINSON, who is now in custody has been a great drunkard, and must have squandered money in self-indulgence.  Throughout last week he drank heavily and some of the inmates of the house became afraid of him.  On Saturday night he threatened to murder the whole of them, but on Sunday he appears to have been quiet, and to have had very little to drink, and it would also seem that yesterday morning he had drunk nothing intoxicating until after the committal of the murder.  The imagined peculations by his wife and relatives evidently worried him and he appears to have entertained the idea that his children became sharers in the worrying to which he considered himself subjected, and to remove them from it by taking away their lives.  Such is the only reason that can be ascertained for the committal of the crime.  Although he had been drinking heavily all last week, and although he had made use of violent threats on Saturday evening - threats to which little heed was probably attached, as they were the utterances of a drunken man - there seems no doubt that the prisoner was sober enough on Sunday and yesterday.  On the previous day he promised his youngest daughter that she should go with him when he went to clean out the Stoke Schools on the following morning;  and after events shewed there was a purpose in this.  Next morning the child was dressed by a servant, taken away by the prisoner to the schools, and there in one of the smaller rooms opening out from the large schoolroom barbarously murdered.  ROBINSON coolly put the poor child across his knee and cut her throat with a dinner knife.  Seeing she was dead he locked up the room, hung up the keys in the large schoolroom, and after drinking brandy at two public-houses, went to the police-station and confessed the murder.  The police seeing the man was so cool and collected through he must be suffering from the effects of drink, and indeed his flushed face afforded grounds for the supposition, but subsequent inquiry shewed that his story was only too true.  There is no pretence for a supposition of insanity in anything of his conduct and by his own confession he intended to murder his other two children, but was daunted by this "awful job," as he called it. Magisterial Examination.   -   The prisoner was brought before the magistrates at eleven o'clock and charged with the murder of the deceased child, GERTRUDE LUCY BREMNER ROBINSON.  The magistrates were Mr J. W. W. Ryder and Mr C. Row.   -   Superintendent Lynn said that at a quarter to nine that morning, on coming to the station, he found the prisoner there in charge of police-constable Horne.  He said, "What is this?"   Prisoner replied, "I have killed my child."  Witness said, "I don't believe that - I don't believe it is true."  Prisoner replied, "Oh, yes, it is;  it is quite true."  One of the constables brought witness a pair of trousers which were covered with blood, and prisoner said, "That is the child's blood."  He also said, "I took her from home to the school.  I cleaned the school, and I cut her throat."  Witness said, "Are you quite sure the child is dead?"  Prisoner replied:  "Yes, I am quite sure she is dead.  I went back to see she was dead, because I would not have her living."  Witness went to the Public School, at Stoke, and there saw a child lying with her throat cut, and her head nearly cut off.  The child was nearly three years old.  -  Mr Row:  Was he sober?  -  Superintendent Lynn:  He appeared sober.  He said he had drunk a shilling's worth of brandy, but he said this was drunk "after the deed was done."  Witness had ascertained that prisoner had been drinking for the last three weeks.  He wished for a remand.  -  Mr Ryder:  Do you wish to ask the superintendent any questions?  Have you anything to say why you should not be remanded until Wednesday?  -  Prisoner:  No, sir.  -  ROBINSON was then remanded until Wednesday.  Prisoner who is a man short of stature, and who wore a dirty white smock, appeared perfectly unconcerned. The Coroner's Inquest.   -   The Inquest was held in the Stoke Public School (the building where the murder was committed) yesterday afternoon, before Mr James Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, and a double Jury.  The body of the deceased lay in an ante-room where the murderer left the child after the deed.   -   The Coroner said he was afraid that the Jury would find the case a serious one.  The throat of the deceased had been cut and death had resulted from violence.   -   The Jury afterwards viewed the body, and it was pointed out that the gash in the throat was a very deep one.  Witnesses were then called.   -   Emily Albertina Niles said she lived at the back of 66 Albert-road, and was a servant to MR ROBINSON.  That morning between half-past six and seven o'clock she asked WILLIAM ISAAC ROBINSON, her master, if she was to clean the Stoke School.  He said he could do all that was to be done by himself, and that she was to go and dress GERTRUDE.  She recognised the child lying in the ante-room as GERTRUDE ROBINSON, and this was the child ROBINSON told her to dress and to get ready for school.  Witness dressed deceased, and put her to stand at the front door.  She did not see anyone take the child away.  As the clock was striking eight witness missed the child and deceased's mother told her to go up and see if she could get into the schools.  Witness was told that morning by her master (the prisoner ROBINSON) that he had promised the child on Sunday evening that she should go to school with him in the morning.  She met the child at the door about three quarters of an hour before she missed her.  When witness missed the child she went up to the school, and on getting there tried to open the doors, but she could not, and went up the lane and tried to find the child, but could not.  She opened one window, and observed the child's cloak lying on the desk.  Witness got through the window and  saw the child lying dead.  She went out and seeing a newspaper boy, asked him to call someone.  Mr Tooker, who kept a shop hard by, next saw the child.  -  By a Juror:  Went to the school to clean them every morning, except Mondays, when ROBINSON went himself.    She knew the knife (produced).  She had seen it at MRS ROBINSON'S house in a drawer.  -  The Coroner:  Have they several like that?  -  Witness:  No more like that.  -  The Coroner:  Have you seen a knife like that anywhere else?  -  Witness:  No, sir.  -  A Juror:  Did he appear very fond of the child?  -  Witness:  Yes, sir.  -  Q.:  Did he use to ill-treat it?  -  A.:  No.  -  Q.:  Did ROBINSON threaten to take any of your lives?  -  A.:  Yes.  -  Q.:  On Saturday night?  -  A.:  Yes.  -  Q.:  Whose lives did he threaten to take?  -  A.:  He said he would murder all of us.  -  Q.:  Was he sober this morning?  -  A.:  Yes.  -  Q.:  What were the habits of your master?  Is he given to drinking, or is he a sober man?  -  A.:  He is given to drink.  -  Q.:  Have you seen him the worse for liquor lately?  -  A.:  Yes, last week.  -  Q.:  Had he been drinking for several days successively?  -  A.:  Yes.  -  Q.:  Has your master threatened any of you before?  -  A.:  Not to my knowledge.  -  Q.:  did you think this morning he had quite got over the effects of intemperance?  - A.:  Yes.  -  Q.:  Had he been drinking yesterday?  -  A.:  Yes, he had been drinking, but nothing to speak of.  -  Q.:  Did the child attend this school?  -  A.:  No.  The child frequently came to the school with his father, and the other two children.  -  The Coroner:  What state was ROBINSON in when he threatened you on Saturday night?  -  Witness:  He was drunk.  -  A Juror:  Were you afraid of him?  -  Witness:  Not till last week.  -  Q.:  Why then?  - A.:  Because of his threats.  He never drunk so much for a week together as he did last week.  -  Q.:  How long have you lived with the family?  -  A.:  For three months.    -   John Horne, a police constable, living at 44 Ker-street, said that morning about half-past seven o'clock he was on duty at the police-station, when a man came in and gave his name as WILLIAM ISAAC ROBINSON.  Witness asked him what he wanted.  He replied, "I want to give information."  Witness said, "Respecting what?"  He answered "About a murder that's committed."  Witness said, "Who's committed it?"  The man replied, "I have."  Witness said, "Who have you murdered?"  He answered, "My own little girl, GERTRUDE."  Witness smelt spirit very strongly and said to ROBINSON, "I think you must have been drinking?"  He replied, "I've had eleven penn'orth of brandy this morning."  Witness thought the man was labouring under a delusion.  He was  in a profuse sweat.  witness told him that if he would sit down for half an hour and cool himself, he would then be able to tell a different story.  After remaining for ten minutes, witness spoke to ROBINSON again.  He asked him "What do you say about it now?"  ROBINSON repeated the same story.  He was calm and sat with his arms folded and one leg thrown over the other.  Witness asked him whether he had not been drinking very freely of late?  and he replied, "On Friday and Saturday I drank a good deal, and yesterday I fetched a pint and a half from Rawling's myself.  Half a pint the girl fetched me."  He said that was all he had on Sunday.  He asked ROBINSON what he committed the deed with, and ROBINSON said, "A knife."  Witness asked where the knife was and he replied, "It is up in the school.  I left it on the skeleton desk on the mantelpiece.  I wiped my hands in a duster, and I left the duster just by the side."  Witness asked him how he came to get into the school, and he replied, "I had the cleaning of the school, and I clean it Monday mornings."  He also said, "The servant dressed the child, and I took it with me to the school, as I frequently do.  It was my intention to have served the other two the same."  Witness asked what prevented him.  He said, "By killing of that one it was such an awful job I couldn't stand to kill the other two."  Witness inquired if he had any motive for doing it, and he said, "I done it out of pity's sake."  Witness asked what moved him to such pity, and he replied, "I'm always being tormented at home;" adding, when asked who tormented him, "My wife's sister and mother."  Witness remarked, "I think that is no cause for it;" and ROBINSON said he "gave in" his pension and the money he earned at the stores besides.  He said they (meaning his wife's sister and mother) were constantly carrying away things from the store, and their worrying was more than he could put up with.  Witness asked ROBINSON if he was sure the child was dead, and he replied, "Yes;  I went back again to make sure, as I wouldn't see it lingering."  One of the constables - Maddock - then came to the station, and witness asked him to go to 66 Albert-road, and ascertain if there was any truth in the statement just made.  Witness then examined a pair of trousers that ROBINSON had on.  He now produced the trousers, which were covered with blood.  Witness asked ROBINSON how the blood came there, and he said (bending his knee), "I put the child across my knee, so."  Coal-dust had been rubbed over the blood stains.  Witness asked how the dust came there, and ROBINSON answered, "I stumbled against the coal-heap and I took the brandy to help me up, or I shouldn't have been able to have reached thus far."  He understood that he took the brandy after he committed the deed.  Superintendent Lynn afterwards arrived, and ROBINSON said that what he had stated was true.   -   William Henry Vanstone, police-constable, living at 59 Mount-street, stated that that morning at ten minutes past eight he was on duty in Fore-street, when Police-constable Maddock gave him some information, and asked him to go to Stoke Schools where a murder had been committed. When witness got there he saw several people outside one of the windows, which was a little open.  Someone said "Policeman, there's a child murdered inside."  Witness tried the door to get in, but could nit, and accordingly got in at the window.  He saw the body of a child at the lower end of the room, lying on its back,  with the throat cut, and quite warm.  Witness at once sent for Dr Rolston, who came about twenty minutes afterwards, and pronounced the child to be dead.  Witness searched all around the room for a weapon, but could not find it in the room where the body was.  There were three doors in the room - all locked.  Soon after, Mr Rider, the schoolmaster, came and unlocked one of the doors, and got into the large schoolroom.  (The small room where the body was found opens out from this room).  Behind the "skeleton study," a short of black board, he found a knife, and close by a duster on which there were blood stains.  -  John Lynn, superintendent of police, repeated the evidence given before the magistrates.  When he saw ROBINSON at the police station he was sitting down, had a pair of spectacles on, and was reading a paper.  When witness came in the man rose up, laid down the paper, and took off his glasses.  He denied having drunk anything that morning before he did the deed.  ROBINSON was as calm as anyone who was attending that Inquest.  Witness saw blood on the trousers, and said to ROBINSON, "That is blood, and I begin to fear there is some truth in what you say;" and he replied, "Yes, it's quite right."  After the constables had arrived at the station reporting the news was true, and ROBINSON had been taken into custody, one of them said the doors were all locked.  The prisoner said "the room in which the little girl is, is locked.  I locked it myself, but the other door is not locked."   -  John Rolson, M.D., deposed that that morning, soon after eight o'clock, he was sent for to go to the Stoke Public Schools to see a child who was lying there covered with blood.  He went within ten minutes and saw a policeman and a man in the room.  He did not go into the room through the window, as the others had done, but waited until the key of the door was obtained from Mr Rider, the schoolmaster.  Witness saw the child lying on its back in the left hand corner of the room, and there was a considerable quantity of blood on the floor.  There was a large, extensive wound across the throat, and the blood vessels and the windpipe had been divided.  The child was warm, and perfectly pallid from loss of blood.  Witness examined various parts of the body, but found no marks of violence.  The child was dead, death being caused by the wound in the throat.  The child was two years and seven months old.   -  The Coroner, at this stage of the proceedings, said he was decidedly of opinion that as the death had occurred only that morning, more time should be given for inquiries to be made, for further evidence to be brought forward and for himself and the Jury to think the matter over, and therefore, with the concurrence of the Jury, he thought it better to adjourn the Inquiry until Wednesday.  The matter was one of importance and should be fully investigated before they came to any conclusion.  -  The Inquest was then adjourned until Wednesday afternoon.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 April 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner's Inquest.  Verdict Of "Wilful Murder."  -  The adjourned Inquest was held at the Devonport Guildhall, yesterday afternoon, before Mr James Vaughan, Coroner.  -  The Coroner said the Inquest was adjourned for the purpose of seeing if any more evidence was forthcoming, but he considered that apart from the man's confession the crime had been traced home to him by most startling evidence and he must have been well aware of its horrid nature and must have been in as perfect senses as any man could be who committed an act of that sort.  It was true he had been drinking but that was no excuse for crime.  -  The Jury after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against WILLIAM ISAAC ROBINSON, who was committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 May 1876
TORQUAY - JOHN WAYMOUTH, a retired baker, of Torquay, who had been for some time disabled by a broken leg, was on Friday discovered by his niece, Margaret Mortimore, to have hanged himself with a sashlino to the foot of his bed.  At the Inquest held on Saturday at the Palk Arms a verdict of Felo de Se was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of SYDNEY NORTHCOTE, aged 17 years, a boy on board the Impregnable.  James Ball, able seaman on board the Impregnable, stated that on Tuesday evening last they had taken some coal from the hatchway, and before they had shipped the ladder the deceased went to go down and fell on the lower deck.  He was taken to the Royal Naval Hospital, where he died on Wednesday from severe injuries to the abdomen.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their opinion that some precaution ought to be taken to prevent similar accidents.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 May 1876
LYDFORD - Death Of A Plymouth Convict.  - Mr R. Fulford, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest at Princetown yesterday respecting the death of RALPH JOHN MOORE SMITH, aged 43 years, a prisoner at the Dartmoor Convict Establishment.  The deceased, who was a widower, and had two children, was visited on Saturday last by his brother, and died early the following morning.  He was a labourer, and in June 1858, was tried at the Plymouth Quarter Sessions on a charge of lead stealing and sentenced to six months' imprisonment.  Ten years later he was brought up at Plymouth charged with housebreaking and sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.  In the course of time he was granted a ticket-of-leave, but soon fell into crime gain, and in January 1875 he received another sentence of seven years' penal servitude from the Recorder of Plymouth, for stealing barley, &c.  The deceased was stated to be a well conducted prisoner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 May 1876
PLYMOUTH - Suicide By A Sentry At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening, relative to the death of CHARLES STURGESS, aged 24 years, private in the 2nd Battalion, 14th Regiment, who shot himself at Millbay yesterday morning.  -  Samuel Oliver, sergeant of the 2nd Battalion, 14th Regiment, said that he was sergeant of the guard at Millbay Barracks on Tuesday, and the deceased was one of the guard, which he joined at nine o'clock, when witness thought he appeared depressed in spirits, although he was generally a lively man.  At three o'clock yesterday morning witness inspected him and he saw the corporal post him as sentry at the barrack-gate, and he did not make any complaint.  When the deceased was posted he was supposed to have ten rounds of ball cartridge in his pouch.  -  William Casey, corporal of the 14th Regiment, deposed to being corporal of the Millbay guard, and that he noticed the deceased was absent minded, paying no attention to the word of command.  He did not ask him the cause of his depression and knew no reason for it.  At three o'clock he posted the deceased, who soon afterwards called into the guardroom "All correct," but about seven minutes afterwards he heard a report of a rifle, and a crash like that of glass breaking.  He ran to the spot, and saw the deceased lying upon the ground close to his post with his rifle at his feet pointing towards him.  The cleaning rod had been drawn and was lying at the butt of the rifle, and the bayonet had been unfixed.  Witness believed that the muzzle of the rifle was pointed at deceased's breast and the cleaning rod must have been brought to bear on the trigger for the purpose of firing the rife.  -  By a Juror:  The deceased also shewed absence of mind by falling into the wrong guard at the citadel and afterwards at Mount wise when the word of command was given, and had to be spoken to individually.  -  P.C. Head said he was called to the spot and upon searching the deceased he found 16s. 3d. on him, and nine rounds of ball cartridge.  -  A private in the 14th Regiment said that he found the shot which passed through the deceased embedded in a shutter about 25 yards distant from deceased's post.  -  Surgeon-Major R. Webb, stationed at the Citadel, said that he went to the Millbay Barracks on Wednesday morning, where he found the deceased quite dead, lying upon the ground.  He examined the body of the deceased, and found a gun-shot over the left nipple, and the bullet had passed through the chest, in the direction of the heart, to the back, and then through the back of the great coat.  There had been a good deal of bleeding and the deceased's clothes were saturated with blood.  Death must have been instantaneous, and from the position of the rifle he should think that the deceased could discharge it by placing the cleaning-rod at the trigger.  On the 25th of April the deceased came before him, and asked him to excuse him from duty, saying that he was suffering from pains in the left shoulder, for which he had been under treatment.  Witness recommended him to be exempted from all work for three days.  It was not true that he applied afterwards to be exempted from duty and that he was refused.  -  Richard Hoskins, sergeant in the Army Hospital Corps, said that the deceased was admitted into the Military Hospital, at Stoke on the 23rd of January, and it was supposed that he was then suffering from palpitation of the heart, but a few days afterwards he was treated for a disease of the large artery of the left arm.  Shortly after he was brought before the invaliding board, and not being found unfit for further service, he was sent to the Hospital again, and he then made repeated efforts to be discharged from the Hospital.  On the 21st of April he was discharged and it was recommended that he should have seven days' light work.  -  Surgeon-Major Webb was recalled and said that the disease of the arm would in some measure cause great anxiety of mind and would lead to depression of spirits.  Witness had doubts whether the deceased was suffering from the disease or not, and there was certainly no evidence in the deceased to disqualify him from duty.  The deceased joined the regiment in 1872.   -   The Coroner, in summing up, said that there was no doubt that the deceased inflicted the injuries on himself, but they had to find what state of mind he was in when he committed the deed.  For some reason or other it was evident that deceased wanted to be discharged from the service, and if his object was to make use of the illness as a means to get out of the army, he failed.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide whilst in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 8 May 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday relative to the death of JOHN BUNSELL, aged 63 years.  The deceased, who was a labourer, had been in the employ of Mr Banks, shipbuilder, for a considerable time, and a few weeks since he fell over some steps in the yard and injured his head.  He remained away from work for several days, but at length resumed work.  He, however, gave up a short time ago and was attended to by Mr W. Square, surgeon, but, despite his treatment, the deceased expired on Thursday last.  A post mortem examination had since been made and the cause of death was found to be a fracture of the skull.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - The Double Fatality Near Exeter. - Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner for the County, held an Inquest at Countess Weir on Saturday afternoon respecting the deaths of ADA MADDICKS and P.C. CHARLES TUCKER, whose deaths from drowning were reported in the Western Morning News of that day.  The Coroner, in opening the Inquest, said there seemed to be no doubt that the girl deliberately committed suicide, and TUCKER lost his life in making a noble attempt to rescue her.  He believed there would be sufficient evidence to satisfy the Jury that the verdict in the case of the girl ought to be one of "Temporary Insanity," and a little evidence, just enough to satisfy their consciences, was all that was required.  The only effect of a verdict of felo de se was that the deceased was buried at dead of night without funeral rites.  This he regarded as a relic of a barbarous age.  In his long experience he had always found juries exceedingly averse to returning such a verdict, and they never did so unless the evidence of sanity was so strong as to make it impossible not to accept it.  The Jury then viewed the bodies, after which evidence was taken.   -   The first witness was Sergt.-Major Whiteway, who stated that on Friday MRS MADDICKS obtained a warrant from the magistrate sitting at the Castle for the apprehension of her daughter on a charge of staling 1s. 2d., and that he placed the warrant in the hands of the deceased constable (who was one of the reserve hands) to execute.  TUCKER left for Countess Weir in company with MRS MADDICKS about half-past twelve.  The only witness of the distressing occurrence was a little girl named Sarah Lowdon, about ten years old.  She did not know her own age, and was unable to read, but after questioning her the Coroner said she appeared to be an intelligent child and he thought she might be sworn.  Her evidence was as follows:-   On Friday morning I was at play with ADA MADDICKS in the Topsham-road.  ADA told me that her mother was gone for a policeman to take her up, and that she wouldn't go to work.  She also said that mother wanted her to fetch Mr Radford's dinner, and she wouldn't.  We afterwards went down on the bridge.  Little Tommy was with us.  then she said to me, "Sarah Ann, will you come and drown yourself if I will?"  She asked me to drown myself with her two or three times.  I said "No, I wouldn't."  Then we saw the policeman coming.  ADA said "What will ee do - run away?  I said "What for?"  She said "The policeman's coming.  The policeman 'll take Tommy home when us be drowned."  I said "No I won't drown myself."  She said "If you won't I will;  the policeman's coming."  I said, "S'pose he is;  I shan't."  ADA said, "I shall, then," and she ran towards the canal bridge and down the bank; and when she saw the policeman was by the gate she gave a good spring and jumped right into the water.  I saw her go under water.  When the policeman was running along he asked me whose child it was, and I told him in a minute.  He took off his hat and asked me whether I knew how deep the water was and whether it was a dyke or no.  I told him I didn't know.  Then he sprang in after her.  He caught hold of her hand, and tried to come in, but he couldn't.  Just afterwards, when he had hold of ADA'S hand, she sprang up and went down again, and then he turned up his face with his eyes shut and said "Oh!" and they both went down.  Neither of them came up again.  I kept on calling out "Ada, Ada!" but I couldn't get any answer.  Alice Lewis, at the canal house, was there.  She went into the house and I went home with Tommy.  -  The Coroner:  Didn't you give any alarm?  -  the Witness:  There was a lot of men in here to work.  I told them of it, and they went over to the cottage and got the grapples and dragged in the water.  They got the policeman out first and then ADA.  I should think they were in the water an hour-and-a-half.  -  Thomas Sallocks, a sailor, who assisted in dragging the canal, stated that the bodies were got out of the water about five minutes to three, and the policeman's watch was found to have stopped at 1.35.  Though such a long interval had elapsed the policeman was not quite dead, as he breathed once, and P.C. Creedy endeavoured to restore animation by turning the body from side to side and working the arms.  Other persons also tried to restore the girl, but in vain.  -  P.C. Creedy deposed to having known the deceased girl for eight years, during which time she had given her mother much trouble, and had several times started off and remained away from home two or three days at a time.  He had had occasion more than once to speak to her about taking things from her mother.  Her behaviour at times was so strange that he did not think she was in her right mind.  -  John Endacott, a shepherd, said he had known the girl about two years, and had frequently observed something peculiar in her demeanour.  He believed that at times she was of unsound mind.  -  In answer to the Coroner MRS MADDICKS said she believed her daughter was of unsound mind.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of the policeman, and a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" with respect to the girl.  -  In the course of the proceedings the Coroner remarked with some satisfaction on the fact that the Town Council had placed grapples and other life-saving apparatus at the various points of the Canal since he called attention to the want of such provision at an Inquest held some months ago at Salmon Pool.

