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Portrait of a Parish: Parkham 1841/1842

By Arthur Dark

Revised 23 Sep 2017

Appendix 1. Baptisms,Marriages and Burials in Parkham 1841 & 1842       Appendix 2. Holdings of Over 100 Acres
Appendix 3. Holdings of Between 10 and 100 Acres   Appendix 4. Holdings of between 1 and 10 acres
Appendix 5. Parkham Census 1841   Appendix 6. Tithe Apportionment for Parkham of 1842

Introduction

For many years the author has been engaged in the investigation of his paternal, main line family history in the parish of Parkham in North Devon, where Darks first appear in the parish registers in the reign of Henry VIII. There his main-line ancestors remained until 1851, before departing first to neighbouring Woolsery and then to Bideford. In the course of this study he realised how lucky he was to have access to both a Tithe Map and Apportionment for Parkham of 1842 and a Census Return for 1841. Combining both sources of information gave him a vivid and extremely accurate picture of his ancestral village in the mid nineteenth century which could not have been obtained in any other way. The bulk of this publication is therefore made up with transcriptions of the Census and Apportionment so that others can judge.

This is preceded by a commentary (Part 1, Portrait of a Parish) on some of the things that were learnt which may be of interest to the modern inhabitants; who may wish to compare the Parkham they know with that of 176 years ago. It relates only to the 2 years 1841 and 1842. Queen Victoria had only been Queen for 4 or 5 years and in her sixty-four year reign England and the English countryside changed enormously and continuously. It is emphatically not a history but simply a momentary snapshot in time of a Parkham long gone. The Census for 1841 has been transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard who has generously given permission for it to appear as Appendix 5. She has also provided the transcription of the Parkham Church registers for 1841/2 in Appendix 1. The Tithe Apportionment transcription which appears as Appendix 6 is my own work.

Note on the Sources

The task of examining the Tithe Maps and Apportionments has now been made immeasurably easier by the appearance online of a superb index to all the Devon Apportionments, which enables one to examine the names of owners, occupiers, holdings and the acreages of those holdings on a parish by parish basis. Only the land utilisation element (arable, pasture, plantation, furze, waste etc.) and the field names and numbers by which individual fields, houses etc. can be identified on the map are missing from the index. But as Mike Sampson, the project co-ordinator, points out their inclusion would have simply made the task unmanageable. As it stands the index makes study of the 1842 Tithe map and Apportionment infinitely easier. Although, as ever, it is necessary to add that any conclusions need to be checked against the original sources. There are occasional, minor and inevitable errors of transcription. The index may be accessed online via the Devon Record Office at www.swheritage.org.uk/devon-archives or by going direct to the homepage of the Friends of Devon's Archives website at www.foda.org.uk and looking under Document Transcripts and Indexes.

When listing the holdings occupied by an individual it is important to check the entire parish list. Some individuals occupied holdings belonging to 2 or more owners. Since occupiers are grouped together in alphabetical order according to ownership the name of the occupier will appear in different parts of the parish index.

Additionally, an alphabetical index (use surnames only) gathers together the names of all the owners found in the Devonshire Apportionments, lists every holding owned by each individual owner, in whatever parish it may lie and gives the acreage of each holding. Thus every single holding belonging to Lord Rolle of Stevenstone near Great Torrington, who was then the biggest single landowner in Devon, can be seen at a glance (just enter Rolle in the name index).

Devon Record Office also holds out the prospect that digital copies of the Tithe Maps themselves (510 of them) may also become available online. As one, who, many years ago wrestled with the Parkham Apportionment and the huge and unwieldy Tithe map at Kew such a prospect would have appeared Utopian at the time and amazing now. In the meantime a copy on CD ROM of each of the tithe maps is available for purchase from Devon Record Office (Exeter) at a cost of £19 plus £1 postage and packing within the U.K. If to this is added a project to transcribe every individual tithe apportionment (472 of them) in its entirety and place transcriptions and digital copies of the originals online, total accessibility of tithe maps and apportionments is within sight of completion.. .

As far as the 1841 census returns for Parkham are concerned a free and complete transcription is available online as well as an appendix to this work. Compiled by Elizabeth Glover Howard, it originally appeared in the Devon section of www.genuki.org.uk . Look for the alphabetical list of Devon towns and parishes and see under Parkham. The most useful map, other than the tithe map, is the first edition O.S. 1” to the mile map of 1809 (sheet 26, Bideford) which is available in facsimile from a number of publishers.

The period 1841/1842 is a particularly significant one because it lies either in the middle or towards the end of the long period of agricultural depression and rural unrest that followed the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815. The “Hungry Forties” were long remembered but during the second half of the century mechanisation gradually transformed the nature of agricultural work, greatly increased productivity and led to a steady improvement in living standards. Increasing agricultural prosperity was checked by an agricultural depression between about 1875 and 1896. This was largely a result of the opening up of the Canadian prairies and Russian steppes to wheat production and the consequent slump in the world price of wheat. Meat also became cheaper as countries like Argentina and New Zealand started to export meat products to Europe in refrigerated ships. After 1896 the situation stabilised and for the farmer the period before the First World War became, in retrospect, another golden age. So 1841/2 represents a point where agricultural practice was still much like it had been in the eighteenth century, rural poverty was intense and mechanisation was only just getting into its stride.

The Tithe Commutation Act of 1836

The tithe was the share of agricultural produce used to maintain the parish priest. There was also land belonging to the church called the glebe which the priest could either farm directly or rent out. Tithe and glebe together represented the priest's living. Originally the tithe was paid in kind, by each farmer, on the basis of one tenth of everything produced; one tenth of the corn, one tenth of the hay, every tenth egg etc., etc. This involved a great deal of trouble in collecting, receiving, storing and disposing of agricultural produce of various kinds. It can never have been accomplished without grumbles from either side which would occasionally have developed into full-blown disputes necessitating appeals to the Archdeacon and his court. In the course of time and in some parishes, of which Parkham was one, the tithe had been commuted, i.e. a money payment had been substituted, but not uniformly and with lots of anomalies that varied from parish to parish. A parish priest who was entitled to the tithe was known as the Rector, as at Parkham.

In many parishes the tithe had been impropriated, i.e. given to a layman who therefore became known as the Lay Rector or Impropriator of the tithe and who had the right to present or nominate the parish priest to the living; a right known as the advowson. In return for these privileges the Lay Rector had to ensure that the parish was provided with a substitute (vicarius) priest in place of the Rector. This was sometimes done by the Lay Rector retaining the greater part of the tithes (Great Tithes) and the remainder (Lesser or Vicarial tithes) being paid to a parish priest who had the title of Vicar. The lay Impropriator had the right to sell both the advowson and the right to collect the tithes to other people. In neighbouring Woolsery (West Woolfardisworthy) parish the tithe and advowson had been given to the monks of Hartland Abbey. At the Reformation Hartland Abbey was dissolved and the tithe and advowson were acquired by the Coles of Woolsery. So in Woolsery the parish priest was a mere Perpetual Curate, simply dependent upon a small stipend and without even the clergy house that a Vicar normally enjoyed. Incidentally, a Perpetual Curate should not be confused with a stipendiary curate (assistant priest) who was paid by the Vicar or Rector. Collectively, Rectors, Vicars and Perpetual Curates are known as incumbents.

The purpose of the Tithe Commutation Act was to ensure that all the tithes were replaced by a completely uniform monetary rent charge based upon the national price of corn (wheat, barley, oats) which was calculated every seven years. The new system was unquestionably fairer to both sides, protecting both from the effects of inflation and deflation, since the rent charge would be adjusted as agricultural prosperity went up or down. In order to do this it was necessary to survey every affected parish and produce a very large scale map (1 inch to 3 chains or 66 yards in the case of Parkham) in which every individual piece of land was numbered and its name, extent, ownership, occupant, land use and appropriate rent charge recorded in an apportionment which accompanied the map. This huge task was accomplished with great efficiency and was completed by 1851.

In parishes where Parliamentary Enclosure had taken place earlier in the century a tithe award was unnecessary because when the commons were enclosed and the land in the 3 great open fields redistributed, the tithes had been commuted at the same time. Over great swathes of eastern and lowland England there therefore exist collections of Enclosure maps which date from an earlier period than the Tithe maps. Because the 3 field system of cultivation either never existed or died out much earlier in Devon there was no requirement for Parliamentary Enclosure and Tithe maps replace Enclosure maps as sources of information about the countryside.

It is very important to understand the difference between an Enclosure and a Tithe map. An Enclosure map shows the landscape as it is intended to look like after the open fields and commons have been redistributed and field boundaries completely recast. It depicts a plan for a totally revolutionary new landscape. Tithe maps on the other hand, depict the landscape exactly as it was when the map was drawn up. They are extremely accurate snapshots of a landscape at a moment in time. When, as in Parkham, the decennial census of 1841 was followed one year later by the publication of the Tithe map, the ability to reconstruct the parish at the very beginning of the eighteen-forties is extraordinary.

One copy of the map went to the Tithe Commissioners, one to the diocese and the third into the parish chest. It would have been a source of wonderment and of intense inspection by the parish. Never before had anybody seen a map on such a scale showing every building, every road, hedgerow, fence and boundary wall in the parish; and every single patch of land, however small, numbered. Numbers which are still the basis of those used today, in spite of all the consolidation of landholdings that has taken place since then. From now on, the boundary disputes so common in rural societies would be enormously reduced. One simply looked at the map.

Physical Setting

The land mostly comprises a plateau between 500' and 700' high of highly contorted mixed sandstones, shales (known locally as shillet) and slates with occasional bands of limestone and chert; described collectively as the culm measures. Although of carboniferous age they are destitute of coal except for a few, impersistent bands running inland along a line drawn from Greencliff through Bideford for a distance of 14 miles to Chittlehampton. These culm rocks can give rise to a relatively thin, acid, heavy and clayey soil which can produce extensive tracts of ill-drained bog and poor heathland, growing little more than gorse and bracken. Elsewhere the soil is usually classified as grade three or four agricultural land. Except in the deeply incised tributary valleys of the Torridge (which almost completely encircles the area) there are few trees to be seen. Those that are tend to be hedgerow specimens only, sharply asymmetrical in shape as a result of constant pruning by the Atlantic wind. On a cold, grey, winter's day it can become a very cheerless and desolate landscape. Its similarity to north Cornwall has often been remarked upon and, indeed, the western boundary of Hartland parish marks the county boundary with Cornwall.

The coastal scenery of Bideford Bay is, however, magnificent and attracted the attention of the painter, Turner, in the nineteenth century. Dove-grey or, occasionally, pink beaches of sea-rounded shingle or larger pebbles fringe the length of the bay, backed by a rampart of cliffs in many different shades of red, grey, brown and black. A vegetated slope curves in a bevel from the level surface to the vertical cliff face below. The curve may be convex or concave but shows plentiful evidence of slumping and sliding (mass movement) and its vegetation adds a bright green in summer.

Parkham in 1841 was a large coastal parish of 5330 acres of which no less than 1426 acres were described in1842 as commons or moorland. (1) Much of this developed on the slates and shales where a natural culm grassland was characteristic, dominated by purple moor grass and rush; permanently wet and only suitable for rough grazing. In 1842 it was still plentiful. On the drier areas furze and gorse developed . All this land was a very significant source of free fuel (furze on the drier areas) and rough grazing to those smallholders who had access to it. Representing close on 27% of the total land surface, it comprised 2 belts of irregular but continuous moorland. One ran from a point just west of the hamlet of Ash (Ash Moor), south-east through Melbury Moor (where Melbury Hill rises to the highest point in the parish at 709 feet) and on into East Putford parish as Putford Moor. The other lay west to east, extending through Melbury Bank (see 1st edition of the O.S. one inch map of 1809) as far as Bableigh Moor in the parish of Buckland Brewer. Today most of this land has been afforested, put under cultivation or flooded to create Melbury reservoir. Already, by 1842, the 168 acres of Ash Moor has been divided in to 26 numbered plots in the apportionment, even though the plots are still described as commons and there are no owners, occupiers or rent charges listed. This was because a lengthy legal process of Inclosure was then under way. (2) White's Directory of Devonshire confirms that Ash Moor had been enclosed by 1850.

Common Land

 

Common land, Parkham, Buckland Brewer & E. Putford (First Edition 1”O.S. Map of 1809)

Of the area under cultivation 3,070 acres was under arable, 296 acres was meadow and pasture, 246 acres under woodland, 18 acres under orchards plus 13 acres of gardens. Land not under cultivation included, besides the commons, 257 acres described as cliffland and 4 acres of waste adjoining roads. In a few instances cottages may have been built on these roadside patches of waste (e.g. plot 1061 in map on p.23). Such cottages do not appear to have resulted from squatting as is illustrated by a 3 life lease dated 4th October 1813 (Devon R.O. 48/22/19) between Lord Rolle and Thomas Jowliffe (sic), a labourer of Parkham. Under the terms of his lease he was granted a waste plot of 30 perches (probably 1045a on the Tithe map) adjoining the Bideford-Hartland road, beside the fields known as the Down and Three Corners Park belonging to Lower Waytown tenement. The entry fine was 5 shillings and the rent half a crown. There was also a heriot of 5 shillings. Perhaps more significant was a consideration of £20 for building and improving the premises. Modern road-widening has ensured the disappearance of these roadside cottages.

The term cliffland, as applied to a particular kind of land not under cultivation, has an especial significance in Parkham. The shoreline of Bideford Bay is marked by an extensive wave cut platform, plainly visible at low tide, which has resulted from the recession of the cliff face through coastal erosion. An area of disturbed land occupies the bevel (see above) behind the cliff edge where the land is beginning to slump and slide towards the sea. On old 6” O.S. maps this belt is indicated by elaborate hachuring. The rate of recession is rapid and cultivation of land near the cliff edge might well be followed by the disappearance of that land into the sea. One unnamed holding of 136 acres (no.1403) was leased by James Dunn from the Rev. J. T .Pine Coffin and was occupied by 'various' unnamed occupiers. It is described as 'cliffs etc.' in the land use column of the Apportionment and may represent a speculative venture by James Dunn in which land at risk from the sea was being rented out in plots to a few hardy souls willing to take on the challenge. The amount of cliffland was restricted by the shape of the parish. The parish looked rather like an inverted blacksmith's anvil with the base lying on the north facing shore of Bideford Bay. This stretch of coast was only about 2 miles long and contrasted with the very nearly 6 miles represented by the fullest east-west extent of the top of the anvil.

The population in 1841 was 995 (513 males and 482 females) having risen from 584 in 1801 (first decennial census). (3) The settlement pattern was a dispersed one of a few scattered hamlets with isolated farmsteads and cottages lying between them. Farmsteads would have been instantly recognisable by a substantial farmhouse with various ancillary buildings comprising barns and housing for animals. Four of the farmsteads in the parish are described in the Apportionment as Bartons: Parkham Town Barton, Halsbury Barton, Goldworthy Barton and Cabbacott Barton. In Hoskins's opinion the term barton 'signifies a farm much larger than average' and 'nine times out of ten, one with a long and interesting history.' (4) All four were farmsteads belonging to four of the 16 largest farms in the parish (see Appendix 1). Contrasting with the dispersed settlement pattern of Parkham is the the large nucleated village containing most of the population, but this is much more characteristic of lowland England further east.

The hamlet of Parkham, after which the parish is named, was grouped around the parish church (St. James) and contained the Rectory and 2 of the 3 taverns, the Bell and New Inn (the latter demolished in 1888). In the census it is described as Parkham Town village and had a population of approximately 94. The third tavern, Hoops Inn, was situated on the turnpike road to Bideford.

Parkham Town village lay on a spur between the deeply incised River Yeo, a tributary of the Torridge, and the Blindlake, in its turn a tributary of the Yeo. The oldest form of the name is Percheham (DB, 1086) and contains 2 elements: pearroc (land enclosed within a fence) and ham (meaning a settlement) or hamm (meaning an intake of land in moorland). If hamm the name is tautologous since both elements imply enclosure. (5) The most important other hamlets were Ash (approximately 37 inhabitants), Broad Parkham (79), Horns Cross (29), Peppercombe (56), East Goldworthy (37) and Buckish Mill (95). None of the houses and cottages within the hamlets had house numbers and farmsteads are simply identified by the name of the farm. The surfaces between the valleys average around about 600 feet above sea level and are observably plateau-like in character.

Buckish Mill was a recent settlement. Early nineteenth century Buckish Mill comprised a mostly single line of no more than 30 cottages on the eastern side of the stream that powered Buckish mill (now known as Mill Cottage) and which gave it its name. The other element in the name, Buckish, was the name of a small manorial estate belonging to the Coles of Woolsery. (6) The mill was the oldest building (no later than 1780) and had become part of the Cole estate by 1808, whilst the rest appeared mainly between about 1812 and 1835. (7) The stream marked two boundaries. The first was that between Parkham parish to the east and Woolsery to the west, so that most of the hamlet was in Parkham parish and only the mill and a few cottages were in Woolsery. The small population living on the Woolsery side of the stream would have brought the total population of Buckish Mill to above 100 in 1841. Nearly all the cottages on the Parkham side belonged to the Pine-Coffins of Portledge in Alwington parish who owned much of the land between Bucks and Portledge.

The second boundary was that between the Hundred of Hartland to the west and Shebbear to the east. Hundreds no longer exist as an administrative unit, but their Anglo-Saxon origin indicates that the settlement at Buckish Mill must have originated much later; since the boundary of parish and Hundred would scarcely have been drawn down the middle of an existing settlement. In the very

Parkham 1841

Parkham Parish showing the seven largest hamlets.

In the very early nineteenth century Buckish Mill was a completely different place from the seasonal holiday village it is today. A continuous traffic of pack-horses and donkeys would have carried corn down to the mill and brought up sea-sand for improving the soil, beach pebbles for road repairing or as mowstead stones (for keeping hayricks off the ground), herring and mackerel in season, and lime from 2 kilns on the beach. Lime was used to make lime-mortar and for counteracting soil acidity. Using lime as dressing for the land seems to have begun about 1630, when the practice was described as 'a new invention'. The terraces on the steep slopes behind the cottages were used to rear goats, chickens and the occasional pig. In 1865 recognition that Buckish had become the biggest of the local hamlets led to a new ecclesiastical parish being created from both Parkham and Woolsery and a new church (St. Anne's) built to serve it.

Social and Occupational Structure

Farm-workers represented by far the biggest occupational group in Parkham in 1841 but the census distinguishes between agricultural labourers (82 of them and all male) and a group simply described as servants of whom there were 75 males (M.S. In the census) and 51 females (F.S. in the census). The vast majority of the male servants were living on Parkham farms and were undoubtedly living-in farm labourers. The term agricultural labourer is never used to describe them. Most of the female servants were also living on the farms or the very small number of gentry houses and some would also have worked on the land as well as in the farmhouse doing domestic chores. The group described as agricultural labourers, on the other hand, would have been day labourers available for hire. In general, the living-in farm servant was better-off than the day labourer since his food, drink and clothing was all provided by his master.

There were also 14 apprentices living and working on the farms (male and female). These were 'apprentices to husbandry,' poor children, some as young as 7 years of age, who had been bound as apprentices for 7 years to local farmers in return for a premium (financial incentive) paid by the Parish and after 1834 by the Poor Law Guardians. The latest apprenticeship for a child of 7 in Parkham occurs in 1813, but as late as 1842 children as young as 9 were still being apprenticed to husbandry. How well or badly they fared depended ultimately upon the character of their master, although, as always in Parkham, gossip flew fast and a relation might well be nearby keeping an eye on things. In theory, if an apprentice was aggrieved, he or she might appeal to the local magistrates. Nonetheless there is plenty of evidence in the Apprentice registers of Parkham that apprentices absconded, could lose their places (and therefore their support) and in other ways find themselves in trouble. The examples below all relate to Parkham:

Devon Record Office 1692 A-2/PO510 1802-1848

229. Charlotte Bartlett, aged 21, dau. of William and Mary, discharged from James Downings's service for having had an illegitimate child. 6.7.1842. [ Apprenticed for West Gulworthy 2.3.1831.]

230. Elizabeth Glover, aged 16, dau. of Samuel and Elizabeth, discharged from Thomas Ching's sevice for robbing him and attempting to destroy herself and absconding from his service. 18.1.1843.[ Apprenticed at 9 for Britton's Gulworthy.]

231. Sarah Nichols, aged 19, dau. of Thomas and Margaret, discharged from apprenticeship with John Grigg for being with child. 1.7.1846.[ Apprenticed 16.8.1836 for Gulworthy Mills.]

232. John Lee, age 15, son of Mary, discharged from from apprenticeship with Thomas Heddon having run away in Feb. 1848. 5.4.1848. [Apprenticed at 9 for Blindlake.]

233. John Bryant, aged 20, son of John, discharged from apprenticeship with Willam Pickard for running away in March 1846 and not returning thereto. 13.12.1848. [Apprenticed at 9 for Weekes Ash, mother deceased.]

