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Help and advice for Littleham (Near Bideford) 1868

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LITTLEHAM (Near Bideford)

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)]

"LITTLEHAM, a parish in the hundred of Shebbear, county Devon, 2 miles S. of Bideford, its post town and railway station, and 5 N.W. of Torrington. It is situated on the road from Bideford to Buckland-Brewer, and adjoins the parish of Monkleigh. It is watered by the two small rivers Torridge and Yeo. This place, anciently a royal manor, formed part of the dower of Queen Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror, and afterwards passed to the Stapleton, Buteler (earls of Ormond), St. Leger, Leigh, and Basset families, from which last it was purchased by the father of the present proprietor. Hops are grown of a superior quality, and for the most part used on the spot in the brewing of a particular kind of beer, the water used in its production possessing medicinal properties. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £190. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Exeter, value £208. The church, dedicated to St. Swithin, is an ancient stone structure containing a richly carved screen, antique font, and several monuments. The windows are of stained glass. There is a parochial school for both sexes. Miss Anthony is lady of the manor, and resides at Littleham Park."

Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003