Western  Morning News, Wednesday 10 May 1876 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall Of An Arch. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday afternoon relative to the death of MR GEORGE LANG, mason, aged 46 years.  -  Thomas Hookridge, mason, residing at Plymouth, said that the deceased and himself had been working at a church (St Mark's) in the course of erection at Ford.  On Monday afternoon the deceased was loading one of arches over the chancel and witness was working on another arch twelve feet distant.  Suddenly the arch the deceased was working upon gave way and carried away the scaffolding, and the result was that the deceased was thrown to the ground, a distance of 36 feet and died shortly afterwards.  The deceased was not standing upon the arch but upon the scaffolding, and he believed the accident was caused by the deceased working too much on one side of the arch.  There was no fault in the construction of the scaffold as the deceased did it himself.  Mr Jenkins, builder, said that he had the contract for building the church, and he employed the deceased, who was doing "day work" at the time of the accident.  The arch in question was 20 feet broad and was of Bath stone, and it was finished three weeks since.  The deceased was backing up the arch on Monday and he must have loaded too much on one side.  He was using his own judgment;  but witness told the deceased only a few days before that he had "struck" the centre too soon, and deceased replied, "I am perfectly satisfied;  it is quite safe."  It was against witness's wish that he struck the arch so soon.  -  The Coroner remarked that the deceased was a competent man and that he did the work of his own accord and used his own judgment.  The deceased did not see any danger, neither did his workmen.  he went into danger willingly;  and if anyone was to blame, it must be the deceased himself.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 May 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of JOSEPH WILLCOCKS, a mason, aged 63 years.  The deceased was working upon scaffolding in Pembroke-street on Thursday afternoon, when the bar supporting the platform he was standing on gave way, and the deceased fell to the ground, a distance of over 30 feet.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of HENRY WAKEHAM, aged 1 year and 4 months.  ELLEN WAKEHAM, widow, said that the deceased was illegitimate and on Friday, last week, she and the child left the Workhouse and went to reside at 54 George-street.  On Wednesday night the deceased was taken ill, and died shortly afterwards.  - Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found that it was well nourished, but he believed death resulted from convulsions through teething.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict. - An Inquest was held at Princetown yesterday respecting the death of HENRY COULON, a prisoner in the Dartmoor Convict establishment.  The deceased, who was unmarried, was 23 years of age, and was convicted at the Chester Summer Assizes, in July last, of wounding with intent to murder, for which offence he was sentenced to fifteen years' penal servitude.  He had never previously been convicted, and his prison character was very good.  The deceased was received from Millbank Prison at the end of March, and was in the Infirmary from that time to his death, which occurred on Thursday afternoon.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER -  Scalded To Death. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner for Exeter, has held an Inquest on the body of ELLEN GILLARD, aged three and half years, daughter of parents in humble circumstances residing in King-street.  From the evidence of the mother it appeared that on Wednesday afternoon the child fell over a kettle of boiling water, which had been left in the stairs, and the contents of the kettle ran over its body.  The sufferer was speedily removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she was found on examination to be badly scalded.  Remedies of the usual kind were applied, but the injuries were of such a nature as to preclude all hope of recovery.  Death took place on Thursday morning.  Verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 May 1876
ASHREIGNEY - Fatal Accident At Ashreigney. - An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner, respecting the death of ROBERT GULLEY, a farmer, of Chittlehampton.  Deceased left his home on Tuesday to go to Dartmoor with some sheep and it is supposed that while returning home he fell asleep on horseback, and fell from the horse when near Riddlecombe, in the parish of Ashreigney, as he was picked up in the road here in an unconscious state early the next morning.  He was taken to Mr Cooke's, Colehouse, where he died the same evening without having spoken.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Late MRS VICARY - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, touching the death of JANE, the wife of MR T. M. VICARY, chemist, of Bedford-street.  Mary Wells, stated that the deceased was 69 years of age, and that on the previous day she took tea in the parlour;  being in her usual health.  She went to her room about seven o'clock, and at nine o'clock witness rang the supper-bell, but finding that her mistress did not come down she proceeded to her room and found MRS VICARY lying on the floor insensible.  She acquainted MR VICARY of the fact, and he with Mr Maurice, immediately rushed to the room and found her dead.  Dr Prance was sent for, but his services were, of course, unavailing.  -  Mr Maurice gave similar evidence and the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."  General sympathy was expressed for MR VICARY, who had been married to the deceased more than forty years.  -  Yesterday morning Mr Prynne, the vicar of St. Peter's referred in feeling terms to the sad occurrence, remarking that the deceased had been a constant communicant for twenty-six years, and that her acts of unostentatious kindness had endeared her to the poor, who would, in common with all who knew her, deeply feel her loss.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 May 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of SAMUEL JAMES SCOTT, aged 19 years, ordinary seaman of the Defence.  On Saturday morning last the deceased and other men were upon the topgallant yard of the Defence, now lying in Plymouth Sound, engaged in loosening the sails.  Deceased had performed his work and was coming down the topmast rigging from the cross-trees, when he let go the "bell" rope, and whilst in the act of catching hold of the shrouds he missed his hold, and fell backwards.  In the fall he struck the lower rigging and then itched upon the netting and rolled into the water.  Some men jumped overboard after the deceased, and a boat was lowered and he was brought on board the ship.  The deceased was attended to by the surgeon of the ship.  He was insensible when brought to the ship and almost lifeless, was suffering from a fracture of the left leg, was severely bruised and three hours he expired.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added that great praise was due to the men who jumped overboard to save the life of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 May 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Of A Scaffolding At Plymouth. -  Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of HENRY BIGNELL, aged 18 years.  On Monday last the deceased was working at the Plymouth Gasworks, under the direction of Mr Willcocks, in the building of a stack.  The scaffolding had been raised to a height of twenty-five feet, and the deceased was engaged carrying mortar.  Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon the deceased and four other lads were upon the scaffolding, when one lad named Williams, who was in the act of emptying a hod of bricks, let the hod slip and the bricks fell upon the scaffolding, a part of which gave way, throwing the deceased with two others to the ground.  The deceased fell upon his back and a plank fell upon him.  He was immediately removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found that he had broken his left arm, and was suffering from a fracture of the spine.  The spar which broke and caused the scaffolding to fall was a new one, and was examined before being erected, and no defects were observed in it.  -  The Coroner remarked that there must have been a defect in the spar which was not perceptible, and the sudden fall of the bricks caused the spar to give way.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 May 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday, relative to the death of ROBERT NORTHMORE, aged 72 years.  -  ELIZABETH MAY, daughter of the deceased, stated that her father resided in Francis Alley, and was a labourer employed by a contractor to look after a team of horses in the dockyard.  About six months ago he was injured in the yard, and had never been well since.  He had been attended to by Mr Bennett, surgeon, occasionally and had not been to work since Tuesday last.  For some time past the deceased had been depressed in spirits, and very strange in his manner, more especially on Monday. Witness missed him for two or three hours that evening, and upon going to the stables near the house she found the deceased hanging from a beam, with a rope doubled around his neck.  He was immediately cut down by P.C. Wootten, and a surgeon was sent for, and upon arriving stated that the deceased had been dead for over two hours.  -  The Coroner remarked that, although it had not been elicited in evidence, he knew that the deceased was in poverty, and was distressed in mind, and being in such circumstances at such an age, he was of opinion that deceased was not accountable for his actions.  The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."  The Jury handed over their fees to the widow, who is an invalid.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 May 1876
EXETER - The Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest on a waggoner named FREDERICK BARTLETT, who committed suicide at the St. David's Station, Exeter, on Tuesday morning, by hanging himself, was held yesterday.  The evidence went to shew that the deceased had been married twice, and about seven weeks ago he lost his second wife.  Since then he has been in a very depressed state, other troubles seeming to have overbalanced his mind.  A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 May 1876
TORQUAY - Strange Fatality At Torquay. - On Wednesday morning a man named PAYNTER was descending the No. 2 shaft of the sewerage works at Torquay when the bucket in which he was descending became entangled in the side, and capsizing threw PAYNTER out, and he fell heavily to the bottom of the shaft.  When the bucket righted, one of the hooks which held it to the chain became undone and the other hook slipping the bucket fell with a loud crash to the bottom and pitched on PAYNTER.  He was quickly removed to the Infirmary, where it was ascertained on a surgical examination being made that one of his hips and an arm were broken, and that he was otherwise badly bruised.  The injured man lingered until six o'clock on Wednesday when he expired.  An Inquest was held at the Infirmary, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 May 1876
ILFRACOMBE - Strange Attempt At Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe on Thursday afternoon touching the death of JOSEPH WILLIAM VAUGHAN, who fell off the seaward face of Hillsborough-hill, Ilfracombe, on Sunday and died at the Cottage Hospital on Tuesday.  VAUGHAN was the driver of a steam-tug boat, and a steamer tug came to Ilfracombe to take the corpse away, bringing a brother of the deceased who gave evidence at the Inquest.  This young man was some time since afflicted with a suicidal mania, and this brother's unfortunate end seems to have brought the affliction back upon him for on Thursday night he ran to jump over a sea wall on the new pier under Lantern-hill, and being prevented, when getting into the boat that was to take him off to the steamer, and which was conveying his brother's body away, he jumped into the water and was saved with difficulty.  Whilst in the water, and struggling hard to free himself from his preservers, he kept saying, "Let me go to my brother."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 May 1876
TORQUAY - Sudden Death At Torquay. - On Saturday afternoon, as JOHN HUNT, carter, in the employment of Messrs. John Vicary and Sons, tanners, Newton, was returning from Torquay with a load of skins, he fell from the wagon and died, when near Law's-bridge, in the parish of St. Mary Church.  Police constable Bond, with assistance, conveyed the body to the Torbay Infirmary, where an Inquest was held in the evening and Dr Richardson stated that he considered death was caused by disease of the heart.  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith.  The deceased had been ailing for some time, but in the morning, before leaving home, remarked that he never felt better in his life.  He has left a wife and six children in poor circumstances.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Horrabridge. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Saturday evening, relative to the death of WILLIAM ELLIS, aged 61 years.  -  Emma McDonald, nurse at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was a native of Walkhampton, and that on the morning of the 24th of November last, whilst he was going to his work at Horrabridge, he slipped and fell, breaking his right leg.  He was then conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where his leg was set and he had been an inmate ever since.  Notwithstanding the skilful treatment he received, the deceased never regained sufficient strength to walk and he gradually declined and died on Friday from exhaustion.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sad And Strangely Sudden Death At Plymouth. - On Saturday evening Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at 121 Union-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of COBDEN TOMS, aged 24 years.  Mr Thomas Doidge, bookseller, stated that the deceased resided in his house, and had been an apprentice and assistant in his shop for upwards of twelve years.  Within the past two years the deceased had been losing flesh, but his general health had been good, although he had sometimes complained of numbness in the extremities, and giddiness.  Witness had advised him to get medical advice, in fact had offered to pursue it for him, but he made light of his ailment and refused.  Deceased ultimately saw a surgeon, who prescribed a tonic, and told him it was general debility from which he was suffering.  On Friday the deceased appeared to be perfectly well, and during the day he prepared a number of hooks for the Plymouth Free Library and partook of hearty meals.  He spent a portion of the evening at a Good Templar's Lodge, where he delivered a speech, and afterwards went to the house of a Mr Crumbers, whom he was in the habit of visiting, finally returning to witness's house at eleven o'clock when he retired to rest.  When called the next morning at 7.30, as was the usual practice, the deceased was found to be dead;  he was in bed lying in a perfectly natural position.  A surgeon, who was called in, stated that the deceased had been dead about five hours.  The deceased was a member of several Temperance Societies.  The Coroner remarked that there could be no doubt that the deceased died from Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 May 1876
ILFRACOMBE - The adjourned inquest touching the death of JOSEPH WILLIAM VAUGHAN, who fell from Hillsborough-hill, Ilfracombe, and died in the Cottage Hospital two days after, was held yesterday, when the evidence of his companion at the time of the accident, was taken, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News,  Saturday 3 June 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Occurrence On Board H.M.S. Hydra.  An Engineer Killed.  -  A frightful accident occurred yesterday on board the turret vessel Hydra, now lying in Keyham basin.  The vessel is being brought forward for the first division of the steam reserve and her engines were being tried in the basin yesterday morning, when a valve, about four or five inches in the bore, and fitted to a steam pipe leading to an auxiliary stop-valve suddenly gave way under the pressure of steam, resulting in a great rush of steam into the engine-room that very speedily filled the place.  Those in the engine-room immediately made for the ladder, and an engine-room artificer named Pearn was severely scalded about the hands.  Shortly afterwards MR CLARKE, an engineer on board, was found to be missing and with creditable promptitude a search for him was made by Mr Johnstone, chief engineer, and a leading man of the factory named Cooper.  It was found impossible to return in consequence of the great quantity of steam, but Mr Johnstone and Mr Cooper got around by another way, and managed to shut off the steam, turning the current into the blow-off pipe.  By this means the search was continued, and resulted in the discovery of MR CLARKE, who was found to be quite dead.  It seems that in his endeavour to escape he took a way which led him on to the boiler casing, and when there, owing to the pressure of steam, he was compelled to succumb.  The surgeon of the yard speedily arrived with bandages and restoratives, but they were of no avail to MR CLARKE.  The Inquest.  -   Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hotel, Morice Town, relative to the death of MR CLARKE, who, it was stated, was 40 years of age.  -  The Coroner, who, in opening the Inquiry, remarked that the accident was a very lamentable one, and the matter should be very strictly investigated.  It was a calamity that, he was happy to say, did not often occur;  and if there were any defects in the machinery inquiries like the present would tend to rectify them.  -  The Jury then proceeded to Keyham Yard, where they viewed the body of the deceased, who had been frightfully scalded about the head, face and arms.  The afterwards went on board the Hydra, and visited the scene of the accident.  -  The Inquiry was watched by Mr W. N. Covey, chief inspector of machinery;  Commander Day, of H.M.S. Indus;  and Mr J. R. Johnson, chief engineer of the Hydra;  Mr Salmon appeared on behalf of Mr W. Eastlake, deputy judge advocate of the fleet.  The first witness called was John Waddle, who stated that he was an engine-room artificer on board H.M.S. Hydra.  Between eleven and twelve o'clock yesterday morning the deceased told off witness and another artificer to go to the boiler-room and just before the explosion occurred he told witness to watch the port and starboard boilers, stating that he (deceased) would look after the "after ones."  Witness was doing what the deceased told him when the explosion occurred, and there was a general rush to the ladder;  and four persons went up the ladder before the deceased.  Witness immediately followed and the deceased was going in the right direction to get out of the way of the steam when a great rush of steam occurred, and rendered the way obscure.  The deceased took a wrong turning in the confusion, and this brought him upon the casing of the boiler.  Witness was about to follow him, but a blast of wind blew away the steam, and he called out to the deceased that he was going the wrong way.  At the time of the accident the pressure of steam on the boiler was 40 lbs.  Witness helped another artificer named Pearn up the ladder, and Pearn escaped, although he was severely scalded.  -  Charles N. Palmer, engineer, serving in H.M.S. Hydra, said that at the time of the accident he was in the engine-room, and upon hearing a loud report, followed by a rush of steam, he immediately went to the engine-room ladder, which he found crowded with men.  He attributed the accident to the belts in the auxiliary stop-valve being defective, as by reason of their being of insufficient strength to keep it in its place the cover of the valve was forced off by the pressure of steam.  At the time of the accident the auxiliary boiler in connection with the stop-valve that broke was at a pressure of 30 lbs, of steam per inch.  He did not consider this to be too high a pressure for a fairly-constructed valve.  The bolts of the valve were produced and they were all broken.  Witness was of opinion that they broke in consequence of their being made of iron instead of brass.  There was no defect in the size or shape of the bolts.  Bolts were examined once a year, but he could not say how long ago the bolts in question were examined.  He had been in the ship only three months, and they had not been inspected since he had been there.  The Hydra was built in 1871, and the machinery was constructed by Elder, of Glasgow.  The screw bolts were of the usual size, and the ship had been to sea.  He believed the bolts that broke had corroded;  they ought to have been made of brass.   -   George Metcalf deposed that he was an engineer and was for duty on board the Hydra that day.  At the time of the explosion he was in the engine-room, and immediately it occurred he went to the entrance of the boiler-room, which was full of steam.  He made enquiries as to whether all the men were clear, and was told that they were with the exception of the deceased, who was on duty in the boiler-room.  He put a wet cloth over his face, and went into the boiler-room in search of the deceased, but could not find him.  After the pressure of steam had died away, he and others went on the top of the boilers where a Mr Cooper, who belonged to Keyham, had discovered the deceased.  He immediately called some stokers out of the boiler-room, and they removed the deceased, who appeared to be quite dead, upon deck.  The surgeon of H.M.S. Indus was on board the ship and he examined the deceased.  He had examined the stop-valves, the bolts of which broke and caused the escape of the steam, and in his opinion the cause of the bolts breaking was that they were of inferior metal.  If the guides had been screwed the explosion would have taken place just the same.  He knew it was the practice in Government yards to make the bolts of brass, but in private yards they were generally made of iron.  The brass he spoke of was known as Muntz's metal, and it was a composition.  The bolts would be made of iron, he believed, unless specially mentioned in the contract to have them of brass.  He did not know whose duty it was to inspect the machinery made for Government yards.  He believed the deceased was frightfully scalded about the hands and face when he was attempting to get out of the stokehole at the time of the explosion.  -  William Henry Covey, chief inspector of machinery, said that he was on board the Hydra at the time of the explosion.  The cause of the screw bolts giving way was a very difficult question to answer.  All bolts were not examined every twelve months if the ship had not been under steam during that time.  If the screw bolts had been examined six months ago they would have been condemned.  If ships engines were tested every six months an accident would never occur, but it would be impossible to do this.  Everyone who knew what an engine was, and the number of bolts in it would clearly see that a ship would never be ready for sea under such circumstances.  From the present appearances of the screw bolts, he was of opinion that the material of which they were originally constructed was of a kind and quality that ought not to have been employed in their construction.  The valve in question was made by John Elder and co., of Glasgow.  In Government yards all such bolts as were used in those valves would, for the future, be constructed of Muntz's metal.  He should report the accident, and it would naturally lead to the valves of the ship being examined, for the purpose of seeing that they were all good.  There was no doubt that the bolts had been examined since they had been placed in the ship.  The screw bolts were, he was of opinion, of the kind named in the specifications which formed part of the contractors' contract, for if they had not been they would, he thought, have been rejected on examination.  He believed that all vessels built now would have bolts of Muntz's metal.  He had seen iron screw bolts used in engines for upwards of 26 years in the navy, and he had always thought them good and serviceable.  It was a very singular thing that all the bolts should have been broken off, and he could not understand it.  He could not say whether, if the pressure of steam caused one of the bolts to break, the other bolts would have also been destroyed.  When a bolt broke it generally caused a leak, and thus gave warning, but in the present case there was no warning.  The deceased had been sent on board the Hydra several times for the very purpose of making himself acquainted with the machinery.   -   John Boswell, engineer, was on board the Hydra attending to the engines, and said that judging from the appearance of the screw pins he considered that the accident occurred owing to the ends of the pins being exposed to galvanic action caused by the lodging of water in the pipe whilst the ship had been in harbour.  He was of opinion that the pins in the first place were well made, and of good iron, and that the accident would never have occurred had not the ends been exposed to the water in the pipe, and they were often so exposed.  The pressure on the outer cover of the valve would be the pressure on the auxiliary boiler to which the valve belonged, and which had been stated to have been 30 lbs,. to the inch.  He had just left H.M.S. Seagull, and during her commission he had frequently to take the iron bolts out of the valves and substitute bolts made of Muntz's metal.  It was a common practice to put iron bolts in the valves.   -   The Coroner remarked that the Inquiry had gone to shew that the cause of the breaking of the bolts in the valve was the employment of improper material in their construction.  The bolts were made of iron, and they ought in the opinion of the witnesses to have been of Muntz's metal, which had been found to be the best material for the purpose.  It had been stated by the inspector of machinery that for thirty-six years similar bolts had been used in the Royal Navy and in the merchant service.  There was nothing singular in the bolts in this particular ship.  The witnesses did not say that the bolts were of such an inferior character and material as they had never before seen, but that they were of a poor description, and it had also been stated that the contractor very probably put in bolts according to the contract submitted.  Although it might be impossible to examine every bolt in an engine, yet it was possible to examine a bolt here and there, especially in hot places, so that an opinion might be formed of their quality.  To say that the accident was caused by the negligence of the contractor, in putting in bad material in the machinery, would be going a great length;  and he did not think any Jury would endorse such a verdict at the assizes.  It was very possible that this accident would cause the overhauling of the machinery of the ship and have it set right;  and that such pins as those in question would be disused by the Government, and that the material of which they should be constructed would be specified in future contracts.  He was of opinion that the occurrence was an accident, and one of those which were liable to occur;  but they hoped, as science advanced, and with proper appliances, that disasters of that kind would be things of the past.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 June 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Sea. - Mr E. Square, Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at Millbay yesterday relative to the death of ROBERT STORY, a marine pensioner, aged 57 years.  It was stated that the deceased was a passenger to Plymouth in the steamship Lady Wodehouse, Captain Watts, from Cork, and on Sunday morning about eight o'clock, when the ship was at sea the deceased was observed upon the deck looking very unwell.  He was sick and vomited blood and died in a few minutes afterwards.  The daughter of the deceased stated that her father had been suffering from weakness in the chest for a considerable time past, but she had not seen him for seven years.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