224. William Bryant, aged 9, son of John and mother deceased, apprenticed to Joseph Clement for West Stone.4.8.1841. [Brother of John Bryant, see 233.]

The parish could act with commendable promptitude (See Apprentice Register entries 185,186 &191 – 195). When William Clement left the parish suddenly in 1832 he left behind 3 apprentices, Mary Ann Clements, aged 14 (clearly a relative),Thomas Shortridge aged 12 and Anne Deane aged 15 'wholly unprovided for and unemployed'. On the same day as their discharge from William Clement's apprenticeship was confirmed Mary Ann Clements and Anne Dean were re-apprenticed to Joseph Clement (another relative).Thomas Shortridge was re-apprenticed to Samuel Lemon for West Stone. Unfortunately for Thomas Shortridge, his employer, Thomas Lemon, promptly emigrated in the same year and we do not know what Thomas Shortridge's fate was. The most likely destination for Thomas Lemon was Canada

All these agricultural labourers, farm servants and apprentices to husbandry were working for 49 farmers, which might seem to be a high number for a single parish. Nevertheless, as we shall see later, the number of people actually engaged in working land which they occupied, was considerably greater than the 49 described as farmers in the census. What the Tithe Apportionment shows, however, is that although there were a number of big farmers (i.e. with holdings of over 100 acres) many had very small holdings and would have been described locally as husbandmen rather than yeoman farmers. The terms farmer or yeoman, husbandman and labourer are the terms most commonly used in the contemporary parish registers of Parkham (see Appendix 1). Husbandman is clearly used to distinguish a subsistence farmer from a landless labourer. Yeomen are the larger farmers, employing labour and generating large or small agricultural surpluses. The terms Yeoman and Husbandman are not used in the census. The Enclosure movement of the early nineteenth century in counties like Dorset largely forced the peasant farmer off the land and made him into a hired labourer. In Devon, on the other hand, the absence of the great open fields where land-holdings were scattered in furlong strips and agricultural practice was fossilised and immemorial meant that Devon was never subject to the Parliamentary Enclosure process that transformed rural communities further east.

Two occupations depended directly upon farming, corn milling and woolcombing. There were three millers in Parkham at Goldsworthy, Boccombe and Old Mill, all utilising the waters of the Yeo. A fourth mill (also a water mill) operated at Buckish Mill, on the Woolsery side of the boundary stream between the two parishes. Two woolcombers, father and son, were listed in the census, confirming the mixed nature of the farming and the existence of flocks of sheep as well as herds of cattle. Tucking Mill Farm in the Yeo valley was probably originally a Fulling Mill where woollen cloth was beaten with fullers earth and water to cleanse and thicken it; implying that woollen manufacture may once have taken place.

There were 2 limeburners, Samuel Paddon at Peppercombe and John Harris at Buckish Mill. Neither man could have operated the kilns single-handed but there was always casual labour available. At Buckish Mill there were two kilns known as the East and West kilns respectively. The 2 mile stretch which was the Parkham coastline formed a solid rampart of cliff and only at Peppercombe at the eastern and Buckish Mill at the western end was it breached by two small streams running down narrow valleys (combes) to the sea. In both cases limekilns had been built on or near the beaches where the valleys reached the sea. On the beach, limestone and culm (low grade coal) carried by sailing vessels from South Wales would be unloaded. The larger vessels would often discharge their cargoes of limestone whilst still afloat, the limestone being recovered once the tide had receded. Smaller vessels were beached before discharging. Once beached, they would be either trigged or careened. Trigging involved keeping the vessel upright by means of timbers wedged against the sides. Careening meant tipping the vessel on its side halfway through the unloading by means of a rope attached to the topmast. The twelve hours that then elapsed before the next high tide gave time for unloading. Even so, the totally open nature of the beaches made it a hazardous operation and confined to the summer months and periods of good weather. The limestone and culm were then fed in alternating layers into the kilns to be burnt.

Lime burning was hard and dangerous work and the kilns produced large quantities of pollutants and noxious gases. There are numerous coroners' reports of workers tending the kilns by night or of tramps seeking the warmth of kilns as places to sleep, being overcome by fumes. In some cases even falling in to the kiln.

Lime directly out of the kiln was known as quicklime and was a hazardous material. Once water was added a fierce chemical reaction took place which produced sufficient amounts of heat to ignite combustible materials. This converted it into slaked lime which could be used to make lime mortar or spread on the fields to counteract soil acidity. If farmers bought quicklime their aim would be to keep it dry until they reached their fields when it would be thinly spread on the soil. Subsequent rain would produce the chemical reaction but this could take place harmlessly in the open air. There were instances, however, when a farmer caught in a Devonshire downpour found his cart or donkeys and panniers severely burnt.

Only three fishing families can be identified in the census. John Prance and William Baglole [sic] operated from Peppercombe and James Braund from Buckish Mill. There may have been others operating part-time but on the face of it fishing was less important in 1841 than it became later. The totally open beaches at Peppercombe and Buckish Mill from which the fishing boats would embark and disembark could present sea conditions which have been compared in difficulty to those of the west of Ireland. As with lime-burning there must have been long periods when fishing was impossible. The boats could only have been made secure by pulling them up the beach beyond the high tide mark and therefore must mostly have been rowing boats. The catch was hawked from door to door in the parish by itinerant fishmongers called jowders among whom was one of the author's great-great grandfathers. Only 1 sailor is listed, William Braund, aged 20, of Buckish Mill.

The day to day needs of the parish were met by a whole army of artisans and craftsmen which made the community largely self-sufficient. Building could be done by 8 masons (+ one apprentice), 9 carpenters (+ one apprentice), one glazier and one thatcher. Furniture could be made by the one local joiner and he or one of the carpenters probably built coffins. Three blacksmiths, each with an apprentice) could make and repair any of the ironwork on the farms and shoe the many horses and donkeys. Fresh meat was provided by the eight butchers. Barrels, washtubs, pails and churns could be made by the one cooper.

Clothes could be made by 1 shoemaker, 4 cordwainers (+one apprentice), a cordwainer being the old term for a shoemaker, two tailors, one dressmaker, one milliner, one bonnet maker and 4 glovemakers.

Glovemakers steadily increased in numbers in most of the North Devon villages throughout the nineteenth century. Glovers were women who worked in their own homes and were paid by the piece. Their earnings were a very important additional source of income. The trade was controlled from Torrington where a small handful of manufacturers cut out gloves in parts that were sewn together by the glovers in the surrounding villages and then returned to Torrington for finishing. Tanning leather was an important industry in Torrington and supplied one of the basic raw materials. Silk, taffeta and other fabrics could be imported from the Midlands but lace, particularly important in making women's gloves, was obtainable from nearby Barnstaple. At this stage gloving was nothing like as important as it later became. In the 1861 census for Parkham, for example, there were 21 glovers and 1 glove collector who distributed glove parts for sewing and returned the completed work to Torrington. The glove collector was a key figure who, because she often carried finished gloves and cash, could be very vulnerable to robbery. Totally dependent upon fashion, gloving faded away towards the end of the century when glove wearing became less fashionable for women.

Mary Passmore was the village schoolmistress and lived at Cuckingstool Cottages (Kelvinstool Cottages today?) but would not have ranked as a member of the professional classes. There is little evidence to show that she was anything other than a Dame School mistress, striving to teach the elements of reading,writing and arithmetic to a motley collection of infants gathered around the table of her own kitchen, for a few pence a week. The level of literacy in Parkham was then very low and many could not read or write. Incidentally the two skills were thought of as separate and somebody taught to read need not necessarily have been taught to write.

Matters are, however, confused by the existence of a small building (10 perches) in the south-western corner of the churchyard described in the tithe apportionment as School House and Court and numbered 344. Ownership was vested in the Parish of Parkham and it was then occupied by a Samuel Martin. We cannot therefore be sure where Mary Passmore did her teaching. There is no doubt that 344 was an old building known as the Church House which existed at least as far back as the first half of the eighteenth century; when the parish accounts record payments to William Dark and later his son William junior, for repairs to the Church House between 1728 and 1765. In the early nineteenth century the Church House was undoubtedly being used as a Parish Poorhouse. Eight baptisms between 1816 and 1835 record the Parish Poorhouse as the place of abode as well as 9 burials between 1813 and 1835. These entries are all found in the printed parish registers which replaced written registers in 1812 and include a column for place of abode.

An Abstract of Returns Made by the Overseers of the Poor in 1776-7 to Parliament shows that Parkham (along with Bideford, Hartland, Northam and Woolsery) did then have a Poorhouse with accommodation for up to 20 paupers.(8) It is extremely likely that the Church House was then the Poorhouse. After 1837/8 the new Union Workhouse in Bideford would have made Parkham's Poorhouse redundant and therefore available as a schoolroom.

An agreement between the Bideford Board of Guardians and the Minister, Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of Parkham on 4th July 1848 confirmed its current use as a 'schoolroom in connexion with the National School Society'and unequivocally identifies the building as the Church House or Poorhouse. (9) The agreement conveyed ownership of the site to the Minister, Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor to be used exclusively for 'a school for poor persons in the parish and for no other purpose whatsoever'.White's Directory of 1850 confirms that a new 'National School' was built in 1848/9 in Parkham and the 1851 census lists a James Martin as 'Schoolmaster and Boot and Shoe Maker Master employing two men and one boy.' When the new Rector was inducted on the 4th March 1846 the North Devon Journal (12th March) reported that Mr. Martin was toasted at a celebratory dinner that evening as the 'village's useful schoolmaster'. On the 12th August 1848, Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette reported that the first stone of the 'new school' had been laid on the 28th July by the 2 small daughters of the Rector. The new building was a very small and simple stone walled, slate-roofed schoolroom, plastered internally and with a wooden floor. A later annotation on the 1848 agreement confirms that a government grant-in-aid of £35, made in 1859, enabled the original schoolroom to be extended from a floor area of 18 feet by 15 feet to an area of 28 feet by 15 feet and 12 feet in height. (10) Financed by the 'National Society for the Education of the Poor according to the Principles of the Church of England' such 'National Schools' and a smaller number financed by the non-conformist 'British and Foreign School Society' became the most usual mode of popular education in English villages in the nineteenth century. In 1877 the National School in Parkham was purchased by the local School Board and became a Board School under the terms of Forster's Education Act of 1870.

The professional class in Parkham in 1842 was uniquely represented by the Rector, the Rev. Richard Walter, who was both the incumbent and patron of his own living.(11) He had graduated from Exeter College, Oxford in 1785 and remained Rector of Parkham for an astonishing 57 years between then and his death in 1842. Amongst the better-off inhabitants the Rector stood head and shoulders above the rest. He was then 77 years of age and a Sarah Wilcocks aged 74 (his widowed sister) was living with him. They were attended to by no less than 7 servants. As previously explained he was as Rector of Parkham (rather than a mere Vicar or Perpetual Curate) entitled to the entire tithe income of the parish, which the 1842 Tithe Apportionment valued at £730. It must also be remembered that the living included his house and 129 acres of glebe land which he was farming in 1840 and which made him one of the largest farmers in Parkham. (12) Additionally, he owned outright 42.2.30 acres in Parkham of a farm known as Hodiland or Hadiland. Walter was buried at Parkham on the 17th July 1842. His will (will & codicil proved P.C.C. 21st Aug. 1842), shows him to have owned other property in neighbouring Woolsery and in the parish of Milton Damerel and that he was able to make exceptionally generous provision for his two daughters and their families. He was succeeded as Rector in 1846 (died 1856) by the Rev. Francis Wolferstan Thomas who seems to have actively engaged in promoting the National School.

It is very difficult for us today to envisage the standing and prestige enjoyed by a man like Walter. Quite apart from his wealth, he was as a University graduate, by far the best educated individual in the parish. He was also the ex-officio chairman of the Vestry, the committee which was responsible for both church and secular affairs in the parish and was therefore a rating authority. Vestries were either closed or open. In the open Vestry members were elected by a gathering of all the parishioners. In the closed Vestry, of which Parkham was one, the committee was a self-perpetuating oligarchy in which the members of the committee itself elected others to fill any vacancies.

Until 1834 the Vestry had the responsibility of appointing two Overseers of the Poor who, together with the 2 churchwardens, were collectively responsible for collecting and dispensing the poor rate . The loss of responsibility for the relief of the parish poor significantly reduced the power of the Vestry and was the beginning of a slow process by which the Vestry lost its civil powers. Nevertheless, in 1841 the Vestry still had to appoint a parish constable and a Surveyor of the Highways. It was not until 1856 and the compulsory creation of County Constabularies that the parish constable became redundant. The Surveyor of Highways was eventually replaced in 1865 by Local Highway Boards responsible for highways in a group of parishes.

The Vestry was also responsible for electing the parish clerk. This was a very ancient office that originated in the Middle Ages when the holder was literally a clerk in holy orders, albeit very minor orders. He would be tonsured by the bishop to show his status, but he would not be required to be celibate. In church he would assist the priest at mass and during the performance of his priestly duties. At the Reformation the minor orders were abolished and only the orders of deacon, priest and bishop were retained by the Church of England, but the parish clerk continued to be appointed and to carry out essentially the same ecclesiastical duties, but in a secular capacity. In particular he led the sung responses of the Anglican prayer book, so it helped if he was musical as well as literate. He and the Rector were the only paid officers of the parish. He cannot be identified in the Parkham census.

In many parishes he was often called upon to be the clerk to the Vestry and keep the Vestry Minutes because of his literacy and knowledge of the Rector and church affairs. In this dual capacity he could become a very significant figure whose knowledge of the ins and outs of the parish would be second to none.

Documentary evidence about non-conformity in Parkham in 1841 is hard to come by. There was a tiny Wesleyan chapel at Holwell, which still exists, which had been built under the terms of a Trust Deed dated 22nd April 1823 (Charity Commission copy, 10398). Amongst the 10 trustees appears the name of Thomas Dark 'the younger' who, along with Thomas Lemon and Richard Bailey of Parkham and Bartholomew Fulford of Buckland Brewer are all described as yeomen. The remaining 6 trustees comprised a schoolmaster, a cooper, a currier, a carpenter, a druggist and a maltster. Yeomen and artisans represented precisely the kinds of lower middle-class occupations attracted to non-conformity.

Parkham certainly lay in Bible Christian territory (north-west Devon and north-east Cornwall), the short-lived movement founded in 1815 at Lake Farm in Shebbear by William Bryant and James Thorne. By the time of the religious census of 1851 there were no Bible Christian congregations listed in Parkham, compared to two Wesleyan chapels and two Bible Christian congregations in neighbouring Woolsery. A very high proportion of those who emigrated from North Devon to Canada in the early nineteenth century were Bible Christians. It is unclear, however, if their religious allegiance was a motivating element in their emigration or that the large numbers simply reflected their local strength at the time

Thirty-two individuals declared themselves to be of independent means. These included the better-off inhabitants but there appear to have been only three other families who might qualify as being of the same or similar social status to the Rector. These must have included the Huckses and Brutons. Matilda Hucks (nee Gifford), an elderly widow of independent means, resided at Foxdown House, with 4 servants (the existing house is of later, mid-Victorian vintage). Her husband, who had died in 1836, had been responsible in 1820 for a diversion of one of the two roads which connected Parkham Town village to the turnpike road between Bideford and Clovelly. In diverting it further away from Foxdown House, which was his purpose, he widened and improved it. But his assertion of private ownership through the erection of two gates at either end was to be remembered by the parish 36 years later (see below). A young woman called Mary Kelly, also of independent means, was living with Matilda Hucks and was one of only 7 people in the parish not born within the county. In Mary Kelly's case she had been born in Ireland, the daughter of Captain Kelly of New Abbey and was Matilda's niece.

Charles Bruton descended from Thomas Bruton (alias Bruerton) M.P. for Exeter in 1584 (see History of Parliament) and was the armigerous owner of South Yeo and Tucking Mill farms in Parkham. He lived at South Yeo with his family of 4. (13) These included his son Walter Meddon Bruton, then a law student at Peterhouse (Cambridge) who later became Rector of West Worlington. (14) At his baptism in 1819, at Parkham, Walter Bruton's father is described as an Esquire. The family employed 5 male and female servants. In 1846 Walter married his first wife, Mary Kelly of Foxdown House and later named his daughter after Matilda Hucks. Walter's mother, Frances Cory Bruton, was one of the two daughters of the Rector, Richard Walter. Brutons, Huckses and Walters were therefore inextricably entwined and Mary Kelly and Matilda Hucks witnessed the Rector's will in 1841.

The Caddys of Bowden were another armigerous gentry family and probably the one with the oldest connection to Parkham. According to Burke (Landed Gentry, 1937 edition, p.308) they descended from Thomas Caddy of Parkham who married Joan, widow of John Gyll of Parkham. About 1490 Thomas Caddy was plaintiff in the court of Requests as to John Gyll's lands. The widowed Elizabeth Caddy (formerly Arnold) was living at Bowden in 1841, with six children and six male and female servants. Bowden was a farm of 80 acres but Elizabeth Caddy described herself as of independent means. Her husband John (born 1779) and a Captain in the North Devon militia in 1805, died in 1839.These 3 families (Bruton, Hucks and Caddy) are the only discernible gentry families living in the parish, other than the Rector, at this time.

All in all Parkham ought to be regarded as a society where there was very little wealth and many people, agricultural labourers, farm servants and a proportion of husbandmen were living perpetually on the margin of pauperism, which from 1838/9 onwards mostly meant entry into the Union Workhouse in Bideford.

The Tithe Dispute of 1831

In 1831 the Rector had been engaged in a bitter dispute with 61 of his parishioners who had petitioned the House of Commons objecting to the size of their commuted tithe payments, which they calculated amounted on average to 4 shillings and sixpence in every pound of the annual rental value. In some cases the tithe charged was five shillings (25%) in the pound. The petition was accompanied by an annexed schedule which set out the annual rental value of each farm and the amount of composition paid by each farmer. Unfortunately, the petition did not survive the House of Commons fire of 1834 and the names of the signatories remain unknown.

The Parkham petition, along with 2 other Devon petitions complaining of unjust tithe exactions, was presented to the House of Commons on the 11th February 1831 (see Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 19th Feb.) by Lord Ebrington. This was Hugh, Viscount Ebrington, 2nd Lord Fortescue (1783-1861) a prominent Whig politician who served as one of the 2 Knights of the Shire for Devon in the House of Commons between 1830 and 1839. He was then summoned to the House of Lords and became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland between 1839 and 1841.(15) In the case of Parkham, Ebrington alleged that the tithes amounted to between one fourth and in some cases one third of the rental. He was quoted in the paper as saying: ' If the tithe question were not put right, the most grievous consequences might be apprehended - a great ferment had been excited, which must be allayed by commuting the tithes; if it were not settled, it might disturb the peace of the Empire.' In his biography in the History of Parliament (Offices Held section) Ebrington is quoted as saying on the same occasion that he spoke 'as a sincere friend to the church' and urged the clergy to bring about a speedy commutation, observing that in Devon there was 'such a degree of frenzy on the subject as to occasion me considerable alarm.'

On March 12th 1831 the Western Times published a strongly worded report on the matter, describing the petition as 'very sensible' and declaring that Walter was 'not only on bad terms with his parishioners on account of these exactions, but that his personal demeanour to his parishioners is that which we feel a difficulty in reconciling with his duties as a Minister of the gospel, or even that of a gentleman.' Parkham was described as a 'disordered parish' and the parishioners were advised to petition the new Bishop of Exeter (Bishop Philpotts). It was suggested that Walter was receiving advice from his son-in-law, the Rev. M. Melhuish, Rector of Ashwater, 'whose tithe pranks have lately excited so much of the public attention.'

Walter responded with a very long letter in Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette (March 26th 1831), amongst other things: threatening legal action against the unnamed source of the Western Times report, denying that he was on bad terms with his parishioners, claiming that the titheable acreage of the parish was grossly underestimated by the surveyors employed by the parishioners and that a number of anomalies were the result of sub-leasing in which the principal leaseholder was responsible for calculating the tithe payments of his sub-tenants.

Walter's letter was followed by a very robust reply in the Western Times (April 2nd 1831) asserting that whilst still dressed in his clerical vestments Walter had, after church, abused one of the 61 petitioners as a 'highway robber' and 'midnight assassin.' The professional competence of the 2 surveyors who had calculated the titheable acreage was stoutly defended and any discrepancy was attributed to the inclusion of 'waste or moor' by Walter. In which case his (Walter's) argument 'goes for nothing', since this was not titheable. The report also drew attention, for the second time, to similar behaviour on the part of his 'son-in-law and adviser' in Ashwater. Once again the parishioners were urged to place the matter before Bishop Philpotts 'who has shown a disposition for Church Reform.' Philpotts was indeed a liberal, and amongst other causes, conducted a prolonged war against clerical pluralism which was then rife in his diocese. Clearly, the tithe settlement of 1842 was badly needed in Parkham.

Getting 61 farmers to sign the petition, obtaining legal advice, employing independent surveyors to assess the titheable acreage and organising the presentation in the House of Commons of a petition backed by facts and figures, as well as meeting the inevitable expenses, would have been a formidable undertaking. There is a striking correspondence between the figure of 61 and the Land Tax Return figures for Parkham of 1830. Excluding the Rector, 59 occupiers are listed in the return, so that support for the petition must have been almost total. The whole incident must be regarded as a remarkable indication of a perhaps surprising degree of social solidarity and suggests the presence of local leadership. It reminds us that there is an enormous amount about the activities of rural societies such as Parkham that we simply do not know. Parish magazines, abundant newspaper reports, letters and diaries do not exist for this early part of the nineteenth century. Known incidents such as this suggest that life in Parkham was altogether more dynamic than appears on the surface.

Isolation and Self-sufficiency

What is perhaps most notable about the census are the occupations that are absent. Crucially, in this community of nearly a thousand, when anaesthetics had not yet been invented, there is no doctor, no druggist, no dentist or any other member of the medical professions; let alone a vet. In the event of a medical emergency the only alternative to self-medication was probably a 6 and a half mile journey (with no ambulances or cars) into Bideford without the opportunity to alert a doctor by telephone or telegram. Childbirth and death would all have been dealt with by mature and experienced women from within the community. Sudden, critical illness or a serious accident would produce instant crisis. Parkham in 1841 was dangerously isolated.

In this environment faith healers and quacks would have abounded. There would always have been someone with a way with warts who could be persuaded to rub the wart with the smooth side of a freshly cut potato, murmur an incantation, and bury the potato underneath a certain tree. Infallible recipes for skin conditions and colds would circulate and constipation, that sovereign indicator that all was not well, would have been ruthlessly treated with castor oil, syrup of figs or other purgatives. Even at the end of the century Jacob describes the low levels of expectation about medical treatment and the primitive dentistry practised by local farmers; a pair of forceps taken from a rusty tea-caddy on the mantelpiece and the patient on the doormat, his head between the farmer's knees. (16)

The average age of the 16 individuals who were buried at Parkham in 1841 was 46.3 (oldest 93, youngest 1). In 1842 the average age of the 14 who were buried had dropped to 34.7 (oldest 78, youngest 1). The burials in 1842 included 'a stranger found drowned', whose age was estimated at 22. Such burials were commonplace in the coastal parishes of North Devon at this time and the bodies do not ever appear to have been identified. The operative word, of course, is 'stranger'. Members of the parish who drowned and whose bodies were recovered are always identified.

George Jacob, writing about Parkham funerals at the end of the century describes them as being very different from what they are today (17):

'There were no hearses in the country then, and from whatever part of the parish a person died they had to be carried by hand, but generally there were plenty of men who would turn up ready to carry. If the distance was one or two miles a big number was always wanted, and Joe Heal marched in front with his watch in his hand and gave orders for six to fall out every two minutes.

It was certainly more impressive to see fifty or sixty men walking in front of the coffin than it is today with everyone meeting at the church. If you were one of the six bearers picked as being friends of the deceased, you were expected to be at the house in time for dinner, and before you started on the funeral procession you would be expected to have a drink. After the funeral you would go back and have another meal and spend the evening with plenty to eat and drink. Looking back at the early part of the century a great amount of money seems to have been spent on clothes. All the relations would be dressed in black, and the women all wearing crepe for several weeks. With the skirts down to the ground and the muddy roads the crepe took a lot of cleaning after a walk. I have heard it said that a decent funeral seems to have been a lot better provided for than most of the weddings today.'

There is no post office or postboxes. The penny post had been introduced by Rowland Hill in 1840 but postboxes did not appear until the 1850's. Letters for posting would either have had to be taken to Bideford, or await the arrival of a uniformed letter carrier engaged on deliveries, who rang a bell or blew a horn to announce his presence. Parcel deliveries relied upon private carriers. The postal service developed very slowly in North Devon. R. Pearse Chope's investigations in 1901 showed, for example, that 2 letter carriers (William Colwill and Thomas Williams) were not appointed to serve Hartland and Clovelly until 1844 when a sub-post office was opened in Hartland by Richard Heard, a draper. (18) Before that time he writes: 'letters were only brought from Bideford by the ordinary carriers and were stuck up in their windows until called for. The charge for bringing them from Bideford was 2d., each.' An examination of the P.O. Appointment Book Indexes between 1841 and 1845 did not reveal a single postal appointment for the swathe of parishes between Torrington, Bideford and Clovelly/Hartland. The Post Office at Horns Cross in Parkham was not opened until 1853 when Humphrey Chalk, a blacksmith, was appointed sub-postmaster (4th May). William White's Directory of 1878/9 confirms Horns Cross as the site of the post office and also that by then a wall postbox existed 'near to the church', which was cleared once a day. A second post office, run by Frederick Martin, was operating in Parkham itself by 1893 (Kelly's Directory) and a third at Bucks Cross by 1902 (Kelly's Directory), where William Jenn was sub-postmaster.

Everyone baked their own bread and there are no retailers or general store. Most retailing would be done by itinerant pedlars or packmen, like the fish jowders, who would knock at the door; probably at regular and well known intervals. A notable absentee from the list of artisans is a wheelwright. This may reflect the fact that until the 'wheeled revolution' of the 1840's much of the work of transportation in rural Devon was still done by pack horses and panniers borne by donkeys; such was the still frightful state of the roads. It would have fallen to the local carpenters to maintain the butts and wagons. There was no resident policeman; indeed no police force. Law and order was maintained by the part-time parish constable who was chosen by the Vestry from amongst the strongest and most dependable members of the community. Normally he would indicate his presence by hanging his elaborate constable's stave outside his front door. The sole representative of national government in the parish was the coastguard who lived at Horns Cross. Although, as we shall see, the local landed gentry owned by far the greatest part of the land in Parkham, none of them lived within the parish.

The quickest way into Bideford for most people in the village was probably along the direct coast road from Bude to Bideford, which, because it was a turnpike was better maintained than any other local road. There was a tollgate known as the Waytown Gate at Lower Waytown, manned by Elizabeth Croscomb. The alternative route to Bideford was via the Yeo valley to its confluence with the Torridge and thence alongside the river to Bideford.

Bideford was the only market town within realistic walking reach of Parkham and in 1841 had a population of 5,211. (19) It had 2 market days a week, Tuesdays and Saturdays, of which Tuesday was the most important. Three Fairs were held each year with the one held on February 14th being the most highly regarded. Bideford had a post office, banks, solicitors, auctioneers and valuers, seedsmen, saddle and harness makers, insurance agents, physicians and surgeons, and a wide range of shops and taverns. Its bustling quayside was one where coastal shipping, fishing boats and the occasional arrival of ships bringing timber from North America or taking emigrants to North America could be observed. There were busy potteries which supplied the district with coarse domestic ware (sgraffito) and several basket makers. Small as it was it must have been a magnet to people in the surrounding countryside.

Most people from Parkham must have walked the 6 and a half miles to and from Bideford. Jacob (see below) writing about the period at the very beginning of the twentieth century emphasises the lack of tarmacadamed roads, even in Bideford, and the absence of public transport. The carrier from Bradworthy (about 6 miles south-east of Parkham) drove his 3-horse brake through Parkham village on his way to Bideford on market days. His was the only mode of transport available to those without pony and trap, horse and gingle. The journey from Bradworthy to Bideford took an astonishing 3 hours.

The roads were a major problem in Parkham. As we have seen, responsibility for maintaining roads in the parish rested with the Vestry but the Surveyor of the Highways was simply one of the parishioners and financial resources were always inadequate. When necessary the Surveyor would call upon the other parishioners for help to repair roads with pick and shovel and a wagon load of stone from one of the many local quarries, but that was all.

The roads and lanes of the parish would have lain feet deep in mud in winter and in summer became dust bowls. Much, by necessity, was still being carried on the backs of donkeys and pack horses and the occasional sledge or truckamuck might have been encountered. The truckamuck comprised a pair of long poles, with a horse between, trailing on the ground with a couple of cross spars behind the horse to keep the poles at an equal distance apart. Sacks could be tied to it and in many circumstances it was better than nothing. The increasing use of carriages and carts simply measured the improvement in the roads.

Only two roads led north out of Parkham village to the turnpike road, one a circuitous route via East or West Goldworthy and the other and quicker route via Foxdown, a little further west. The Foxdown road ran through the Foxdown estate which claimed ownership. Notices indicated that it was a private road and two gates, originally erected as we have seen in 1820, were the subject of constant dispute and vandalism on the part of the locals. Things finally came to a head in 1876 when the author's great-great-grandfather Thomas Dark and his nephew John Dark, the then farmer of Limebury, travelled, with others, by train to Bristol to give testimony upon oath to the Bristol Assize. The hearing occupied 2 days and at least one witness had never travelled by train before. Was the road a private footpath or public carriageway? The flavour of the proceedings is conveyed by the following extract from the local press report (See North Devon Journal, 10th August 1876, p. 8) which clearly ranked the matter as of some importance:

'Mr. Richard Dunn, yeoman of Parkham, seventy years of age, said that he knew the road leading from Foxdown, Holwill, to the turnpike road leading from Bideford to Clovelly. Remembered the time Mr. Hux [the former owner - should read Hucks] diverted the old road, and the new road had always been used by the public. - The witness caused considerable laughter by his broad Devonshire dialect. - His Lordship remarked that it would have been better for the case to have been tried at Exeter, for then there would have been a chance of the jury understanding what was said. (Laughter.) As it was they almost needed an interpreter. (Laughter.) - In cross-examination, witness admitted that before Mrs. Graves purchased the estate there was a gate at the Parkham end of the road, with stepping-stones by the side. There was formerly a notice-board there, warning people that if they trespassed on the road they would be shot. (Laughter.) - His Lordship: Shot! - Witness: Yes, and no mistake. (Laughter.) - Mr. Pinder: Did it not caution people against riding or driving along the road? - Witness: It said, “Take notice that whoever is found trespassing on this road is to be shot.” (Roars of laughter.) - You would not swear to that? - Yes I would. (Laughter.) I heard Mr. Tardrew read it before the magistrates, and they said it must be put up by a person of weak intellect. (Laughter.) - Mr. Pinder: He must have been. You can read, I suppose? - Yes, - Have you ever read any notice? - That notice was taken down. There have been two or three put up. I never read any of them. - Re-examined: Mr. Hux was a man who did wild things. He would do anything that came into his head.'

Age and length of memory were crucial. Thomas Dark gave his age as 79 and address as Bucks Cross, Woolsery and said that he had lived there and in Parkham all his life. His nephew John Dark of Limebury farm also gave evidence. Thomas`s evidence was especially important because in 1874 he had supervised the repair of the road and paid the labourers on behalf of the local Highways Board. A road repaired with public funds could scarcely be a private one. The judge found in favour of the parishioners who returned to Parkham triumphant with stories and new experiences which, no doubt, became the stuff of legend.

The Land Owners

There were five major landowners (freeholders) in Parkham and some 36 others. No single landowner had anything like a monopoly of land ownership, unlike nearby Clovelly parish where Sir James Hamlyn Williams bart. had almost total ownership of the land. (20) Historians would readily recognise in Clovelly a classic example of a 'closed parish' where the resident landlord at Clovelly Court wielded immense power and influence over what went on. Parkham by contrast, with some 41 different landowners, is an 'open parish.' Land continually changed hands in Parkham and there was nothing fixed about the pattern of land ownership. None of the 5 biggest landowners lived in the parish. The five biggest landowners in 1842, in order of importance, were: (1) Lord John Rolle with 87 landholdings, including the toll house on the turnpike road between Bideford and Bude. (2) Rev. John Thomas Pine-Coffin with 51 landholdings. (3) Samuel Trehawke Kekewich with 34 landholdings.(4) John Lee Lee with 13 (including the 338.1.33 acres of Halsbury Barton). (5) Lewis William Buck M.P., 3 landholdings (including the 314 acre Sedborough farm).

The richest and biggest of them, Lord Rolle, lived at Stevenstone House near Torrington or at Bicton House near Sidmouth. He also maintained a London town house. Lord John Rolle was created Baron Rolle of Stevenstone in 1797, the title having become extinct in 1750 when his eldest brother Henry died unmarried. Lord John was quite simply the largest landowner in Devon with an estate said to be worth £40,000 a year in 1797. (21) Greville describes him as 'a choleric hard-bitten old Tory' who characteristically opposed the 1832 Reform Act. When castigated by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Brougham, for his opposition his brief and only response is said by Greville to have comprised the words, 'My Lord, I wish you to know that I have the greatest contempt for you both in this house and out of it.' Rolle's sole claim to fame is that when about to swear allegiance to the Queen he fell down the steps leading to the throne at Queen Victoria's coronation on the 28th June 1837; he then being in his eighty-first year. The Queen responded by advancing down the steps to enable him to pay his homage. The incident was popularised in a ballad called Mr. Barney Maguires Account of the Coronation, which contained the lines:

But Lord Rolle was rolling - twas mighty consoling
To think his Lordship did not break his bones

Whilst Lord Rolle became a figure of fun Victoria's action was seen as a gesture of Queenly graciousness. Lord Rolle died (at Bicton) childless on April 3rd. 1842 when the title again became extinct. The estates then passed to his second wife's family (Trefusis) via his nephew the Honourable Mark George (son of the 2nd Lord Clinton) and in 1883 comprised 55,592 acres, worth £47,170 a year. (22) Actual ownership of the estate was vested in trustees and Mark George was obliged to adopt the name and arms of Rolle as a condition of his occupancy of the estate. Mark George resided at Stevenstone and Lady Rolle (Lord Rolle's widow) at Bicton.

The Rev. John Thomas Pine-Coffin's family seat was at Portledge in the adjacent parish of Alwington, where he was Lord of the Manor and the incumbent. He owned a very large estate in Alwington, Monkleigh and Parkham. His strange name was owed to his ancestor John Coffin who was the grandson of Edward Pine who married Dorothy Coffin of Portledge in 1671. John Coffin inherited Portledge and assumed the arms and name of Pine by private Act of Parliament in 1797 in order to perpetuate the family name of Pine

Samuel Trehawke Kekewich had been M.P. for Exeter (1826 - 1830). His family seat was at Peamore near Exeter and he had very extensive estates scattered across Devon; in parishes as widely separated as Alwington, Parkham, Exeter, Exminster, Lifton and Stoke in Teignhead.

John Lee Lee's Parkham estates included the Barton of Halsbury (338 acres), which he inherited from his uncle Edward Lee who resided at Orleigh Court in the adjacent parish of Buckland Brewer. John Lee Lee's original name was John Lee Hanning but he dropped the Hanning and substituted Lee; hence the extraordinary and confusing combination of names. John Lee Lee lived at Dillington House at Ilminster in Somerset where he inherited the huge Dillington estate from his father William Hanning (died 1834). There was a family connection with John Hanning Speke (1827-1864) the discoverer of Lake Victoria as the source of the Nile. John Lee Lee died in 1874. The proliferation of surnames reached its apogee with John Lee Lee's grandson who was named Arthur Vaughan Hanning Vaughan Lee!

Lewis William Buck was M.P. for North Devon (1839 – 1857), and lived at Moreton House, a Georgian mansion near the western edge of Bideford. He owned, amongst many other estates in North Devon, the Hartland Abbey estate, where his son George lived at the Abbey. George Buck, who followed his father as M.P. for North Devon, later (1858) changed his name to Stucley and was made a baronet in 1859. It is from him that the present owner of Hartland Abbey, Sir Hugh George Coplestone Bamfylde Stucley (6th Baronet) is descended. Lewis William Buck was a powerful presence in North Devon and was, for example, able to present Charles Bruton's son, Meddon, to the living of West Worlington, whose advowson he owned. It is doubtful if any of the Parkham farmers ever met their landlords face to face. Most of the time they would have negotiated the terms of leases and paid their rents through land agents employed by the landowners.

The Rector owned 26 pieces of glebe (church owned land) land which was therefore a life interest only (129 acres in total), plus freehold ownership of the 43 acres called Hordiland or Hardiland, which in 1842 was tenanted by Richard Dunn. The Rector also rented some 11 acres at Pynes Moor (from Charles Bruton) and 7 at Venn (from Samuel Trehawke Kekewich).

One other interesting, although small, landowner in Parkham was William Tardrew Esq., who was, unusually, a native of Parkham, baptised at Parkham on the 11th August 1771, son of Philip and Prudence Tardrew. There ia no evidence of gentry origins but William must have attracted attention to himself in 1803 when he raised a company of 83 Volunteers from Parkham for local defence. (23) By 1842 he was the owner of two small farms, Hoopers Bocombe (21 acres), then occupied by John Harding and Higher Bocombe (7 acres), then occupied by Thomas Lemon. He also leased a small group of adjacent properties (approximately 7 acres in total) on the Parkham side of Peppercombe, near the mouth of the combe, from John Thomas Pine Coffin. They comprised a limekiln (3 combustion chambers) hard by the high tide mark, a dwelling house and court, readily identifiable as Peppercombe Castle, a nearby warehouse, 4 cottages and small plots of open land: lawn, pasture, waste and garden. The beach by the kiln is marked by an excavated channel through the platform of rocks behind it known as the Lear. This channel only became visible at low tide when it gave vessels access to the beach and therefore to the kiln. A similar channel, for the same purpose, exists at Bucks Mills called the Gore. The Castle became steadily ruinous from about 1909 and was replaced by the Pine Coffins with a wooden bungalow in 1926.

Peppercombe Castle

Peppercombe Castle 1906.  Francis Frith Collection.

The Castle was a substantial property comprising a drawing and dining room, dressing room, 6 bedrooms, water closet, kitchens and offices and a coach house and stables.(24) It is not marked on the 1809 O.S. 1” map and is remembered as a sprawling, stuccoed exercise in the Picturesque. However, the 1841 census shows that William Tardrew Esq., (described as a landed proprietor farming 60 acres and employing 6 agricultural labourers), was not then living at the Castle but at Annery Court, Monkleigh, with his wife Louisa and 4 servants. He had evidently been living there for a number of years having bought the Annery Court estate in about 1810. (25) At some point before 1822 he rebuilt the old house as a rather grand mansion in the classical style. (26) The estate comprised some 560 acres and included many cottages, the Annery limekilns, strategically situated at the head of navigation on the Torridge and a shipyard next to the kilns. He later moved the shipyard to the sea-lock on the newly constructed Rolle canal (1827) in which, along with Lord Rolle and John Thomas Pine Coffin, he had a substantial number of shares. The Rolle canal was a struggling enterprise which closed in 1871 following the closure of the Annery kilns in about 1864. Access to the Wear Giffard side of the Torridge was obtained by the road bridge built by Lord Rolle and William Tardrew in 1835. A toll house was constructed on the Wear Giffard side and since pedestrians paid a greatly resented halfpenny toll it was known as the ha'penny bridge. William Tardrew was a Deputy Lieutenant of the County and magistrate. (27) At one time he was mayor of Bideford and obviously a man of considerable substance, with various business interests, including ship owning and building as well as lime-burning. He died in 1853 and his wife in 1871.

He also leased, again from John Thomas Pine Coffin, a second and even tinier group of adjacent properties in Parkham: No. 1140, Culmer Court (3 perches), No.1141, Limekiln (8 perches), No. 1142, Waste (22 perches) and No. 1143, Old Culmer Court (21 perches). The Culmer Courts were not houses and may have been storage areas for culm (coal from South Wales). The limekiln is undoubtedly the East Kiln (2 combustion chambers) at Bucks Mills. (28) This group appears on the Parkham Tithe map only because of an anomalous dogleg in the parish boundary, which appears just before the Bucks Mills watercourse reaches the sea. (29) This may have resulted from the building of the East Kiln in the first place, when a very short stretch of the watercourse marking the boundary may have been diverted from the western to the eastern side of the kiln. Thus both the coastal limekilns in Parkham were in William Tardrew's hands in 1842 although his lease for both the Peppercombe properties and those in Bucks only dates from 1841. (30) Tardrew was certainly keenly interested in lime-burning. The six mile long Rolle canal was basically intended to take limestone and culm upstream to Great Torrington where it could feed the kilns owned by Lord Rolle near Rosemoor, so that lime could be distributed over a wider inland area.

Bucks Mills

Photo of 1930 showing the East Kiln (left) and West Kiln (right) at Bucks Mills. Although the East Kiln lay on the Woolsery side of the boundary stream between Parkham and Woolsery parishes it appears on the 1842 tithe map as part of Parkham. Coastal erosion has much altered this scene. (Francis Frith Collection)

When the then lessee of both properties at Peppercombe and Bucks Mills, a Mr. Balsdon, put them up for sale in 1857 by private contract his sale notice described the Peppercombe limekiln and coal cellar as being “near where a good trade has heretofore been carried on, and still may be, if in the hands of a competent person.” In the following year, the property having still not been sold, it was publicly auctioned at the Newfoundland Inn, Bideford, on the 9th September 1858. It may be therefore that lime-burning was in decline in Parkham by that date.