LIFTON - The Suicide At Lifton. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Arundell Arms, Lifton, by Mr Robert Fulford, respecting the death of MR WILLIAM RAYMOND, landlord of the Arundell Arms, Lifton, aged 57 years, whose death by suicide was reported yesterday.  Mr Christopher Tapson, father-in-law, of the deceased, deposed that the deceased had been in a very desponding state of mind for a long time past, and he believed it was brought on partially by his having suffered from bad eyes.  -  Mr G. G. Doidge, surgeon, said that he had attended the deceased for a long time past, and that he had noticed him to be in a very low state of mind.  On Saturday about noon he was called to see the deceased, who, when he arrived, had been dead about twenty minutes.  He found him lying on the bed and made an examination of the wound, which was a very deep cut in the throat, made with a razor, that had severed several of the vessels of the neck.  He also found about two quarts of blood in a receptacle.  The deceased had formerly been in the Royal Navy, and in an engagement with a slave ship received three bullets in his back, two of which had been extracted, but the third still remained, and caused him a great deal of pain, and he had no doubt that this, with the declining of his eyesight, greatly affected the deceased's mind.  -  The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 June 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, relative to the death of JOSEPH WALLICE, labourer, aged 23 years.  Thomas Chaffey, labourer, stated that about one o'clock on Tuesday afternoon last he, deceased, and two other men were engaged at whitewashing in the coppersmiths' workshop, Keyham.  After being at work for about fifteen minutes a plank upon which the ends of six other planks were resting gave away, and the whole scaffolding, with the exception of one plank, fell to the ground.  Witness and a man named Cook were standing on one of the planks which fell to the ground, and the deceased was standing on one of the others.  Witness saved himself by catching hold of a piece of rope and the end of a plank.  The deceased fell a distance of 15 feet, and pitched upon some copper bolts and a bar, which were lying at the bottom of the scaffolding.  Witness had been working on the plank which gave away for about a month.  There was a little more weight on the plank that gave away than there was on any of the others.  They had been using two planks instead of a spar, but on the morning of Tuesday last Cook gave orders for the scaffolding to be removed, and upon its being re-erected only one plank was placed in a similar position.  The plank gave away in the centre.  -  Witness did not observe that there was only one plank used instead of a spar, otherwise he would have refused to have worked on it.  -   William Brooks, labourer, stated that he was kneeling on a plank scraping some glass when the scaffolding gave away, and he fell upon a labourer named Cook, receiving a severe shaking.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 9 June 1876
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death At Plymouth. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Mutley, on Tuesday evening, relative to the death of ELEANOR SHULDHAM, aged 64 years.  -  Francis F. Fowler, residing at Lismore-villa- Mannamead, stated that the deceased resided in his house and had done so for the last seven years.  She was the widow of WILLIAM SAMUEL SHULDHAM, a gentleman of independent means.  About ten o'clock on Monday night the deceased retired to rest as usual, but on Tuesday morning she was found dead in her bed with a piece of elastic tied around her neck,.  Witness did not recognise the piece of elastic, neither had he seen any in MRS SHULDHAM'S possession.  The deceased had been depressed at times through ill-health, and had said that God had deserted her.  He had been told that she had suffered from, and was treated for mental depression in London about twenty years ago.  -  By a Juror:  Deceased slept in the room next to his, but he heard no noise.  She had been a widow for nearly twenty years.  Had heard the deceased say that she made a will several years ago;  she had only a life interest in property.  Deceased went for a drive as usual on Monday.  His present servant had been with him for about three years, and during that time he had had no occasion to complain of her.  -  Caroline Rolling, servant in the employ of the previous witness, stated that about twenty minutes before seven on Tuesday morning she went to the deceased's bedroom as usual, and found her dead.  witness had been in the habit of going to the deceased's bedroom about that time for the past two months, and up to three weeks ago she gave the deceased her medicine, but had not done so since.  On Monday night the deceased asked her to bring her some salts in the morning.  Witness recognised the piece of elastic;  the deceased used to wear it at night to keep her curls back.  As MRS SHULDHAM appeared to be rather low-spirited on Monday night witness asked her if she should sleep with her, but the deceased refused, saying that she would ring if she required her.  Witness left the deceased in her bedroom alone about ten o'clock at night, but she did not put the candle out, the deceased doing it herself.  -  By a Juror:  Had asked the deceased to allow her to sleep with her before, but MRS SHULDHAM always refused.  Never saw any scissors in the room.  Observed blood about the deceased's nose when she found her dead on Tuesday morning.  Deceased did not have her usual supper on Monday evening.  On Monday the deceased appeared to be glad that her brother was coming to see her.  -  Edwin C. Langford, surgeon, stated that about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning he was called to see deceased, whom he found in bed lying on her left side quite dead.  With the assistance of Dr Prance he made a careful examination of the body, and found a long piece of elastic tied tightly around the deceased's neck, immediately under the thyroid cartilage.  The cause of death was suffocation.  The deceased had been dead two or three hours when he arrived.  Everything in the room was in perfect order. There was no appearances of the deceased having struggled.  Her hands were clenched and laid gently across her chest.  The marks produced by the elastic band could not have been produced after death.  Dr Prance's opinion was that the deceased was in a depressed state of mind.  Suffocation would not follow immediately as far as tying was concerned.  (The elastic was tied tightly behind the neck, and then returned to the front where it was tied again.)  -  By a Juror:  When he found the elastic the ends were short.  The elastic could not have slipped from the head to the neck from the position in which he found it and the way in which it was tied.  There was no appearance of any struggle having taken place, nor were there any marks of violence on the deceased.  He believed that the injury was inflicted by the deceased's own hands, and that it could not have been done by another person.  The Jury, after a quarter of an hour's consultation in private, returned a verdict "That the deceased destroyed herself by tying a piece of elastic band around her neck, whereby she had Suffocated, whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Stoke. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Stoke yesterday relative to the death of DANIEL BALSDEN, aged 60 years.  -  Ellen French, a domestic servant, stated that the deceased kept a small shop at the back of Albert-road, and was in the habit of calling at her master's house, 11 Tamar-terrace, for orders.  Yesterday morning he came as usual, and almost immediately afterwards threw up his arms and fell upon the grass in front of the house and expired in a short time.  The deceased was always a happy man and she had never heard him complain of being unwell.  The daughter of the deceased stated that her father suffered from severe pains in the side, but it was only occasionally.  -  Mr May, jun., surgeon, said that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found that he died from heart disease.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 June 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Peculiar Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, and a double Jury, of whom Mr Wellham was Foreman, held an Inquiry at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES BURCH, aged 47 years, late a warrant officer (a gunner) in the Royal Navy, who committed suicide on Thursday.  -  EMMA BURCH, eldest daughter of the deceased, stated that about half-past eleven o'clock on Thursday morning she heard a groan in her father's bedroom, and afterwards heard her father ask for a drink of water.  She went to the door and upon finding it bolted forced it open, and the first thing she saw was her father lying on the floor, with a razor covered with blood at his side.  There was a quantity of blood about the room.  On Wednesday evening she fetched the deceased a pint of beer for his supper.  There had been no unpleasantness between the deceased and her aunt.  -  HANNAH HOSKING, sister of the deceased stated that on Thursday morning her niece called for her to come upstairs, which she did, and upon entering the room she observed her brother lying on the floor with his right arm covered with blood and a razor at his side.  The deceased asked witness for water - which she gave him and he drank some of it.  In November 1874 the deceased lost his wife, and since that time he had been very depressed in spirits.  She had heard him talk in a similar manner to that of a man out of his mind.  She did not believe that he would have committed such an act had he been in his right senses.  Some time ago he said that the amount of trouble on his mind was so great that he was half inclined to put an end to himself.  The deceased was invalided from the Navy for an internal complaint.  -  Henry Horton, surgeon, deposed that about noon on Friday he was requested to go and see the deceased, whom he found quite dead, but warm.  Upon examination witness observed that there was a very slight skin wound on the left elbow, and on the right arm there was a cut across the elbow about two and a half inches in length, that had opened both the large veins, out of which a large quantity of blood had flowed.  The artery was uninjured.  He believed that the wounds were self-inflicted, and that at the time the deceased inflicted them, he was of unsound mind.  About November 1874 the deceased lost his wife after child birth, and as the only possible means of saving her, the deceased had the operation of transfusion performed on her, himself supplying the blood from the arm that he had cut on the previous day.  The deceased had sufficient blood taken from him to cause faintness, and to shew him that death by bleeding would be absolutely painless.  Witness had seen the deceased several times since the death of his wife, and had found him in  a very desponding state of mind, but not so bad as to lead him to suspect that he would injure himself or others.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the deceased had more than ordinary love for his wife, and this had caused him to be in such a desponding state of mind.  -  The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 June 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - A Child Suffocated At Devonport. - Mr John Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of ROBERT THOMPSON JEFFERY, aged four months.  -  CAROLINE JEFFERY, wife of a seaman on board H.M.S. Cambridge, stated that she resided at 28 St John's-street, and that on Saturday night she went to bed at eleven o'clock, when the child appeared to be in its usual health.  About three o'clock the next morning she nursed the deceased, but a short time afterwards she found the child dead by her side.  About a fortnight since the deceased was vaccinated, and it had never been well since, but it had not been ill.  Mr De Larne, surgeon, said that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found it to be that of a very fine and well nourished child and there was no appearance of its having suffered from any disease.  The vaccination had gone off perfectly well.  The lungs were intensely congested, and there was very little air in them.  The heart and brain were also congested, but all the other organs were perfectly healthy.  His opinion was that the deceased died from suffocation.  -  The Coroner remarked that the arm of the deceased's mother might have been pressing upon the deceased while asleep, and it might have been suffocated.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Suffocation, but that there was no evidence to shew how such suffocation was caused.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 June 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Fall At Stonehouse. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Stonehouse Workhouse yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM EDWARD GILSON, aged 8 years.  The mother of the deceased stated that he left home, in Plymouth, on Tuesday morning to attend school in Prospect-row, but he did not return to either dinner or tea, and she had been told that he did not go to school.  A boy named William Weekes said that about quarter to 7 o'clock, on Tuesday evening, he was playing in the quarry, and saw the deceased at play with a little boy in the Battery Field above.  Shortly afterwards he saw the deceased fall over the rocks.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner mentioned that the Local Board had decided upon building a deadhouse instead of having bodies conveyed to the Workhouse.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 June 1876
PLYMOUTH - Death From Want At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at Millbay, Plymouth yesterday respecting the death of WILLIAM PAYNE, aged 75 years.  -  Mary Palmer stated that the deceased was in receipt of a Greenwich pension of £4 per year and used to do a little at fishing.  He never had sufficient food and although he had applied to Mr Mayell, the relieving officer, several times for relief, he never received any, as he refused to go into the Workhouse.  On Saturday and Sunday last he had only a little sago and three cups of cocoa.  Last week the Rev. Mr Gurney gave him a shilling's worth of groceries, otherwise he would have had none.  The deceased was of a very violent temper and on Monday, just before his death, he used very violent language towards her (witness).  On Monday morning he vomited and died a few minutes afterwards.  About an hour before his death she went for Mr Jackson, surgeon, and told him that the deceased was dying, but Mr Jackson did not come until an hour after death.  She was certain that the deceased died from want of food;  the only things he made us of unless she gave him something were bread and salt butter.  He had had hardly any meat for the past nine months.  After the death of the deceased she went to the relieving officer and asked him to give her a shirt to put on the deceased as he had none, and to allow her a person to wash the body but he refused, saying that she (witness) must do it herself.  Witness then applied to the Rev. Mr Gurney, who gave her a shirt, and she washed the body and put it on.  The boat that the deceased used for fishing was, she believed, his own.  -  Mr Williams, Coroner's officer, stated that the deceased's room was nearly empty and very dirty.  There was no food in the room.  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of proper food and nourishment.  They also stated that the coffin, which had been provided by the parish, was of a very inferior description, and the worst they had ever seen.  They considered that the deceased ought to have had a much better one, considering that he had a boat which the parish officers were in search of.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 June 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Morice Town. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport on Wednesday, relative to the death of CHARLOTTE JANE HANKIN, aged 35 years.  RICHARD HANKIN, the husband of the deceased, stated that his wife arrived at Plymouth by steamer from Portsmouth on Tuesday morning, and came to Devonport with her mother.  In the evening she went to Morice Town to meet witness, who is a stoker on board her Majesty's ship Indus, and they were walking through Charlotte-street when deceased exclaimed, "Oh my god!" and fell upon the ground, and died almost immediately.  The deceased often complained of pains in the chest when she walked fast, and did so that morning whilst walking from Plymouth to Devonport, the severity of the pains causing her to rest several times on the way.  -  Mr C. J. Moore, surgeon, deposed to having made a post mortem examination of the deceased's body, and found the lungs congested and fatty degeneration of the heart.  The kidneys and stomach were also congested, and there was an ulcer in the latter which had nearly penetrated the coat.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 June 1876
PLYMOUTH - Suicide in Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of MYRA WYATT, aged 60 years.  It was stated that the deceased had since May last been living at 12 Coboug-street, with a Mrs Aus, who believed that she was a person of independent means.  She had been in delicate health and was last seen alive on Thursday night, when she was eating some gruel.  Yesterday morning, on her bedroom being entered, she was found lying on the floor dead.  She held a razor firmly clenched in her right hand, and with this she had inflicted a deep wound on the right side of her throat.  After doing this she seems to have held her head over a pan until she fell down exhausted with loss of blood, of which there was over a quart in the pan and a little on the carpet.  The deceased was wearing her nightdress and nightcap, and she had tied the blade of the razor firmly to the handle with a  piece of string.  The razor was new, but the Coroner's officer had been unable to find where it had been bought.  Mr W. Square, surgeon, who gave evidence, stated that he knew the deceased very well.  She was very weak and feeble, and was always gloomy and melancholy.  A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 June 1876
ST MARYCHURCH - Bathing Fatality At Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at St. Marychurch on Saturday evening by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of ALICE JANE OWEN, daughter of MRS OWEN, widow of the late CAPTAIN OWEN, of the merchant service.  The first witness called was a Mr Brown, who stated that whilst sitting on the Babbicombe Downs that morning he saw the deceased and her sister go into the water from a bathing machine on Oddicombe Beach.  They were walking backwards and apparently one was teaching the other to swim.  After a little time they got out so far that he became alarmed, and directly afterwards it appeared to him as if they were drowning.  He took off his hat and waved it to [?] of those on the beach, and shouted loudly for help.  He did not see what subsequently occurred as he ran to his house for some brandy, and when he arrived at the beach the body had been brought ashore.  Every effort to restore animation was made, but without success.  The deceased and her sister were about forty feet from the shore.  There did not appear to be any special arrangement for saving life, nor did there appear to be anyone in charge.  -  Ellas Waymouth, the owner of the bathing machines on Oddicombe beach, stated that about noon on Saturday he let a machine to the deceased and her sister.  He placed the machine down to the water's edge, and saw the deceased and her sister enter the water.  At that time he was about twelve yards off, but he subsequently went to a distance of about fifty yards to a lobster pot.  Soon after this he heard someone shouting, and on turning around saw that something was amiss.  He pulled towards the young ladies and picked up MISS ADA OWEN, who was floating on the water.  He placed her on shore, and then went out with his grapnels with which he recovered the body of the deceased, who had sunk.  He took the body ashore, and although every means was taken to restore animation by medical men, it could not be affected.  The deceased was still alive when he put her in the boat.  The Coroner, in his summing up, pointed out that the Jury could only return a verdict of "Accidental Death," and a verdict accordingly was returned.  The Coroner cautioned Waymouth to be more careful for the future in his attendance on bathers.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 June 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Sea. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM HENRY PHIPPS, aged 28 years.  George Dick, master of the fishing lugger Little Eleanor, stated that the deceased was a fisherman on board.  On Wednesday last the boat left Portsmouth harbour, and all went well until Saturday.  About 2 a.m. on that day the vessel was almost seven miles from the Isle of Wight and the deceased and others were upon the decks.  The deceased, who was apparently quite well, was running in the sheat rope when he fell upon some nails on the deck and died almost immediately.  He never complained of being unwell.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 3 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening, relative to the death of CHARLOTTE KEMP, aged 50 years, who was found drowned that morning.  -  NICHOLAS KEMP, husband of the deceased, stated that he was a labourer, and resided at 15 Lower-street, and had been married for seventeen years.  The deceased had been in a desponding state for a considerable time past, and at the time of her death she was suffering from an enlargement in the throat.  He had taken her to several surgeons, but the treatment did her no good;  and she had also been attended to at the South Devon Hospital.  She often prayed to God to take her out of the world, and appeared like a person distracted;  but he never heard her say that she would put an end to her life.  On Friday night she went to bed with him  about half-past eleven o'clock, and shortly afterwards he fell asleep;  but upon awaking about three hours later he found that she had left the room.  Not finding her in the house, he went into the street in search of her, and afterwards gave information to the police at the Harbour-avenue Station.  A search was made, and the deceased was found drowned upon the Avenue slip.  -  HELENA CARD, deceased's sister, deposed that the deceased suffered from pains in the head, and a large swelling in the throat that interfered with her swallowing.  She had oftentimes told witness that she thought she should be choked, chronic inflammation having set in.  A few days ago the deceased consulted Dr Square who told her that she would have to undergo an operation, and she dreaded the operation.  The deceased was at witness's house on Friday night when she was very strange in her manner, and complained of her head and consequently she took her home.  Deceased was continually praying and asked others to pray for her, saying that no one knew what her sufferings were.  Deceased's husband was always very kind to her.  -  Inspector Price stated that he found the lifeless body of the deceased upon the Avenue slip that morning about twenty yards from the police station. From the position she was in it appeared as though she had lain upon her face and hands on the slip and allowed the water to flow over her.  Her face had been under water, but the tide had not reached the back of her head, which was quite dry.  The deceased was partly dressed when found.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased committed Suicide in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Mannamead. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening regarding the death of FRANCIS PACK, a mason, residing in Frankfort-street.  On Wednesday last the deceased was working on a scaffold, thirty feet from the ground, outside a house being erected for Mr B. Call, at Mannamead.  Mr Call was in the act of descending from the scaffold when he heard a noise, and on turning round saw that the deceased had fallen to the ground.  he was taken home and died yesterday.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 7 July 1876
EGG BUCKLAND - Sad Case Of Suicide AT Little Efford. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the house of Mr G. W. Soltau, Little Efford, last evening, relative to the death of THOMAS PARKER, aged about 55 years, who committed suicide yesterday morning.  Mary Jane Smith, cook at Mr Saltau's, said that at half-past six o'clock yesterday morning upon coming downstairs she found that the work that the deceased was in the habit of doing had not been performed, and she immediately went to the pantry, but could get no admittance, the door having been fastened on the inside.  She could not find the deceased, but a few minutes afterwards she heard a noise at the front door, and then observed that the door had just been opened.  She then found that the pantry door had been unlocked and upon looking into the pantry found a quantity of blood upon the floor, together with a large knife.  A search was immediately made around the garden for the deceased, but it was half an hour before he was discovered.  he was then found with his throat cut, and his head was immersed in a large tub of water.  She left the deceased in the kitchen on Wednesday evening and he went to bed about eleven o'clock.  Of late the deceased's wife had been very ill, and the deceased appeared to be in a very desponding state respecting it, but during the past two or three days he had been more cheerful.  -  Mr G. W. Soltau said that the deceased had been a butler in his employ off and on for about twenty-five years.  Before the deceased was found witness sent for Mr Langford, surgeon, who arrived shortly afterwards and when deceased was found life was extinct.  For some time he had been excessively distressed, owing to the dangerous illness of his wife.  About a fortnight since he was looking very haggard and desponding and witness called him into the house and said to him, "You look so ill and feeble that you should go home and rest yourself," at which suggestion he became deeply agitated, and said he could not go home because his wife was so very ill and there was no room for him the.  He wept bitterly, and was in a very restless condition.  Witness had several times since observed tears coming from his eyes and he appeared to be suffering from mental anguish.  The deceased had been suffering from a running in the leg, and he was admitted to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital but he came out a short time ago, and told witness that the leg was cured, but the deceased had not been so active since.  The deceased varied at times.  Witness did not tell him he was to quit his service.  When he was sent to the Hospital the deceased appeared to be in a very desponding state respecting the condition of his leg.  -  Mr Edwin C. Langford, surgeon, stated that he was called yesterday morning and upon arriving found the deceased quite dead, with a very large wound in the right side of the throat which divided the jugular vein.  The deceased bled very much and his opinion was that the deceased became giddy and fell into the tub, but he did not die from suffocation.  The windpipe had not been touched and the injury was certainly self-inflicted.  About a fortnight ago the deceased's son asked witness to come and see the deceased, who, he said, was very weak and in low spirits, but a message was sent the next day to the effect that the deceased was so much better that witness need not come to see him.  He believed the deceased was in an unsound state of mind.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 July 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - The Tragedy At Devonport.  Magisterial Examination And Inquest.  -  At the Devonport Police Court yesterday, before Messrs. R. J. Laity, J. W. W. Ryder and A. Norman and Colonel Brown, THOMAS ELLICOTT, 47, shoemaker, was placed in the dock in the charge of three policemen, on an indictment charging him with causing the death of his wife by striking her with his fist on the previous day in Monument-street.  Prisoner, who had been quiet in his cell all night, behaved very violently for half an hour prior to his examination, refusing to have his coat, which he had taken off, put on, and struggling with and swearing at the police-officers.   -  Superintendent Lynn deposed:  Yesterday afternoon I saw prisoner in the custody of P.C. Westlake at the police-station.  I charged him with causing the death of his wife by striking her a blow on the head in Monument-street.  He said, "I pushed her, but I did not intend to hurt her."  He was considerably the worse for drink.  I apply for a remand until Monday next.  -  Mr Laity:  Have you anything to say why you should not be remanded?  -  Prisoner, who asked what the magistrate said, and muttered something about his poor wife, was then remanded  until Monday. The Inquest.   -   The Coroner's Inquest was held at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday afternoon before Mr James Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, and a double Jury, of whom Mr H. W. Bryant was the Foreman.  -   Robert William Ash said:  I reside at the Guardship Inn, Pembroke-street, and am a joiner by trade.  Deceased came into my house at a quarter to three o'clock on Thursday afternoon.  Prisoner was not there, and had not been for hours.  She sat down for about two minutes and then a Mrs Wallis came in and she asked her to have a glass of porter.  Wallis at first said "No," but on being asked a second time, she consented and took the drink.  She consumed it and left, deceased having no drink at all. Two or three minutes after the accused (ELLICOTT) came into my house.  He immediately went over to his wife and slapped her in the face, saying "Make hast home."  She rose up to go out, and as she was leaving the door and, turning round, said, "What have I done that you should serve me in this manner?"  If you will go home I will."  He went out, and I thought they had both gone home together.  Immediately after I saw the deceased sitting down in the street; several people were round her bathing her with water;  prisoner had gone again into my house and I begged him to leave.  P.C. Westlake came in and told ELLICOTT to go for a doctor, but he refused, saying he had not hurt his wife.  The policeman again persuaded him to go home and look after deceased, remarking that he was afraid he had done her serious injuries.  Did not notice that prisoner had been drinking.  He had a glass of ale in the morning, coming there with his wife.  He had a quart of beer in the taproom, and of this he gave deceased a small glass.  He did not say to her "This is no place for you," when he saw her in the afternoon.  His foot touched her dress when he lifted his foot as if to kick her.   -   Emily Jane Wallis, wife of James Wallis, shoemaker, of 5 Monument-street, deposed to having gone into Ash's to look for her husband, and finding deceased there.  She gave witness a glass of porter, and after drinking it witness asked her if she would come home as her husband was home.  She said no, and then witness left, thinking deceased was sober.  As witness was going into her house after having had the porter she met prisoner coming out;  he was not quite sober.  Both father and mother were out all night on Wednesday looking for the daughter who was out all night.  Never heard prisoner threaten his wife.  Did not hear them often quarrelling.  Prisoner struck his wife in the face about twelve months ago on account of his daughter.   -   Mary Ann Kendall, a widow, residing at 7 Pembroke-street, deposed that at a quarter-past three o'clock on Thursday afternoon she was in Monument-street.  Saw prisoner and deceased there.  They were quarrelling and prisoner asked his wife to go home.  She said, "No, I will not go until you do."  He asked her to go a second time, and she said "No," and then he struck her with his hand, on the left side of the neck.  She reeled round and fell with the right side of her head against the wall of a house.  Witness did not think the blow a heavy one which prisoner struck.  Deceased fell heavily.  She never spoke after she was struck.  She was carried home by several women, and on the road there she made a gurgling noise and turned a dreadful colour.  Was quite sure that prisoner only struck deceased once, and that that was not on the forehead.  She had that blow by falling against the wall.  When she picked deceased up she had a large discoloured bruise on the left temple.   -   P.C. Westlake said on Thursday afternoon about three o'clock he was standing in Mount-street, and observed prisoner push his wife, who was standing with him at the bottom of the street.  Heard him say "Go home with your family," and then saw him strike her on the head, deceased having previously made a reply which witness did not hear.  He saw the woman stagger and fall, apparently striking her shoulder.  When he came down to her she seemed faint or unconscious, and he ordered the crowd to stand back and give her air.  He lifted deceased up and some women took her home.  Witness went into the beer-shop to prisoner and told him he had better go home and get a doctor for his wife as she had a serious blow in the temple.  He said, "I shan't go;  let her go."  Witness said, "Mind, I have told you."  At that time he did not appear to be drunk;  later on, when apprehended, witness noticed that he had been drinking considerably.  That was ten minutes after he had seen him in the beer-house.  Mr De La Rue, surgeon, having pronounced the woman to be dead, witness apprehended THOMAS ELLICOTT and took him to the Guildhall.  He charged him with causing the death of his wife by striking her on the head, and he said, "I did strike her, but I never meant to kill her.  I loved her dearly."  Prisoner seemed greatly affected and repeatedly asked if it was true that his wife was dead.   -   Mr Superintendent Lynn said:   Yesterday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, I came into the station, and found prisoner there in charge of P.C. Westlake.  In consequence of what the constable said, I charged him with causing the death of his wife by striking her a blow on the forehead with his fist.  Prisoner said, "I pushed her, and she fell, but I never intended to hurt her."  He appeared to be in liquor, and I said, "You have been drinking a good deal."  He replied, "No, sir not a great deal;  I have only had two glasses of ale.  I have been a teetotaller for four months until today."    -   Prosper Felix De La Rue, M.R.C.S., England, deposed to having been called to see deceased, and going to her house.  He found her lying on a bed.  She was dead;  the body, however, being still warm.  He examined the body externally.  She was a stout, short woman, and there was a slight lividity about the face and neck.  The lips were also slightly livid.  There was a small cut in the inside of the upper lip, towards the right corner.  He noticed a swelling about the size of a walnut on the left side of the left forehead above the temple.   Saw no other marks of violence on the body, and could not discover from an external examination if the bones of the head were fractured.  That day he had made a post mortem examination of the body.  On cutting through the swelling near the temple he found it infiltrated with blood.  It was a smooth, soft swelling and the skin was not broken.  He opened the head, and found at the base of the brain about two tablespoonfuls of effused blood, the effusion extending up slightly on each side of the head from that point.  He examined the membranes and surface of the brain, and also its cavities, and found nothing unusual in their appearance.  There was no congestion about them, and they appeared quite healthy.  The substance of the brain was not softened, and was also in a healthy state.  He examined the spinal cord and the neck to see if there was any dislocation or fracture of the bones, and found none.  He then examined the chest.  He opened the bag of the heart; it was empty.  He examined the heart itself.  All the chambers of the heart were filled with dark blood.  The valves of the heart and vessels leading to and from it were healthy. The substance of the heart itself was also healthy.  The lungs were slightly congested, but otherwise free from disease.  The liver and spleen were also healthy.  The stomach smelt strongly of malt liquor.  From the examination he made he considered death resulted from the effusion of blood at the base of the brain and that that was produced by the swelling on the face, caused by a blow or fall.  A fall against the wall of the house in Monument-street, where the blow was struck, might have caused the swelling.  Natural causes or diseases sometimes caused the effects which he saw, but the tendency of such natural cause or disease would be aggravated by a blow or fall such as had been described.  Excitement and drink would predispose to fatal results from a blow of the kind.   -  The Coroner, summing up, said undoubtedly the investigation needed in the present case arose from the unfortunate effects of drink and passion combined.  The evidence had left in his mind the impression that prisoner did not intend, of his malice aforethought, to kill his wife, but he did strike her and the result of his striking had been to cause an effusion of blood at the base of the brain, resulting in the woman's death.  In striking her prisoner did an unlawful act and if from that death resulted, the offence was at least one of manslaughter and the man was responsible for the consequences of such an act.  If the fall occasioned the death, then the fact that the blow caused the fall would make prisoner still responsible.  -   The Jury, after consulting for a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against THOMAS ELLICOTT;  and the Coroner issued his warrant for his committal to the Assizes on that charge.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Drowning Made Easy At Coxside. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening, relative to the death of HENRY WILLIS, aged 7 years, who was found drowned that morning at the Creek, at Coxside, near Sutton Harbour Railway Station.  From the evidence of deceased's mother, who resided in Marine-place, it appeared that on the previous afternoon she sent the deceased an errand, and that he never returned.  A search was made for him all that night, and on the following morning, soon after ten o'clock, the deceased was found in the creek drowned.  After hearing further evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr Foot was Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased was Found Drowned, but as to how he came into the water there was no evidence to shew.  The Jury expressed themselves very strongly respecting the unprotected condition of the quay at the place where the body was found, and also urged the Coroner to make a representation that it would be very desirable that there should be some proper appliances kept near the spot for saving life in case of a person falling overboard.  That was the third or fourth Inquest that the Coroner had held on persons being drowned.  The Coroner promised to speak to the Mayor respecting the matter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of ALICE MARY BISHOP, aged two months.  The deceased was the daughter of a cabinet-maker, who resides at 46 Rendle-street, and on Tuesday night the deceased was taken to bed with its parents about ten o'clock, and when MRS BISHOP awoke the following morning the infant was found to be dead by her side.  It was proved that there were no marks of violence upon the deceased, and that it was a fine, healthy child.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the King of Bells Inn, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of JOSEPH TUCKER, aged 49 years.  -  ERNEST J. TUCKER, son of the deceased, stated that his father was the landlord of the Old London Inn, 34 Vauxhall-street, and on Saturday morning last the deceased was upon a tank, when he suddenly fell a distance of about twelve feet, falling upon a cask, severely cutting his right arm.  It bled very much, and he was removed to bed and a surgeon was sent for.  The deceased, however, grew worse, and on Sunday he became delirious and violent, and died on Tuesday evening.  -  Edward E. Meeres, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, and found a large cut over the elbow, and he bandaged it.  Witness saw him twice on Saturday and in the evening delirium tremens set in and the deceased died on Tuesday from exhaustion.  Deceased received no other injuries except that to his arm.  Witness attributed death to delirium tremens, which was brought on by loss of blood which followed the accident.  The fall on the cask was the cause of the delirium tremens which ended in death.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 14 July 1876
LYDFORD - Coroner's Inquest At Princetown. - An Inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, Deputy Coroner for the County, on the body of Convict A.640 ARTHUR JOHNSON, who died on Wednesday morning.  JOHNSON was undergoing a term of seven years' penal servitude, afterwards to be under the supervision of the police for five years, and was classed as an "habitual criminal."  He was received from Portland the latter end of May last, and has been in the prison hospital from the time of his arrival.  Deceased was barely 20 years of age, and his conduct during the whole of his sentence up to his reception at Dartmoor was unmistakably "bad."  Death resulted from "Natural Causes."

DAWLISH - An Infant Scalded To Death At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at the Townhall, Dawlish, last evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, on the body of the illegitimate female child, aged 15 months, of MARY ANN DUNKIN, residing with her parents in High-street.  The mother of deceased stated that on Tuesday evening last, after the child was nearly undressed, it was placed on the floor in the kitchen, when on playfully jumping about it became giddy, and in turning, fell over the fender, knocking the kettle of hot water off the lower lap of the grate.  The child screamed, and witness gave it to her mother, who at once sent for Dr Baker.  The child died yesterday morning.  MARY ANN DUNKIN, mother of the last witness, said she did not see the accident, but after the occurrence took the child and saw it was scalded over the arm.  The mother was always kind to the child.  Mr Albert de Winter Baker, surgeon, stated that on examination he found the child scalded severely over the right side of the chest, face and arm.  He applied remedies, but had little hopes of the child's recovery.  The cause of death was shock to the system from scalds.  After summing up, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was scalded by the Accidental upsetting of a kettle of boiling water."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Overboard From A Pleasure Steamer. - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner for Plymouth, at the Pier Hotel, Millbay, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of COURTENAY B. CREWES, aged 20 years, seaman on board the steamer, Sir Francis Drake.  Mr Rooney watched the Inquiry on behalf of the owners of the steamer.  -  James Bennett stated that on the 1st of July the Sir Francis Drake made an excursion trip to the Eddystone.  On the return journey, when near the Knap Buoy, witness saw the deceased cleaning up the deck.  He asked witness to get him a bucket from the deck-house, which he did and CREWES then went upon the sponson, and drew two or three buckets of water.  Witness said to deceased, "COURTENAY, be careful you do not get overboard," and he replied, "All right," and almost immediately, when filling the next bucket, the force of the water drew him overboard.  Witness called to the captain to stop the vessel and the engines were stopped immediately and reversed.  The deceased fell into the wash of the paddle wheels and he only rose to the surface once.  He did not see any lifebuoy thrown to the deceased.  Directly the deceased fell overboard one of the passengers cut the fore-tackle, and the boat fell into the water and filled and became useless.  The steamer stood by the spot for about two or three minutes to see if the deceased rose again.  If the deceased had risen to the surface there was a man ready to jump over after him.  In witness's judgment nothing more could have been done to save the deceased, who was quite sober.  At the time there was a little sea running.  It was the force of the water when the bucket filled that drew the deceased overboard.  -  Samuel Davey, master of the Sir Francis Drake, said he heard cries of "A man overboard;" and being upon the bridge he spoke through the voice-tube to the engine-room, ordering "Ease engines;  stop her;  go astern;"  and afterwards "Go astern full speed."  This order was obeyed, but the deceased was not to be seen, although he saw the bucket.  witness immediately unshipped the lifebuoy, and gave it to a man named Rockey, telling him to throw it to the deceased if he saw him rise.  Witness ordered the boat to be lowered, but one of the passengers cut away the fore fauls, and the boat was swamped.  He then returned to the voice-tube, and communicated to those in the engine-room to stop the engines, and the vessel laid quite still.  He then looked over the side of the vessel, and seeing the bucket he then considered that he was right over the spot where the deceased sunk.  He lay to for a quarter of an hour after the accident.  There was very little sea running.  The Board of Trade only required the vessel to carry one boat.  -  In answer to Mr Rooney, witness said he accounted for the mishap to the boat by one of the fore fauls being cut instead of it being lowered.  If half a dozen boats had been lowered the deceased would not have been rescued, because he had sank.  -  By a Juror:  There were five lifebuoys on board at the time of the accident, all of which were in the reach of the crew, but there was no buoy kept fixed at the stern.  There were eight cork jackets on board for the use of persons who might desire to jump overboard on such occasions.  -  John Saunders, builder, deposed to being a passenger on board the Sir Francis Drake, and that he saw the deceased above water for about two minutes and a half and that he sank directly the steamer got way upon her to go astern.  If the Drake's boat had been properly launched it could not have reached the deceased in time to save him.  Every effort was made to save the deceased.  -  Charles Gilbert, waterman, proved that he picked up the body of the deceased that morning between Rame Head and Penlee Point, and he towed it to Millbay pier.  The Coroner, in summing up, said that the captain had stated that when the deceased was drowned he was left with only one able seaman on board, and it was a question for them to consider whether, having charge of such a valuable freight - over 150 lives - at the time, the steamer was sufficiently manned with only two able seamen on board.  There were also an engineer and stoker, but they had nothing to do with the management of the vessel.  There was no doubt, however, that the deceased's falling overboard was a pure accident, and it had been admitted that everything was done that could be to save the deceased.  They had also to consider whether one boat was sufficient for the vessel when she went on such trips, and whether she was well manned.  -  A Juror here remarked that the vessel was manned according to her tonnage.  -  The Jury, having consulted in private, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."  -  Mr Rooney remarked that the vessel had now been supplied with a lifeboat in the place of the present one, and that when the vessel went on pleasure trips a man was sent on board by the Dock Company to keep good order and to lend assistance, and he was on board on the occasion in question, but the captain did not regard him as one of the regular crew.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Workhouse, Plymouth, on Thursday, regarding the death of MARIA BROOKS, aged 3 years.  The little girl, a month ago, was taken to the Hoe by an elder sister, and fell over the rocks, receiving a severe blow at the back of her head.  She was admitted to the Workhouse, and treated with every care by Dr Thomas, but died on Saturday last.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  Her mother had become an inmate of the Workhouse on the day the accident occurred.