The Farmers

Amongst the 49 described as farmers in the 1841 census of Parkham only 4 had holdings above 200 acres and 14, holdings of over 100 acres. The largest group described as farmers were the 27 occupying holdings of between 10 and 100 acres. Then came a group of 24 occupying holdings of between 1 and 10 acres. All told, some 86 people were occupying land holdings greater than 1 acre in extent (see Appendices 2,3 & 4). In other words although 49 described themselves as farmers in the census some 37 other individuals were also occupying land from which they were obtaining economic benefit.

The 24 (Part of Tucking Mill was held jointly) occupying land between 1 and 10 acres in extent included 4 who described themselves as farmers in the census, 7 who were artisans (Ann Heydon the bonnet maker, 2 carpenters, 1 mason, 1 blacksmith, 1 tailor ) plus 1 butcher, 1 miller, 6 agricultural labourers and one of independent means. Five names could not be found in the census.

Those occupying holdings of less than an acre are mostly occupying dwellings with gardens attached. Although these gardens might be tiny they were of enormous importance to the occupants because they gave the opportunity to grow vegetables and keep a pig. The 6 agricultural labourers who boasted holdings of greater than an acre must have regarded themselves as very fortunate. So many people were living on the margins of existence in Parkham that benefits like the ability to keep a pig or a few chickens, or have access to moorland or commons, could make all the difference between independence or the workhouse.

One very clear feature of the Tithe Apportionment is the extremely small size of many of the fields on the Parkham farms. A huge proportion are measured in rods and perches only. Since 1842 a massive reduction in the number of fields has taken place as holdings have been consolidated and hedgerows removed. One unique feature of the field pattern is what looks like a fossilised system of strip cultivation around the hamlet of Ash.

The author's paternal great-great grandfather Thomas Dark and his younger brother, Joseph Dark would have been typical Parkham farmers at the time. (31) Joseph is described in the Census as a farmer of Limebury. The 1842 Tithe Award shows Limebury as comprising 40 acres, 1 rod, 4 perches leased directly from Lord Rolle, plus 17 acres, 3 rods, 21 perches (Moleshill), sub-leased from John Sergeant. Joseph had inherited the farm from his father, Thomas senior, who had died in 1835, although why Joseph inherited rather than his elder brother, Thomas junior, we have no way of knowing. Joseph belonged to that middling group of 46 farmers working a holding of between 10 and a hundred acres. Indeed, his 57 acres was probably about average for this group.

Like Joseph, the 1841 Census describes Thomas Dark as a farmer, although Thomas's 7 acres put him squarely in the middle of the 24 individuals with the smallest holdings. The 1842 Tithe Award shows him to be occupying a compact small-holding very near to Limebury, comprising a house and six small fields. The farmhouse (1066) occupied the south-western corner and lay only a few hundred yards yards east along the road from Limebury. In the census it is named as Limebury Cross Park. A seventh field, known as Lower Piece, lay about 3/4 of a mile away on the road to Horns Cross. In 1842 all seven fields were in pasture and totalled 5 acres, eight perches. This little holding was described in the Tithe Apportionment as 'part of Hortops, Broad Parkham' and was sub-leased from William Turner, who was in turn a tenant of Lord Rolle. Additionally, Thomas occupied two more fields (total acreage, 2 acres, 1 rod, 13 perches) given over to arable and actually adjacent to Joseph`s fields. Both fields lay very near to the farmhouse on the opposite side of the road. They belonged to Samuel Trehawke Kekewich and Thomas sub-leased them from Thomas Lemon.

Although Thomas is described as a farmer in the census it is important to note that at the baptisms of his seven children he is always described as a husbandman, except in the case of the baptism of his fourth child, Thurza, when he is described as a farmer, and of his seventh, James (born 1843) when he is described as a labourer. The term husbandman is almost certainly the term that would have been used within the parish to describe his economic and social status. It was a term habitually used in North Devon at the time. Thomas later gave up farming in Parkham, moved to Woolsery and then to Bideford where he became a publican and fisherman.

Whilst Thomas struggled, Joseph's son John (born 1836) expanded Limebury by incorporating Thomas's smallholding and ultimately (in 1889) bought the freehold from the trustees of Lord Rolle for £850 when it was then 80 acres in extent. John survived the great agricultural depression at the end of the century and retired to Bideford in 1901, leaving a tenant behind at Limebury. Besides his own house in Clovelly Road he owned 3 other properties in Bideford and died in 1910 when his personaL estate was valued at £2,117.15.5d., a considerable sum for those days. John married but had no children and spent his retirement devising an over-elaborate scheme of succession which would keep the farm in the family but without his having to make the final choice as to who should inherit. In the event it was a close run thing and the farm very nearly fell out of Dark ownership. The last Dark owner of Limebury being Victor Dark of Instow (1925-2004). John's story demonstrates that it was possible for some farms to survive into the twentieth century and the period of agricultural prosperity that preceded the First Word War. His uncle Thomas's story is that of the many husbandmen who did not survive the hungry forties.

As we have seen, the 57 acres or so farmed by Joseph and the 7 farmed by his brother Thomas was then typical of the Parkham farmer at the time. What was also typical was the fact that they were tenant farmers. The vast majority of the land in Parkham was farmed by tenants. Even the biggest of the farms, Melbury (547 acres), farmed by William Pridham, was sub-leased from Henry Downing, who leased the land from Lord John Rolle. Sub-leasing was very common.

In Devon the traditional terms on which land was leased out by the freeholders was for a period of 99 years or 2 or 3 'lives', whichever was the shorter. The 3 lives might be the farmer's wife, son or grandson, for example, in order to ensure that the farm remained within the family. The terms of the lease usually required the payment of a lump sum or 'premium' at the beginning, followed by a yearly rent. When a named life took over, a fine (heriot), typically the 'best beast', was paid to the landlord. Sub-leasing can make the picture of landownership and occupancy very complicated. Such long leases could suddenly look very insecure in the event of the unexpected death of one of the lives. In these circumstances the lease was often extended by the addition of another life (if the landlord agreed) so that the same family could be found occupying the same farm for very long periods of time. On the other hand if the lease fell in and the landlord refused to renew it the family could lose the farm and have no other choice but to become landless labourers.

Limebury Farm

Limebury Farm in the late 1970's


Parkham looking north

Parkham looking from the north across the Yeo valley.

Limebury Farm

Limebury Farm Tithe Map, 1842

 :

Limebury Farm, Parkham, 1842 (Field Names & Acreages)
Source: 1842 tithe Apportionment & Map. P.R.O. Ref. I.R. 29,30/9/459

Nos.     Name     Cultiv.   A.    R.   P.  
811   Cleave Arable 5 0 5
934   Thorn Close Marsh Pasture 1 1 29
935   Middle Marsh Arable 1 3 5
936   Marsh Arable 2 1 25
937   Meadow Pasture 1 2 11
938   Road Road     16
939   Garden Garden     16
940   House, Building & Court  House   2 2
941   Mowhay Mowhay     32
942   Mowhay Plot Arable   3 21
943   Will Plot "     32
945   Clover Field " 3 1 12
945   Little Plot "     20
946   Middle Hill " 3 1 32
947   Road Road   1 8
948   Thorn Close Arable 6 3 12
956   Horse Park " 3 1 33
957   Over Marsh "   2 22
958   Middle Marsh "   3 6
959   First Marsh " 1 1 31
960   Broad Close " 6 2 26
    Total Acreage   40 1 4

Rent of £4 . 18 . 0d. paid to Rector in lieu of tithes. Land-Owner:
Right Hon. Lord John Rolle. Occupier, Joseph Dark.
Additionally: Mouse Hills (sic) 17 acres, 3 rods, 21 perches leased from John Sergeant (owned by Lord John Rolle) occupied by Joseph Dark.

Thomas Dark`s Smallholding

(Part of Hortops, Broad Parkham)

Nos.   Name     Cultiv.   A.    R.   P.  
1066 House House etc.     7
1067 House Plot Pasture   1 11
1068 Plot "   1 24
1069 Clover Field "   1 19
1070 Middle Field " 1 1 3
1071 Higher Field " 1 1 9
1365 Lower Piece "   2 15
    Total Acreage     5 0 8

Rent of 18 shillings paid to Rector in lieu of tithes.

Land-Owner: Right Hon. Lord John Rolle.

Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thomas Dark.

Nos.   Name     Cultiv.   A.    R.   P.  
954 Moor Arable 2 0 9
955 Moor Arable   1 4

Land-Owner: Samuel Kekewitch Trehawke. Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thoms Dark.

Land-Owner: Samuel Kekewitch Trehawke. Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thoms Dark.

The Parkham farms were overwhelmingly family affairs, where much larger families than we are used to today, lived with one or two farm servants who were very likely to be related, plus an elderly relation or two. At Goldworthy Barton there were no less than 13 Downings living in 1841, nine Pickards at Ash, nine Heals at East Stone, 8 Mays at Babeleigh and 8 Moasts at Halsbury, etc. No wonder that Bartholomew Pickard, a farmer of 13.0.32 acres (part of Daniels, Broad Parkham) and living alone, named his cottage 'Robinson Cruso [sic] Cottage.'

There were no less than 4 female farmers named in the Parkham census of 1841: Ann Hortop at Peppercombe Farm, Susan Austin at East Goldworthy, Ann Andrew at Parkham Town Barton and Ann Becklake [sic] at West Goldworthy. Four more women are listed in the Apportionment as occupying land: Elizabeth Caddy (82.0.21 acres, Bowden), Mary Matilda Hucks (20.3.24 acres, Payne's Cleave), Mary Tardrew (17.1.05 acres, Flexmans Parkham Town Barton) and Ann Heydon (6.2.35 acres, part of Daniel's Broad Parkham). Three other women would have been well known in the parish: Elizabeth Stanlick who was running the Bell Inn, Elizabeth Croscomb who was manning the toll gate at Waytown and Mary Passmore the Dame School mistress. The 1841 census does not record marital status but these responsibilities often resulted from early widowhood. The experience of the Dark family shows how this situation could come about and how common it was. On the 17th December 1846 Joseph Dark of Limebury died, aged only 43 (according to his death certificate), after a two year decline; the then universal way of describing tuberculosis. A verse from Jeremiah on his gravestone stoically underlined the tragedy of the situation; 'Leave thy fatherless children, I will preserve them alive; and let thy widows trust in me.' The gravestone also gives his date of death as the 12th December and his age as 40. Joseph’s death was followed in 1848 (4th June), by that of his mother Mary (aged 83) and on the 13th October 1850 (6th October on her gravestone) by that of his widow Rebecca aged a mere forty (39 on her gravestone). She too had died from tuberculosis (phthisis on her death certificate). The quotation on her gravestone reads: 'I waited patiently for the Lord: and he inclined unto me, and heard my calling.' (Psalm 40). Ironically, Rebecca's name occurs in the list of Parkham farmers included in White's Directory of Devon for 1850.

In 1851, when the next Decennial census was held, the farm, which had by then grown to 59 acres, was in the sole charge of Mary, aged 19 and unmarried. Mary was, apparently, running the farm with the help of her sister, Louisa, aged seventeen, her brother, John, aged fifteen and two farm labourers. One of the labourers, Samuel Johns, lived in. In 1856 Kelly's Directory lists John Dark as 'Farmer of Limebury' so that by then the twenty-year old younger brother appears to have taken over from Mary, who had earlier, on the 4th March 1852, married John Collins, a blacksmith of Lawford's in Parkham, in the parish church.

Kith and Kin

Another characteristic feature exemplified by the Dark brothers was that they were both married to daughters of Richard and Grace Dunn of neighbouring Nethercott Farm in Parkham; Thomas junior to Miriam (1827) and Joseph to Rebecca (1831). Nethercott lay a little over a mile south-west of Limebury. It is impossible to exaggerate the extent and complexity of the network of blood relationships and inter-marriage that bound the people of the parish together in an all pervasive network of mutual obligation and support. Marriage horizons probably extended to no more than 10 or 12 miles (a days walk) from the home village and within that area inter-marriage and migration between the villages making it up was considerable. Nevertheless, by modern standards, it was a restricted geographical area with a correspondingly restricted genetic pool. One in which neighbours were highly likely to be connected in one way or another and in which inheritance, especially in respect of land, would be jealously safeguarded. It would have been an extremely close, claustrophobic society, very difficult for one who was not a member to enter.

Once part of it, however, the invisible network of relationships would have been extremely important in terms of everyday living. How much of the sharper edges of the Poor Law, for example, was blunted by help from neighbouring relations? How many of the 75 and 80 year olds found in the mid-century Census Returns, described as 'farm-servants' were poor relations rather than sturdy old men and women able to make a genuine contribution to running the farm? How important were aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters and cousins of varying degrees, to households much more used than we are today to widowhood and orphaning? At birth and death there must always have been someone to call upon from within the family group. Opaque when viewed from outside there could have been few secrets within it.

Two cottages lay very near Limebury Farm and Thomas Dark's smallholding. In 1841 one of the nearby cottages was called Limebury Cross Cottage (1062) and was occupied by Jasper Pickard, a carpenter, his wife Ann and an old lady called Mary Bailey. The other known as Watershute Cottage (1061) was occupied by Thomas Pickard, Jasper's son, who was an agricultural labourer, his wife Susanna (formerly Dark), their 3 children, his mother-in-law Mary Dark and another labourer called John Lee. Four neighbouring dwellings; the inhabitants all related. But it does not end there.

Three other Dark families lived nearby. Another Thomas Dark, an agricultural labourer, his wife Ann and four of their children lived at Broad Parkham. This was an older Thomas who married Ann Dennis Daniel, daughter of Bartholomew and Elizabeth Daniel, at Parkham on the 25th November 1824, when he was described as a husbandman. Further south was the solitary cottage at Windabout belonging to John Dark, another agricultural labourer, his wife Elizabeth and their 4 children. Thomas and Betsy Dark lived at Lower Holwill. Two small Dark children, Elizabeth and Ann Dark were lodging with John Lang, an agricultural labourer, his wife Susan and their 2 children, Elizabeth and James, at East Goldworthy. Richard Dark was working for William Braund, farmer of Buckish Mill, Edwin Dark was a male servant to Thomas Hockridge at Worthyeat Farm and George Dark was a male servant with the Nancekivells at Higher Holwill Farm.

It takes a great deal of investigation to uncover this network and the nature of the connections. The relationships on the paternal side are relatively easy to discover but, of course, relationships via the distaff side where the woman changes her name on marriage are much less obvious. Dr.Janet Few, in her intensive study of kinship in Buckish Mill, has shown that only 8 of the 24 occupied cottages in Buckish in 1841 were inhabited by families not related to the other 16 families. (32)

Poverty, the Poor law and Emigration

After 1834 there was a revolutionary change in the way poverty was dealt with in Parkham. Since Elizabethan times the relief of poverty had been a parish responsibility. The parish accounts are full of details of the names of payments to poor parishioners who were sick, unemployed, disabled or in any other way in need. Because the line between prosperity and poverty was so thin and so many of the parishioners were related to each other there must always have been a sense of 'there but for the grace of God go I.' Such help might therefore have had a personal quality based upon knowledge and kinship that may have have made its acceptance easier. Above all it was mostly administered to people living in their own homes.

Willingness to assist the parish poor rarely extended to individuals from outside the parish and strangers and pregnant women moving into the parish were always objects of suspicion if there was any chance that they might become a charge on the parish.. In order to prevent this it was necessary to demonstrate a 'right of settlement' in the parish which was conferred by things like birth within the parish, apprenticeship, property ownership etc. Anyone who could not demonstrate a right of settlement and fell on evil times was removed back to the parish where there was such a legal right, no matter how far away that might be. The receiving parish bore the cost of removal. Devon C.R.O. possesses numerous Parkham removal orders. Just how reluctant the parish was to maintain an illegitimate baby is shown by this extract from the parish apprenticeship register of 1827:

160. Elizabeth Hamlyn, aged 19, dau. of Richard and Jane, discharged from the service of John May being with child likely to be born a bastard and to become chargeable to the parish of Parkham. 17.2.1827. [Apprenticed for Babeleigh 7.5.1817.]

The poor Law Amend ment Act of 1834 totally changed the system of poor relief. Parishes lost their poor law responsibilities and were grouped into Poor Law Unions controlled by Boards of Guardians. Parkham belonged to the Bideford Union with 18 parishes and 25 Guardians, one of whom represented Parkham. A Union workhouse was erected at Bideford in 1837/8 in Meddon Street and any able-bodied person claiming relief had to enter it. Outdoor relief, in which the parish assisted people in their own homes, was therefore intended to became a thing of the past. A workhouse test was applied so that conditions in the workhouse had to be such that, whilst not inhumane, no one would enter a workhouse unless they had to. Families entering a workhouse would be broken up; the women put into a women's ward, the men into a men's ward and the children into separate boys' and girls' wards. Were poor families actually going to be forced to leave Parkham and pass through the great archway at Bideford? There to don a uniform that marked them out and then be separated from one another, brother from sister, husband from wife? They were and they are. This then was the prospect that faced impoverished families in Parkham in 1841. It is difficult to convey today how revolutionary and unwelcome this must have been to many in Parkham who could remember the system of outdoor relief of some years earlier.

The unrest and distress that resulted from Enclosure, combined with the economic depression following the end of of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 and resentment at the operation of the Poor Laws resulted in widespread rioting, rick-burning and threats from an eponymous Captain Swing throughout the counties most affected by Enclosure. These culminated in the infamous Captain Swing riots, rick-burnings and destruction of machinery that occurred throughout the southern counties in 1831. A number of executions of ring-leaders of the unrest followed. All of this economic unrest took place against a background of the febrile political climate that preceded the difficult passage of the Parliamentary Reform Act of 1832.

The unrest in Devon may have been somewhat less than in counties further east and may be explainable by the absence of the effects of the Enclosure Movement. Farming in Devon had not been characterized by the communal cultivation of great open fields in which individual land holdings had been scattered in small strips across a wide area. Consequently there was no equivalent to the Enclosure Movement in Devon which so disrupted the agrarian landscape and way of life further east. In counties like Wiltshire and Hampshire Enclosure more or less destroyed the small, subsistence farming class and polarised rural society between landless labourers and large land-owning farmers. Enclosure had mainly taken place at the end of the eighteenth century or early in the nineteenth, so memories amongst the rural poor were still strong. In Devon there was a higher number of small independent farmers, usually described as husbandmen or small yeoman farmers and there had been no revolutionary change in the shape of the landscape and rural life.

Nevertheless, there was unrest in North Devon, much of which was reported in the North Devon Journal (see for example the issue of the 8th December 1830). In that year workers at the Rawleigh lace factory (Barnstaple) went on strike for higher wages, following an angry confrontation with the owner, in which letters signed by'Swing' were left behind by the departing workers. In nearby Pilton an arson attack was reported. In the following year two Swimbridge men, George Goff and Thomas Roughcliffe were sent for trial at Exeter as leaders of local unrest. At the Midsummer Quarter Sessions of 1831 a George Goff was subsequently sent to prison for 6 months for misdemeanour and a Thomas Ratcliffe [sic] given 12 months for the same offence. (33) In Bideford it was reported in 1830 that several threatening letters signed 'Swing' had caused two proprietors to destroy their threshing machines and similar pre-emptive destruction had taken place in Torrington and South Molton. In Ilfracombe an Association for the Protection of Persons and Property was set up and everywhere large numbers of special constables were sworn in by local magistrates. Those sworn in are often described as 'farmers and pensioners' and presumably included ex-soldiers or sailors.

Unrest continued throughout the thirties. In 1836 (6th February) The Exeter and Plymouth Gazette reported a serious riot amongst paupers in Chittlehampton and on the 20th the Western Times reported that the Yeomanry were called out to Sheepwash and Petrockstow and 5 men conveyed to prison in Exeter. The Petrockstow riot was occasioned when the Relieving Officer attempted to substitute bread for part of the monetary dole. The author remembers, as a boy, seeing the very large collection of special constables' truncheons that used to be displayed in the museum in Bideford Town Hall. At the time he was puzzled why so many of them bore the Royal cypher of King William IV.

Rural distress in North Devon was sufficient to encourage large numbers of the smaller yeomen farmers and husbandmen to emigrate to Canada, mostly to Ontario and Prince Edward Island. Some of this emigration was privately financed and took place via Bideford and Appledore. This is additional to the assisted emigration from Plymouth and Bristol. Emigration is the best explanation for the 23 unoccupied houses recorded for Parkham in the 1841 census. It also may help explain the consolidation of holdings and the gradual substitution of short leases for 3 life leases that family historians start to observe in the 1840's and subsequently.

In 1830 Thomas Burnard Chanter advertised in the North Devon Journal that his ships Collina, Calypso, Sappho and Euphemia had been 'conveniently fitted up for Families and will take out passengers on moderate terms to Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick' In the following year The North Devon Journal described some 5000 people lining the Quay and Long Bridge at Bideford to wave farewell to the Apollo, Calypso and Bacchus, bound for New York, St. Andrews and Montreal. Such, it reported, 'is the prevailing rage for emigration, that a female who had given birth to a child but three days before, would not be persuaded by the most urgent entreaties....to remain behind for another season'.(34) Emigration continued throughout the thirties and forties and as late as 1857 the North Devon Journal had the following illuminating comment:

'About seven years ago, a young farm servant from a neighbouring village went to America leaving his sweetheart behind in a state that added nothing to the good reputation of either. When he had been there about a year, he sent home for the latter; she went out to him, and they were married. He now writes home that he has maintained his increasing family during that period, and has worked himself into a farm – not a hired one – but 50 acres of purchased land, to which 10 more are soon to be added. Besides the land, there is the stock enumerating 25 bullocks besides other animals with the rest of the et ceteras of a farm.' A few miscellaneous particulars were added, such as that they had to be their own tailors and make their own candles and soap, etc. 'Suppose the couple has been married seven years ago in this country, where would they have now been with their half dozen children? Where would have been the acres, the bullocks, the sheep, the corn, the candles, and the soap. Not only would there have been nowhere for them, but instead there-of hopeless poverty, dirt, drudgery, the Union, and a pauper's grave.'(35)

Evidence of poverty in Parkham in 1841/2 is not very abundant because the operation of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act meant that those those seeking poor relief were obliged to leave the parish in order to enter the workhouse, where they disappear from view. Unfortunately the census does not indicate the origins of the paupers resident in the Bideford Union Workhouse so we have no means of knowing how many of them came from Parkham. One resident only of Parkham, Jane Squance (aged 87), is described in the census as a pauper

Life on the Farm

There is much, of course, about daily life that the census and tithe documents cannot tell us. Written memoirs, letters and reminiscences by the people of mid nineteenth century Parkham, or indeed any other Devonshire village, are extremely rare or fragmentary. Most people were illiterate in the 1840's. Of my collection of 3 death certificates, 3 birth certificates and 1 marriage certificate of Darks born, married and died between 1837 and 1848 at Parkham, only one, a birth certificate, contains a signature. In every other case the groom or the informant made his or her mark. In these circumstances direct written evidence about how life was actually lived is very hard to find. Two sources, one written at the beginning of the century (1807) and the other by a man born in Parkham in 1897 do throw a little more light. But in each case they depend upon the extent to which one can reliably extrapolate forward and back.

One precious secondary source is R. Pearse Chope's little article entitled One Hundred Years Ago (no. 25 in Notes of The Past) in the Hartland Chronicle of 1901. Born in Hartland in 1862 and one of Devon's most distinguished local historians, he is an extremely reliable informant about local conditions in the nineteenth century; especially because he was able to draw upon the memories of eyewitnesses to earlier events .(36) He emphasises the suspicion of strangers, the enforced self-sufficiency and isolation, the predominance of hand tools like the reaping hook (as distinct from a sickle with its serrated inner edge) and the zellup or seedlip. The latter was the traditional apron wrapped around the shoulder and waist containing the seed, which was broadcast by hand from side to side. He confirms the absence of wheeled vehicles earlier in the century and the greater numbers of subsistence farmers. In particular he emphasises the harshness of the life that faced many apprentices and the poverty endured by the agricultural labourer.

Joseph Dark's father,Thomas Dark senior, probably succeeded his cousin John Dark as the occupier of Limebury in 1807. What would conditions have been like on a Parkham farm in 1807 and what kind of farming would have been practised then and at least until 1841? We can answer such questions with some assurance because it was in the same year that the Board of Agriculture published George Vancouver's great General View of the Agriculture of the County of Devon. Parkham at that time was still a completely agricultural community. Vancouver reckoned that it had 584 inhabitants (283 males & 301 females) divided into 107 families, living in 107 houses, plus one vacant house (cf. the 23 in 1841). Of these 584 inhabitants no less than 542 were engaged in agriculture (children were clearly included in the estimate). Of the remainder, only 13 individuals were classified as engaged in 'manufacture', which probably means that they were rural craftsmen, and 29 were classified as 'other'. (37)

The agriculture in which they were engaged was mixed. Vancouver calculated that 1/8 of the land was arable (corn, fallow, roots and potatoes) and the rest given over to grass. However, only 1/8 of the 7/8 given over to grass was permanent, so that 7/8 of the land was subject to a system of crop rotation. At this point Vancouver, who was a great advocate of agricultural improvement, observes tartly; 'The word system is here perhaps not quite admissible, as that word implies order in a regular series, both in time and in succession, with each other. No such rules, however, govern the practice of the North Devon farmer.' (38)

Apart from the church and the parsonage, the village and most of the scattered farmsteads would have been built of cob (a semi-wet mix of stiff clay and chopped straw) and thatched. To Vancouver's eyes the adherence to cob in a county where building stone was 'variously dispersed, and by no means difficult to procure' was puzzling and produced a curious visual effect; 'Garden walls, farm-houses, barns, stables, linneys (sic), village fences and cottages are all built of this dull, heavy and deforming material. Left without rough-cast, or white-wash, to conceal the native colour of the loam, it is utterly impossible, at a distance, to distinguish a village from a beatfield, both having uniformly the same shade, and from both of which the stranger perceives smoke issuing.'(39) Such a scene is probably only found nowadays in parts of the developing world such as China.

Turnpike roads apart, the network of Devonshire lanes joining these villages was so bad and narrow that much of the carriage was still done by pack horses and donkeys with panniers, and continued to be until well into the century. Indeed, it was not until the 'wheeled revolution' of the 1840's that carts and other wheeled vehicles became the universal means of transport. The Clovelly donkeys and sledges are a vestigial remnant of this earlier period of transport. At the end of the century James Dark (1843-1907) of Bucks Mills still employed a string (normally 8) of donkeys named after the Apostles, which he used to carry sand up from the beach at Bucks. Earlier in the century farmers regularly rode to market and elsewhere with their wives and daughters on pillions behind them.

Oxen were still commonly employed as draught animals and Marshall, writing earlier, in 1796, has this striking vignette of plough-time in Devonshire (40):

'The style of driving an ox-team here, is observable; indeed it cannot pass unnoticed by any stranger. The language, though in a great degree peculiar to the country, does not arrest the attention; but the tone or rather tune, in which it is delivered. It resembles, with great exactness, the chanting, or recitatives of the cathedral services. The plough boy chants the counter-tenor, with unabated ardour through the day; the plough man throwing in at intervals, his harsher notes. It is understood that this chanting march, which may sometimes be heard a considerable distance, encourages and animates the team, as the music of a marching army, or the song of the rowers. Let this be as it may, I have never seen so much cheerfulness attending the operation of ploughing, as in Devonshire.'

We know, this time from Vancouver, the plan of the cob cottages in which agricultural labourers would have lived. They comprised a principal room about 14 feet square, with combined fireplace and oven, and two small rooms behind; one of which would be used for storing food and provisions. The upper storey was divided into two bedrooms, one for the parents and the other for the children. Such a house, we are told, could be built and 'made very comfortable and decently furnished, for about £60.'(41) As Hoskins has often emphasised, such labourers' cottages were far too insubstantial to survive. What we see today in Devonshire are only the more substantial houses of Yeomen and better-off husbandmen. Once the thatch with its overhanging eaves was removed the cob walls below simply dissolved in the Devonshire rain and thatch, wood beams and cob soon returned to the earth. Only the brick or stone firebreast and chimney survived a little longer. Many of the cottages seen on the 1842 Tithe map, like the 3 neighbouring dwellings next to Limebury Farm and lived in by Darks and Pickards, are simply untraceable today.

The out-door farm labourer was then (1807) being paid seven shillings a week, winter or summer, plus a quart to 3 pints of ale or cider per day. This was supplemented by cheap bread-corn (barley or wheat) and 20 perches of allotment land for potatoes and a pig. By 1844, when Sir Robert Peel enquired into the matter, the North Devon labourer's wage had still only risen to 8 shillings and had remained at that level since 1837.

What wage levels of this kind actually meant in terms of living conditions is dramatically illustrated by the verbatim evidence given by James Vicary, an agricultural labourer of Great Torrington, who gave evidence in London to the Anti-Corn Law League in 1840. This report appeared in the North Devon Journal on the 2nd April 1840. His evidence is especially telling because he admits to being better paid than others:

'James Vicary, of Great Torrington, was then examined: I am a farm labourer. I arrived in London last evening. I have been employed by Mr. Braginton, for a year and a half. I get 9s a week. I have six children. The eldest is twenty-two years of age; the second, 20; the third, 18; the fourth, 16; the fifth,11; and the youngest about three years old. Four are living with me. The third earned 1s or 1s. 6d a week, on an average; the fourth, who is about sixteen years of age, is deficient in his mind, and gets nothing; the fifth goes to school, and the youngest remains at home. My wife earns 6d a week. My master gives his men 9s a week, but the regular wages of all the other farmers is only 7s a week, and one quart of cider a day. The latter is worth 2d a quart, which is equal to 8s a week. He is paid 7s in money. The reason I get higher wages is that my master is a little better off than other farmers, and he (witness) did a little odd work. I get 11s a week altogether; of that I lay out on bread 3s 6d. The farmer give us a crop of potatoes if we manure the land. I feed a pig in the course of a year. I buy corn for it and save the waste. The pig eats 7 or 8 bushels of barley at 5s or 5s 6d a bushel. We drink herb tea, or perhaps a little peppermint. My wife occasionally gets half an ounce of tea. She has no sugar. We have three-quarters of a pound of candles a week. We eat no shambles meat [meat from the slaughter house] but have a rasher of bacon and a bit of bread. We have no cheese. We may taste it once in a while. The family generally have fried potatoes and a bit of bacon. We purchase coal at 1s a hundred [weight, about 25kgs, 56 lbs]. We use on hundred and a half per week. Our yearly rent is £3.14s. I pay poor rates and highway rates- on an average 3s to 3s 6d a year. There are no church rates. We have but little clothing. I have had this jacket for five or six years or more. I only wear it on Sundays. I bought the rest eight or nine years ago. The trousers were at first only second hand. My every-day clothes are very mean. I could show you a pair of trousers that made [sic] them myself. They are patched six or seven times over. They are nigh forty pounds weight, ... loud laughter.... I have had them since within a few days of my marriage. That was about 30 years ago. During that time I have had none else except a pair of sail canvass trousers and the pair I have on. I had the canvass trousers about three years. My wife buys the linen from a pack-man. She also buys clothing for herself and the children that way. I have two shirts. My wife has one gown in the course of a year. For one pair of shoes I pay 8s 6d. I wear the best only on Sundays. Married men have no better wages than single. For seven years, till my wages were raised, I had only 1 1\2 lb bacon a week for myself, wife and three children. In 1835 I got 7s wages. Corn was then 2s 6d or 3s a bushel. Now it is 5s or 6s a bushel. I was better off then than now. I had more of a bellyful. My wife now has less money to spend. The bread used is barley bread.

The Chairman: Do you save any money? - Witness (with surprise): God bless you sir, no savings. I don't know what will become of me when I am old. In illness I get 6s from a club. I pay the club 3d a week. I owe three quarters of a year's rent. I know not how I shall pay it. I was never in debt so much before. The labourers on Lord Rolle's estate get 7s a week. There are no railways near us. The people generally are in a state of starvation.

By Mr. Sturge: These labourers who have 7s a week have no meat. Thirty years ago I got 7s or 8s a week wages. I used then to be up on job-work. In war time we lived better then. We could get a little wheat and labourers were generally better off. Some of my neighbours keep a pig, as I do. I never get parish relief. My daughter earns 1s 6d a week. She works from six o'clock in the morning till nine o'clock at night. I have not always had a bellyful of food. It is the same frequently with my family. Barley bread is used about me. If barley was cheaper, we could buy more clothing. We have heard something about corn laws lately. We first heard about half a year ago. The labourers wish that a change would take place, but some persuaded them against it. They told the labourers that it would be worse for them, but we say that it never can be worse,....hear hear, and laughter.'

According to Vancouver's earlier 1807 account the hours of work for agricultural labourers were from six in the morning to six in the evening in summer and from 7 until 5 in the winter. Pay was not increased at harvest-time 'but amply compensated for by board, and very extraordinary sittings over ale and cider.'(42) Just how extraordinary may be judged by Vancouver's verbatim account of the high jinks and jollifications that accompanied the wheat harvest:

'The reaping and harvesting of the wheat is attended with so heavy an expense, and with practices of so disorderly a nature, as to call for the strongest mark of disapprobation, and their immediate discontinuance, or at least a modification of their pastime after the labours of the day. The wheat being ready to cut down, and amounting from 10 to 20 acres, notice is given in the neighbourhood, that a reaping is to be performed on a particular day, when, as the farmer may be more or less linked to the village, on the morning of the day appointed, a gang, consisting of an indefinite number of men and women, assemble at the field, and the reaping commences after breakfast, which is seldom over till between eight and nine o'clock. This company is open for additional hands to drop in at any time before the twelth hour, to partake in the frolic of the day. By eleven or twelve o'clock the ale or cider has so much warmed and elevated their spirits, that their noisy jokes and ribaldry are heard to a considerable distance, and often serve to draw auxiliary force within the accustomed time. The dinner, consisting of the best meat and vegetables, is carried into the fields between twelve and one o'clock; this is distributed, with copious draughts of ale and cider; and by two o'clock the pastime of cutting and binding the wheat is resumed, and continued without other interruption than the squabbles of the party, until about five o'clock, when what is called the drinkings are taken into the field, and, under the shade of a hedgerow or large tree, the panniers are examined, and buns, cakes, and all such articles are found, as the confectionery skill of the farmer's wife could produce for gratifying the appetites of her customary guests at this season.

After the drinkings are over, which generally consume from half to three-quarters of an hour (and even longer, if such can be spared from the completion of the field), the amusement of the wheat harvest is continued, with such exertions as draw the reaping and binding of the field together with the close of the evening. This done, a small sheaf is bound up, and set upon the top of one of the ridges, when the reapers retiring to a certain distance, each throws his reap-hook at the sheaf, until one, more fortunate, or less inebriated than the rest, strikes it down: this achievement is accompanied with the utmost stretch and power of the voices of the company, uttering words very indistinctly, but somewhat to this purpose:- WE HA IN! WE HA IN! - which noise and tumult continue about half an hour; when the company retire to the farm-house to sup, which being over, large portions of ale and cider enable them to carouse and vociferate until one or two o'clock in the morning.

At the same house, or that of a neighbouring farmer, a similar scene is renewed, beginning between eight and nine o'clock in the morning following, and so continued through the precious season of the wheat-harvest in this country. It must be observed, that the labourers thus employed in reaping receive no wages, but in lieu thereof, they have an invitation to the farmer's house, to partake of a harvest frolic; and at Christmas, during the whole of which time, and which is seldom less than three or four days, the house is kept open day and night to the guests, whose behaviour during the time, may be assimilated to the frolics of a bear-garden.' (Vancouver, previously cited, pp. 145-147).

That such entertainment had a coarse-grained quality is obvious, but Vancouver's parsimony towards 'so heavy an expense' during 'the precious season of the wheat-harvest' seems a little un-generous. Life for the agricultural labourer throughout the nineteenth century was always hard and the occasional saturnalia an inevitable safety valve. Incidentally the 'drinkings', comprising saffron cakes, apple tarts and clotted cream were still a feature of Parkham harvests at the end of the nineteenth century and called as such.

We have the ability to compare conditions at the beginning of the century with those at the very end through the reminiscences of the late George Jacob. Jacob was born in 1897 in Parkham but whose childhood memories of growing up in Parkham before the First World War must have held good for several decades before that:

"The farmers were on the whole farming the same size farms then as now. Of course, the style of farming has altered with the times and one man with a modern machine can do more than 3 men could then. The old unwritten law of being a good farmer was to plough up the ley, have two straw crops, then put to roots, and then seed out on a straw crop and leave to grass for four years before ploughing up again...the names of the farmers on the farms seldom changed as the families were larger and there was nearly always a son to take over when the older farmer gave up. The farmhouses have nearly all been altered inside if not out. They are chiefly fairly large, but probably not too big for the old days when the families were a lot larger than they are today, and all had a servant girl living in, and a good many had one or two young farm-workers too.

There was no tap water and all the water had to be pumped from a well which, in a good many cases, was some little distance from the back door. Then it had to be carried to the open fireplace if you wanted hot water and put into large kettles or boilers, which hung on chimney crooks, which you would raise or lower according to how quickly you wanted hot water. The fire was nearly always burning as generally there was a big log at the back which would often last the day. To boil the water for the vegetables, the sauce-pans were set on a 'brandis' - a three-legged iron frame. As all the hot water had to be carried away in clome pitchers or buckets, you can realise what a lot of work was involved. The 'bodley' for cooking was being fixed in a great many farmhouses, but in quite a lot the open chimney and the clome oven was the only means of cooking the food for a big family. The 'privy' was generally at the bottom of the garden or at some quiet spot some distance from the house. One of my uncles used to say that it was 'A Sabbath day's journey' to get there.

Butter-making was one of the big jobs in the house. Until the arrival of the cream separator, all the milk had to be scalded in clome pans, and I remember how proud everyone felt when we had our first separator. Nothing today seems to look so good as the junket covered by that layer of fresh yellow scalded cream, or an apple tart covered in a like manner. Making butter during a hot summer was always a trying job as there was nothing to cool it except the cool water from the well.

As there was no electricity then the only light was by candles or oil lamps. The lamps had to be filled every day and the lamp glasses cleaned. One tiny splash of water when it was hot made the glass crack at once. The only light outdoors was the oil lantern or in some cases a six-sided lantern made of horn with a candle inside. This was not a very brilliant light.

One of the busiest days in the farmhouse was when the pig was killed - to be salted and put in the 'trendle'. The butcher would arrive at a given time and expect the water to be boiling in the copper furnace. After the pig was killed and cleaned, all the offals were brought indoors and cleaned, and the suitable parts made into 'hogs-puddings'. Then the butcher came again in the evening and cut up the pig ready for salting. This made a very busy day, but there was always the feeling that there was plenty of meat to last for some time....The general food of the old farmhouse was plenty of meat, home-made bread, pasties of meat or potatoes, saffron cake and plenty of cream."(43)

What is so interesting about this description of life on a Parkham farm at the beginning of the twentieth century is how slowly things had changed. The farming was still mixed. The water was obtained from a well. The privy was at the bottom of the garden. By privy, of course, Jacob means a rickety shed with an earth closet beneath. The privy was usually insubstantial enough to be moved to another site when necessary, leaving a rich growth of stinging nettles to mark where it had been. In many farmhouses the 'bodley' was being installed, the local name for a coal-fired, cast-iron cooking range, but 'in quite a lot” the open fireplace and clome oven was the only means of cooking. The latter were arched apertures, lined with fireclay, in which quick-burning furze or faggots of twigs were burnt to heat the surrounding bricks to a high temperature. The ashes were then raked out and bread, pasties etc. could be easily cooked in the 45 minutes or so before the oven cooled. Candles were still in use, mostly in bedrooms, but supplemented by oil lamps, whereas in 1841 tallow candles and the cheaper rushlights would have predominated. The separator, for separating cream from the milk only arrived during Jacobs's childhood.

Every detail of the above picture is confirmed by the late Rev. Fred Pennington (born on a Hartland Farm in 1911) in his autobiography From Ploughboy to Priest published in 1984. Pennington describes both the taking of the lunchtime meal to the workers in the fields at the corn harvest; and the 'drinkings' later in the day, as described by Vancouver a hundred years earlier.

The question about when technological innovations arrived on the farm is a very difficult one. Jacob recognises it was crucial in improving productivity: 'one man with a modern machine can do more than 3 men can do now.' By 'now' Jacob means 1970 when his book was published. By then, Limebury Farm had got its first mains electricity supply (1963). But what was the rate of innovation on the Parkham farms between 1841 and 1900? We simply do not know. Clearly it is not sufficient to know when the major new piece of machinery was invented. Patrick Bell of Scotland invented a reaping machine in 1828, but it was never patented and the first horse-drawn mechanical reaper (followed by the reaper-binder) is generally attributed to Cyrus McCormick (1809-1884) of America in 1831-34. A machine operating on the same principles was exhibited in England at the Great Exhibition of 1851 but it took time before mechanical reaper-binders appeared on English farms and then only on the biggest and richest. To this must be added the undoubted fact that North Devon was always regarded as a region that lagged behind the rest of the country in agricultural innovation.