TEIGNMOUTH - Death By Drowning At Teignmouth. - The County Coroner held an Inquest on Monday evening, respecting the death of a lad named JOHN TROUT, aged 8 years, who went out to bathe with a companion, at a point close by the mouth of the River Teign, a most dangerous spot, and where bathing is strictly prohibited.  The tide was running out fast, and the deceased was carried out beyond his depth and immediately sank.  His companion endeavoured to rescue him, but could not succeed.  A boatman named Hook went out, and succeeded in reaching him, and brought him ashore, and took him to his home, where medical assistance was immediately procured, but the energy of Dr Rawlings in applying the usual restoratives was of no avail.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Death From Sunstroke At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday as to the death of JOHN WILLS, a carter in the employ of Mr Parkins, ironfounder of that city.  WILLS, whilst assisting some other men in the foundry duties, complained of feeling a pain in the stomach and left work.  James Avery, a labourer at Mr Linscott's saw mills, which adjoin the foundry, stated that he saw the deceased staggering whilst walking, and he suddenly saw him fall to the ground.  Assistance was immediately rendered, and the man was at once conveyed to the Hospital, but was then quite insensible.  his breathing was short and noisy and the skin was very dry.  The temperature taken by the thermometer was 98.4, being about eight degrees above the ordinary temperature.  By putting the deceased into a cold bath the temperature was reduced, but the man never thoroughly recovered consciousness up to the time of his death, which took place about ten o'clock the same evening.  There was no external cause of death, but from the symptoms the surgeon judged it to be sunstroke.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

TEIGNMOUTH - Mysterious Poisoning At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the London Hotel, by H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of HUBERT JORDAN, aged 5 years and 9 months.  From the evidence of the child's parents, and Drs. Rawlings and Magrath, the latter of whom had made a post mortem examination, it appears the deceased complained of being unwell on Wednesday last, and was sick, and his mother gave him some purging medicine.  On Thursday he complained of an injury on the right side of the neck, and which appeared like a scratch.  The boy got worse and began to swell from the neck downwards, and across the chest.  The medical man was first called in on Friday morning, when deceased was swollen very much, and was at times delirious.  Medicine was administered but to no effect.  Convulsions set in, which were soon followed by stupor and death.  The symptoms were similar to such as would result from the bite of a poisonous creature.  It did not appear like the bite of a dog, but as if a needle had been dragged across the neck.  -  The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned the following verdict:-  "That deceased died from blood poisoning, but how the blood was poisoned there was no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 July 1876
BARNSTAPLE - Sad Death By Drowning At Barnstaple. - A Fatal accident occurred at Barnstaple yesterday morning.  About a quarter past six o'clock, ALFRED RICHARDS, an apprentice to Messrs. Rush and Co., Joy-street, went in company with several companions to bathe at the place on the River Taw known as Pottington Point.  A young man named Skinner, who could swim a little, was first to go into the water, and he was followed by RICHARDS.  Someone standing on the bank warned him not to go too far, as the water was deep and the tide was running out quickly.  RICHARDS replied that he did not care, and shortly afterwards it was seen that he was sinking.  Skinner went to the rescue, but the deceased dragged him under and he was obliged to let go his hold and get clear.  The unfortunate young man had then been under water for five minutes and his friend quickly dressed and came into the town for help.  About half an hour after a young man named Cutcliffe went to the spot and after diving several times picked up the body.  An Inquest was held last evening, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned, the Jury representing that, as lives are lost every year, there should be a proper bathing place provided, with attendants to prevent accidents.

STOWFORD - An Inquest was held at Stowford on Wednesday by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) relative to the death of THEOPHILUS MAYNE, aged 23 years, who was drowned whilst bathing in the Thrussel on the previous day.  The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

ERMINGTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Inn, Ermington, yesterday relative to the death of JAMES WORTH, aged 3 years, son of a dairyman.  On the 13th of July a pan of hot milk was placed in the dairy to cool, but shortly afterwards the deceased, who was playing about, fell into the pan and was so severely scalded that he died on Thursday, notwithstanding that it was attended to by Mr Langworthy, surgeon.  The Jury, of whom Mr R. Milliam was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 July 1876
EXETER - Drink And Death. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of an elderly woman named ELIZABETH STONE, who had died in the County Hospital from the effects of a fall downstairs.  Deceased lived in a court in Ewing's-lane, and earned a living by doing "chores" and washing.  On Friday evening, after taking a short turn at washing, she seems (according to her own statement) to have fallen in with some soldiers, who treated her to a large quantity of beer, and when she got home, at half-past ten, she was intoxicated.  This was proved by the evidence of Elizabeth King who stated that deceased told her she had had three quarts of beer given her, and asked the witness to drink.  Little more than an hour afterwards, a man named Ball, who lives in the same house, heard a noise in the stairs.  He ran out of his room to see what was the matter, and at the bottom of the stairs saw the deceased lying in  a pool of blood insensible.  With assistance the poor woman was put to bed, and on the following Monday she was taken to the Hospital.  Death ended her suffering on Wednesday night.  At the request of the Coroner, Mr c. G. Bell, acting house surgeon, made a post mortem examination.  He found that there was a large wound at the back of the head, which penetrated to the bone.  Death was, in his opinion, caused by exhaustion, produced by loss of blood and epileptic fits, which repeatedly attacked the patient after her admission to the Hospital.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 July 1876
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of SUSAN SANDERS, aged 64 years, who was found dead in bed yesterday morning.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY - Fatal Fall At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Torquay, on Thursday evening by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, relative to the death of a little girl named ELIZABETH LEAN, whose parents reside at Upton.  It appears from the evidence that during the absence of the mother at Paignton Regatta, on Wednesday, the deceased was playing about the quarries at the rear of Prospect-terrace when she suddenly fell over the rocks, receiving considerable injury.  The child was admitted to the Torbay Infirmary, and notwithstanding the efforts made by the officers of the Institution, she died a few hours after having been admitted.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 August 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Another Victim To Drink. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Workhouse yesterday relative to the death of JOHN ANTONY, a naval pension.  -  Mrs E. Jennings said the deceased resided with her at 6 Rutger-street.  About twelve months ago he lost his wife and daughter, and since Christmas he had been drinking very heavily.  He had eaten scarcely anything in her house since then, and she did not believe he had eaten anything outside.  -  P.C. Albert Spear said that on Saturday last he saw the deceased lying helplessly drunk on the ground in Devonport Park with a crowd around him.  He went to the police-station for assistance, and took him there in a wheelbarrow, as he was very dirty.  -  Sergeant Webber said he saw the deceased at the police-station on Saturday, and deceased told him he had been drinking very heavily.  He visited him in the cells two or three times during Saturday, and when asked how he was getting on, deceased said "all right."  On Sunday morning when he (witness) came to the station he was told that the deceased was very ill, and that Dr row had been there, and would be there again soon.  He came about ten o'clock and ordered the deceased to be taken to the Workhouse in a cab, and on the way there the deceased suddenly gave a moan and died soon after.  -  Inspector Matters said he visited the deceased on Saturday evening and asked him how he was getting on.  He replied, "Jolly, thanks;  but I have had nothing to eat for the past week or two, and my stomach is washed out with drink."  He had some tea and some bread and butter, which he appeared to eat heartily.  -  Dr Row stated that he was called about six o'clock on Sunday morning to visit the deceased, and he found him very cold and shivering.  He asked him how he was, and he said he had a little pain in his back, but he was very well.  About ten o'clock he gave an order for his removal to the Workhouse, where he afterwards saw him dead.  He believed that the deceased came by his death from exhaustion caused by excessive drinking without food.  The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from exhaustion, accelerated by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 August 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Attempt At Desertion. - Mr John Martyn, Mayor and Coroner of Saltash, held an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, Devonport, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM ASHFORD, aged about 17 years, a sailor boy, on board the training ship Implacable.  -  William Honychurch, quartermaster, on board the Implacable, stated that about a quarter before four o'clock on the morning of Thursday last he heard a splash in the water, and upon looking over the side of the ship he saw a person swimming between the Lion, which is attached to the Implacable, and a small sailing launch near the shore.  He called a ship's corporal, and both immediately obtained a boat and pulled to the spot, but could not find anyone.  They pulled around the spot for over half an hour, but with the same result.  He returned to the ship and upon all hands being mustered, the deceased was found missing.  Nothing was heard of him until yesterday morning when his dead body was found by James Hampton, seam of the Himalaya, floating in the water about 300 yards from the Torpoint landing place.  He then had his boots tied around his neck and a bag containing some bread was tied around his waist. Witness saw the deceased on Wednesday night on board the Lion, when he appeared in his usual spirits.  -  George Armstrong, first-class boy on board the Implacable, said he saw the deceased get into his hammock on Wednesday night, and about midnight he went to the "head," where he found the prisoner.  They both came back and went to bed again.  About a fortnight since the deceased deserted from his ship, swimming to the shore, and a few days afterwards he presented himself at Granby Barracks, Devonport, for enlistment into the Artillery, but the authorities, believing him to be a deserter from the Navy, had him taken on board the Implacable, where he received as punishment twenty-four stripes from a birch and confinement to his ship.  The deceased was birched on Wednesday last.   He never complained to witness that he disliked the Navy.  -  Lieutenant Fitzherbert Coddington stated that previous to the deceased's first desertion from the ship, he bore a very good character, but he was never an agreeable boy, and was of a very morose disposition.  No practical jokes had been played upon the deceased as far as he knew.  At the time the deceased met with his death, it was the second time he had deserted from the ship.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that "The deceased was Drowned whilst attempting to escape from the Implacable."

NORTH HUISH - The Murder Near Modbury. - An Inquest was yesterday opened at Lupridge, in the parish of North Huish, near Modbury, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN ROBERT WARD, farm labourer, who died on Sunday night from the effect of injuries inflicted upon him by Robert Coaker.  The first witness was Elias Andrews, who stated that the deceased lived with him at Lupridge.  He was, he believed, 30 years of age.  Last Sunday night witness saw deceased at Brownstop Cross, a little before nine o'clock.  He was standing outside the Kingsbridge-road Inn with some friends - George Soper and Richard Matthews.  They were drinking a pint of beer, and deceased called to him and he drank once with them.  They were all sober.  He (witness) remained only two or three minutes and then proceeded on his way.  In about half an hour he returned by way of the Cross and saw deceased lying near the corner of the road by the hedge.  He went to him and lifted his arm and his head, but deceased appeared to be quite dead.  Noticed blood at the nose.  Saw several men, could not see all, but Charles Clarke, Mr Luckraft, Thomas Brocking, John Harris and Thomas Lee were standing a little distance off talking. He got a cart, and with assistance placed the body of deceased in, and took it to his (witness's) house.  Knew Robert Coaker, who lived at Fowlescombe Gate, in the parish of Ugborough.  Saw Coaker at Brownston Inn, at Brownston village, which is not the same as the Kingsbridge-road Inn, at Brownston Cross, with WARD about eight months ago.  Robert Coaker and his brother, Mr Coaker, the landlady, and witness's wife, were there, and so was Thomas Coaker, the landlord.  There was a general conversation about work and Robert Coaker said he would as soon fight as eat.  WARD replied that he would not believe it;  he knew Coaker was a liar to say so.  Coaker then said, "If you call me a liar again I'll knock your ..... head off."  WARD replied, "I don't know about that:  I doubt whether you are able to."  Coaker then got up to go over to strike WARD, and Coaker's brother said, "Sit down you fool;  what do you want to have anything to do with him for?"  Witness then said, "The man (meaning WARD) is the worse for drink.  "Tisn't worth while having anything to do with him."  Coaker remarked, "I am not going to be called a liar by a man like that.  I would as soon kill a man as I would a cat."  Coaker's brother then spoke to him and told him to be quiet, and he said Coaker was sober then, but WARD was drunk.  Witness got WARD away without any fighting.  Knew of no other ill-feeling between the two.   -    Charles Clarke said he was a labourer of Lupridge, and knew deceased.  On Sunday night he walked with deceased to the inn at Brownston, which they called California.  They went in and had a pint of beer, and saw Robert Coaker, William Coaker and a boy, whose name he did not know.  Drank all the beer himself and deceased had another pint which he carried outside the door.  Witness followed deceased out and found George Soper drinking the beer which deceased had taken out.  Richard Mathews then came.  After the beer was finished, Robert Coaker came out of the inn and said, "Ain't you the man I owe a grudge to?"  This was addressed to WARD, who replied, "You don't want to bring up that now, do you?"  Coaker said, "I'll give you a punch in the head."  He then took off his clothes and struck WARD in the breast with his fist, and, with the other fist, knocked him on the side of the face.  The blow on the breast knocked WARD down, and he fell along the road on his back.  Before WARD got up, Coaker kicked him as hard as he could, but witness could not say in what part of the body.  Coaker had on nailed boots.  Only saw one kick given, and then went into the inn, WARD having got up on his knees, Coaker was standing by his side.  Left Richard Mathews outside with WARD and Coaker.  After witness had been in the inn three or four minutes Richard Mathews came in, and in consequence of what he said witness went out.  Thomas Luckraft and John Harris went out with him, and they saw WARD lying along the road, on the opposite side from where they had left him.  Coaker came up and said, "That's one that interfered with me," and then struck witness in the face with his fist.  He struck the second time and said he would "fight any ..... on the road."  He wanted to fight with everyone.  Witness then went and found WARD was dead, and with Elias Andrews conveyed him to his lodgings.  -  Examined by Mr  Nepean, who appeared for Coaker:  It was about nine o'clock and it was getting dark.  He knew the boots Coaker had on were nailed, but he could not say that those produced were the same.  The deceased was perfectly sober.  Never heard deceased say that Coaker had any grudge against him.  -  By the Foreman:  He was afraid Coaker would strike him and that was why he would not interfere and went inside the inn.  -   Richard Mathews, a labourer, said that he saw the deceased on Sunday evening outside the inn, called by some the Kingsbridge Road Inn, and by others the California Inn.  The deceased had come up with his sister from Brownston, and had fetched a pint of beer from the inn.  He drunk this, and then Robert Coaker and Charles Clarke came out of the inn.  Coaker said "Are you the man that made those grievances at Brownston Inn?"  WARD replied, "I have not made any grievances along with you."  Coaker said, "I'll give you a hit in the head."  Both then began to walk away, but Coaker would insist on having a row and pulled off his clothes.  He then knocked WARD on the head with his fist, and knocked him to the ground, and then kicked him with his toe as hard as he could in the bowels.  WARD got on his knees, when Coaker kicked him three or four times more.  Clarke went into the public-house, witness thought for assistance, so he did not interfere.  Coaker then made towards witness, but he ran away, leaving WARD lying on the ground.  Witness did not see the deceased move after Coaker kicked him down.  The kicks were all on the body as near as witness could see.  Witness went over to WARD and found he was dead;  and saw Coaker hitting Clarke in the doorway of the public-house. Witness had known WARD  for about twelve months, and Coaker he had seen only once or twice.  He was not aware that any ill-will existed between them. He saw WARD give no provocation whatever to Coaker before he struck him.  It was a little dark, but he could see what was going on plainly.  -  Examined by Mr Neapean:  Coaker did not say what the grievances were that he complained of.  WARD and Coaker had some words, and Coaker threatened to thrash WARD.   WARD replied, "I won't fight you tonight because of my clothes."  That was all WARD said before Coaker struck him.  Witness thought WARD was hurt, for he fell on the road heavily.  Witness did not prevent the blows.  He thought WARD could take care of himself.  WARD did not attempt to strike Coaker and witness thought then there was no danger.  He (witness) then ran away, as he was afraid.   -   Thos Luckraft, landlord of the Kingsbridge-road Inn, said the deceased came to his house on Sunday evening about a quarter to nine and had a pint of beer, which he paid for and carried outside.  There were several men in the taproom at the time, but they could not see WARD, who had a second pint of beer, which he also carried outside.  WARD was dressed in dark clothes, and was perfectly sober.   Witness soon after found him dead on his back in the road.  Witness saw Coaker go out of the inn alone, but saw nothing of what took place outside.  He saw Coaker strike Clarke.  The boots produced were those worn by Coaker on the Sunday evening.  -  Examined by the Police:  When Coaker struck Clarke he said he would "do for any ..... there."  -  Examined by Mr Nepean:  He should think Coaker had been in his house about two hours, but was not tipsy. He did not know what he had to drink.   -   Police-constable William Dunsford said that he assisted Sergeant Willington in arresting Robert Coaker at his father's house, Fowelscombe Gate, in the parish of Ugborough.  He then went to Newton to give information to the Coroner, and on his return the accused, Robert Coaker, made a statement to him without any promise of favour or inducement whatever, and although he (witness) repeatedly cautioned him.  He, however, made the following statement, and afterwards repeated it in Sergeant Willington's presence:-  "I came outside the public-house door, and one of them said "is that the young ..... which you and he want to get to fight with at the lower public-house, that young ....., he is no bigger than a  .... minute."  I went forward and said, "Perhaps the young ..... is as good as you," and with the same he hit me in the face.  One of the others caught me by the waistcoat, another caught me behind and tore my shirt, then the deceased man rushed forward and gave me a kick in the leg.  I got fee and hit the fellow down and gave him a kick.  Then one of the others ran away in the public-house door, and I ran after him.  Then I went home in company of my brother."   Coaker made no further statement and willingly put his mark to the statement that he had made.   -   Samuel Willington, sergeant of the Devon constabulary, stationed at Diptford, said he apprehended Robert Coaker, and charged him with having maliciously caused the death of JOHN ROBERT WARD on Sunday night.  Coaker replied, "He began with me first."  Witness took him before a magistrate at North Huish, who remanded him until Thursday next.  The statement made by Constable Dunsford was read to the accused that morning, and he said it was perfectly correct.  He (witness) made him no promise to induce him to make the statement.  -  At this stage the Inquiry was adjourned until this evening.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 August 1876
MODBURY The Murder Near Modbury. -  The Inquest concerning the death of JOHN ROBERT WARD, a labourer, who was killed by being kicked by Robert Coaker, near Modbury, on Sunday last, was resumed at Lupridge Farm yesterday afternoon before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner.  Mr Davies, of Kingsbridge, appeared for the police, and Mr Nepean for the friends of Coaker.  It was stated that Mrs Luckraft, wife of Thomas Luckraft, volunteered a statement to the superintendent of police the night before, but that day her husband had said she should not come to the Inquest.  A summons for her attendance was then issued.   -   Thomas John West, farmer, living at Huish, said he knew the deceased.  He saw him and Coaker fighting and saw WARD fall down twice.  It was between half-past eight and nine o'clock.  He did not see deceased strike Coaker.  This occurred at a public-house near Brownston Cross.  When WARD got up from the ground after being knocked down, Coaker struck him again with his fist.  He then saw deceased fall back on to the hedge, and he did not see him move again.  Witness was about forty feet off when he saw this.  He did not see Coaker kick deceased but he "saw fire in the road" when WARD fell down.  Witness heard the two men talking before he saw the fighting.  Coaker said to deceased, "You are the man who kicked up the row at Brownston two years ago."  WARD said "I did not."  Coaker said, "We'll have it out now."  WARD said he should not fight, as it was Sunday night, and he had on his best clothes, and Coaker had not.  Witness heard no more, but immediately after he saw deceased fall down as related.  He was not near enough to see how WARD fell either the first or second time, but afterwards Coaker knocked him down, hitting him somewhere about the neck.  Witness did not go to the hedge to pick deceased up but went into the public-house.  If he had gone to pick up WARD, Coaker might have "knocked up a row" with himself.  When witness went into the inn he saw Coaker turn back and go in the direction of the hedge where WARD was.  -  By Mr Davies:  Coaker had his jacket on.  He did not know how the fire on the road was caused.  - By Mr Nepean:   He did not know when he went home whether the deceased was injured or not - he did not think about it.    -  Philip Alfred Cornish, surgeon, living at Modbury, first saw deceased at his house at Lupridge about eleven o'clock on Saturday night.  He was dead.  The body was upstairs on the bed.  Witness made an external examination of the body, which was well nourished and healthy.  There were no marks of violence on it.  he had since made a post mortem examination assisted by Mr W. Square, surgeon, of Plymouth.  On opening the head the brain was found healthy.  All the organs but the heart were healthy.  The aortic valve of the heart was almost closed with ossific deposit, the result of rheumatic disease. There was a milk spot on the pericardium, the outside membrane of the heart and one on the liver.  The left ventricular wall was thickened by one inch.  There was an extravasation of blood in the pancreas - a gland that went across behind the pit of the stomach.  This extravasation, he considered, came from a blow, and rather a hard blow, he should say.  There were no other marks about the body.  He considered the blow the direct cause of death and that the blow caused a shock to the system that made the heart refuse to act any longer.  He would not say the man would not have lived on, notwithstanding the condition of the heart, had there been no shock to the system.  He might have lived on or might not.  His heart was diseased quite enough to cause death had there been no blow.  Had he had a blow and no disease he did not think the blow would have proved fatal.  -  By Mr Nepean:  Any kind of excitement might have killed the deceased, but it was not so likely that death would be caused in this way as that it would from a blow received in the pit of the stomach.   -  Hannah Edwards, wife of Edward Edwards, farmer, living near Modbury, said deceased was her brother and had dinner and tea at her house on Sunday.  Witness, with another brother, two children and deceased, went away after tea and she again saw deceased after chapel time near Brownston Cross.  At the inn there witness's brother and deceased, with others present, had some beer, and then witness and the others went away, leaving deceased at the inn with Peter Rogers, the tailor and young Mathews.  She did not see him after.  When at the inn she saw Coaker, who, without any apparent reason, shook his fist in her face and threatened to knock her down, using very bad language at the same time.  Witness knew of no ill feeling between Coaker and deceased.  -   Henrietta Luckraft, wife of Thomas Luckraft, landlord of the Kingsbridge-road Inn, at Brownston Cross, knew deceased, and saw him at her house on Sunday last.  He was subsequently standing at her door when she heard Coaker say to somebody, "You .... I'll kill you."  She heard no angry language before this.  She could not say to whom these words were addressed.  She heard no fighting.  -  By Mr Davies:  She saw something lying in the road, and heard a noise proceeding therefrom.  She saw Coaker standing by, but could not say if the body lying in the road was that of WARD.  The noise she heard was a gurgling noise.  -  This concluded the evidence, and The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a serious one.  The deceased, it appeared, was quite sober at the time he came by his death, and the evidence shewed that Coaker had spoken to WARD about some old sore between them, and thereupon struck deceased, afterwards also taking off his clothes and striking deceased on the head, kicking him also and knocking him down and after he had got up kicking him in the stomach.  One witness had stated deceased was kicked in the bowels and other places and the witnesses of the scene did not interfere as they were afraid.  There appeared to have been ill-will between the deceased and Coaker eight months ago, and that was the only evidence of ill will between them.  In the statement of Coaker to the police it was admitted there was a quarrel, but Coaker said that deceased begun it.  He asked them to give all weight to the statement made by Coaker, and if they saw sufficient in it to counterbalance the testimony of Mathews, Clark and West, they should take it into consideration when considering their verdict.  Mr Cornish said the hart was diseased, and a blow or any ordinary excitement might cause death.  But if that man had his heart in such a condition that he might have died next day, that was no excuse for a man causing his death the night before.  They were not at liberty to send a diseased man out of the world before a healthy one.  If they were satisfied that death resulted from the blow inflicted by Coaker their duty would then be to consider what motive influenced Coaker.  It was no excuse for the latter to say he had been provoked by deceased to strike the blow because of the quarrel eight months before.  It would have been a different thing had deceased provoked Coaker and the latter thereupon struck deceased a blow which killed him.  The question the Jury must consider was whether Coaker had had time to cool between the period when he was provoked by deceased and when he struck him.  If a man had time to get cool, and overcome the excitement, and yet, after that, struck the other man a fatal blow, he was as guilty of murder as if he had done it after provocation received ten years before.  The Coroner pointed out that a blow given under excitement produced by provocation might reduce the crime to manslaughter;  but if the blow was not given under these circumstances, and with intent to injure, it would be their duty to find a verdict of wilful murder.  It was  a question of provocation, providing they were satisfied that the deceased died from the effects of the blow given by Coaker.   -   After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Coaker, adding that they blamed the witnesses of the occurrence for running away as they did.  Had they interfered the life of deceased might have been spared.

EXETER HEAVITREE - The Fatal Encounter With A Bull At Heavitree.  -  Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Country House Inn, Wonford, respecting the death of a man named BASTIN, who was gored to death on Tuesday afternoon by a prize bull belonging to Mr R. N. G. Baker, cattle breeder, of Heavitree.  It appeared from the evidence that the accident was first discovered by ELLEN BASTIN, daughter of the deceased.  While passing the linhay in which the bull was kept, she heard her father cry "Murder," and on going into the yard saw him lying on the ground inside the linhay, the animal being tied to a post outside.  At her father's request she fetched her brother, JAMES.  The lad, on finding what the state of affairs was, went for assistance, and obtained the help of Mr Edward Briggs, a foreman at Heavitree Brewery.  Deceased said to Briggs, "Lift me up;  I'm a dead man."  Witness asked how it happened, but the only reply he got was a request for some water.  Mr Williams, a surgeon, was sent for, and he quickly arrived.  Blood was flowing copiously from a wound in the deceased's thigh.  Mr Williams directed Briggs and others to do all they could to staunch the wound while he went home for instruments and stimulants.  he was absent only a few minutes and just after he returned the poor man breathed his last.  -  Mr Briggs stated that he saw blood on the horns and forehead of the bull.  One person, and especially a man like the deceased, who had been accustomed to the animal from its birth, was quite sufficient to attend to it, providing the usual precaution of leading it with the hand-staff had been adopted, but this the deceased seemed to have neglected.  Mr Baker had time after time cautioned him about using the staff.  The bull was said to be a quiet animal, but Mr Baker had it shot immediately after the fatal occurrence.  Witness could give no explanation of how the animal came to be tied after it had attacked the deceased;  but he agreed with several Jurymen that it was probable the deceased had struggled with it for some time after he received the fatal injuries, and persevered until he succeeded in tying the bull where it was found, when he must have become faint from loss of blood and fallen to the ground, where he was discovered by his daughter.  -  Mr Williams stated that on examining the body after death he found that in addition to the wound in the thigh there was a penetrating wound in the abdomen, through which the small bowels were protruding to the extent of eighteen inches or two feet.  Late in the day he examined the deceased again and found that the horn of the bull had penetrated the bowels themselves.  The wounds inflicted were undoubtedly the cause of death.  In witness's opinion they were inflicted at one time, the animal making a rush at the deceased and thrusting one of its horns into the thigh whilst the other entered the abdomen.  -  The Jury, acting upon the advice of the Coroner, decided not to hear any more witnesses;  and, after a short consultation, they returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attached no blame to anyone.  -  Mr Baker gave the deceased an excellent character.  -  The Jury requested that their fees should be handed over to the widow, who is left with six young children.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 August 1876
STOKENHAM - Horrible Discovery. - A very strange event has occurred at Beeson, a remote fishing village on the South Coast of Devon, between Torcross and the Start.  Among the residents were a man and his wife named SMITH, who had once occupied a respectable position, but had become so reduced in circumstances that they were compelled to have pay of the parish.  The man, it should be observed, has been remarkable for his eccentricities.  At the pay day last week neither the man nor his wife came before the relieving officer, but SMITH sent a little girl for the money.  When she came back he asked her to go upstairs and see his wife.  The unsuspecting child did as she was told, ignorant of the cause of a dreadful stench which filled the house.  No sooner had she entered the upstair room, however, than the shocking secret was revealed - for there lay the woman, not only a livid corpse, but in an advanced state of decomposition.  The piercing screams of the terrified child aroused the neighbours as she rushed away from the room so horribly tenanted.  She could hardly explain the cause of her alarm, but it was speedily revealed as the villagers en masse rushed to the spot and up the cottage stairs.  As they entered the house SMITH left it, and he has not been seen since.  It is believed, therefore, that he must have committed suicide by throwing himself into the sea.  From the condition of the body it was evident that the woman had been dead several days, so that last week's was not the only pauper pay SMITH had drawn for a corpse.  An Inquest has proved satisfactorily that there was no foul play, but that the deceased died from an affection of the heart.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Soldier At Devonport. - An Inquest was held by Mr John Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, at the Military Hospital yesterday, relative to the death of EDWARD FLYNN, 36 years of age, a private in the 36th Regiment,. who shot himself on Saturday night.  John Logan, private 26th Regiment, stated that he had known the deceased for many years, and in February last he went on furlough, and whilst away got married without leave from the commanding officer.  The deceased's friends did not approve of the marriage, and deceased appeared depressed respecting it.  He had not been living with his wife for some time.  For the past eight days the deceased, who used to be of a "jolly" disposition, had been unusually low in spirits.  Witness was with the deceased on Saturday evening in the town, and left him in barracks about half-past nine o'clock.  -  Owen Joyce, musketry-sergeant of the 36th Regiment, deposed that the deceased had been a servant to Sergeant-Major Moore of the same regiment for about eight years, and that on Saturday night about eleven o'clock he went to one of the rooms occupied by Sergeant-Major Moore, in Raglan Barracks, where he found the deceased lying across a box with his head resting against the fire-place.  He examined the deceased and found that he had shot himself through the mouth, and the ball had passed through the back of his head and entered the ceiling of the room.  The back of his head was covered with blood and death must have been instantaneous.  The deceased had tied one of his boot laces to the trigger of the rifle, and had then put his right foot into the loop and pointing the rifle to his mouth fired it.  Witness was not aware where the deceased obtained the ammunition from, but in June last he was at musketry instruction at Mount Batten, and he might not have expended all of it, but might have secreted the shot in question.  -  Sergeant-Major Moore stated that the deceased was a very sober and steady man, and that if he had trouble he would keep it to himself.  He (witness) had noticed nothing unusual in the deceased's manner of late, but on Saturday, however, he did not perform his work properly.  Witness produced a letter which he found upon the deceased.  It was from his wife, who was now living at Salisbury, and it seemed from it that the deceased had charged his wife with drunkenness and appeared to be very much displeased with her conduct.  Her reply to the charge was that she was not drunk on the day the deceased mentioned, and that she was not in the habit of getting drunk.  She further stated that if he required them she could obtain good characters from respectable persons who knew her well, and that she lived a highly respectable life.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said he was satisfied that the deceased was greatly troubled respecting the conduct of his wife, and that the deceased thought that she had not behaved to him as a wife should.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst suffering from a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 August 1876
PLYMSTOCK - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at the King's Arms, Oreston, on the body of WILLIAM REID, a timber lumper.  The man was found dead in his bed on Sunday morning last, having gone to bed the evening previously in apparently good health.   The Coroner ordered a post mortem examination by Mr Mould, surgeon.  The Jury, of whom Mr John Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 August 1876
SIDMOUTH - A Dangerous Medical Expression. - An Inquest was held at Sidmouth on Tuesday by Mr S. M. Cox, County Coroner, respecting the death of a child named ERNEST GEORGE WARD, son of SETH WARD, labourer.  The first witness examined was Mary Cox, who stated that on Friday last the mother of the child called her in to look at it, and as it appeared to be very ill she advised her to send for a doctor.  MRS WARD went herself and Dr Hodge came and examined the deceased.  MRS WARD told him that she had given the child something for diarrhoea that she had obtained from Mr Talbot, chemist, and shewed him a bottle.  Dr Hodge gave the child something, and then sent for Mr Fox, surgeon.  The child died the next day.  She did not see any of the mixture given to the child and did not notice particularly by the bottle how much had been taken, but should think about three spoonfuls.  The mother told her that she had given the child only one teaspoonful, that she held the spoon over the glass, and let the child drink out of the glass.  -  Dr Hodge gave evidence as to the appearance and condition of the child and the treatment it received from him.  The mother told him that she had given the deceased a teaspoonful of the mixture, but very much more was missing from the bottle.  He sent for Mr Fox, and certain treatment was continued for several hours.  He obtained two good nurses and the child was carefully treated up to its death.  The term "teaspoonful" was frequently used.  -  ELIZABETH WARD, the mother, deposed that the child was 11 months old, and was very healthy.  It had been teething and she was in the habit of giving it Steadman's teething powders.  She gave it one on Thursday evening last, as it was relaxed and she thought it was teething as usual, but she believed it vomited it.  The child was very restless all night and the next morning was sick and could not eat anything.  She sent to Mr Talbot's for something for diarrhoea, and he sent back a bottle of mixture labelled "Diarrhoea mixture, shake the bottle and give a teaspoonful every four or five hours."  She poured a teaspoonful of the mixture into a wineglass and gave it to the child.  She gave only one spoonful;  it did not run over.  Some hours afterwards a change came over the child, its lips turned purple and its eyes glazed.  She afterwards went for Dr Hodge.  -  Hugh Talbot, druggist, stated that the mixture contained one grain of opium, 2 drachms of sugar, half a drachm of prepared chalk and about 15 drachms of dill water.  He thought it impossible for one teaspoonful to have hurt the child, but thought the whole quantity missing would kill it.  Three teaspoonfuls were missing from the bottle.  Put only 1 grain of opium in the bottle.  The opium had been mixed with bread the night before.  -  Dr Pullin, who was present as a witness for Mr Talbot, to give evidence as to the previous health of the deceased, &c., here stated that his son, Mr F. B. Pullin, had during the Inquiry measured the three spoons produced by the mother, out of one of which she had given the medicine, and that he had found one contained 120 minions or two teaspoons full instead of one, and the two others 90 minions, or one and half teaspoons full instead of a single teaspoon full.  The mixture, if given in the larger spoon, would be equivalent to 1/3 of a grain of opium instead of 1-16th, as prescribed by Mr Talbot, and if given in either of the smaller ones would reach almost the same excess and might possibly account for all that had occurred.   -   The Coroner, in summing up, strongly deprecated the use of the word "teaspoonful" by medical men as a measure.  -  The Jury, after a very short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Died from an Accidental Overdose of Opium," and also desired to express their strong disapproval of the use of the word "Teaspoonful" inasmuch as the term was proved in the present instance to be deceptive and dangerous.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 August 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Instance Of Drunkenness.  -  Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of BRIDGET SMALE, aged 40 years. The deceased was very drunk on Saturday last, and in the afternoon she was going downstairs, when she slipped and fell from the top to the bottom.  She had a jug in her hand, and as she fell her head came in contact with it.  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased came by her death "Accidentally whilst in a state of Intoxication," and commented strongly on the unprotected state of the stairs.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 August 1876
BRIXHAM - Suicide At Brixham. - An inquest was held last evening at Monksbridge Gatehouse, near Brixham, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN DAVIS, labourer, aged 78 years, who was found dead on Monday morning with his throat cut almost from ear to ear.  SARAH DAVIES, wife of the deceased, stated that at half-past five o'clock on Monday morning her husband was sleeping in bed, but shortly after she found that he had left the room.  A search was made and he was discovered in another room with his throat cut.  He had inflicted the wound with a razor, with which he had been in the habit of shaving himself.  He had only his shirt on.  He had lately been in the habit of praying a great deal, and had been called upon by the Rev. A. F. Carey, vicar of the parish, who had prayed and read with him.  -  SARAH DAVIS, daughter of the deceased, gave similar evidence, and stated that she never thought her father contemplated suicide.  -  Mr George Searle, surgeon, of Brixham, said he had been attending the deceased for the past twelve months.  He had been suffering from rheumatism.  Never heard him make use of expressions which led him to believe he contemplated self-destruction.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity, and gave their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 August 1876
BERE FERRERS - Drowned In The Tamar. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Beeralston yesterday, relative to the death of EDWARD DRAKE, aged 21 years.  Joseph Clatworthy, 10 years of age, son of a farmer, stated that the deceased was in his father's employ as a labourer, and on Tuesday afternoon last he and the witness went to bathe in the Tamar near Hole's Hole.  The deceased, who could swim a little, undressed and walked into the water as far as his armpits, and was about to swim, when a stone slipped from under his feet and he sank.  He did not rise again, but witness saw his hands above the water once.  Witness ran for assistance and in two minutes another labourer was upon the spot, but the body of the deceased was not to be seen.  George Whipple proved finding the lifeless body of the deceased about 6.30 the same evening, about five yards from the spot where he sank.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 August 1876
BEAFORD - An inquest was held at Beaford, near Torrington, respecting the death of JOHN WARE, a farm labourer.  The deceased was working for Mr Channings in the harvest field, when he fell from the corn rick, and received injuries from which he died shortly afterwards.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 August 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mysterious Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Stonehouse Workhouse on Saturday relative to the death of MARY ANN BOWDEN, aged 21 years.  -  Margaret Lewer stated that the deceased rented a room in her house in Admiralty-street and was unmarried.  She was a respectable and steady young woman, and witness was not aware that any man frequented her house.  She had seen her walking with a marine;  but the deceased did not tell her neighbours her business.  About a fortnight since a Mrs Langdon came to witness's house,  and told her that the deceased was ill and she went and saw the deceased, who was then insensible.  On Tuesday, the 8th inst., witness again saw the deceased, who said, "It's all through a fright that has brought this illness on."  Witness asked what fright it was, and she replied, "I was on the Hoe with my own chap, named Robinson, or Robertson, and as he was wishing me 'good night' that other chap who was imprisoned for two months a short time ago, came up and wanted me to go with him.  I would not, and clung on to some railings, whereupon he caught hold of my feet and threw me over the railings, and dragged me down over the grass; but just then an officer and a civilian came to my rescue."  The deceased never recovered.  -  William Jacobs, armourer sergeant, 14th Regiment, quartered at the Plymouth Citadel, said that at 10 o'clock on the night of the 30th of July he was returning to barracks and was about half way down the Citadel Road, when he heard a woman's shrieks proceeding from the Hoe.  He jumped over the wall and ran towards the spot from which he heard the sound proceeding, and saw a soldier named Gainer, who was a private in the 14th Regiment, struggling with two civilians.  The deceased was standing upon the grass crying, and she told him what had occurred, and also that she knew Gainer.  Witness took her to the Citadel and the circumstances were reported.  On the way thither she told him that Gainer had ill-used her by striking her in the face and by catching her by the throat and tearing her clothes.  When they arrived at the Citadel, Gainer, who was in the guardroom, was immediately identified by the deceased, who charged him with assaulting her, but he denied it.  The Inquiry was adjourned until Monday, 28th, and in the meantime a post mortem examination will be made.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 August 1876
EXETER - Fatal Accident Near Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday, touching the death of FRANCIS SLEE, a labourer, of Heavitree.  On the 5th inst. the deceased was driving a cart when the horse bolted, and plunged and kicked in a violent manner.  SLEE was riding on the front part of the cart, with one foot resting on the shafts, and the horse's hoof struck him on the exposed leg, so as to break it in two places.  He was taken to the Hospital, where the broken limb was set, and all went well for a time, but eventually the injured man sunk into a low condition and died, the immediate cause of death being blood poisoning.  Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - Death By Burning Through Reading In Bed. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Bideford, before Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner, on the body of BESSIE MAJOR, aged 14, the fourth daughter of MR WILLIS MAJOR, auctioneer, &c.  Deceased and her sister went to bed together on Saturday night about ten o'clock and deceased, who was very fond of reading, took a book into bed with her and commenced reading to her sister, holding a lighted candle on the bed in her hand.  The sister fell asleep, and was awoke by screams.  Deceased was then out of bed, enveloped in flames, by the washstand looking for water, and exclaimed "Fetch father - I am dying."  MR MAJOR being down in the kitchen, hearing screams, rushed upstairs and caught his daughter in his arms.  The whole of her nightdress was then consumed with the exception of a string around the neck.  Dr Cox was sent for and applied the usual remedies, but deceased died on Sunday morning, ten hours after the occurrence.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 August 1876
BISHOPSTEIGNTON 0 Bathing Fatality In The Teign.  -  A little boy named CRAMP, living at Bishopsteignton, was accidentally drowned in the river Teign whilst bathing near the Summer House opposite to Coombe Cellars.  It is supposed that he was seized with cramp whilst in the water.  His body was picked up early yesterday morning by some lightermen just below Hackney.  An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, and an Open Verdict returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 August 1876
PLYMOUTH - ELIZABETH CRISPIN, aged 83, an inmate of the Plymouth Workhouse for the past five years, was found dead in bed on Saturday morning.  An Inquest was held in the evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 August 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr T. C. Brian, acting as Deputy to Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Devonport last evening relative to the death of FREDERICK C. S. DANIELS, aged 31 years, who committed suicide on Sunday.  KATE DANIELS, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was an engine room artificer belonging to H.M.S. Indus, and witness kept a haberdashery shop at 52 Fore-street.  About noon on Sunday the deceased asked for the keys of the chest to get some brandy as she (witness) was unwell, but instead of taking the keys of the chest he took those belonging to the shop.  He was away for some little time, and becoming suspicious she asked her son to search for the deceased, whom he found hanging in the shop.  She had watched the deceased minutely during the past fortnight, as he had been walking about the house like a person distracted.  He complained of a peculiar sensation in the head, which he stated was indescribable, and on Saturday night he was very much worse.  In the early part of the year the deceased was invalided from the Pacific station suffering from coast fever, and he was in Haslar Hospital for some time.  At times he was entirely out of his mind, and he had often said to witness, "My dear, I feel I must put an end to myself," and she had seen him pray for power to overcome the temptation to take his life.  He had been under the treatment of Dr Wilson for the past fortnight.  -  By the Jury:  Dr Wilson had sent two certificates to the surgeon of H.M.S. Indus, and she believed they stated that the deceased wished that the state of his mind should be concealed from the surgeon of his ship lest he should be sent to the Hospital, as he dreaded the thought of going there.  -  ALBERT JAMES DANIELS, aged about 12 years, said that his father had been very low in spirits of late, and he was constantly complaining of pains in his head.  Witness found the deceased in the shop hanging by a rope, which was secured to two hooks in the ceiling;  he was quite dead.  -  Charles Carters deposed to living in the same house as the deceased, and stated that about a fortnight since he said to witness "I feel as though I could make away with myself."  On Sunday morning the deceased said, "Thoughts come over me that I must destroy myself."  Witness said, "If you feel like that you had better go to the Hospital where you will be carefully watched;" and deceased replied, "I will go on board the ship on Monday and report myself, and go to the Hospital."  The deceased was a sober man. -  The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Inquest At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of MARY JANE HENNAFORD, aged 83 years.  The husband of the deceased stated that his wife had been very ill for the past two weeks, and he obtained a Dispensary ticket.  Mr Greenway, surgeon, attended her two or three times and on Wednesday last she was taken worse, and about eight o'clock that evening he went for Mr Greenway, who did not come until 5.30 the following morning, although he went to him several times. The deceased died on Thursday night.  -  Mr Greenway was called and stated that the deceased died from Natural Causes.  The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXETER - A Child Burnt To Death. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner for the City of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of a child which had been burnt to death.  The deceased SARAH ANN MURPHY, was the infant daughter of a private in the 11th Regiment, whose wife lived in a room in one of the back streets.  On Friday the child was left in a room with an elder brother for a few moments.  In the mother's absence one of the neighbours heard screams, and on proceeding to the room found the child enveloped in flames.  The neighbour tore off the burning garment, and the sufferer was carried by its mother to the shop of a chemist, who dressed the wounds and advised that the child should be removed to the Hospital, which was done.  Mr Bell, assistant house surgeon, reported that the injuries were chiefly to the abdomen.  He administered stimulants and the child revived, and seemed to be going on well until Saturday, when tetanus set in and proved fatal.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Mysterious Death At Stonehouse Workhouse. -  Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at the Stonehouse Workhouse yesterday respecting the death of MARY ANN BOWDEN, 17 years of age, who died in the house on the 18th instant.  At the first Inquest the evidence adduced, chiefly from the statements of the woman to witnesses, was to the effect that when deceased had wished good night to a man with whom she was keeping company, a soldier named Gainer came up and as she would not go with him she was thrown by him over some rails on the Hoe, from which she became very much frightened and screamed loudly.  The result was that some civilians came up and released her from Gainer, who subsequently for the assault was sentenced by the colonel of his regiment, the 14th, to fourteen days' imprisonment.  The woman died a fortnight afterwards, and after opening of the Inquest, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry for a post mortem examination.  -  Mr Thomas Leah, surgeon, now stated that he had examined the body, and found that deceased had very extensive inflammation of the right lung and inflammation of the membranes of the brain, and that she died from inflammation of the lung and brain.  These diseases began shortly before the commencement of witness's attendance on her on Sunday, 6th of August.  There were no external marks of violence, and the other organs of the body were healthy.  There was nothing to shew that deceased died from anything but natural causes.  -  By a Juror:  Shock to the system might possibly bring on such symptoms as I saw, especially if the woman was predisposed to such diseases.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," at the same time expressing their high opinion at the prompt manner in which Sergt. Jacobs, armourer sergeant of the 14th Regiment, went to her rescue on hearing the screams of the woman.  The coroner concurred in the verdict.

Western Morning News, 31 August 1876
HENNOCK - A Woman Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Chudleigh Knighton, Hennock, by Mr Henry Michelmore, touching the death of MARY ANN BARBER, widow, 52 years of age.  Last Monday deceased's father heard screams from MRS BARBER'S house, and on running into the kitchen he saw that her clothes were on fire.  He put out the fire.  Deceased was perfectly sensible after the accident.  She was badly burnt over the body, and said that she was nodding over the fire, when she fell upon it.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 September 1876
CHUDLEIGH - Shocking Fatality At Chudleigh. -  Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Chudleigh touching the death of ROBERT BAKER, of Kingsteignton, who met with his death at the Harcombe Lime-kilns, on Wednesday.   The deceased was in the employ of Mr Joseph Lake, lime merchant, of Kingsteignton, and was in charge of a horse that had drawn some stone from the quarry to the kiln-bed.  The cart was backed against the pit circle, and a pole about ten feet long was placed behind the wheels.  When the stone was being tipped from the cart into the kiln the pole must have moved away from behind the wheels, as the horse and cart went further back and fell into the burning pit.  BAKER called out to John Lake, manager of the quarry, "Oh, John, what shall us do?" and Lake immediately threw some culm on the kiln fire to damp it, and ran below to stop the draught.  He was not absent more than about four minutes, and on his return to the kiln-bed he found BAKER in the kiln, as if he was trying to free the horse from its harness.  Lake at once jumped in.  The horse was then down, but BAKER was on his legs, and endeavouring to vomit.  Lake got him up across the horse and cart and he was then about two feet from the top of the kiln.  BAKER was unconscious and he fell forward against the kiln.  The poor fellow was got out and placed on the kiln-bed;  but he shortly afterwards died.  Dr Massiah, who was called to the scene of the accident, stated that from the appearance of the body he was satisfied that the deceased was suffocated by the fumes of the burning lime.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, spoke of the danger of tipping loaded carts directly into the kiln, instead of depositing the material on the kiln-bed.  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased was Accidentally Suffocated, but they condemned the practice of tipping loaded carts into the mouth of the kiln as being very dangerous to life.  The deceased was about 25 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child.  -  The Jury gave their fees for the relief of the widow.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Carriage Accident At Devonport. - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, Deputy Coroner, at the Artillery Arms, Devonport, on Wednesday evening, touching the death of GEORGE WARD, a lad 10 years of age.  At a quarter past seven on Monday evening the tram car, No. 4, was proceeding up Chapel-street, and, when some distance up, Shear, the conductor, seeing one of the leading horses out of its place, stepped off to ascertain the cause, and on returning he saw three or four boys (amongst them the deceased) hanging about the platform.  On seeing him they "fell off in all directions."  At that moment a hansom cab, driven by the owner, Mr Harris, coming down the street, knocked one boy down, and the near wheel passed over his head, inflicting such injuries that he died next morning.  Captain Pasley, of H.M.S.  Simoom, who was riding in the cab at the time, gave evidence, as did also Harris, the driver of the cab, and Shear, the conductor of the tram car.  It was shewn that the circumstance was entirely accidental, and no blame was attributed to anyone.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and Captain Pasley was thanked for his conduct in the matter.  Although pressed for time he accompanied the lad to the surgery of Dr Wilson, made frequent inquiries about his condition and it was understood he would defray the expenses of the funeral.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 September 1876
ASHPRINGTON - Strange Fatality At Ashprington. - An Inquest respecting the death of JAS. CLEMENTS, of Tuckenhay, Ashprington, was held on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd, on behalf of Mr Michelmore, Coroner for the district.  The deceased, who was unmarried, was a labourer, and 40 years of age.  He went to bed as usual on Wednesday and was heard to get up in the middle of the night.  Nothing more was seen or heard of him until half-past ten o'clock on Thursday morning, when his dead body was found in Bow Creek, River Dart, about half a mile from his house.  There was no evidence as to the deceased having contemplated suicide, and the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