Threshing machines were certainly in existence on the farms of southern England in the 1830's because, as we have seen, they were objects of destruction during the Swing riots. The invention of the stationary threshing machine is generally attributed to the Scot, Andrew Meikle, in 1786. Threshing by flail gave employment to the agricultural labourer during the winter months and so threshing machines threatened livelihoods; although the extent of their adoption in the 1830's is hotly debated by agricultural historians. The question also arises about the nature of the early machines. Some were hand or horse operated and no bigger than an upright piano. Some were very large and expensive and beyond the means of a small North Devon farmer. Nevertheless, there is an intriguing, if tragic, entry in the burial register of Alwington, one of Parkham's adjacent parishes, for the 22nd December 1813: 'buried, William Tremeere, aged 8, killed by a threshing machine'. How extensive the use of machines was in 1813, we have, of course, no means of knowing.

Combined threshing and winnowing machines powered by steam traction engines were certainly being employed in North Devon in the era of agricultural prosperity that preceded the First Word War. These big and expensive machines were normally hired and moved around from farm to farm, slowly, because the traction engine moved at about 4 miles per hour. Between these 2 great landmarks of the horse-drawn reaper-binder and the steam operated thresher, of course, lay all sorts of newly invented horse-drawn machines like grass cutters, tedders and rakes for bringing in the hay harvest. Additionally, hand operated machines greatly reduced the labour of chaff cutting, pulping roots and grinding corn to feed the animals. All these devices together increased productivity in the second half of the century and reduced the demand for labour but one suspects that on many of the small Parkham farms one would be surprised at the slowness of technical innovation.

Pat Pidler, who amassed a splendid collection of farm machinery and was born in 1930 on a farm in Swimbridge near Barnstaple (whose mother cooked on an open fire and clome oven in the traditional way) writes this of his father: 'My father could remember how, when he was young, a sickle which was held in one hand with the top of the corn held in the other was used for cutting the corn. It was placed in rows that later were tied into sheaves with straw. Then the scythe was introduced which he held with both hands and with a swinging movement cut the corn. It was then the turn of the reaper which was a machine pulled by a horse with a man sitting on the seat driving a horse, another person walking along with rake in hand raking the corn into the moving blades. This way the corn was cut in rows and then bound by hand.'(44)

Clearly, sickle or scythe were not being used simply for tidying up operations where isolated clumps left behind by the reaper were dealt with. What is also interesting about this passage is that when mechanical reaping came in the first machines were reapers only and that reaper-binders came later. Elsewhere Pidler writes about the hay harvest: 'when my father started farming he used to cut all the grass with a scythe.' (45) Altogether, the little evidence that exists within North Devon, suggests that the use of oxen as draught animals and of ancient hand tools and implements would have been characteristic of Parkham in 1841 and on many Parkham farms for some time afterwards.

Such then was Parkham in 1841/2, poised between two worlds. One reflecting the eighteenth century with its yeomen, husbandmen, and agricultural labourers, with its oxen, donkeys and pack horses, employing scythes, reaping hooks and flails to bring in the harvest, self-sufficient, secretive and withdrawn. Rural poverty was then intense and unknown numbers had already emigrated before 1841 but especially to Canada. To our eyes it would probably have seemed a somewhat unkempt countryside, what with the unmade roads and absence of tarmacadam, commons and patches of waste, cottages in need of repair and a surprising number empty and abandoned. The other world, the second half of the nineteenth century, increasingly mechanised, with fewer farm labourers and farmers, vanishing husbandmen, shrinking common land, secularised local government and a growing range of horse-drawn vehicles as roads improved. Its population becoming more literate and open to outside influences, but with the shadow of the workhouse always in the background.

Footnotes

(1) Map & Apportionment, 1842. By Thomas Brown of Bittadon,valuer and Charles Cooper of Alverdiscott, map maker. Work completed in 1840, legally confirmed 20th April 1842. See Parish Summary at the beginning of the Apportionment for land utilisation totals.

(2) Advertisment headed Ash Moor Inclosure, by Joseph Risdon of Specott near Torrington announcing a 'Last meeting on the Subject,' Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 18th November 1848 and MAF 1/537 (30th August 1850), The National Archives.

(3) Decennial Census Reports 1801 & 1841.

(4) Barton 'signifies a farm much larger than the average' and 'nine times out of ten, one with a long and interesting history.' See Old Devon, W.G. Hoskins, 1966, David & Charles, p.30.

(5) Terry Green, North Devon Archaeological Society, Newsletter No. 5 (2003).

(6) Buckish derived from Bochewis (Domesday Book 1086), land recorded in a book.

(7) Faith, Fish, Farm or Family?, Janet Few, Phd. thesis, University of Exeter, 2009, p.81.

(8) Parliamentary Survey - Abstract of Returns made by the Overseers of the Poor 1776/7. Quoted in Researching Devon Workhouses in the Westcountry Studies Library, Fact Sheet No.29, D.C.R.O.

(9) D.C.R.O. Ref: 1892A/4/PF107.

(10) For dimensions see National Archives. Ref: ED 103/742/2. School No. 4448, p.21.

(11) Joseph Foster, Alumni Oxoniensis.

(12) By 1850 the glebe had dropped from 129 to 119 acres (see White's Directory of 1850).

(13) Charles Worthy, Devonshire Wills (369/370) describes him as a Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County. He was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the North Devon Yeomanry (London Gazette, (28th October 1828) of which his brother William was Colonel and served in that regiment for 30 years, becoming the adjutant. The family originally lived in Alwington where they resided at Yeo Vale House (since demolished) before moving to South Yeo in Parkham. See also The Bruton Family in The Hartland Chronicle, 1913, No. 173 in Notes of the Past by R. Pearse Chope.

(14) J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigiensis

(15) History of Parliament, online, Vols. 1820-1832, see biographical section for biography of Viscount Ebrington.

(16) George Jacob, Looking Back on Parkham & Bideford Years Ago, Bideford 1970.

(17) George Jacob, same reference.

(18) Corrective note by R.Pearse Chope in The Hartland Chronicle, 1901, No. 054. The P.O. Appointment Book Indexes confirm the 3 appointments on the 5th and 13th March 1844.

(19) Pigot's Directory of Devon, 1844.

(20) Apart from the glebe only 3 other individuals owned land in Clovelly: William Cole Loggin, the Impropriator of Woolsery, owned 103 acres, William Ching 69 acres and John Squire 16 acres.

(21) Complete Peerage 1895,p. 394.

(22) Same reference.

(23) 12672M/O/LD/72/16, Devon Archives. Letter and list of names to the Lord Lieutenant from William Tardrew. 1262M/O/LD/72/15, North Devon R.O. Letter from Mr. J.Meddon of Winscott, Alwington, commending William Tardrew to the Lord Lieutenant.

(24) See sale notices for the Peppercombe estate in Bideford Weekly Gazette, page 1, Apr. 27th 1857 and page 1 of the North Devon Journal, 2nd Sept. 1858.

(25) Tristram Risdon, Survey of Devon , 1811, p.422. Annery Court, “ now belongs to Mr. Tardrew of Bideford.”

(26) Samuel Lysons, Magna Britannia, 1822, p. 363. “the house has been modernised by Mr. Tardrew.”

(27) See signature of William Tardrew, “Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for the county of Devon” in Parkham baptismal register, correcting the baptismal entry for Samuel Tardrue dated 12th December 1782.

(28) Sale notice of Apr. 27th 1857, previously cited. “There is also at Bucks Beach, on the coast, and in the same parish, a limekiln and stable held by the same lessee.” The lessee was a Mr. Balsdon

(29) See 25” O.S. Plan , Devon XVIII 14, Revised 1904

(30) See B648/8, North Devon Record Office. Counterpart of a lease between Thomas Pine Coffin and William Tardrew.

(31) See Dark of Parkham, CD ROM, Obtainable from the author.

(32) Janet Few, previously cited, p.127.

(33) Devon Record Office,QS32/108.

(34) North Devon Journal, 14th April 1831.

(35) North Devon Journal, 16th April 1857.

(36) Chope was one of the first to point out that there was no compelling evidence, apart from Braunton, for the existence of the 3-field system in North Devon.

(37) George Vancouver, General View of the Agriculture of the County of Devon, Board of Agriculture report, 1808,p. 406 (table).

(38) Same reference, p.139.

(39) Same reference, p. 92.

(40) The Rural Economy of the West of England, W. Marshall, (2 vols.), 1796, London.

(41) Vancouver, previously cited, p. 29.

(42) Vancouver, pp. 361-363.

(43) George Jacob, previously cited.

(44) Pat Pidler, My Boyhood Days, self published, 1987, p.23.

(45) Same reference, p.34.

  

Appendix 1. Baptisms,Marriages and Burials in Parkham 1841 & 1842      

(Transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard)

Marriages

21.02.1841 Vaggers George Bowden Caroline
27.03.1841 Beer Stephen Slee Elizabeth
29.03.1841 Mounce William Davie Mary
31.03.1841 Gifford Richard Clement Mary Ann
19.08.1841 Gist Samuel Harvey Elizabeth Ann
02.09.1841 Sanders Thomas Braund Mary Ann
29.12.1841 Drew William Headon Mary Ann
07.04.1842 Downing Thomas Johns Elizabeth
24.04.1842 Prance James Prance Ann
21.08.1842 Bartlett John Mallett Elizabeth
31.10.1842 Shapton Samuel Moals Tammy
03.11.1842 Lane Joziah Ashton Jane

Baptisms

Date Surname Child's Name Father Mother Occupation Abode
10.01.1841 Morrish James Henry James Amy Shoemaker Parkham Town
12.02.1841 Downing Charlotte Maria James Elizabeth Yeoman Goldsworthy
28.02.1841 Brend James James Ann Husbandman Higher Kerswell
27.06.1841 Paddon Thomas James Ann Husbandman Northway
04.07.1841 Ashton Frances John Fanny Husbandman Broad Parkham
14.07.1841 Delve Mary Ann George Mary Yeoman Watershute
15.07.1841 Heale Margaret John Betsy Yeoman Stone
31.10.1841 Wakely Mary William Margaret Husbandman Horns Cross
09.01.1842 Braund Thomas William Susannah Fisherman Buckish
06.02.1842 Mounce Ellen William Mary Husbandman Parkham Town
13.02.1842 Dunn Mary Jane Richard Betsy Yeoman Nethercott
13.02.1842 Heale Mary Robert Elizabeth Carpenter Parkham Town
06.03.1842 Wade Richard Philip Ann Farmer Ash
08.03.1842 Southwood Ellen William Mary Husbandman Horns Cross
*?06.1842 *Heale? William John *Betsy? *Yeoman? *Stone?
24.07.1842 Bartlett Mary Anne Bartlett   Charlotte   East Goldsworthy
24.07.1842 Pickard John James Agnes Labourer Melbury Cottage
24.07.1842 Peard Giles William Mary Labourer Horns Cross
24.07.1842 Acland Ann William Mary Labourer Bulland
31.10.1842 Sanders Alice Thomas Ann Miller Boccombe Mill
17.11.1842 Ching John William Fanny Yeoman Cabbacott
11.12.1842 Martin William James Emlyn Shoemaker Parkham

N.B. * indicates very faint entries.

Burials

Date Surname Christian Name Abode Age
17.01.1841 Lee Elizabeth Parkham Town 72 years
27.01.1841 Ashton William Crooked lake 74 years
05.02.1841 Beclack William Sedgeborough 54 years
21.03.1841 Lane Josias Goldsworthy 65 years
05.04.1841 White Ann Horns Cross 78 years
20.05.1841 Pickard William Ash 93 years
13.06.1841 Hancock Susan Old Mills 2 years
27.06.1841 Ashton Isaac Crooked lake 2 years
12.07.1841 Vigurs Joanna Dundridge 69 years
29.07.1841 Peard Grace Goldsworthy 3 years
23.08.1841 May Thomas Bableigh 2 years
05.09.1841 Johns Mary Goldsworthy 3 years
07.09.1841 Hancock Nathaniel Old Mills 37 years
11.09.1841 Nancekivell Margaret Cabbacott 1 year
13.10.1841 Grigg William Horns Cross 65 years
06.12.1841 Dark Mary Water Shute 84 years
29.01.1842 Dobb George Peppercombe 49 years
04.04.1842 Nancekivell William Broad Parkham 75 years
26.04.1842 George John Merton 39 years
03.05.1842 Moass Mary Ann Parkham Town 1 year
15.05.1842 Rudd James Parkham 1 year
17.05.1842 Walter Richard, clerk Rectory Parkham 78 years
31.08.1842 Veal Grace Parkham 71 years
18.09.1842 Hancock Mary Sedborough, Parkham 45 years
22.09.1842 Hockridge Mary Lower Worthygate 25 years
25.09.1842 A Stranger no name found drowned about 22 years
21.10.1842 Lewis William Knotty Corner, Alwington 75 years
14.11.1842 Pickard Agnes Melbury Cottages 2 years
17.11.1842 May William Babeleigh 49 years
27.11.1842 Nancekivell Elizabeth Lower Parkham 3 years

 

Appendix 2. Holdings of Over 100 Acres                   

Occupier Farm Acreage Census Description
William Pridham Melbury 547.0.34 Farmer
James Moase Halsbury Barton 338.1.33 Farmer
William Beckalick  Bur. 5/2/1842 aged 54 (Ann Beckalick succeeded). Sedborough 314.3.16 Farmer
William May Babeleigh 265.2.25 Farmer
Mary Andrew Part of Melbury 173.1.25 Not found
James Downing Goldworthy Barton 150.3.27 Farmer
Various, on land leased by James Dunn from Rev. J.T. Pine-Coffin Unnamed land 136.2.12 James Dunn Not found
Richard Bailey Kerswell 135.2.32 Farmer
Ann Andrew Parkham Town Barton 117.1.14 Farmer
Edward George (snr.) Cabbacott Barton 111..3.12 Farmer
           ditto Smiths Cabbacott 43.1.35  
           ditto Haynes Cabbacott 36.2.15  
           ditto Broad Parkham Tenement 35.1.09  
           ditto Hawkes Stone 21.0.10  
James Pickard Steart 95.0.09 Farmer
           ditto Welcom Moor 23.3.15  
George Delve Watershute Blinches 101.1.37 Farmer
Joseph Heywood Glovers Worthyeat 63.2.08 Farmer
      ditto Harrises Watershute & Berrymans 41.0.30  
      ditto Part of Daniels Broad Parkham 3.2.08  
William Pickard Beers Down 62.0.19 Farmer
       ditto Weeks Ash 33.0.25  
       ditto Arnolds Moor 7.2.17  
       ditto Unnamed 2.2.13  
        ditto Unnamed 0.2.19  
Thomas Ching Brittons Goldworthy 64.2.35 Farmer
       ditto East Goldworthy 61.3.12  
       ditto Unnamed Land 0.0.21  
George Ford Sloo 66.3.29 Farmer
       ditto Daniels Broad Parkham 25.0.15  
       ditto Brittons Worthyeat 9.0.38  

 

Appendix 3. Holdings of Between 10 and 100 Acres

Name of Occupier Name of Holding Acres Census Description
William Braund Galsworthy 21.0.15 Farmer
Lee John Lee Part Halsbury 39.1.07 Not found in 1841 census
John Chappell Harrises Hill 10.1.22 Butcher
       ditto Bank Hole 6.0.37   
Edward George (jnr) Bishops Cabbacott 47.2.14 Farmer
      ditto Hen House 40.0.35    
John Lang Part of Hore Hill 14.3.06 Farmer
     ditto Pearce's Broad Parkham 47.3.18    
     ditto Short's Cottage 23.1.10     
     ditto Broomhill 3.3.18     
     ditto Unnamed house etc. 0.1.10     
Henry Parr Higher Dendridge 10.0.21 Farmer
     ditto Lower Dendridge 7.2.29      
    ditto Part of Stone 2.0.37      
Richard Bond Part of Melbury 65.1.14 Not found in 1841 census
Joseph Clements West Stone 53.1.20 Not found in 1841 census
       ditto Daniels Broad Parkham 25.0.15       
Walter Heywood Berrymans Watershute 11.1.09 Not found in 1841 census
Thomas Headon Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton 15.3.28 Farmer
    ditto Part of Blindlake 19.0.38   
    ditto Blindlake 42.2.07    
Joseph Dark Limebury 40.1.4 Farmer
    ditto Moleshill 17.3.21  
William Kievell Higher Fox Downs 35.3.32 Not found in 1841 census
John NanceKievell Waytown 64.1.26 Farmer
William Nancekivell Smiths Broad Parkham 47.0.06 Farmer
Samuel Norman Fortescues Ash 54.2.04 Farmer
Bartholomew Pickard Part of Daniels Broad Parkham 13.0.23 Farmer
Thomas Robins Part of Nichol's Ash 39.1.26 Farmer
Mary Tardrew Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton 17.1.05 Farmer
Philip Wade Part of Nichols Ash 6.3.04 Farmer
      ditto Kingsland Ash 27.2.19    
      ditto Gilberts Ash 8.2.06     
      ditto Southcotts Ash 44.1.21     
Charles Bruton South Yeo 35.2.18 Ind. means
      ditto Tucking Mill 48.0.15      
James Braund Unnamed house etc. 10.3.07 Fisherman
      ditto   0.0.10  
Ann Blinch Hortop Peppercombe 61.2.34 Farmer
Thomas Nancekivell Lower Holwell 18.2.25 Ind.means
James Peard Shapleys Goldworthy 37.0.34 Not found in 1841 census
Thomas Pridham Pearce's Northway 21.3.07 Farmer
Richard Dunn Nethercott & Shortridges Bocombe 69.2.20 Farmer
Richard Grigg Olivers Parkham Tenement 35.1.09 Blacksmith
Thomas & William Hockeridge Worthygate 75.2.24 Farmers
Mary Matilda Hucks Payne's Cleave 20.3.24 Ind. means
John Bates Part of  Lower Foxdowns 14.3.24 Not found in 1841 census
John Harding Hoopers Bocombe 21.3.34 Farmer
Richard Dunn Hordiland 43.2.30 Farmer
Elizabeth Caddy Bowden 82.0.21 Ind.means
Thomas Lemon White Fields & Parkham 15.2.21 Farmer
Anna Rolle Morrison & others Parkham Side 76.3.36 Not found in 1841 census
William Bate Hammetts Worthygate 16.1.05 Butcher
James Shortridge Higher Waytown 62.3.17 Farmer
John Saunders Part of Harrisses 10.2.32 Tailor
James Hamlyn Worden 34.1.05 Not found in 1841 census
John Heal East Stone 92.2.06 Farmer
William Squance Halsbury Mill 16.0.23 Farmer
Richard Lane Bocombe 85.2.29 Farmer
John Veale Honnocotts West Stone 34.2.21 Farmer
Richard Bate Deans Steart 3.3.04 Farmer
       ditto Reckards Steart 7.0.26   
Daniel Glover Unmamed house etc. 1.3.00 Ag. Lab.