PLYMOUTH - Remarkable Suicide In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday respecting the death of WILLIAM STOYLES, 51 years of age, a cooper, of Plymouth, who died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on Friday from the effect of a wound in his throat.  On Tuesday, the 22nd of August at 10.25 p.m., deceased went to the Plymouth police-office and said someone had cut his throat on the Hoe.  He held his handkerchief to his neck and appeared to be sober.  He said he was walking across the Hoe when a man came behind him and cut his throat, adding, in answer to a question of Inspector Manning, that he did not know the man, and that he did not speak to him nor the man to him.  Mr Manning asked if he raised any alarm and deceased said he did, and that the man ran away towards Gill's-cottages.  Questioned as to when it happened, deceased said he had come direct from the Hoe.  Deceased wished to go to the Hospital, and witness took him there;  on arriving STOYLES said he sat down for half an hour after the wound was inflicted and before he went to the Guildhall.  The Inspector told him that he could not understand a man doing this without there having been some altercation, but deceased said there had not been.  He described his alleged assailant as six feet high and "a navvy sort of man."   -   Alexander Richard Anderson, licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries, acting as house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital for Mr Andrew, said he examined deceased, and found he had not injured any of the important vessels;  he had cut down to, but not into, the windpipe.  There had not been much haemorrhage.  Witness sewed up the wound and bandaged the throat;  about five days afterwards, in consequence of inflammation having set in, the stitches were removed.  Last Tuesday the deceased shewed symptoms of delirium tremens, and he died on Thursday.  The immediate cause of death was delirium tremens consequent on the shock to the system by the cutting of the throat, taken in conjunction with deceased's probable habits of intemperance.  On two or three occasions witness asked deceased how his throat had been cut, and he adhered to his first statement that someone had cut it for him.  The wound might have been done by someone else, but the probabilities were that deceased did it himself.  -  By Mr Mutten:  He based his idea on the fact that besides the actual wound there were two slight cuts in the same locality, as if two previous attempts had been made.  -  Thos. Daw, detective inspector of police, saw deceased on the 23rd, as to the alleged cutting of the throat, and he then said that it was on the Monday night that a tall man pulled him back by the forehead and passed a razor or knife across the throat:   subsequently he corrected this, and said it was on the Tuesday.   A razor was found on the Hoe and witness shewed it to deceased, who said he knew nothing of it.  On being asked, deceased said on the previous Saturday, Sunday and Monday nights he slept with a Mr Delafield, in Melbourne-street.  no such man was known there, but a barber named Delafield lived on Stoke-hill.  Deceased was a very intemperate man, "he had swallowed three fortunes."  -  Thos. Rochey, who found the razor in the shrubbery on the Hoe, stated that the blade was secured to the handle by a string, so that it could not slip.  -  Richard Delafield, hairdresser, of Stoke-road, said he had known deceased for thirty years.  About two years since he became possessed of £1,000 and had been drinking very hard since.  Up to within the last two months he lived in Clifton Place, but he had become separated from his wife, and his home was broken up.  This preyed upon his mind and his spirits were low lately.  The razor produced belonged to witness.  On the 22nd ult. he missed it;  deceased was at his house every day, and slept there on the night of the 21st;  he had access to the place where the razor was kept.  had he asked for a razor witness would not have let him have one, as he had seen a great change in him during the previous fortnight.  On the 22nd witness had to tell deceased, in consequence of his habits, that he could not let him stay there, and he left.  Deceased had no money, and said he would not trouble him again.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out the improbability of deceased's story, and said it must be quite evident to a common sense man that deceased inflicted the wound.  -  A verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 September 1876
CULMSTOCK - Concealment Of Birth. - An Inquest was held at Culmstock on Wednesday, respecting the death of the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH SQUIRES, a domestic servant.  The girl was taken ill on the morning of the 1st instant, and on the following Sunday the body of a child was found.  It had been tied up in some under linen, wrapped in an apron, then put into a skirt, secured at the bottom, and the whole hung to a peg in the girl's bedroom.  Medical evidence was given that the child was born alive, and that with due care it would have lived, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against SQUIRES.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 September 1876
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Milton, Buckland Monachorum, respecting the death of MRS JANE TREGILLEES, aged 68, wife of MR EDWARD TREGILLEES, of Meavy.  Mr R. Willis, surgeon, Horrabridge,  stated that he had made a post mortem examination, and found that the deceased had died from apoplexy.  There was a bruise on the side of the head, but this had evidently been caused by the fall.  A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Ivybridge. -  Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JAMES BALLANCE, labourer, aged 71 years.  -  John Webber, a labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Allen and Sons, Ivybridge, stated that he knew the deceased, who worked in the rolling-room with him.  On the 6th of June last, just after dinner, he heard some person cry out "Oh," and upon looking around saw that the deceased's arm had been caught in the machine.  It was taken from the machine, and he was immediately removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered until Saturday morning last.  On the way to the Hospital the deceased said that the accident was caused by his putting his arm between the rollers whilst they were in motion, and forgetting the way in which the machine was working.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 September 1876
DAWLISH - Drowning Near Dawlish. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening at Cockwood, near Dawlish, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a little boy named MURCH, who was found drowned in the rivulet on Monday morning.  From the evidence it appeared that the child, who was of weak intellect, strayed away from home and after a search lasting some time was found dead in the rivulet.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.  The Jury recommended the highway authorities to raise the bank of the canal.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 September 1876
BARNSTAPLE -  Death From Lockjaw.  An Inquest was held at Barnstaple, on Saturday, by Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of MR WILLIAM COCKREM, clothes dealer, who died on Friday from lockjaw.  It appeared from the evidence that about five weeks ago MR COCKREM went to his garden in company with his wife, and found that a pig had got out of the house.  Whilst catching it, he fell and cut his right arm very badly.  The wound was dressed, but after a time the deceased complained of soreness in the jaws, and symptoms of lockjaw were gradually developed.  For some time the deceased suffered almost continually from spasms, and he was unconscious at the time of his death.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 September 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of THOMAS WYATT, aged 55 years, in the employ of Messrs. Shilson, Coxside.  -  Wm. Skinner said the deceased was a fellow-workman of his, and about nine o'clock on Wednesday morning they were engaged in hauling up a piece of timber from the slip to the quay.  When they had got the timber half way up, WYATT called out "vast heaving" and he found him lying on his side insensible.  He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, but died on the way there.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and several of them complained of the way in which the deceased was carried to the Hospital.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 September 1876
EXETER - Sudden Death After A Drinking Bout. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on MR JOHN DAY, a widower, aged 42, who had died very suddenly on the previous morning.  Deceased was some years ago an auctioneer, and more recently he filled the situation of sanitary inspector for the St. Thomas Rural Authority.  Mrs Lomath, with whom the deceased lodged at Friars' Walk, informed the Coroner that on Wednesday morning he went out about seven o'clock, and came home at ten in a state of intoxication.  After resting on the couch a while he went to bed.  Witness went to his room on the following morning and he asked her for a cup of tea.  She prepared the tea, but on returning with it to his bedroom, found him lying on the floor.  He was dead.  Mr Farrant, surgeon, stated that the cause of death was an attack of epilepsy.  The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 September 1876
TAVISTOCK - Death After A Wasp Sting.  -  Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest near Gulworthy yesterday, concerning the death of MRS ELIZABETH PHILLIPS, an elderly lady.  The Rev. D. P. Alford, vicar of Gulworthy, was Foreman of the Jury.  On Saturday morning deceased was stung by a wasp, and died almost immediately.  Mr Sleman, surgeon, made a post mortem examination and found that her heart was diseased and that she died from fatty degeneracy.  The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Lady. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening relative to the death of MISS HARRIET MABLE WORTHINGTON, aged 71 years, who was found dead in her room on Sunday morning.  -  Mrs Emma Mildren stated that she kept a lodging-house at 2 Balmoral-place, and that the deceased lodged with her and occupied two rooms.  She had been in the house for six months, during which time she had enjoyed very good health.  On Wednesday last, however, she was taken unwell, and on Saturday she became worse.  Medical aid was obtained, and witness remained with the deceased up to half-past four on Sunday morning, when MISS WORTHINGTON requested her to leave.  This she did, and the deceased immediately afterwards locked the door of her room.  At ten o'clock that morning Mr Eccles, surgeon, arrived, and he and witness went to the door, but finding it still locked, they thought that the deceased was asleep, and consequently left.  They could get no reply from the deceased.  At 12.30 the same day (Sunday morning) Mr Eccles sen. came and the door being still locked a man named Vicary entered the room by the window.  In answer to the Coroner, witness said that during Saturday night she heard the deceased knocking about the furniture, but upon going to the room each time she found her in bed.  The room was not in such confusion when she left for the last time as it was when Vicary entered.  -  John Vicary, blacksmith, said that he was sent for on Sunday morning and entered the deceased's bedroom by the window.  He found the room in very great confusion, and that the bed had been slept in.  The deceased was in the corner of the room opposite to the door, between a chest of drawers and the wall, crouched up and underneath a chair.  The door was locked and the key was upon the floor.  The deceased was partly dressed.  -  Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon, said that he first saw the deceased on Saturday evening, when he found her suffering from congestion of the lungs, and in a very prostrate condition.  At times she was scarcely able to speak, and as she was very ill he directed Mrs Mildren to allow some person to remain with her during the night.  He considered her to be in danger.  The deceased was very emaciated.  When he called on Sunday morning the servant told him that she heard MISS WORTHINGTON speak at 9.30 and as this was only half an hour before, he thought deceased was asleep, and therefore did not feel justified in forcing the door open.  When he saw the deceased was dead;  and there was a large bruise upon her forehead, and several bruises upon her elbows and lower extremities.  He believed that death resulted from natural causes, hastened by her getting out of bed and falling about.  -  Mr Alfred Hingston stated that he had known the deceased for several years.  She was a native of Chester, but had lived in Plymouth for some time past.  She was a lady of independent means  and was at the Devon and Cornwall Bank a few days ago, when she drew some money.  She was not a person likely to injure herself intentionally.  The deceased, who was an artist, was very reserved.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 September 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident In Torbay. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening respecting the death of a fisherman named GEORGE SCOTT.  -  WILLIAM SCOTT, a fisherman, stated that he was the father of the deceased.  On Friday, the 8th of September, about two o'clock, he boarded the Lizzie Fox, and left the deceased with his younger brother in the punt alongside the barque.  Soon afterwards the deceased was thrown into the water through the capsizing of the boat.  Every effort was made to save him, but without avail.  He recovered the body on Tuesday morning about a quarter of a mile off Meadfoot.  Deceased's brother was saved.  -  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Torpoint. - Mr J. J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, relative to the death of JOSEPH DYER, a mason, aged 68 years.  -  John Short stated that he was a carpenter, residing at Wilcove, and on Monday he was working at the Congregational Chapel, Torpoint.  Deceased was also at work upon the roof of the chapel, and about 10 o'clock in the morning, whilst he was in the act of stepping from the roof to the ground ladder, he slipped his foot and fell to the pavement, a distance of twenty feet, receiving internal injuries.  He was immediately taken into the vestry of the chapel, and Mr Chubb, surgeon, who was called, directed that he should be removed to the Hospital, where he died within an hour of his admission from internal haemorrhage.  The deceased was attended by four surgeons, but the case was seen to be hopeless from the first.  -  The daughter of the deceased, MARY CLARKE, was called, and stated that her father suffered from fits.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 September 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of REECE MCDONALD, a painter and glazier, aged 54 years.  The deceased's son stated that his father had been ailing for some time, and on the previous evening vomited a great deal of blood.  After this he went for a walk, and upon returning about an hour afterwards fell down dead.  Mr Lewis, surgeon, was called in, and stated that in his opinion the deceased died from the rupture of a blood vessel.  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of An Old Man. - An Inquest was held at the King's Arms Hotel, Exeter-street, Plymouth, last evening, to Inquire into the cause of the death of JOHN GLIDDON, lamplighter, aged 74.  Deceased had been unwell for some time with an abscess in his knee, and had been attended by the doctors of the dispensary.  He was last seen by Mr May on Friday;  and on Monday evening, when Mary Jane Palfrey, a widow deceased had brought up from infancy, was reading the Bible to deceased, who was in bed, she thought he was looking ill, and said she would go for the doctor.  Deceased then used strong language and died quite suddenly.  Deceased had been a man of intemperate habits, and had very much failed of late.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 September 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Fall At Paignton. - An Inquest was held at Torquay last evening by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN MICHELMORE, 12 years old, son of EDWARD MICHELMORE, a labourer, of Paignton.  On the 6th of September the deceased and a son of Mr Charles Palk, butcher, of Paignton, were in an orchard picking apples and whilst he was up in a tree the bough he was on gave way and he fell to the ground, a distance of eight feet, breaking one of his arms.  It was stated that the deceased was taken to the house of Mr Pridham, surgeon, who informed the woman who brought him that the lad must wait for Mr Spurway, his assistant.  Mr Spurway did not arrive for an hour and a quarter.  When he came to set the bone, and the deceased was subsequently removed to the Torquay Infirmary, where he died on Tuesday.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and complained of Mr Pridham's conduct.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death In Plymouth. - The Coroner for Plymouth has held an Inquest respecting the death of MAGNUS WINNICK, of Leith.  John Hetherington, chief officer of the steamship Arklow, deposed that deceased was a passenger from Glasgow to Plymouth, and that on Saturday night last he acted very strangely, throwing his money about the ship, and otherwise acting in such a way as to induce the belief that he had been drinking freely.  His conduct became so violent that the captain put him in irons, fearing that he would commit suicide.  On arriving near Plymouth collapse supervened, and everything possible was done for him.  Dr Pearse was sent for, and found the deceased in a state of utter collapse, and suffering from pressure upon the brain.  Two of the crew  then took the deceased to the Emigration Depot, where they refused to take him in, but advised his removal to the Workhouse Infirmary.  Whilst proceeding thither, however, he died.  Verdict, "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 9 October 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Excessive Drinking. - An Inquest was held at Devonport by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, on Friday night, relative to the death of WILLIAM BLACKLER, aged 78 years.  It was stated that the deceased, who resided in Pond-lane, was a superannuated ropemaker from the dockyard, and that whenever he took his pension he was in the habit of drinking to excess.  On Tuesday he received his pension and immediately afterwards went to a public-house in Catherine-street, kept by a man named Holman, where he remained from 10 a.m. until 9.30 p.m., when the landlord took him home.  The deceased was in the habit of sleeping with a man named Monk, and when the latter came home he found him in the passage of the house quite drunk.  He got him to bed, and on the following morning the deceased asked Monk to fetch him some rum.  This was procured, and deceased drank a part of it.  He was apparently ill, and his daughter was sent for.  Deceased asked Monk a second time to get him more rum and some milk;  but he declined to do so.  As the deceased became worse a surgeon was sent for, but before he arrived death had taken place.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by excessive drinking."  Monk and Holman, who were called as witnesses, were both under the influence of drink and they behaved in a very unseemly manner.  The Coroner spoke to them in strong terms;  and the Jury severely censured them for appearing in such a state.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 October 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday relative to the death of ANN HIGMAN, aged 31 years.  The deceased, who resided at 43 Cornwall-street, had been complaining for some time past of severe pains in her stomach, and she had been advised to obtain medical aid, but she had neglected to do so.  On Saturday morning she was again taken unwell and Mr Wilson, surgeon, was sent for, but before he came life was extinct.  A post mortem examination shewed that there was inflammation of the heart, and an ulcer in the stomach, which had the appearance of having recently broken.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - The Strange Death Of An Exeter Tradesman. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on MR HEALE, whose death, under singular circumstances, was announced yesterday.  Mr Perkins, surgeon, who attended the deceased in his illness, stated that he had two abscesses, one on the hand and a second on the groin.  They resulted, without doubt, from poisoning, which was the cause of death, and he had been prepared to give a certificate to that effect.  The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this evidence, adding that the majority considered the Inquest unnecessary, as they thought it was clear that MR HEALE died from natural causes.  The Coroner said this was entirely opposed to the evidence, and he had never held an Inquest more conscientiously.  It was shewn that the accident was the primary cause of death.

PLYMOUTH - An Unsolved Mystery. - Mr E. Square, Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JOHN TAYLOR, aged 73 years, who was found drowned in Sutton Pool on Saturday evening.  -  Johanna Thorn said that she knew the deceased, who resided in Peacock-lane, and was in the employ of the Town Council.  He was a man of temperate habits, but for some time past had complained of giddiness, and when he had these fits he rambled very much in his work.  She saw him at seven o'clock on Saturday night, and he was then perfectly sober, but complained of "dizziness."  -  A lad named George Pengelly deposed to being upon the North Quay at eight o'clock on Saturday night when he heard a cry on the quay, and upon proceeding to the spot, heard a splashing in the water.  He immediately raised an alarm, and a man named Edwin Anderson took a punt, and, after pulling a short distance, he picked up the lifeless body of the deceased.  The body was taken to the dead-house.  There were no marks of violence upon it.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - Mr Elliot Square, Deputy Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall concerning the death of FREDERICK LEY, aged 77 years.  George Reynolds, a fish packer, living in New-street, said that the deceased was a rigger.  On October 3rd, just after five o'clock, witness saw the deceased in New-street, near the old foundry, carrying some ashes in a bucket from his house.  Suddenly he slipped and fell on his side.  Witness helped deceased up;  he could not speak, and was assisted home.  He had had a similar fall a week before.  Mr Edlin, surgeon, subsequently attended the deceased, who had been paralysed for some years, so much so that one leg was almost useless.  It was found, at the South Devon and West Cornwall Hospital, that deceased had a broken thigh.  He died on Monday night from shock to the system and old age.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 October 1876
IDE - Frightful Accident At Ide. - Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at Ide, on ARTHUR RICHARDS, a lad, son of a widow, who met his death in consequence of an accident with a thrashing machine.  The boy was in the employ of Mr C. Copplestone, of Combes Head Farm, and on Monday morning he was placed in charge of the horses harnessed to the driving gear of the thrashing machine.  It appears that he must have climbed up one of the beams, and while looking over the partition at the men working on the thresher his head came in contact with some part of the gear, and was so frightfully mangled as to cause instant death.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrences At Plymouth. - Mr E. Square, Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD PERRYMAN, aged 15 years.  Louisa Jackson, residing in Stillman-street, stated that the deceased had lived with her since April last.  She last saw him alive on Tuesday afternoon, when he appeared to be in good spirits.  On Monday morning he received a letter from his sister, who is in Malta, stating that she had been very ill, and was still weak, that she sometimes thought that she should never see him again, but she did not wish him to grieve about it.  After the deceased had read the letter he grieved very much.  His father had been very good to him.  Charles Spurin, dispenser at Mr Square's surgery, where the deceased was employed, stated that during the time he had known the deceased he had never seen him smile, and he believed that he was not right in his mind.  He last saw the deceased alive shortly after two o'clock, and about an hour afterwards he found him hanging in the bottle cupboard from a crook in the ceiling.  William Joseph Square, surgeon, residing in Portland-square, stated that the deceased was a very silent boy, and he very rarely heard him speak.  After the discovery that the deceased had hanged himself, he (witness) tried three different methods of artificial respiration but without success.  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

PLYMOUTH - A second Inquest was subsequently held by Mr Square relative to the death of HENRY BLACKLER, aged 8 years, who was found drowned at Guy's Quay on the previous morning.  The evidence shewed that on Monday evening the deceased went on board the schooner Devon, of which his father was the captain, and which was lying at Guy's Quay.  He was told to go home, and it was believed that he fell overboard just afterwards.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

DARTMOUTH - Boating Fatality At Dartmouth. -  An Inquest was held last evening at Dartmouth by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, respecting the deaths of CHARLES ROLESTONE HEARN and WILLIAM GEORGE CARTER HEARN, brothers, aged respectively 16 and 27, one a shipwright and the other a sailor, who were drowned on Tuesday.  -  JOHN HEARN, boatman, Dartmouth, father of the deceased, stated that at about two p.m. on Tuesday the deceased went for a sail up the river in a small boat about 16 ft. in length.  About 4.30 a man on board the Britannia told him that a boat similar to that in which deceased had gone up the river had upset and that two men had been drowned;  these proved to be his sons.  -  William Ware, marine, of H.M.S. Britannia, said that on Tuesday about three p.m., he was at Maypole, on the Kingswear side of the river, and saw a small boat, which was under sail, containing two men.  The boat capsized when she was about twenty yards from the shore.  One of the men struck out and swam for about two minutes, when he sank.  Did not see the other man after the boat went down.  Thought it was a squall that made the boat capsize.  After the boat went down witness could see a part of the mast.  Gave an alarm, and five men from the Britannia went to the assistance of the men in the water and three of them swam about, but could not find the deceased.  -  By the Jury:  There was a boat near at hand, but the men could not launch her as the tide was low.  Neither of the deceased appeared to be entangled in the boat when it went down.  -  Joseph Brown, lighterman, also saw the boat capsize and sink.  He was in his boat at the time, but was too far away to render any assistance.  He helped to tow the sunken boat ashore, but found neither of the men entangled in her.  Subsequently he tried to find the bodies with grapnels, but was unsuccessful.  After getting larger hooks, however, both bodies were recovered.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham Yard. - Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, last night held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hotel, Morice Town, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN STAPLETON, aged 33 years, a hired shipwright in Keyham Yard, the circumstances of whose death was recorded in the Western Morning News of yesterday.  The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, said he hoped they would find no want of appliances or ready help through the absence of which this man's life could be said to be lost.  There should be every appliance ready in these great establishments in the event of an accident, and he hoped the Jury would Inquire as much into the presence of such means of rescue as into the cause of death.   -   Robert Pearse, acting leading man of shipwrights, stated that at about ten minutes to three on Tuesday afternoon, after the Doris had been moored alongside the basin, deceased, following the example of at least a score of others, got out of one of the ports, so as to get ashore.  The lower half-port was secured by what was known as a "levelling chain," one end of which was fastened to the port, which "dropped down," and the other end hooked on to a bolt put in for the purpose by a link, which, though large enough to go over the bolt, was narrowed at the end to secure it, and it could not come off unless moved.  The chain was covered with canvas, as is usual in a sea-going ship, and this made it perfectly "stiff," and deceased in catching hold of this lifted the chain off the bolt, the result being that the half port fell, and he was precipitated into the water, striking his head as he fell.  There was no landing-stage ready at the time, as the ship had been moved, and though not the usual method of getting out, men often left ships in this way.  The mode of fastening by the bolt was universal in the service, and witness could not suggest any improvement.  There had been no one brought up for getting out of a ship by the porthole, and witness knew of no order against it.  Had deceased waited a quarter of an hour he could have left the ship by the landing stage which was being put up.  On seeing deceased fall, witness, who was in the ship, rushed to the port immediately and cried "Man overboard," and the nearest man, who was 78 feet off, came directly.  This man dropped himself down to the water's edge by a rope, but deceased had disappeared, and did not rise again.   -   The Coroner:  Had he come up again, what appliance was at hand to save him?  - A.:  The man could have saved him if he came up where he went down and there is no tide running there.  -  Q.:  Supposing the man could not have reached him or any drowning person, what appliances have you for saving life in this great dockyard?  -  A.:  There is a boat-hook kept at the caisson.  -  Q.:  Is there a lifebuoy?  -  A.:  I know of none.  -  Q.:  If there was would you know it?  -  A.:  Yes.  Q.:  Do you think there ought to be lifebuoys?  -  A.:  I would rather not answer that.  -  A Juror:  To answer that would put him in an awkward position with his officers.  -  The Coroner:  I cannot help that. -  A Juror believed lifebuoys were at hand, and witness recalled his answer and said there might be lifebuoys, but he knew of none.  Did not think there was any diving apparatus in Keyham;  believed they were kept at Devonport Dockyard.  ropes might be got to throw to a drowning man from the caisson.  The authorities gave no instructions as to the course to be pursued in the event of such an accident.  -  By the Jury:  The bolt and chain were not out of repair, but appeared to be perfect.  Deceased sank almost immediately;  he left the ship of his own accord, and was not ordered to do so.   -   Henry George Davis, rigger, stated that on hearing the report, "Man overboard," he rushed across the caisson to the rescue.  He jumped down to the water's edge by a man rope, and waited to see if the body would rise, but it did not.  Men came with ropes to throw if necessary.  It would have been dangerous for a man to jump over, as the ship might "come to" the jetty, and if there were no "fenders" out both might be crushed.  Had the body risen witness could have reached it.  Saw the admiral-superintendent, the master attendant and other officers of the yard at the scene of the accident, and he believed that they did all they could to recover the body.  "Grappling" irons were got out, and, no doubt, had a diver been thee he would have gone down directly.  Witness knew of no instructions in case of such accidents, and thought it would be well for others than riggers, who nearly always had ropes with them, to have such instructions.  -  By the Jury:  If the man had had any life in him he could have caught a man rope which he (witness) went down by, an which was hanging in the water.  -  William Rowe, shipwright and diver in the dockyard, stated that on hearing that there was a man overboard, he ran to the spot immediately.  He was working on board the turret ship Hecate, four minutes' walk from the scene of the accident.  Mr Mitchell, the constructor, and Mr Stayner, foreman of the yard, ordered him to get the diving dress immediately.  He had to go to Devonport Dockyard to get it, and by the time he got the dress and was ready to go under water, about half an hour had expired.  Had a dress been kept near, in Keyham yard, it would have taken him half an hour to get it to prepare to go under water.  -  The Coroner:  Do you know any reason why a diving dress should not be kept in Keyham?  -  A.:  I know of no reason.  Q.:  Do you think it would be advisable to have a dress at Keyham yard?  -  A.:  I do think it would be advisable.  I never hard why one was not kept there.  In the dockyard there are a great many diving dresses, and many kept ready to go down with in case of emergency.  A particularly constructed building is not needed to keep them in, and of course there must be places in Keyham where they could be kept.  Q.:  Why are they not kept in Keyham Yard?  -  A.:  I cannot answer that question.  The chief constructor has got the control of that department, and if he thinks they should not be kept there I cannot say that they should be.  They were not required to be used in Keyham as often as the dockyard.  It would be impossible to get on a dress and be down in time to save life.  Knew of nothing to save life except lifebuoys placed on the caissons.  Did not know that any were there now, although they were all along the sea wall, and in his opinion they should be placed on the caissons.  did not think it necessary, if these buoys were so placed, that there should be instructions how to act.  He found the body, and on the right temple there was the mark of an apparently heavy blow, which he believed stunned the man, so that he never rose.  Witness formed this opinion from the fact that he had brought up several drowning and drowned people when not in his diving dress, and when he had jumped over at the risk of his own life.  -  By a Juror:  Thought it would be well to have a dress or two at Keyham, because nearly always divers were working there, or else one or two might be stationed at Keyham.  Had the man not received the blow, he might have risen again and have been saved.   -  The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that there was no doubt that deceased fell by handling the chain in a way which took it off the bolt, and there was no doubt that the wound prevented him from rising to the surface.  Steps were taken to recover the body, but it was to be regretted very much that no instructions (which he thought the wisdom of the officers might devise) were issued by which the men would know the best course to pursue in case of such accidents.  It also seemed desirable that diving apparatus with divers near at hand should be in Keyham Yard, the men being shipwrights as well as divers.  The only reason he could suggest why this was not the case was the effect of red-tapeism, from which English people suffered so much.  Clear as it was that the deceased could not have been saved by life-buoys, yet the suggestion of the witness Rowe was a good one, namely, that lifebuoys should be placed on all the caissons.  As it was clear, too, that the men got out of the port against orders, he hoped the authorities would prevent this being done.  -  A Juror said this had always been done, and always would be.  -  The Coroner said this was no reason why there should not be an order against it.  -  The Jury found that deceased met his death Accidentally, and asked the Coroner to send a recommendation to the Admiralty that a diving apparatus should be kept at Keyham, and that if there were not now lifebuoys on the caissons that they should be placed there.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 October 1876
BARNSTAPLE - Supposed Death From Excessive Drinking. - A sad instance of the evils arising from excessive drinking was revealed in the evidence given at an Inquest held at Barnstaple last evening, by Mr R. I. Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, respecting the death of a woman named MARY ANN READ.  -  MR WILLIAM READ, the husband of the deceased, who formerly carried on business as a tailor and draper in Liverpool, deposed that for the past twelve years his wife had given way to drink.  About four years ago he brought her to Ilfracombe, in the hope of effecting some reform, and for the space of twelve months or more she gave up drinking altogether.  Of late, however, she had fallen into the old habit, and on Thursday of last week she got a good deal the worse for liquor.  Next morning, on rising she said she should leave home, and while the witness was downstairs in such a position that he thought his wife could not leave without his knowledge, she managed to get away.   Nothing was heard of her until late that day, when it transpired that she had gone to Morthoe.  At that place she must have slept for one night, as nothing more was heard of her until the following day, when she was seen at Barnstaple, where she went to the house of Mr Payne, in High-street, whilst quite intoxicated.  The woman afterwards went to a house at Pilton, and there slept.  Ultimately she was lodged at a Mr Dymond's, in Boutport-street, where she became very ill, vomiting almost continually.  A telegram was sent to her husband, but the wretched woman died on Wednesday.  It transpired that she had pawned her watch for £2.  -  Mrs Payne gave evidence to the effect that deceased told her that she believed she had unintentionally poisoned herself;  she took something from a cupboard while sleeping at Mrs Goss's house at Pilton, and became very bad indeed after drinking it.  Mrs Goss said there were some bottles in the cupboard, but they were all empty, and she was sure there was no poison in the house.  -  Mr Fernie, surgeon, who was called in  to attend the deceased, said he hardly thought that the appearances were caused by excessive drinking alone;  and, under such circumstances, the Inquest was adjourned until this morning, in order that a post mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 October 1876
BRIXHAM - Fatal Somnambulism At Brixham.  -  Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Brixham yesterday respecting the death of MRS JANE BOWDEN, aged 76, who had died from injuries received in falling from an upstairs window into the street early on Thursday morning.  The evidence shewed that the deceased was not known to walk in her sleep, and it was stated that she had shewn no suicidal symptoms, indeed that she clung to life rather than desired to take it.  -  The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased fell out of the window while asleep.