 

Appendix 4. Holdings of between 1 and 10 acres

Name of Occupier Name of Holding Acres Census Description
George Brend Robins Goldworthy 4.2.20 Ag. Lab.
William Bond Part of Hore Hill 2.1.17 Ag.Lab.
Anthony Clement Unnamed Land 4.0.03 Ag. Lab.
Ann Heydon Part of Daniels Broad Parkham 6.2.35 Bonnet maker
John Jewell Part of Daniels Broad Parkham 3.2.14 Carpenter
Thomas Jewell Part of Bishops Cabbacott 6.1.13 Mason
Richard Grang Prestons Holwill 9.0.11 Not found in 1841 census
John Grigg Goldworthy Mill 6.2.15 Miller
William Tardrew Houses etc. 5.1.10 Not found in 1841 census
William Gill Part of Northway 6.3.27 Not found in 1841 census
Thomas Dark Part of Hortops Broad Parkham 7.1.21 Farmer
Henry Parr Part of Stone 2.0.37 Farmer
Samuel Wakely Part of Daniels Broad Parkham 1.2.05 Ag. Lab.
Nathaniel Hancock Frys 2.0.20 Independent means
John Saunders Bocombe Mill 8.1.20 Tailor
Michael Chalk Part of Bishops Northway 2.1.05 Blacksmith
Thomas Squance Part of Bishops Northway 6.3.33 Not found in 1841 census
Thomas Lemon Higher Bocombe 7.3.32 Farmer
Robert Lot & Thomas Palmer Part of Tucking Mill 1.0.19 Carpenter & Ag.Lab. respectively
William Dunn Daniels Broad Parkham 9.1.21 Farmer
William Harris Hunger Road 5.1.22 Ag.Lab.
James Lane Part of Northway 6.1.28 Glazier
     ditto Part of Northway 3.0.22    
Lewis Southcombe Hele Part of Brittons Galworthy 5.1.29 Not found in 1841 census

 

Appendix 5. PARKHAM CENSUS 1841 - HO 107/244

Transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard

North Side: Turnpike Road from Bideford to Hartland

Road Street etc Surname Name Rel to Head Age Rank, Prof, Occ Born in county?
HORNS CROSS            
VILLAGE GEORGE Grace F 35 Independent Y
             
  VEAL Henry M 40 Ag Lab Y
  VEAL Mary Ann F 40   Y
  VEAL Richard M 15   Y
  VEAL George M 13   Y
  VEAL Henry M 11   Y
  VEAL Ann F 9   Y
             
  LANE James M 50 Glazier Y
  LANE Anne F 42   Y
  LANE Lewis M 15   Y
  LANE James M 13   Y
             
  GRIGG William M 65 Carpenter Y
             
  NANCEKIVELL William M 35 Ag Lab Y
  NANCEKIVELL Betsy F 33   Y
             
  WAKLEY William M 40 Ag Lab Y
  WAKLEY Margret F 35   Y
  WAKLEY Ann F 9   Y
  WAKLEY William M 6   Y
  WAKLEY James M 2   y
             
  PEARD William M 40 Ag Lab Y
  PEARD Mary F 35   Y
  PEARD Ann F 5   Y
  PEARD Grace F 3   Y
  PEARD William M 6 months   Y
             
  SOUTHWOOD William M 30 Ag Lab Y
  SOUTHWOOD Mary F 30   Y
  SOUTHWOOD Elizabeth F 9   Y
  SOUTHWOOD William M 5   Y
  SOUTHWOOD Luisa F 2   Y
             
Peppercombe PRANCE John M 50 Fisherman Y
  PRANCE Mary F 50   Y
  PRANCE John M 17   Y
  PRANCE Athaliah F 12   Y
  PRANCE Jane F 9   Y
  PRANCE Joseph M 6   Y
             
  TANTON Betsey F 30 Independent Y
  TANTON John M 7 months   Y
             
  PASSMORE Sally F 25 Independent Y
             
  KIVELL Jane F 74   Y
  KIVELL Mary F 30 Glove maker Y
             
  GERMAN Mary F 30 F.S. Y
  MILNE Julia F 15 F.S. Y
             
  RUDALL Eliza F 30 Independent Y
  RUDALL Walter M 5   Y
  RUDALL Margret F 4   Y
  RUDALL Mary F 2   Y
  RUDALL Anna F 1   Y
  WALLER Nora F 15   Y
  BARKWILL Grace F 15   Y
             
  PADDON James M 40 Ag Lab Y
  PADDON Ann F 30   Y
  PADDON James M 10   Y
  PADDON William M 7   Y
  PADDON Samuel M 4   Y
  PADDON Richard M 2   Y
             
  DUBB George M 45 Ag :Lab Y
  DUBB Elizabeth F 35   Y
  DUBB Faney F 10   Y
  DUBB Samuel M 7   Y
  HUTCHINGS Elizabeth F 65   Y
             
  PADDON Samuel M 62 Limeburner Y
  PADDON Ann F 63   Y
             
  LASHBROOK William M 40 Ag Lab Y
  LASHBROOK Ann F 40   Y
  LASHBROOK Mary F 11   Y
  LASHBROOK Ann F 9   Y
  LASHBROOK James M 7   Y
  LASHBROOK Thomas M 5   Y
  LASHBROOK John M 1   Y
             
  HARRIS John M 70 Farmer Y
  HARRIS Grace F 65   Y
  HARRIS James M 35 Ag Lab Y
  HARRIS John M 12   Y
             
  BAGLOLE John M 30 Fisherman Y
  BAGLOLE Eliza F 30   Y
  BAGLOLE James M 8   Y
  BAGLOLE Ann F 6   Y
  BAGLOLE William M 3   Y
  BAGLOLE Elizabeth F 9 months   Y
             
  YEO Philip M 50 Ag Lab Y
  YEO Frances F 40   Y
  YEO Jane F 14   Y
  YEO Susan F 12   Y
  YEO Philip M 7   Y
  YEO Maria F 4   Y
             
Peppercombe HORTOP Ann F 75 Farmer Y
Farm STEER Thomas M 20 M.S. Y
  BRAUND Ann F 15 F.S. Y
  SANDERS Jane F 15 F.S. Y
  STEER John M 14 M.S. Y
  ASHTON Thomas M 25 M.S. Y
  SHEPHERD Samuel M 10 M.S. Y
             
Worthyeat HOCKRIDGE Thomas M 60 Farmer N
  HOCKRIDGE William M 56   N
  HOCKRIDGE Mary F 84   N
  BOND Thomas M 16 M.S. Y
  DARK Edwin M 13 M.S. Y
  GOODNEW Grace F 18 F.S. Y
             
Slough FORD George M 30 Farmer Y
  FORD Elizabeth F 30   Y
  VANSTONE John M 20 M.S. Y
  LANE William M 15 M.S. Y
  JOHNS Maria F 15 F.S. Y
  GLOVER Henry M 14 M.S. Y
  JOLLIFF Sharlot F 14 F.S. Y
  WAKLEY John M 13 M.S. Y
  JOLLIFF John M 9 M.S. Y
             
Higher Worthyeat PRANCE James M 70 Independent Y
  PRANCE Francis M 25 Butcher Y
  PRANCE Ann F 25   Y
  PRANCE Jane F 20 Dressmaker Y
             
  HARRIS Elizabeth F 35   Y
  HARRIS Mary F 10   Y
  HARRIS Lucy F 5   Y
  HARRIS Jesse M 2   Y
             
  JOHNS William M 45 Ag Lab Y
  JOHNS Mary F 50   Y
  JOHNS William M 9   Y
  JOHNS Jane F 7   Y
             
Buckish Mills HAMLYN William M 45 Ag Lab Y
Village HAMLYN Elizabeth F 40   Y
  HAMLYN Mary F 20   Y
  HAMLYN Elizabeth F 8   Y
             
  SLEE William M 60 Ag Lab Y
  SLEE Ann F 56   Y
  SLEE Grace F 30   Y
  SLEE John M 16   Y
  SLEE Elias M 13   Y
  SLEE Mary F 28 ?Miliner Y
  SLEE James M 7   Y
  SLEE Mary Ann F 4   Y
             
  BRAUND William M 40 Farmer Y
  BRAUND Susan F 40   Y
  BRAUND Elizabeth F 11   Y
  BRAUND Thomas M 6   Y
  BRAUND Lewisa F 3   Y
  DARK Richard M 15 M.S. Y
             
  PENINGTON Samuel M 42 Ag Lab Y
  PENINGTON Elizabeth F 47   Y
  PENINGTON Samuel M 16   Y
  PENINGTON Andrew M 8   Y
  PENINGTON Ariet F 6   Y
  PENINGTON Eliza F 3   Y
             
  METHERALL John M 60 Mason Y
  METHERALL Mary F 50   Y
  METHERALL Samuel M 20   Y
  METHERALL Ann F 12   Y
  DUNN David M 1   Y
   
  PENINGTON Richard M 50 Ag lab Y
  PENINGTON Mary F 45   Y
  PENINGTON Ann F 14   Y
  PENINGTON Moses M 8   Y
  PENINGTON Richard M 3   Y
  JEWELL Henry M 25 Ag lab Y
   
  SANDERS John M 55 Ag lab Y
  SANDERS Jane F 55   Y
  SANDERS Mary Ann F 12   Y
  SANDERS James M 9   Y
   
  CHIDLEY Susanna F 34 Glove maker Y
  CHIDLEY Mary F 72   Y
  PHILIPS John M 76   Y
   
  GOODNEW John M 30 Ag Lab Y
  GOODNEW Elizabeth F 30   Y
  GOODNEW William M 5   Y
  GOODNEW Elizabeth F 1   Y
  GOODNEW Samuel M 20 Ag Lab Y
   
  FOUND Richard M 78 Ag Lab Y
  FOUND Jonna F 79   Y
   
  DAVY Robert M 55 Mason Y
  DAVY Mary F 55   Y
  DAVY Lewis M 20   Y
   
  JOLLIFF Thomas M 42 Ag lab Y
  JOLLIFF Mary F 72   Y
   
  BRAUND John M 70 Cooper Y
  BRAUND Ann F 80   Y
  BRAUND Thomas M 35   Y
  VANSTONE Susan F 15   Y
   
  BRAUND Mary Ann F 28   Y
  BRAUND Jane F 8   Y
  BRAUND William M 6   Y
  BRAUND James M 4   Y
  BRAUND John M 2   Y
  BAGLOLE Rebecca F 23   Y
   
  BRAUND James M 54 Ag Lab Y
  BRAUND Elizabeth F 50   Y
  BRAUND Betsey F 23   Y
  BRAUND William M 20 Sailor Y
  BRAUND Faney F 14   Y
  BRAUND Joseph M 10   Y
  ALLIN Grace F 13   Y
   
  BAGLOLE John M 60 Ag Lab Y
  BAGLOLE Mary F 60   Y
  BAGLOLE Elizabeth F 14   Y
  BORED Mary F 25   Y
  BORED Hariet F 6   Y
  BORED Mary F 4   Y
  BORED Elizabeth F 3   Y
  BORED Thomas M 1   Y
   
  BRAUND James M 34 Fisherman Y
  BRAUND Mary F 29   Y
  BRAUND Hannah F 8   Y
  BRAUND James M 7   Y
  BRAUND Mary F 5   Y
  BRAUND William M 4   Y
  BRAUND John M 2   Y
   
  HARRIS John M 27 Limeburner Y
  HARRIS Jane F 25   Y
  HARRIS Samuel M 6   Y
  HARRIS Thomas M 4   Y
  HARRIS Elizabeth F 2   Y
  EDDY Giles M 60 Shoemaker Y
   
  LOGGIN Mary F 45 Independent Y
  LOGGIN Rosa F 14   Y
  LOGGIN Hester F 13   Y
   
Steart PICKARD James M 40 Farmer Y
  PICKARD Jane F 30   Y
  PICKARD Elizabeth F 19   Y
  DOWNING Thomas M 25 M.S. Y
  DUBB Ann F 18 F.S. Y
  NICHOLDS Thomas M 18 Aprentice Y
  HAMLYN James M 12 M.S. Y
   
Down water BISHOP Richard M 35 Ag lab Y
  BISHOP Mary F 30   Y
  BISHOP Henry M 4   Y
  BISHOP James M 2   Y
   
Shute Cottage GLOVER John M 55 Ag Lab Y
  GLOVER Ann F 60   Y
  GLOVER Elizabeth F 17   Y
   
  NICHOLDS John M 30 Ag Lab Y
  NICHOLDS Sarah F 30   Y
  NICHOLDS Harriot F 2 months   Y
   
? Holwill NANCEKIVELL Thomas M 75 Ind Y
  NANCEKIVELL Grace F 70   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Thomas M 50   Y
  ASHTON Martha F 55 F.S. Y
   
Hoops Inn CRANG Henry M 25 Inn keeping Y
  CRANG Sarah F 30   Y
  CRANG Elizabeth F 1   Y
  MARTIN Judith F 14 F.S. Y
  JOHNS Harriet F 20   Y
   
Hoops VEAL John M 40 Ag lab Y
  VEAL Frances F 40   Y
  VEAL Harriet F 12   Y
  VEAL Frances F 7   Y
  VEAL Henry M 5   Y
   
Northway CRUMB John M 35 Ag Lab y
  CRUMB Elizabeth F 35   Y
  CRUMB Ann F 10   Y
  CRUMB John M 8   Y
  CRUMB William M 4   Y
   
  BRAUND Agniss F 15 Farmer ? Y
  BRAUND Susanna F 8   Y
   
  MITCHELL William M 30 Ag Lab Y
  MITCHELL Margret F 25   Y
  MITCHELL Sarah F 7   Y
  MITCHELL William M 5   Y
  MITCHELL John M 3   Y
  MITCHELL Eliza F 6 months   Y
   
Northway Farm GRIGG Thomas M 25 Farmer Y
  GRIGG Grace F 20   Y
  GRIGG Elizabeth F 1   Y
  HEAL Ann F 10 F.S. Y
   
Summary: 55 houses occ 7 unoccup 127 males 135 female 262 persons  
   
2            
Newhaven WAKELY Samuel M 72 Ag Lab Y
  WAKELY Rachel F 73   Y
  WAKELY John M 35   Y
   
  WAKELY James M 30 mason Y
  WAKELY Sarah F 40   Y
  WAKELY Mary Jane F 11   Y
  WAKELY Caleb M 8   Y
   
  MOYSE John M 75 Ag Lab Y
  MOYSE Ann F 18   Y
   
  MOYSE William M 35 Ag lab Y
  MOYSE Grace F 30   Y
  MOYSE John M 8   Y
  MOYSE William M 5   Y
  MOYSE Mary Ann F 5   Y
  MOYSE Joseph M 1 month   Y
   
  VAGGERS William M 35 Mason Y
  VAGGERS Sarah F 35   Y
  VAGGERS Henry M 14   Y
  VAGGERS WIlliam M 12   Y
  VAGGERS George M 6   Y
   
  JEWELL Thomas M 50 Mason Y
  JEWELL Jane F 50   Y
  JEWELL Thomas M 20   Y
  JEWELL Henry M 17   Y
   
Cross Park Cottages CLEMENT Anthony M 47 Ag Lab Y
  CLEMENT Mary F 48   Y
  CLEMENT Eliza F 13   Y
  CLEMENT Christopher M 6   Y
   
  GENT John M 28 Ag lab Y
  GENT Ann F 33   Y
  GENT James M 3   Y
  GENT John M 1   Y
Goldsworthy Village            
  SHEPHERD Samuel M 45 Cordwainer Y
  SHEPHERD Jane F 40   Y
  SHEPHERD Elizabeth F 12   Y
  SHEPHERD James M 8   Y
  SHEPHERD John M 5   Y
  SHEPHERD George M 3   Y
   
  CHING Thomas M 35 Farmer Y
  CHING Ann F 33   Y
  DARK Thomas M 23 M.S. Y
  HERN William M 18 M.S. Y
  GLOVER Abraham M 18 Aprentice Y
  BRIANT John M 14 M.S. Y
  WEBB Mary F 18 F.S. Y
  GLOVER Elizabeth F 14 Aprentice Y
   
  CHING John M 84 Independent Y
  CHING Elizabeth F 64   Y
East Goldsworthy            
  AUSTIN Susan F 53 Farmer Y
  AUSTIN Richard M 24   Y
  AUSTIN Joseph M 18   Y
  AUSTIN Thomas M 12   Y
  AUSTIN William M 31 M Servant Y
   
  PEARD James M 84 Ind Y
   
  LEE Thomas M 25 Ag Lab Y
  LEE Fanny F 20   Y
  LEE Charles M 3   Y
  LEE Ann F 6 months   Y
   
  JEFFRY William M 45 Ag Lab Y
  JEFFRY Grace F 42   Y
  JEFFRY John M 7   Y
  JEFFRY William M 4   Y
  JEFFRY Grace F 6 months   Y
   
  LANG John M 40 Ag Lab Y
  LANG Susan F 40   Y
  LANG Eliza F 14   Y
  LANG James M 12   Y
  DARK Elizabeth F 12   Y
  WHITE Sarah F 12   Y
  DARK Ann F 7   Y
   
  LANE John M 35 Farmer Y
  BRIANT Elizabeth F 40   Y
  BURNICLES Mary F 13   Y
   
  BARTLETT William M 55 Ag lab Y
  BARTLETT Mary F 60   Y
  BARTLETT Jane F 16   Y
   
  JOHNS Samuel M 40 Ag Lab Y
  JOHNS Mary F 40   Y
  JOHNS Joanna F 8   Y
  JOHNS Mary Brooks F 6   Y
  JOHNS Betsey F 1   Y
   
  LANG William M 75 Ag Lab Y
  LANG Elizabeth F 74   Y
  LANG Ann F 16   Y
  LEE Christian F 8   Y
   
Horns Cross Village CHALK Michael M 60 Blacksmith Y
  CHALK Ann F 60   Y
  CHALK Humphrey M 30   Y
  PIPER George M 15 M. Servant Y
  LEE Mary F 14 F.S. Y
   
  HARVEY William M 45 Coast Guard Y
  HARVEY Elizabeth F 45   Y
  HARVEY Elizabeth F 20   Y
  HARVEY Samuel M 13   Y
  HARVEY Emelia F 11   Y
  HARVEY Eliza F 8   Y
   
  LEIGH Joanna F 45 Ind Y
  GRIFFITHS Fanny F 10 F.S.  
   
  CLOAK Samuel M 50 Carpenter Y
  CLOAK John M 45 Carpenter Y
  CLOAK Mary F 40   Y
Higher Holwill Farm            
  NANCEKIVELL William M 35 Farmer Y
  NANCEKIVELL Elizabeth F 30   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Elizabeth Ann F 12   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Mary Jane F 7   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Fanny F 5   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Thomas M 4   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Grace F 8 months   Y
  DARK George M 12 M Servant Y
   
Lower Holwill BATE William M 62 Butcher Y
  BATE Mary F 54   Y
  BATE Thirza F 17   Y
   
  DARK Thomas M 75 Ag Lab Y
  DARK Betsey F 40   Y
   
  BATE Henry M 25 Butcher Y
  WAKELY James M 10 M Servant Y
   
Waytown Gate CROSCOMB Ellizabeth F 40 Toll gate keeper Y
  WAY William M 2   Y
   
Prances Cottage BECKLAKE Simeon M 70 Butcher Y
  BECKLAKE Mary F 50   Y
  BECKLAKE Samuel M 16   Y
   
Waytown Cottages JOLLIFFE Elizabeth F 55 Ind Y
  JOLLIFFE Maria F 9   Y
   
Waytown Farm NANCEKIVELL John M 40 Farmer Y
  NANCEKIVELL Elizabeth F 35   Y
  PICKARD Richard M 15 M.S. Y
  JOHNS Elizabeth F 26 F.S. Y
  PALMER George M 13 Aprentice Y
   
  SHORTRIDGE James M 70 Farmer Y
  SHORTRIDGE Elizabeth F 65   Y
  ASHTON Grace F 20 F.S. Y
   
Watershute Farm DELVE George M 25 Farmer Y
  DELVE Mary F 25   Y
  DELVE John M 4   Y
  BEER Joseph M 15 M.S. Y
  NICHOLS Charles M 15 M.S. Y
  HOCKRIDGE Rebecca F 55 Ind Y
  PETHERICK Mary F 15 F.S. Y
   
  HAYWOOD Joseph M 60 Farmer Y
  HAYWOOD Ann F 40   Y
  HAYWOOD Miriam F 17   Y
  HAYWOOD Thomas M 15   Y
  HAYWOOD Joseph M 13   Y
  HAYWOOD James Cook M 12   Y
  HAYWOOD Ann F 10   Y
  HAYWOOD William M 9   Y
  HAYWOOD Mary Jane F 8   Y
   
Watershute Cottage PICKARD Thomas M 30 Ag Lab Y
  PICKARD Susanna F 35   Y
  PICKARD John M 5   Y
  PICKARD Mary Ann F 3   Y
  DARK Mary F 83 Ind Y
  LEE John M 40 Ag Lab Y
   
Limebury Farm DARK Joseph M 35 Farmer Y
  DARK Rebecca F 30   Y
  DARK Mary F 9   Y
  DARK Louisa F 7   Y
  DARK John M 5   Y
  DARK John M 14 M.S. Y
  REYMONT John M 11 Apr Y
   
Limebury Cross PICKARD Jasper M 68 Carpenter Y
Cottage PICKARD Ann F 65   Y
  BAILEY Mary F 84 Ind Y
   
Limebury Cross Park DARK Thomas M 40 Farmer Y
  DARK Miriam F 38   Y
  DARK Thomas M 13   Y
  DARK John M 11   Y
  DARK Joseph M 7   Y
  DARK Thirza F 3   Y
  DARK Ellen F 1   Y
  DUNN Eliza F 26 Ind Y
   
Broad Parkham NANCEKIVELL William M 74 Farmer Y
  NANCEKIVELL Frances F 60   Y
  NANCEKIVELL John M 32   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Thomas M 27   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Samuel M 25   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Edward M 23   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Fanny F 20   Y
  COPP John M 14 M.S. Y
   
  LANG William M 35 Farmer Y
  LANG Ann F 30   Y
  LANG Caleb M 7   Y
  LANG Harriot F 3   Y
  LANG John M 1   Y
  ELLIS Edward M 14 M.S. Y
  JOLLIFFE Ann F 14 Apr Y
  ROWELL Mary F 13 F.S. Y
  JEWELL Aaron M 9 M.S. Y
  LANG John M 85 Ind Y
  LANG John M ? M.S. Y
   
  DARK Thomas M 45 Ag Lab Y
  DARK Ann F 39   Y
  DARK Mary F 10   Y
  DARK Lewis M 5   Y
  DARK Ann F 3   Y
  DARK Elizabeth F 8 months   Y
   
  JEWELL John M 58 Carpenter Y
  JEWELL Elizabeth F 44   Y
  JEWELL Susanna F 22   Y
  JEWELL Gideon M 20   Y
  JEWELL Moses M 17   Y
  JEWELL Morella F 15   Y
  JEWELL Emellia F 7   Y
   
  WAKELY Samuel M 45 Ag Lab Y
  WAKELY Grace F 40   Y
  WAKELY William M 15   Y
  WAKELY Rachael F 13   Y
  WAKELY Grace F 4   Y
   