BARNSTAPLE - The Strange Death At Barnstaple.  -  The adjourned Inquest respecting the death of MARY ANN READ, who died under circumstances already reported, was held yesterday by Mr I. Bencraft, Coroner.  The Inquiry was adjourned in order that a post mortem might be made.  -  Mr Fernie, surgeon, stated that he had made an examination and found all the organs perfectly healthy, with the exception of the stomach which was greatly inflamed at the cardiac end.  That caused the vomiting, and he thought it was brought about by some irritant that the woman had taken.  Doubted whether drink alone would produce such appearances, and was of opinion that the Inquiry would not be complete unless the stomach were analysed.  Mrs Dymond, the wife of the man at whose house the woman died, was sworn, and she deposed that the deceased, on first reaching her house on the Saturday evening, said she had been drugged, and just before that the daughter of the landlady of the Braunton Inn came to the deceased, and requested her to "come back to ma, directly."  Under these circumstances the Inquest was adjourned for a week, in order that the stomach may be analysed and further inquiries made.

Western Morning News, Monday 16 October 1876
LODDISWELL - The Drowning In The Avon. - As has already been announced the dead body of a man was found on the 7th inst. in the river Avon, near Loddiswell.  Descriptions of the deceased and of his clothes were circulated, but there was no one to identify the body at the Inquest, at which a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and the interment took place in due course.  Yesterday, however, William Knapman, blacksmith, of Cremyll-street, Stonehouse, visited Kingsbridge Police Station, and identified the clothes of the deceased as those of his brother-in-law, GEORGE AGGETT, who, it was stated, bore tattoo marks similar to those described as on the dead man's arm.  Knapman said that the deceased was a native of Southtawton, where his widowed mother lives, that he was unmarried and that he lodged with him.  He had been employed as a stableman at Plymouth, but had recently been discharged.  He left home on September 30th and had not been seen since by his friends.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of ALEXANDER ROGERS, aged 23 years.  William John Lewarn stated that he and the deceased were clerks in the employ of Messrs. Baker, wholesale grocers, Charles-street.  He saw the deceased alive on Saturday for the last time, and he was then quite well.  Caroline Parlew said that the deceased lodged with a Mrs Turner, at 32 Park-street.  On Saturday she saw the deceased outside his house vomiting blood, and soon after being taken inside he became unconscious.  Blood was still pouring from his mouth, and he died soon after noon that day.  Sarah Turner deposed that the deceased had lodged with her for seven months.  His health had been very bad during that time, but he was able to continue his work, and he never complained of being unwell.  The deceased's employer was called, and said that the poor young fellow bore a very good character, and was very steady.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JAMES ELLIS, a mason, aged 58 years.  -  ROBERT ELLIS, son of the deceased, said that he was working at a house near the Hoe with his father on Monday morning.  Just before eight o'clock the deceased said to him "I am going home, as I fell unwell," and directed witness to bring home his tools.  Witness went home shortly afterwards but his father was not there.  A little girl then came to the house and told witness to go to the police-station as his father was there very ill.  The deceased enjoyed very good health.  -  Mr J. E. Feller deposed that he was walking along Alfred-street soon after eight o'clock on the morning mentioned, when he saw the deceased lying motionless upon the ground on his back.  He called a private in the 14th Regiment, named Noon, who was passing, to assist in raising him, and as they lifted him up the deceased gave two or three gasps and expired immediately.  The assistance of Dr W. H. Pearse was obtained, but his services were of no avail.  When the deceased was raised, witness noticed a small quantity of blood oozing from a cut in the back of his head, caused by the fall upon the ground.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."  Mr Feller was thanked by the Coroner and Jury for the prompt assistance he rendered.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 October 1876
DAWLISH - Unauthorised Burial Near Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at Cockwood, near Dawlish, last evening, by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of an illegitimate and newly-born female child of JANE TAPLEY, a dressmaker, of Cofton, which was buried about a fortnight since without a medical certificate.  -  Samuel Ellis, gravedigger at Cofton, testified to receiving the body at the hands of Sarah Gilpin, the nurse, and interring it on the 3rd inst.  He had more than once buried babies without any medical certificate, and simply upon the statement of the nurse.  -  The Sexton (John Harris) stated that he knew nothing of the interment until last Sunday, when he was told of it by the Rev. J. N. Lightfoot, vicar of Cofton.  -  Mr A. Parsons, surgeon of Dawlish, stated that he made a post mortem examination of the body, which was buried in a cornflour box, and he found the body fully developed and all the organs healthy.  He refused a certificate for the burial of the child, as he did not see the body until after the interment.  His own opinion was that death was caused by suffocation.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said that in the matter of burials there seemed to be very loose management at Cofton, and he trusted that that case would be a lesson to all there.  The conduct of Ellis opened the door to a very grave crime, and the sexton was also much at fault.  -  After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased infant child was suffocated on the 2nd inst., but by what means there is no evidence to shew."  The Jury also recommended that the gates of the churchyard should be kept locked, and the keys placed in the hands of some responsible person.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 October 1876
EXETER -  Fatal Accident Near Crediton. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday respecting the death of JAMES BINDING, a farm labourer, of Sandford, near Crediton.  The deceased was engaged on Tuesday last in removing some furniture and whilst walking beside of the horses he became entangled, was knocked down, and the wheels passed over one of his legs.  He was at once removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, mortification having set in, he died on Friday.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

KINGSWEAR - Strange Death At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Dart Yacht Club Hotel, Kingswear, on Saturday night, by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN BARBER, a gardener, in the employ of Mr R. Brooking, of Ridley House.  On Friday night deceased, who was married and had a family, was found lying flat on the ground quite dead, with his face and hands in a large tub of water, sunk in the garden.  There being no evidence to show that the deceased was of a melancholy temperament, but the reverse, an Open Verdict was returned.  

BIDEFORD - Scalded To Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday at Bideford by Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner, respecting the death of JAMES ARTHUR NICHOLS, a child one year and ten months old, son of MR WILLIAM NICHOLS, brewer.  A servant girl, about 16 years of age, had charge of the child on Thursday evening, and went into the brewhouse, where she got on the platform, over a large tub containing boiling wort from the furnace.  The platform was about 18 inches wide and 4 feet long, and after standing there some little time, the girl jumped off and attempted to take the child down, but he went backward and fell into the boiling beer.  The child was immediately got out by his father, who was near at hand, but he was so frightfully scalded, that he died two hours afterwards.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Drowning At Mutton Cove. - Mr William Shaddock, Mayor and Coroner of Saltash, held an Inquest at Devonport, on Saturday relative to the death of HENRY FORD, who was found drowned at Mutton Cove.  A waterman named William Hayes deposed that on Friday morning he saw the body of the deceased standing upright in the water at Mutton Cove within a foot of the eastern pier wall and about two feet under the surface.  He brought the body to the land, and after some difficulty, as use of the dead-house was refused, the body was conveyed to the Waterman's Arms.  It was searched by Detective Warne, of the Devonport police force, and a written character was found upon it.  It stated that HENRY FORD had been in the employ of Mr J. D. Platt, of Buckland Monachorum, whom he had served faithfully.  The deceased's feet were embedded in the mud and he had a walking stick in his hand.  There was a severe cut over one of his eyes, and this must have been caused in the fall.  Hayes complained that as he had not brought the Saltash Coroner acquainted with the fact of his finding the body, the Coroner's officer for Devonport had threatened to lock him up for his neglect.  He did not think it was his duty to do so.  -  Francis Beer, foreman at Mr Gent's flour mill, Mutton Cove, said that he saw the deceased about six o'clock on Thursday evening in the mill yard.  Witness told him that that was not a public road, and the deceased then asked to be directed to Knackersknowle.  He told the deceased the way and he saw no more of him.  -  In reply to the Coroner witness stated that he was not certain that the lamp on the eastern quay was lighted.  It was dark at the time.  The deceased spoke as if he had been drinking.  - A gardener named Quick, stated that the deceased was his brother-in-law and was a herdsman with Mr J. D. Platt, of Place Barton, Buckland Monachorum, where he lived with his wife and six children.  On Thursday morning deceased went to Sheviock Barton, and was expected home in the evening.  He had an impediment in his speech, and this gave strangers the impression that he had been drinking.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and desired the Coroner to recommend the owner of the property at Mutton Cove to take steps to have the pier protected by chains or railings.  They also desired that the attention of the Authorities should be called to the defective lighting of Mutton Cove.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 October 1876
BARNSTAPLE - The Strange Death At Barnstaple. - The adjourned Inquest respecting the death of MRS MARY ANN REED, the wife of a resident at Ilfracombe, was held at Barnstaple on Saturday evening.  It will be remembered that the deceased was supposed to have died from excessive drinking, but as the doctor did not think the symptoms were altogether consistent with that theory, an order was made for an analysis of the stomach of the deceased.  The Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft) read the report of Mr A. W. Beyrer, county analyst, who stated that no poison had been found in the stomach, but on examining the stains left on the pillow and shawl, he found unmistakable signs of oxalic acid.  that being the case, the Coroner said there could be no doubt as to the cause of death, and he had instructed the police to make inquiries with a view of ascertaining where the woman had purchased the poison.  Very little further evidence of any formal character was taken, but it transpired that the deceased - who first came to Barnstaple on a Friday and slept at the house of a relation, named Goss, during the night, got up early next morning, and went to Mr Moon's, pawn broker, where she pledged her watch for £2.  Nothing more was heard of her until between eleven and twelve o'clock, when it is believed that she went to a public house and purchased a bottle of gin.  She went shortly afterwards to the house of a Mrs Payne, where she remained some time, and apparently slept off the effects of the drink she had been taking.  On leaving there, about a quarter past four, she went to several public houses, asking to be accommodated with a bed.  At one of these places she was served with threepennyworth of brandy.  She went out after drinking it,  and was subsequently taken into the house where she died.  No actual evidence was offered to shew that the woman had taken the poison, but it is assumed that she must have taken it in the brandy and water that she drank at the public house.  -  After some consideration, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had died from the effects of taking oxalic acid, but how obtained, and where and by whom administered, there was no evidence to shew.

LYDFORD -  The Sudden Death Of A Convict. -  Mr R. Fulford, Deputy Coroner for the County, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Princetown, respecting the death of convict A 1,244, WILLIAM SMITH, aged 49 years, who was found dead in his cell on Sunday morning on the opening of the prison.  Dr Power, the medical officer of the establishment, who made a post mortem examination of the body, stated that he was sent for at about 8 o'clock on Sunday morning to see the deceased, whom he found quite dead, and he should imagine had been so for several hours.  He died from a rupture of a blood vessel.  SMITH, it was stated, had been sentenced to penal servitude no less than four times, and the sentence he was undergoing at the time of death was ten years' penal servitude, and five years' police supervision, for receiving stolen property.  He was described as being a very well conducted convict, but his career has evidently been one of the most criminal on record, for besides being sent to penal servitude four times, he has undergone thirteen summary convictions, varying from one to six months.

EXETER - Another Victim To Drink. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of JAMES CREEDY, formerly a baker to the St. Thomas Workhouse.  -  Mrs Lydia Lypell, who occupied rooms in the same house as the deceased, stated that on Friday evening last a man named Drake called to see him, and as he stayed so long as to lose his train to Wellington, where he intended to go that night, was persuaded by the deceased to remain with him all night.  During the night witness heard a noise in CREEDY'S room and on proceeding downstairs found the deceased on the floor - he having fallen from his chair.  Deceased was then in a sitting position.  Witness spoke to Drake, who was on the bed, and asked him to assist her in raising the deceased.  Drake replied that CREEDY had had a "drop too much," and would be all right after having a "nap."  Witness then left the room.  Some time afterwards she again heard a noise, and went to CREEDY'S room, and then put a pillow under his head.  Drake left in the morning, and after he was gone witness bathed the deceased's head with vinegar and gave him some tea.  Finding that he was very ill, she sent for Mr Perkins, who, on arriving, found that the man was dying.  His breath smelt very strongly of alcoholic liquor.  Mr Perkins applied the usual remedies, but without effect.  Death occurred shortly afterwards.  Mr Perkins said it resulted from the excessive quantity of drink taken, coupled with exposure, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, relative to the death of BENJAMIN HARRIS, an able seaman on board the schooner Gideon, Captain Warren, now lying in Sutton Pool.  On Sunday evening the schooner arrived at Plymouth from Cardiff, and the deceased, in company with the remainder of the crew, were engaged in running the ropes.  After they had finished their work and were about to return to their ship the deceased complained of a pain in his chest.  It having been stated that the deceased had suffered from heart disease, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH HELSWOOD, aged 72 years.  The evidence was to the effect that on Tuesday morning the deceased, who resided in Hoe Gate-street, was throwing coals into the fire, when she fell forward and struck her head.  She was immediately picked up by her daughter, and as she was insensible, was placed in bed, but she never recovered consciousness.  Mr Prynn, surgeon, was sent for, but she died before he arrived.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 October 1876
PLYMOUTH - Parental Treatment Of Children. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of CHARLES THOMAS WILLIAMS, aged 1 year and seven months.  FANNY WILLIAMS, mother of the deceased, living at 20 Morley-lane, stated that the deceased was a very healthy child, but on Friday last he became unwell.  He ate his food as usual, however, but on Sunday afternoon he became worse and an emetic was administered.  Late in the evening a poultice was applied to his chest and on a change taking place, Mr Rendle, surgeon, was sent for, but he was not at home.  The child died at nine o'clock that night.  The Coroner remarked that in future it would be well for the witness not to wait until a child was death seized before sending for a doctor.  -  Witness:  I did not think the child was so ill until the change took place just before it died.  -  Charlotte Smith, residing in the same house as the last witness, stated that she did not think the child was in danger.  MRS WILLIAMS asked her opinion as to whether a surgeon should be called in, and she told her that she did not think it was necessary.  The deceased, however, was breathing very hard and appeared to be very drowsy. -  The Coroner, who summed up at some length, spoke of the thoughtlessness often displayed towards young children.  Their lives were as valuable as those of grown up people, and he was very anxious that they should be preserved.  The poor little creatures could not help themselves, and as he was not at all satisfied with the present case, he thought it desirable that it should come before a Jury.  There was neglect in not calling in a surgeon, and the more people in the neighbourhood understood the importance of obtaining medical aid the fewer such cases would become.  The present case was one in which medical skill was required and the deceased, in his opinion, had been permitted to die through the want of it.  If the parents could not have afforded to obtain the services of a medical man they should have applied to the parochial officer.  -  The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and stated that they concurred in the Coroner's remarks.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 November 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Fall At Torquay. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Torquay, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of GEORGE C. RIX, 19 years of age, whose death had been caused by falling over the stairs at Hatcher's refreshment rooms, Vaughan Parade, on Wednesday night, on which occasion the Leander rowing Club held their annual dinner.  -  THOMAS RIX, father of deceased, said he was called on Thursday morning at about one o'clock by Mr Hatcher, who wanted him to come to his house as witness's son had had a slight fall and had been put to bed.  Witness went to Mr Hatcher's and found deceased on a bed upstairs, quite unconscious.  He then went for Mr Gamble, surgeon.  -  Kate Keatie, servant at Mr Hatcher's said that on Wednesday night Stephen Hatcher, son of Mr Hatcher, went down the back stairs in company with the deceased, whom she saw turn and take hold of the bannister and then fall over the stairs.  He fell to the bottom, with his head against the wall and one of his shoes came off.  After the fall deceased said, in reply to a question from young Hatcher as to whether he would go for a walk or not, "All right, Steve."  Afterwards deceased became faint, and was put to bed.  -  Stephen Hatcher said he went down the stairs in front of deceased when the accident occurred.  Deceased was not the worse for drink, having had but two glasses of ale and a little sherry.  -  Mr S. Gamble, surgeon, said he was sent for to see deceased at Mr Hatcher's at about one o'clock on Thursday morning and found him dead, death having resulted from the rupture of a vessel at the base of the brain, the vessels being at the time very much congested.  -  The Coroner said it was a very sad case, and one which should be a warning to all young men.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On Shipboard. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Workhouse into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES WILLIAMS, a man of colour, aged 38 years.  -  Charles Frederick Johnson, licensed victualler and lodging-house keeper, residing at Southside-street, stated that he knew the deceased, who was a seaman on board the schooner Belle, of Brixham.  On Friday last the deceased was paid off from his vessel, and went to reside with him.  He heard the deceased state that he had had a fall, but he did not hear him blame any person.  On Monday last the deceased left witness's house, and went into the infirmary at the Workhouse.  At times he appeared to be in acute pain.  -  Henry Drew, master of the Plymouth Workhouse, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Workhouse Infirmary on Monday afternoon last, and was then spitting blood.  -  Elizabeth Paterson, nurse at the Workhouse infirmary, stated that when the deceased was admitted into the Infirmary he appeared to be very unwell.  He told witness that three weeks previous he fell into the hold of the ship, and had been unwell ever since, but he did not blame any person.  -  Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, stated that when he saw the deceased on Monday afternoon last he was nearly insensible, and spitting blood profusely.  The deceased told him that he had injured his right side through falling down the hold of the ship.  It appeared to be a hopeless case from the first.  Witness had made a post mortem examination, and found that the deceased died from the effects of a blow that he had received on the left side of his chest.  The right lung was contused and inflamed.  Previous to the accident deceased was a strong, healthy, and muscular man, and if he had received medical treatment soon after the accident in all probability he would have been alive now.  The only medical treatment the deceased had on board his ship was a dose of castor oil.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said that the case was a very unsatisfactory one, as they had no eye witnesses of the fall.  He considered that Mr Johnson had acted the part of a good Samaritan to the deceased.  There could be no doubt that the deceased died from the injuries he received, and that those injuries were caused accidentally.  The deceased should have received medical treatment immediately after the accident, but it was apparent that he continued his work after the accident, and that this was death to him.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 November 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of Children. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Brunswick Inn, Barbican, relative to the death of FLORINDA SOPHIA FOSTER, aged 11 weeks.  The deceased was the daughter of a fisherman, and on the evening of Thursday she went to bed with her parents.  On the following morning the deceased was found dead in bed.  Dr Pearse was called in, and stated that he believed that the deceased died from convulsions.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A second Inquiry was held at the Tradesman's Arms, Octagon-street, into the circumstances attending the death of Emma Jane Vanstone, aged 7 months.  EMMA VANSTONE, mother of the deceased, stated that on Thursday evening the deceased appeared to be unwell and before she had time to call a surgeon in she expired.  The witness called a neighbour to look at the child, and she expressed her opinion that the deceased died from convulsions.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - On Thursday Mr Brian held an Inquest at the Guildhall concerning the death of the infant child of MICHAEL OSBORNE, a labourer, living at 13 Pike-street, Plymouth.  From the evidence of the mother, it seemed that at two o'clock on Thursday morning she awoke and found the child dead in her arms.  She immediately arose, and called a neighbour named Square.  There was an appearance of pressure on the child's face.  The Jury, of which Mr William Wise was foreman, after a prolonged and careful investigation, found as their verdict - "That the deceased child had died from Suffocation, caused by Accidental pressure against its mother during the sleep of the latter."  It transpired that MRS OSBORNE had lost three children before the deceased, making four out of five.  The other three, however, had been attended by medical men.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 November 1876
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr James Stephens was Foreman, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of the female infant child of ELIZABETH WILLIAMS.  -  The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, stated that the case was a very peculiar one.  The mother of the deceased had until recently been in service at Stoke, and since she had left her situation she had been in lodgings in Looe-street.  On Thursday last she was confined, and on Saturday the child died.  There was neither a midwife nor a surgeon present at the birth.  He asked the Jury to pay great attention to the case.   -   Mariana Huggins, residing at 10 Looe-street, stated that she knew the mother of the deceased, whose name was MARY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, and who lived at 10 Looe-street, which house was kept by a Mrs Freeman, and let out in lodgings.  She had been lodging there about three months, and had told witness she had come there to be confined.  She informed witness that she had been in service at a Mr Harvey's at Stoke, and had left it in consequence of being pregnant.  During the time she had been lodging in the house Mr Harvey had been to see her once.  She was delivered on Thursday night last of a female child.  Witness's husband fetched the nurse, but neither the nurse nor a surgeon was present at the birth.  The deceased was a fine child.  On Friday witness saw her put the deceased to her breast, but the child would not partake of the milk.  Previous to the birth the mother told witness that she intended to go back to Mr Harvey's service and that, in consequence, she did not intend to suckle the child.  She had stated that she was a married woman, and that her husband, who was a mason by trade, was in Australia.  The child expired about half-past four o'clock on Saturday afternoon last.  Witness never saw the deceased take any nourishing food.  -  Elizabeth Folley, residing in Lower Batter-street, stated that she had been a midwife for bout thirty-five years, and about two months since a Mrs Freeman asked her to attend the mother of the deceased at her confinement.  The deceased, who was a fine child, refused to take some hot milk soon after its birth.  It was witness's practice to put child in bed with their mothers, but she did not do so in this case, as she was informed that the mother was not going to suckle it.  There was a change in the child on Friday morning and at the mother's request Mr Prynne, surgeon, was sent for.  When he came he told witness to put the deceased in bed with its mother, that it might partake of the breast, but it was too far gone to do so.  -  Mr E. M. Prynne, surgeon, stated that he was first called to see deceased between twelve and one o'clock on Friday afternoon.  He found it to be in a state of stupor,  and very cold.  He asked the nurse what had happened to the child, and she told him that it had been convulsed.  he then asked if the child had taken any food, and she replied that it had not, as it could not swallow.  Some person in the room informed him that the mother did not intend to nurse the deceased as she wanted to go back to her situation as soon as possible.  The deceased was in such a state of stupor that it could not partake of the mother's milk.  When he left the deceased  was in bed with its mother, and he heard nothing further until between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday night when Mr Huggins came to him and asked for a certificate of the deceased's death.  In answer to a question put by witness, Mr Huggins stated that the deceased died that afternoon, and that the body was nailed down in a box.  He declined to give a certificate until he had communicated with the Coroner.  Shortly afterwards Mrs Huggins and Mrs Folley came, and begged him to give a certificate of death, and he replied that he could not do it.  He had made a very careful post mortem examination of the deceased, and found that the throat in general was quite healthy in every respect, and that there was no obstruction in the swallow.  The stomach and intestines were quite empty, but in a healthy state.  The organs were universally perfectly healthy.  he did not believe that any kind of nourishment had passed through the child since its birth.  There was no physical reason why the deceased should not have taken in suitable nourishment as well as any other infant.  If the deceased had not sufficient warmth, and was not supplied with any food, it would be in such a condition as he found it.  When he saw the child he thought that it had not had the warmth it should have had.  He was informed that the child was not born until one o'clock on Friday morning, whereas it was born two or three hours previous.  If the deceased had been kept warm after he saw it he believed that it might have recovered from its state of stupor and that its life would thereby have been saved.  The deceased was a fully developed child.  He believed that the cause of death was want of food and warmth.  He could not say whether the total absence of food was owing to the deceased's inability to receive that offered to it, or to its not having any administered.  It was his opinion that the child ought not to have been removed from its mother until it had taken some nourishment.  He did not consider that sufficient care and attention had been paid to the child.   -   Elizabeth Folley was recalled, and stated that every arrangement was made to bury the deceased on Sunday morning.  She gave instructions to have the body nailed down in the box, which was done before she went to Mr Prynne's for a certificate of death.  -  The Coroner:  Were you going to bury the deceased?  -  Witness:  No.   -  The Coroner:  It would not be the first you have buried, would it now?  -  Witness:  Oh, no.  -  The Coroner:  How many have you buried?  -  Witness:  I cannot tell.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and added that it was probable that the deceased suffered from a spasm in the throat, which prevented it from swallowing and that the spasm was caused by the window being open at the time of the deceased's birth.  They were unanimous in their opinion that it was a proper case for investigation.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 November 1876
AVETON GIFFORD - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Weir Down, Aveton Gifford, yesterday, respecting the death of a child named SARAH MOORE, aged 2 years and 6 months, the daughter of RICHARD MOORE, a farm labourer. The child had been unwell for some time past, and was found dead in her cradle on Saturday morning.  Mr William Langworthy, surgeon, stated that the child died from pneumonia, and a verdict in accordance with this evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 November 1876
EXETER - Melancholy Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of MRS S. G. S. W. BISNEY.  Deceased, who was the wife of MR CHARLES BISNEY, hatter, of High-street, Exeter, was 63 years of age.  According to her husband's statement she had never enjoyed good health, and had recently shewn symptoms of nervous depression, being especially distressed by his late pecuniary embarrassments.  MR BISNEY has often pressed her to procure medical advice, but she preferred the homeopathic treatment, which she had studied somewhat carefully.  On Thursday morning his wife appeared as cheerful as usual, and when he last saw her alive, about four o'clock, there was nothing in her manner to excite suspicion.  An hour afterwards the housekeeper told him that something had happened to her mistress, and on going to his dressing-room he found the deceased kneeling on the floor with her head resting on a small tin bath, which contained a quantity of blood that had flowed from a wound in her throat.  Two doctors were sent for, but their services were of no avail;  in fact, death must have taken place before the witness entered the room.  It appeared that the wound had been inflicted with one of MR BISNEY'S razors.  -  In reply to the Coroner, MR BISNEY stated that he was contemplating removal, and the prospect of the change affected his wife very much, as they had occupied the High-street premises for upwards of twenty years.  -  Evidence was given by Susan Norris, the housekeeper;  Mr Ball, nephew of MR BISNEY; and Mr G. F. Webb, surgeon.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, expressed sympathy - which he was sure the Jury shared with him - for MR BISNEY in his sad bereavement, and intimated that there was little or no reason to doubt that the deceased's mind was so affected by her husband's misfortunes as to render her unconscious of the nature of the fatal act.  -  The Jury, after a brief consultation, unanimously returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 20 November 1876
BERE FERRERS - An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, at Beeralston, on Saturday, respecting the death of a child named ELIZABETH ANN HERBERT.  Mr Norrish, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination, stated that the death was from Natural Causes and a verdict to this effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 November 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth relative to the death of ELIZABETH HANSLEY, aged 73 years.  Sarah Walker stated that the deceased resided in her house, 9, Batter-street.  On Thursday evening she went to chapel, and returned about nine o'clock, and went to bed.  The next morning, when witness went to the deceased's room, she found her lying on her face, dead and cold.  The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 November 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening respecting the death of MR CAPE, who for very many years had held the position of store-keeper in Mr Shilton's shipyard at Coxside.  The deceased had attended to his duty without any complaint of illness up to the dinner hour when he went to his residence within the yard.  In the midst of dinner he was noticed to suddenly change in appearance, and before medical assistance could be procured had breathed his last.  -  Mr Harper, surgeon, believed him to have had a pre-disposition to heart disease, but thought he died from a fit of apoplexy.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Friday 1 December 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM MOGG, aged 57 years.  The deceased, who was a seaman pensioner, resided at 20 Marlborough-street, with his sister-in-law, a flag-maker in the dockyard.  On Monday the deceased was attacked with gout and became worse in the evening, but the following day he recovered.  On Wednesday morning, however, the deceased complained of a sore throat and a poultice was applied to it, but in the afternoon he vomited and died almost immediately.   Mr J. Rolston, surgeon, made a post mortem examination, which shewed that the kidneys were very much diseased, and the lungs were also congested.  The primary cause of death was the disease of the kidneys, accelerated by pulmonary disease.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 December 1876
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident To A Lady At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at Stonehouse relative to the death of MISS H. M. BOARDMAN, a lady of independent means, aged 81 years.  Sarah Heale stated that for upwards of thirteen years she had been a companion and an attendant of the deceased, who resided at 53 Emma-place, Stonehouse.  On the evening of Sunday week last deceased was ascending the stairs for the purpose of going to bed, when she fell over the stairs.  Witness, who was in an upstairs bedroom, heard the deceased call out "Come quickly, I have had a fall," and she went to her assistance immediately.  The deceased was lying on the stairs with a severe blow over her right eye, and witness conveyed her to bed.  MISS BOARDMAN was subject to fits, but did not have one at the time of the accident.  -  Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, stated that on Monday last he was asked to go and see the deceased, whom he found suffering from a severe blow over her right eye, and her right arm and shoulder were also much bruised.  The deceased told witness that she caught her foot in the stair carpet and fell over the stairs.  Deceased lingered in great pain until Sunday when she expired.  The cause of death was the fall.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Suspicious Death Of An Infant. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, relative to the death of EMILY JANE HUXTABLE, infant child of HENRY HUXTABLE, a fisherman, living in Batter-street.  -  Charlotte Foster, living in Stillman-street, said that about a month since the mother of the deceased came to her and asked her to nurse her child, which she said was about seven weeks old.  Witness went to Kinterbury-street and saw the child wrapped up in a bed.  The mother said, "That's my child;  it's very small."  Witness agreed, but said that with care it might get on.  The child at that time was nothing but skin and bone, and it was very dirty.  It was comfortably dressed.  Witness took the child and carried it home.  The mother agreed to give witness 3s. a week for looking after the child, and 2d. a day for food for it.  In the evening HUXTABLE took the child away to shew her mother, and when she brought it back to witness she was under the influence of liquor, and witness told her to get home.  HUXTABLE said she had one other child living, 9 years old.  She had lost two others, when infants, one 3 months and the other a fortnight old, and she said that both these children had been thinner than the present one.  Witness had charge of the baby a fortnight and four days.  Sometimes HUXTABLE would take away the child for the night.  At other times she wished to take the child home, but witness would not allow her to do so, as she did not appear to be sober enough to take charge of it.  Witness had thought all along that the child was not right in one part of its body, and she had asked the mother repeatedly to get a doctor.  HUXTABLE laughed at her about it and would not have one.  On Saturday week Mr Prynne, surgeon, was sent for, and he said that the child was ruptured.  He wished to give the child some medicine, but did not like to do so without the mother's consent.  He thought, however, that the matter was almost too far gone.  He said the child was very ill and in danger.  Before she saw Mr Prynne she went to the market to see the mother.  Witness found her in the Chester Cup public-house, hard by.  She told HUXTABLE that she had sent to the doctor about the child and thereupon HUXTABLE swore at her, abused her and threatened her for doing so.  At witness's request HUXTABLE took the child away subsequently, but said she should not have a doctor as the child did not want one.  The child was well nourished while witness had it.  On Friday night last HUXTABLE let the child fall on the Parade, outside a public-house door, when her husband gave her a black eye.   -   Hannah Meddle, wife of John Meddle, a boot finisher, said that on Monday last the woman HUXTABLE came to her house, at No. 4 Batter-street, and on Wednesday asked her to take charge of the child for 3s. a week, she (the mother) supplying its food.  The child was taken away at night by the mother.  On Saturday morning HUXTABLE came to her with the child, which died in four or five minutes. HUXTABLE said, "Do you think I had better take it to a doctor?"  Witness said, "It is too late now."  The evening before the child was apparently quite well.  Whilst with the witness the child ate and drank well.  -  Thomas Wadlan, landlord of the White Swan beer-house, Southside-street, said that about half-past eight on Thursday evening, the woman HUXTABLE with the child and her husband, were in his house.  There was a disturbance between HUXTABLE and his wife, and a Mrs Box had the child in her arms.   The woman Box commenced to throw glasses at the husband, holding the child in one arm the while.  He never saw the child again.   -   Edward Michael Prynne, surgeon, said he saw the child on Saturday evening.  He had since examined it.  It was very emaciated, and was about the smallest child he had ever seen at ten weeks old.  It had hernia in the groin, which might have been congenital.  There was no appliance of any kind to the rupture, which was, in itself, a piece of neglect. If neglected, strangulated hernia might occur, and that was generally fatal to children.  He considered the child in danger, and told Mrs Foster so, and said that if the mother did not wish to have medicine from him she should send for another doctor.  He said that if the child died he should not feel at liberty to give a certificate.  He considered the case so serious that he did not like to undertake it without the mother's authority.  He did not see the child alive after that.  In the post mortem examination he discovered the child was 5 ½ lbs in weight, and was 22 inches long.  At birth it probably weighed from 8 to 10 lbs.  It was 10 inches round the chest.  The child was very emaciated, and he considered death to be due to want of proper care and nourishment.  He considered that the lack of nourishment for the child before it was put out to nurse might have had an indelibly prejudicial effect upon its constitution.  -   Emma Cockwell, a young girl, said that last Friday she saw MRS HUXTABLE with the baby in her arms, walking down Stillman-street.  She tripped against the curb stone and fell and the baby fell out of her arms.  It fell on its back.  HUXTABLE picked it up and went home.   -   The Coroner, in summing up (the woman HUXTABLE, on his advice and that of the Jury, not giving evidence), said the child appeared to have been well developed at the time of birth, yet at its death it was about half the natural size and there was no disease about it, so that the death must have arisen from lack of nutrition and want of nourishment - starvation, in fact, or something equivalent to it.  Who was the natural guardian?  The mother;  and the question was - was she criminally negligent?  There had been neglect before the child went to Mrs Foster (who seemed to have done all she could for it), and there was unmistakable evidence that there had been neglect on the part of the mother in not attending to the rupture, despite the protestations and declarations of Foster.  She took the child away from Foster, but did not take it to a doctor; on the contrary, she handed it over to Mrs Meddle.   -   The Jury, after consideration, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against MRS HUXTABLE."  This verdict the Coroner said was unanimous.  The Jury exonerated Mrs Foster, but severely censured the father of the child, thinking that attention on his part might have brought about a better state of things.  -  MRS HUXTABLE was taken into custody and will be brought before the magistrates today.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 December 1876
PLYMOUTH - Death In Child Birth At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at Morley-place, Plymouth, last evening, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) relative to the death of ELIZABETH ANN HARRISON, aged 39 years.  -  JOHN HARRISON, husband of the deceased, stated that he resided at 31 Morley-place and his wife had had eleven children.  Early on Monday morning she became ill, and, expecting to be confined, a midwife named Pearse, who had attended her on five previous occasions - was called in.  After Mrs Pearse had been there for some little time she asked witness to fetch Mr W. B. Stephens, surgeon, as the deceased was in danger.  He went to Mr Stephens's residence, but before he arrived the deceased had died.  The deceased was not delivered of the child and no surgeon was engaged to attend his wife.  Grace Pearse stated that she had acted as a midwife for nearly thirty years and had attended the deceased in nearly all her confinements.  Witness gained her experience under Mr Square, surgeon, and she had never had a case which terminated fatally.  The deceased at first appeared to be going on all right, but a change took place and she died.  Witness was unprepared with anything that was necessary to apply in the event of the case assuming a dangerous aspect.  -  The Coroner remarked that he did not think that there was blame attached to any person, nor did he believe that the deceased's life would have been saved if a surgeon had been present.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" exonerating Mrs Pearse from all blame.

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death By Poisoning At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, relative to the death of ASHLEY JAMES SHERWELL.  -  Mary Couch, nurse at the house of MR SHERWELL, grocer, Old Town-street, knew the deceased child, who was 1 year 9 months old.  Yesterday forenoon at eleven o'clock she heard the child speaking in the drawing-room, and when she got there she saw deceased and his sister, a little girl about 4 years old, playing with a box of matches that had been used to light the gas with the night before, and which had been left on the table.  Subsequently the child was taken ill and vomited.  Mr Rendle, surgeon, saw the child and prescribed for it.  He was told they were afraid the child had been sucking the matches.  The deceased died about eight o'clock.  It was subsequently discovered that the top of eight or ten matches had been sucked off by the child.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Poisoning."

Western Morning News, Friday 8 December 1876
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held in Cambridge-street, Plymouth, last evening by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, relative to the death of THOMAS TRULL, aged 70 years.  -  ANN TRULL, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was a labourer, and resided at 30 Cambridge-street.  He was employed by the Plymouth Town Council, and was at work in the market all day on Wednesday.  He enjoyed very good health, and worked very hard.  When partaking of his tea on Wednesday he complained of a pain in the stomach, but no particular notice was taken of that, and he went to bed at the usual hour.  At four o'clock the deceased told witness that he could not sleep, and that the pain in his stomach was more severe.  Two hours later she heard the deceased gasping, and upon speaking to him she found he could not answer her, and he almost immediately expired.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 December 1876
EXETER - Strange Death Of An Exeter Tradesman. - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of MR JAMES MALLETT, a tradesman, who died under very peculiar circumstances.  A few nights since two men were walking on the Quay, when the observed a man lying on the ground in an unconscious state.  They at first thought he was dead, but after some minutes symptoms of life were noticed, and they raised him to his feet.  The sufferer, who seemed to have had a fit, walked with assistance as far as Holloway-street, where the men left him, as he appeared to be considerably better, and it was raining heavily.  A quarter of an hour later one of the men, named Holmes, heard that the body of a man had been found in the river, and on going to the Port Royal Inn he saw that it was the same person as he had found on the quay.  -  Mr Edwards of the Port Royal Inn, stated that between ten and eleven o'clock he was walking towards the quay, when he noticed an object floating in the river near the bank.  He immediately ran back to his house, seized a boathook, jumped into a boat and intercepted the object, which proved to be the body of a man.  With assistance the body was landed.  It was not quite cold, and the persevering application of the usual remedies succeeded in restoring animation.  The unfortunate man, who was identified as MR MALLETT of High-street, was attended by Mr Tosswill, surgeon, and then removed to the Hospital.  Next morning, having slightly rallied, the patient was taken to his own residence, where he was attended by Mr Phelps, surgeon.  He improved a little; but the strain to which the constitution had been exposed proved too much and death supervened on Thursday morning.  It was elicited from one of the deceased's sons that at the time of the sad occurrence his father was financially embarrassed, but there was no evidence to shew that suicide had been committed.  Mr Tosswill stated that the appearance of the deceased when he was called to see him was consistent either with the supposition that he had been drinking or that he had suffered from an epileptic fit.  Mr Phelps said death resulted from acute inflammation, caused by the sudden immersion.  The Jury returned a verdict to that effect, adding that there was no evidence to shew how the deceased got into the water.  The conduct of Messrs. Holmes and Edwards was highly praised.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 December 1876
EXETER - A Child Burnt To Death At Exeter. - An Inquiry was held yesterday by the Exeter Coroner into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM MATTHEWS, a boy aged 3 years and 9 months, the son of WILLIAM MATTHEWS, a quay lumper.  It was stated that on Saturday evening last the mother of the child left it with only its nightdress on whilst she went an errand.  During her absence a neighbour heard screams proceeding from the room, and on going there found the child's nightdress in flames.  Assistance was procured, and the fire extinguished, and the child removed to the Hospital, where, after lingering until Sunday, it died from the effects of the injuries received.  -  In answer to some questions from the Coroner, MRS MATTHEWS stated that three matches were placed loosely on the mantelpiece, and it is supposed that the child got them and lighted them, and that in so doing he set fire to his nightdress.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that by how and what means the child's nightdress became ignited there was no evidence to shew.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 December 1876
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM COLES, aged 62 years.  The deceased resided at the Prince George Inn, Vauxhall-street, and on Wednesday evening, just after leaving his room, he fell over a flight of stairs.  The deceased was perfectly sober;  but there was no rope or handrail attached to the stairs.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed a desire that the Coroner would communicate with the landlord of the house, requesting him to protect the stairs.

PLYMPTON ST MARY - Strange Suicide At Plympton. - MR JOSEPH DEWDNEY, farmer, of Holland, Plympton St. Mary, eldest son of MR GEORGE DEWDNEY, Higher Chaddlewood Farm, committed suicide late on Wednesday night or early yesterday morning.  It appears that his brother and Mr Parnell, jun., of Battisford, returned from Plymouth between Wednesday midnight and one o'clock yesterday morning, and, without obtaining a light, "backed" the trap into the cart-house at Holland.  Parnell went round the back of the trap to see that it was right and, in doing so, came in contact with what seemed to be a human body.  A light was obtained, and the deceased was found hanging by the plough-rein, with his feet about six inches from the ground.  The body was at once cut down, and though warm, and Mr Ellery, surgeon, Ridgway, was at once fetched, all means to restore animation were unavailing.  The deceased's sister, who acted as his housekeeper, heard the dogs bark about 11 o'clock, when it is supposed, he got the rein from the stable, and subsequently she heard the rattling of chains, probably those on the cart shafts close to his feet.  The deceased, who was 29 years of age, left home on Friday last, and, stabling his horse at the Boot Inn, Plymouth, went away from the district.  He is reported to have been seen at Brent Church on Sunday, at Ivybridge market on Monday and last at the Cornwood Inn on Wednesday night, where he had a glass of brandy and water about ten o'clock.  Holland Farm is the property of the Plympton Grammar School.  -  An Inquest was held last evening by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner.  The first witness called was William Parnell, who described the circumstances under which the body was found.  -  Mr Richard Ellery, surgeon, was the next witness.  He stated that about 12.30 a.m. yesterday he was called, and went to Holland Farm, where he saw the body of the deceased, who was dead, and he believed had been so for between one and two hours.  The body was warm.  He believed that the deceased did the act whilst in a state of temporary insanity.  -  The father of the deceased said that the deceased, who managed his (witness's) business, had been in great anxiety about his debts.  On Friday last twelve months' rent was due, and the deceased gave him a cheque for £200 to pay it.  It was signed by T. Pooley, of Plymouth, and he (witness) remarked "Why I am surprised, JOSEPH;  all this money for forage alone?  -  Mr Bewes will think you have been robbing the farm to have so much for forage."  He told the deceased to go to Plymouth and get the cheque cashed, and deceased went away and did not return.  He had since heard that when the deceased presented the cheque at the bank it was dishonoured.  Mr Pooley told him that he lent the money for a month.  -  Sergeant Hicks said he found two cheques on the deceased - one for £200 and the other for £7 - besides £17 in cash.  -  The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a very painful one.  He had no doubt that his difficulties greatly troubled the deceased, and that he committed the rash act whilst of unsound mind.  -  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 December 1876
GOSPORT - Firing Into A Fishing Boat.  A Plymouth Man Killed.  [Special Telegram.]  Gosport, Tuesday Evening. - Today Mr Harfield, County Coroner, resumed an Inquiry into the death of GEORGE GRINGER, who, whilst in a fishing vessel off the "back" of the Isle of Wight, in July last, received a wound, and died a few days since in Haslar Hospital from the injuries received.  -  After medical evidence had been taken, Orlando Johns,  a fisherman living at Plymouth, deposed that on the 12th of July last he left Plymouth for Whithy, in the fishing boat Dewdrop.  He was in charge, and he had on board five men, of whom GRINGER was one.  About two o'clock on the morning of the 19th, whilst six miles off the Needles, at the "back" of the Isle of Wight, witness, who was on deck with Thomas Foster and deceased, called up the other men to hoist her lugsail, and upon this being effected he went below, leaving Foster and GRINGER on deck.  About five minutes afterwards he hard GRINGER tell Foster to "Luff," and then he heard him remark "All right, keep her away;  it's a pilot boat."  Two or three minutes after this Foster shouted, "Jump up here, what's the matter with poor GEORGE?"  All hands ran on deck instantly and everyone asked what was the matter.  GRINGER was lying on the deck, apparently in great pain.  He did not know that he was shot, and said "Something has struck me."  Just then they heard a shot cracking in the mizonmast, and after that they heard another shot and then a third.  When the third shot was fired, witness discovered that the deceased was bleeding from the arm.  He then thought that the vessel was a Revenue cutter, and he saw that it was coming towards them.  He did not see the vessel before.  He told the man at the helm to put the helm down, and ordered a "Flare up," to be shewn.  A gig then came alongside and four men came on board.  Witness asked what they meant by firing into his boat, and the officer in charge replied that if she had not been "hove to" he would have put a six-pounder into her.  As the cutter was "end on" she could not be perceived distinctly further off than 300 yards.  -  Mr Harvey, the Admiralty solicitor, closely examined the witness, who said that he was in his berth when the shot that struck GRINGER was fired, and if blank cartridges had been previously fired he could not have heard them.  The master gunner had said that he fired three blank cartridges and a pistol before he fired a ball, and that the shots were fired at the halyards, to cut away the rigging.  The master-gunner accounted for the accident by the boat dipping.  -  Thomas Foster, fisherman, of Plymouth, one of the crew of the Dewdrop, corroborated, and stated that the cutter hoisted the ensign when she came on the lugger's quarter.  The deceased was leaning on the rails, so that it was possible his form was not recognised as that of a man.   -  Charles Henry Smith, the master-gunner of the Revenue cutter Spy, asserted that when the lugger was seen the ensign was hoisted, and the lugger hailed to heave to.  Witness fetched a pistol loaded with blank cartridge, and fired four rounds;  but the lugger took no notice.  He afterwards fired a round of blank cartridge from a rifle, and the lugger having got four hundred yards ahead of the Spy, he loaded the rifle with ball cartridge, and aimed for the vessel's mast.  He fired three times from the rifle, and another shot from the revolver.  On the last shot being fired the lugger hove to.  Smith added that he had saved life four times, and held a medal from the Royal Humane Society.  He was promoted for gallant conduct four years ago at Penzance, and he was also specially recommended for other gallant conduct, and held the long service and good conduct medal.  Other evidence having been taken, the Jury, after two hours' deliberation, found that the deceased was shot by Smith, but that it was an excusable act.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 December 1876
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held at Devonport, relative to the death of JOHN BAZLEY, aged two weeks.  -  EMILY BAZLEY, wife of a naval seaman, stated that the deceased was taken unwell on the previous night and refused to take its food.  She went to bed at the usual hour, and at ten o'clock the next morning she found it dead.  In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that she rose at eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, but did not look at the child until a Mrs Luke came into the room, as she thought that it was asleep.  She was nineteen years of age, and had one child living who was two years old.  Her husband had been away on the China station for three years.  She always treated the deceased, who was an illegitimate child, kindly.  Mr J. Wilson, surgeon, said that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found the brain and lungs much congested, and both ventricles of the heart full of blood.  From the appearance of the deceased he was of opinion that it died in convulsions, and there were no marks of violence upon the body.  The child was fairly well nourished and was not emaciated.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall From A Viaduct. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, relative to the death of WILLIAM HALLETT, aged 38 years.  -  John Lander stated that the deceased was a labourer, and was working with him upon the Keyham Viaduct of the Cornwall Railway on Tuesday morning.  About eleven o'clock they were engaged in putting in a "filling" piece, and witness inserted one end, whilst the other was resting upon the deceased's shoulder.  Witness told the deceased that he would get a mallet to drive the piece of wood into its place, and asked him if he was safe, to which he replied in the affirmative.  When witness was returning he saw the deceased, whom he had left standing between the road way and the top rail, falling into the road below, a distance of about 71 feet.  There was no necessity for HALLETT to have shifted his position, and he must have lost his hold.  The deceased was attended to immediately by Mr J. May, surgeon, but he was unconscious.  He was admitted into the Royal Albert Hospital and died soon after admission.  - The Coroner remarked that such work as the deceased was engaged in was very dangerous, and he considered that precautions should be taken for the protection of workmen, as a false step, or overbalancing, as in the case of the deceased, would lead to fatal results.  He did not make this remark with the idea of censuring anyone;  but he thought that if a temporary rope or railing were placed on the outside of the viaduct, so that when a man found that he was falling he might catch hold of it, valuable lives would be saved.  -  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 December 1876
LAMERTON - Yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, Devon County Coroner, opened an Inquest at Chaddle Hanger, Lamerton, on the body of MR RICHARD ELLIS, farmer.  The deceased was returning on horseback from Tavistock on Friday last when the horse stumbled and he was thrown to the ground with considerable violence, receiving injuries which resulted in his death on Sunday.  Sufficient evidence having been taken to allow of the interment of the body, the Inquest was adjourned to Saturday next.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 December 1876
EXMOUTH - Fatalities At Exmouth. - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday by Mr S. M. Cox, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN BULL, who was over 80 years of age.  It appears that about midday on Saturday deceased went upstairs to lie down, as was his custom, and his son-in-law, Mr G. Smith, on coming into the house some time afterwards, found him at the foot of the stairs, dead.  It is supposed that the deceased, in coming downstairs, fell and dislocated his neck.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXMOUTH -  An Inquest was also held with respect to the death of EMMA NEWCOMBE, aged 6 months, the daughter of JOHN NEWCOMBE, a labourer.  The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Evening's Work Of The Plymouth Coroner. -  Last night Mr Brian had three Inquests to hold.  The first, which took place at the Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, was respecting the death of MR WM. HENRY COLES, master mason, of 33 James-street.  Deceased, who was 54 years old, had not been well of late, and during last week he did not work.  He went to bed at midnight on Saturday, and shortly after six the next morning his wife found he was very ill, and raised an alarm.  Deceased's son ran for Mr Square, surgeon, who did not return with him, and on coming home and finding his father still living, he went for Mr May, surgeon, and that gentleman came, but by that time the deceased had expired.  He has suffered from gout recently, but would not have a doctor.  The Jury (of whom Mr William Stanbury was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Coroner then adjourned to Lewis's Barley Sheaf Inn, King-street East, where the other two Inquests were held.  The deceased person in the first case was JANE DAWE, 55 years of age, wife of RICHARD DAWE, carrier, who lives at 25 Morley-lane.  The husband deposed that on Sunday night, soon after nine o'clock, he was sitting by the fire with his son, and deceased who had been sitting with them all the evening, went upstairs.  She had continually been referring to the sudden death of a carter named Searle, a neighbour, (the Inquest in this case is reported below) and seemed low spirited in consequence.  She went up about 8.30 p.m. having previous read aloud two religious tracts which had been given him the day before.  After being upstairs about ten minutes she came down and went to the drawers, and then went up again.  Ten minutes after he heard a noise upstairs, of which at first he took no notice.  A louder noise, as of someone falling, caused him to open the door and he heard her groaning.  He called his son, and both ran upstairs.  A lamp was burning and he observed deceased lying on her back on the floor beside the bed. She was groaning faintly, and he said, "What's the matter, mother?"  She replied, "Oh, nothing," upon which he and his son lifted her into a sitting posture on the side of the bed.  Witness opened the bed clothes and laid her down, sending his son for "Aunt Betty."  Deceased said, "Don't send for anyone for me;  make haste and come to bed."  He again asked he what was the matter, and asked if he should fetch a doctor.  She said no;  no one need be fetched for her, and she wanted him to come to bed.  As the son returned without his aunt, witness went for two neighbours, and the son subsequently went for a surgeon.  Before he went one of the women whom he had got took over a candle to the bed and saw a strap round deceased's neck.  She said, "Oh, your wife is dead," upon which witness said, "You don't say so?"  The attendant said, "Oh, it is a suicide case;  she done it herself."  The strap found was a handkerchief, and when she went upstairs deceased had not got it round her neck, as far as he knew.  had been married to deceased thirty years;  about sixteen years ago she met with an accident, striking her head severely, and she had never been well since;  at times she was very bad.  About two years ago, too, by the falling of a wall of an old building on the site of the new Blind Asylum at North-hill, one of his sons was killed and this fact weighed very heavily on deceased's mind, especially when any sad occurrence took place.  She often said, "It would be a good job if I were out to the cemetery."  A letter had been received by deceased from a son in the Horse Artillery, and she feared that he had deserted.  This, he being a favourite son, weighed on her mind.  Did not know and had not heard that she had attempted to take her life before.  -  The Foreman:  did you live comfortably together?  -  Witness:  Yes, sir;  like other men and wives;  we had not quarrelled that day, and I had been home all day.  We had had a lot of trouble and bad luck."  -  The son, ALBERT gave confirmatory evidence.  Whilst his father was away fetching the neighbours deceased said to him "I'll give it to you."  She spoke plainly and not like a person choking.  -  Priscilla Hoskin deposed to being called at 9 p.m. to go to DAW'S house.  She heard no one groaning.  The candle was on the drawers at the foot of the bed and deceased was covered with the bedclothes from head to foot.  Witness pulled down the clothes and saw MRS DAW on her face and hands.  She turned the body round, and the head falling back she noticed the string round the neck and untied it.  She said to DAW, "What does this mean?"  He replied, "I don't know;  what is it?"  Witness said, "She is strangled I believe," upon which he seemed frightened and said he had not left her ten minutes and that before he went she spoke to him.  The knot of the handkerchief rested on the windpipe, where the mark on the neck was the deepest.  The knot could easily have been tied by deceased;  from the tightness of the handkerchief she did not think it possible that when deceased had it round her neck as she found it should cold have spoken.  Mr Meers, surgeon, was sent for, and on coming he said she should have let the handkerchief remain.  She took it off because she thought it right.  -  The Coroner:  And I, and I am sure the Jury, agree with you. If ever such a sad thing comes under your knowledge again, don't hesitate - take the thing apparently causing the death off."  -  Witness, continuing, said she had heard deceased say, on hearing of a person's death, "Well, it will be my turn next."  -  The Coroner , in summing up, pointed to the singular way in which deceased had put an end to herself.  It was difficult to understand how deceased could have had the handkerchief round the neck from the time of the fall to the arrival of Hoskin and have spoken several times as the husband said.  -  The Jury found that deceased Strangled herself whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - The next Inquiry was into the cause of death of EDWARD SEARLE, 55 years of age, who resided in Morley-lane.  deceased, a steady man, who has been in the employ of the British and Irish Sugar Refinery Company as a driver for many years, went out for a walk on Sunday morning, and came home to dinner between twelve and one o'clock.  He drew a chair to the table, and sat down on it when his head was observed to fall and in a minute or two he was dead.  Deceased had enjoyed good health previously.  The Jury found that death resulted from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 December 1876
TORQUAY -  An Inquest was held at Torquay last night respecting the death of MARY ANNA WOTTON, aged 58 years, the wife of a builder. She died at the Infirmary on Thursday evening from the effects of a fall over the stairs on Wednesday night.  A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner remarked that drink was doubtless the cause of the accident, as was too frequently the case.