  LEMON Thomas M 50 Farmer Y
  LEMON Sarah F 48   Y
  LEMON William M 16   Y
  LEMON Thomas M 14   Y
  LEMON Samuel M 11   Y
  LEMON Elizabeth F 7   Y
  WATCHER Elizabeth F 17 F.S. Y
   
  ASHTON John M 35 Ag Lab Y
  ASHTON Frances F 30   Y
  ASHTON Elizabeth F 6   Y
  ASHTON John M 5   Y
  ASHTON William M 2   Y
  ASHTON Alice F 2 months   Y
   
  HARRIS William M 35 Ag Lab Y
  HARRIS Sarah F 30   Y
  HARRIS Mary Ann F 10   Y
  HARRIS John M 8   Y
  HARRIS Harriot F 6   Y
   
  DUNN William M 39 Farmer Y
  DUNN Mary Ann F 29   Y
  DUNN Jane F 11   Y
  DUNN William M 10   Y
  DUNN Grace F 7   Y
   
  HAMLYN Richard M 60 Ag Lab Y
  HAMLYN Grace F 55   Y
  HAMLYN Ann F 20   Y
   
  GEORGE Edward M 35 Farmer Y
  GEORGE Elizabeth F 30   Y
  GEORGE Edward M 3   Y
  GEORGE Elizabeth F 2   Y
  GEORGE Jane F 2 days   Y
  HERN Eliza F 11 F.S. Y
  BRIANT Mary F 15 Apprentice Y
  NANCEKIVELL Frances F 15 F.S. Y
  CANN Isaac M 14 M.S. Y
   
  NANCEKIVELL William M 35 Ag Lab Y
  NANCEKIVELL Eliza F 25   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Thirza F 3   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Elizabeth F 1   Y
  NANCEKIVELL James M 65   Y
  NANCEKIVELL John M 35   Y
  NANCEKIVELL Mary F 25   Y
   
Robinson Cruso Cottage            
  PICKARD Bartholomew M 65 Farmer Y
   
Foxdown HUCKS Matilda F 65 Ind Y
  KELLY Mary F 20 Ind N . I
  PIDLER George M 50 M.S. Y
  PIDLER Mary F 50 F.S. Y
  VEALE Charlotte F 25 F.S. Y
  HEARD Jane F 20 F.S. Y
   
Bank Hole Farm CHAPPLE John M 30 Butcher Y
  CHAPPLE Margaret F 24   Y
  CHAPPLE John Ashton M 10 months   Y
   
Bank Hole Farm BROOM John M 60 Ag Lab Y
Cottage CHAPPLE Grace F 59 Ind Y
  CHAPPLE Elizabeth F 15   Y
   
Goldsworthy Mill GRIGG John M 35 Miller Y
  GRIGG Grace F 30   Y
  NICHOLS Sarah F 13 App Y
   
West Goldsworthy DOWNING James M 46 Farmer Y
Farm DOWNING Elizabeth F 39   Y
  DOWNING Harriot Fortescue F 14   N
  DOWNING Thomas F M 12   Y
  DOWNING Henry F M 11   Y
  DOWNING Lucey F F 9   Y
  DOWNING James M 7   Y
  DOWNING Eliza Ashton F 6   Y
  DOWNING Charles M 3   Y
  DOWNING Sarah J F 3   Y
  DOWNING Eliza F 1   Y
  DOWNING Charlotte F 5 months   Y
  BOWDEN Richard M 17 M.S. Y
  BARTLETT Charlotte F 19 App Y
  DOWNING Henry M 58 Ind Y
   
Mount Pleasant CANN William M 45 Thatcher Y
  CANN Mary F 445   Y
  CANN Philip H M 15 Blacksmiths App Y
  CANN Isabella F 12   Y
  CANN Noah M 8   Y
  CANN Joshua M 4   Y
  CANN Mary Ann F 2   Y
   
3            
   
Hoar Hill BOND William M 45 Ag Lab Y
  BOND Ann F 51   Y
  BOND Ann F 10   Y
  BOND James M 7   Y
   
  HARRIS Jane F 60 Ind ? Fundholder Y
   
Courtice Cottage GLOVER Daniel M 65 Ag Lab Y
  GLOVER Mary F 65   Y
   
  BOND John M 65 Ag Lab Y
  BOND Margret F 65   Y
  HEDGES Susan F 85   Y
   
Rectory WALTER Rev Richard M 77 Clerk Y
  WILLCOCKS Sarah F 74 Ind Y
  ASHTON Jane F 35 F.S. Y
  VEAL Elizabeth F 30 F.S. Y
  VEAL Allice F 14 F.Ap Y
  ABBOT Richard M 25 M.S. Y
  PRANCE Anthony M 15 M.S. Y
  LABBOTT William M 15 M.S. Y
  DAVY Caroline F 20 F.S. Y
   
Parkham Town GRIGG Richard M 70 Publican Y
Village GRIGG Johanna F 61   Y
  GRIGG Joahanna F 26   Y
  GRIGG Edward M 22 Maltster Y
  GRIGG Reuben M 19   Y
  SHORTRIDGE William M 20 M.S. Y
   
  MARTIN James M 25 Cordwainer Y
  MARTIN Emlyn F 20   Y
  MARTIN Reuben M 2   Y
  MARTIN Ann F 11 months   Y
  CREDICOTT Edward M 20 I Cordwainer N
  HEADON John M 15 App Y
  WAKLEY Eliza F 10 F.S. Y
   
  HEADON Ann F 50 Bonnet Maker Y
  HEADON Elizabeth F 20   Y
  HEADON John M 20 Carpenter Y
  HEADON Mary F 11   Y
  COOK Louisa F 3   Y
   
  MORRISH James M 25 Cordwainer Y
  MORRISH Emlyn F 25   Y
  MORRISH Mary Ann F 5   Y
  MORRISH John M 3   Y
  MORRISH Henry M 6 months   Y
   
  SAUNDERS John M 60 Taylor Y
  SAUNDERS Mary F 60   Y
  SAUNDERS Daniel M 30   Y
  SAUNDERS Alice F 20   Y
  BLIGHT Louisa F 4   Y
  EVELY John M 30 M.S. Y
  BALCH Richard M 10 Ap Y
   
  MOASE John M 40 Cordwainer Y
  MOASE Elizabeth F 40   Y
   
Griggs Row SOUTHWOOD Thomas M 55 Woolcolmer Y
  SOUTHWOOD Ann F 50 Glover Y
  SOUTHWOOD James M 20 Woolcolmer Y
  SOUTHWOOD Elizabeth F 15 Glover Y
   
  BREND Richard M 65 Butcher Y
  BREND Egnes F 65   Y
  BREND John M 30 ?J Butcher Y
  BREND George M 25 Ag lab Y
  BREND Robert M 1   Y
  HURT William M 20 App Mason Y
  PERKING Elizabeth F 18 F.S. Y
   
  GRIGG Richard M 30 Blacksmith Y
  GRIGG Ann F 30   Y
  PRIDHAM James M 15 App Y
   
  MOASE John M 35 Carpenter Y
  MOASE Mary Ann F 35   Y
  MOASE Frederick M 4   Y
  MOASE Mary Ann F 1   Y
  MOASE Richard M 19 Ap Carpenter Y
  PENGILLY Susan F 25 F.S. Y
   
  LEE John M 37 Ag lab Y
  LEE Sarah F 37   Y
  LEE John M 4   Y
  LEE Mary F 1   Y
   
  MOUNCE William M 27 Ag Lab Y
  MOUNCE Mary F 24   Y
   
Harris Farm TAR DREW Mary F 70 Ind Y
  TUCKER Johanna F 50 F.S. Y
  TUCKER William M 30 M.S. Y
  TUCKER Alice F 12 F.S. Y
   
Parkham Town ANDREW Ann F 50 Farmer Y
Barton ANDREW Edmund M 18   Y
  ANDREW James M 13   Y
  ANDREW George M 11   Y
  HOPPER James M 34 M.S. Y
  COLWILL Harriot F 20 F.S. Y
   
  HEADON Thomas M 50 Farmer Y
  HEADON Mary F 40   Y
  HEADON Richard M 24   Y
  HEADON Prudence F 13   Y
  HEADON Susan F 10   Y
  HEADON Samuel M 8   Y
  HEADON Eli M 6   Y
  MATHEWS William M 21 M.S. Y
  JOLLIFFE Elizabeth F 12 Apr Y
  LEE John M 9 Apr Y
   
Bell Inn STANLICK Elizabeth F 50 Inn keeper Y
  STANLICK Sophia F 25   Y
  MINOR John M 50 Labourer N
Village            
  HEAL Robert M 30 Carpenter Y
  HEAL Elizabeth F 25   Y
  HEAL Louisa F 2   Y
  HEAL George Austin M 1   Y
   
Cuckingstool Cottages BRAYENT John M 45 Ag lab Y
  BRAYENT Grace F 45 Y  
   
  PASMORE Mary F 30 Schoolmistress Y
  PASMORE Ann F 5   Y
  PASMORE Mary F 3   Y
   
  ANDREW Thomas M 20 Blacksmith Y
  ANDREW Ann F 20   Y
  ANDREW James M 2   Y
  ANDREW Thomas M 1   Y
  ASHTON Joshua M 16 App Y
   
Blindlake Farm PRIDHAM Thomas M 25 Farmer Y
  PRIDHAM Susan F 20   Y
  PRIDHAM Mary Ann F 2   Y
   
  CORY William M 45 Farmer Y
  CORY Susana F 40   Y
  CORY Elizabeth F 10   Y
  CORY Grace F 9   Y
  CORY James M 5   Y
  CORY John M 15   Y
   
Windabout Cottage DARK John M 50 Ag Lab Y
  DARK Elizabeth F 50   Y
  DARK Grace F 15   Y
  DARK Elizabeth F 12   Y
  DARK Ann F 9   Y
  DARK William M 8   Y
   
Dyers Moor Farm GEORGE Edward M 40 Farmer Y
  GEORGE Elizabeth F 50   Y
  BAILEY Margret F 45 F.S. Y
  LASHBROOK Grace F 15 "F.S.," Y
  WADE Benjamin M 15 M.S. Y
  DEAN William M 20 M.S. Y
  MANNING Samuel M 12 M.S. Y
   
Kerswell Farm BAILEY Richard M 40 Farmer Y
  HAMLYN William M 25   Y
  MANNING Mary F 25 F.S. Y
  JEFFREY James M 20 M.S. Y
  GIFFORD Mary F 15 F.S. Y
  BREND William M 10 M.S. Y
  SAUNDERS William M 15 Apr Y
   
Lotts Cottage PICKHARD James M 37 Ag Lab Y
  PICKARD Egness F 33   Y
  PICKARD Ann F 9   Y
  PICKARD Richard M 7   Y
  PICKARD William M 5   Y
  PICKARD James M 4   Y
  PICKARD Egness F 1   Y
   
Melbury Farm PRIDHAM William M 60 Farmer Y
  PRIDHAM Mary F 45   Y
  PRIDHAM Jasper M 20   Y
  PRIDHAM Lawarance M 15   Y
  PRIDHAM Daniel M 14   Y
  PRIDHAM Frances F 13   Y
  PRIDHAM Edward M 10   Y
  PRIDHAM John M 7   Y
  SQUANCE William M 75 Ind Y
  SCOINS Roda F 12 F.S. Y
  BATE John M 14 Taylor Y
   
Melbury Cottage WESLICK William M 33 Ag lab Y
  WESLICK Betty F 38   Y
  WESLICK Thomas M 11   Y
  WESLICK Abraham M 8   Y
  WESLICK Grace F 6   Y
  WESLICK James M 3   Y
  WESLICK John M 1   Y
  CANN William M 73 Ag lab Y
   
Ash Moor Cottage WEBB Robert M 33 Ag Lab Y
  WEBB Mary F 55   Y
  GOODNEW Prisila F 17 F.S. Y
   
Ash ROBINS Thomas M 60 Farmer Y
  ROBINS Elizabeth F 55   Y
  ROBINS Thomas M 25   Y
  ROBINS John M 21   Y
  ROBINS Grace F 18   Y
  CHAPMAN Richard M 15 M.S. Y
  KEIVELL Richard M 14 M.S. Y
  BRINDCOMBE Fanny F 4   Y
   
  WADE Philip M 35 Farmer Y
  WADE Ann F 33   Y
  WADE Grace F 8   Y
  WADE Honour F 6   Y
  WADE Martha F 4   Y
  WADE John M 2   Y
  WADE Thomas M 1   Y
  JOLLIFFE Richard M 40 M.S. Y
  JENNINGS Richard M 14 M.S. Y
  HARRIS Robert M 10 M.S. Y
  CHUBB Grace F 16 F.S. Y
   
  NORMAN Samuel M 45 Farmer Y
  NORMAN John M 22   Y
  NORMAN Samuel M 20   Y
  NICKHOLS Noah M 10 Apr Y
  COTTY Ann F 50 F.S. Y
   
  PICKHARD William M 50 Farmer Y
  PICKARD Mary F 40   Y
  PICKARD John M 18   Y
  PICKARD Ann F 17   Y
  PICKARD Mary F 16   Y
  PICKARD William M 14   Y
  PICKARD Susan F 12   Y
  PICKARD James M 3   Y
  PICKARD Allice F 9 months   Y
  BRAYENT John M 10 Apr Y
   
Kerswell Cottage BREND James M 35 Ag Lab Y
  BREND Ann F 25   Y
  BREND Elizabeth F 8   Y
  BREND John M 6   Y
  BREND Hariot F 2   Y
  BREND James M 6 months   Y
   
Welcombe Moor SCOINS John M 45 Ag Lab Y
Cottages SCOINS Ann F 46   N
  SCOINS George M 8   Y
  SCOINS Reuben M 5   Y
  SCOINS Frances F 3   Y
   
  LABBOT Richard M 50 Ag Lab Y
  HEARDING John M 28 Ag Lab Y
   
Sedbourah Farm BECKLAKE Ann F 35 Farmer Y
  BECKLAKE James M 14   Y
  BECKLAKE Willliam M 12   Y
  BECKLAKE John M 10   Y
  BECKLAKE Margret F 6   Y
  BECKLAKE Joseph M 4   Y
  BECKLAKE Ann F 2   Y
  BECKLAKE Margret F 60 F.S. Y
  DUNN Elizabeth F 36 F.S. Y
  DUNN Bartholomew M 27 M.S. Y
  DUNN Joseph M 25 M.S. Y
  DUNN Harriot F 23 F.S. Y
   
Nethercott Farm DUNN Richard M 31 Farmer Y
  DUNN Betsy F 27   Y
  DUNN Frederick M 8   Y
  DUNN Orlando M 4   Y
  DUNN Samuel M 20 M.S. Y
  YEO Robert M 18 Apr Y
  SAUNDERS William M 13 "M,S," Y
  BRAYENT Ann F 15   Y
  DUNN Jesse M 2   Y
   
Shorteridge Cottages BARTLETT William M 35 Ag lab Y
  BARTLETT Mary F 40   Y
  BARTLETT Edward M 8   Y
  BARTLETT William M 7   Y
  BARTLETT Susan F 4   Y
  BARTLETT Ann F 3   Y
  BARTLETT John M 1   Y
   
  HOLMAN Mary F 72 Ind Y
   
Little Boccombe Farm HEARDING John M 55 Farmer Y
  HEARDING Ann F 56   Y
  HEARDING Thomas M 24 Butcher Y
   
Great Boccombe Farm LANE Richard M 65 Farmer Y
  LANE Mary F 65   Y
  LANE Josiah M 40   Y
  LANE James M 20   Y
  JEFFREY Eliza F 20 F.S. Y
  GREENWOOD Bryant M 20 M.S. Y
  BRENT Josiah M 13 M.S. Y
  BRENT William M 9 M.S. Y
   
Lt Boccombe Cottages HARRIS Robert M 46 Ag lab Y
  HARRIS Ann F 43   Y
  HARRIS Grace F 8   Y
  HARRIS Thomas M 5   Y
  HARRIS Lewiza F 4 months   Y
  HARRIS Elizabeth F 74   Y
   
  TUCKER Adam M 40 Ag lab Y
  TUCKER Thomazin F 40   Y
  TUCKER John M 9   Y
  TUCKER Mary Ann F 3   Y
   
Boccombe Mills SAUNDERS Thomas M 20 Miller Y
  SAUNDERS Ann F 20   Y
  LABBOTT John M 13   Y
  MOISE Ann F 40 F.S. Y
   
Pim Rise Cottage PIDLER John M 30 Joiner Y
  TUCKER Richard M 7 Labourer Y
   
Broom Hill Cottage LANG John M 45 Farmer Y
  LANG Rebbacca F 61   Y
  LANG Bartholomew M 10   Y
   
4            
Honiaets Stone VEAL John M 45 Farmer Y
  VEAL Margret F 35   Y
  VEAL Richard M 14   Y
  VEAL Elizabeth F 11   Y
  VEAL Margt F 9   Y
  VEAL John M 7   Y
  VEAL Mary F 4   Y
   
Houcks Stone GLOVER James M 50 Ag lab Y
  GLOVER Elizabeth F 50   Y
  GLOVER Saml M 3   Y
  GLOVER Thomas M 11   Y
  GLOVER Elizabeth F 88 Ind Y
   
West Stone TALLAMY William M 40 Ag Lab Y
  TALLAMY Ann F 50   Y
  TALLAMY Thomas M 7   Y
   
Cabbicott GEORGE Edward M 65 Farmer Y
  GEORGE Elizabeth F 68   Y
  CHING Fanny F 8   Y
  BOND James M 20   Y
  HARRISE James M 14   Y
  HARRISE Mary F 30 F.S. Y
   
  KIVIL Thomas N M 30 Ag Lab Y
  KIVIL Mary F 25   Y
  KIVIL Margret F 11 months   Y
  KIVIL John M 2   Y
   
  GEORGE William M 35 Ind Y
   
Green Hill GLOVER John M 30 Ag Lab Y
  GLOVER Mary F 30   Y
  GLOVER Elizabeth F 11   Y
  GLOVER Joseph M 9   Y
  GLOVER Andrew M 4   Y
  GLOVER Grace F 1   Y
   
  ASHTON Lewis M 25 Mason Y
  ASHTON Grace F 50   Y
  ASHTON Richard M 8   Y
   
Babeley MAY William M 47 Farmer Y
  MAY Elizabeth F 36   Y
  MAY Saml M 10   Y
  MAY Mariam F 8   Y
  MAY Elizabeth F 7   Y
  MAY William M 5   Y
  MAY John M 3   Y
  MAY Thomas M 1   Y
  BEER Rebecca F 23   Y
  AVERY Anna F 16 F.S. Y
  HILL Edward M 24 M.S. Y
  NICHOLS John M 18   Y
  BATE Thomas M 17 M.S. Y
  HERD John M 14 M.S. Y
   
Deans Steart BATE Richard M 47 Farmer Y
  BATE Mary F 50   Y
  BATE Mary F 5   Y
  PIPER Nathan M 9   Y
   
Cracked Lake ASHTON John M 46 Mason Y
  ASHTON Grace F 47   Y
  ASHTON James M 13   Y
  ASHTON Sarah F 9   Y
  ASHTON Siles M 6   Y
  ASHTON Abraham M 4   Y
  ASHTON Isic M 2   Y
   
South Dundrige PARR Henry M 75 Farmer Y
  PARR Abb F 75   Y
  MOAS Mary F 15 F.S. Y
  GLOVER James M 15   Y
  MORISH Varlett (?Violet) F 11   Y
   
North Dundrige VAGERS John M 65 Ag Lab Y
  VAGERS Johanna F 65   Y
   
  NICHOLS Thomas M 55 Ag Lab Y
  NICHOLS Margret F 55   Y
   
  PALMER William M 45 Ag Lab Y
  PALMER Elizabeth F 45   Y
  PALMER Anne F 25   Y
  PALMER Grace F 12   Y
  PALMER Phillip M 8   Y
   
Old Mill HANDCOCK Nathl M 35 Ind Y
  HANDCOCK Mary F 40 Ind Y
  METHEREL Richard M 10   Y
   
  HANDCOCK George M 25 Miller Y
  HANDCOCK Mary F 25   Y
  HANDCOCK Susan F 2   Y
  HANDCOCK James M 4 months   Y
  NIGHT Phillip M 15 M.S. Y
   
Frys JIFFORD Richard M 20 Ag Lab Y
  JIFFORD Mary F 20   Y
   
  ASHTON Richard M 50 Mason Y
  ASHTON Elizabeth F 50   Y
  ASHTON Elizabeth F 20   Y
  ASHTON Grace F 10   Y
   
Tucking Mill PALMER Thomas M 30 Ag Lab Y
  PALMER Mary F 30   Y
  PALMER John M 3   Y
   
  LOTT Robert M 45 Carpenter Y
  LOTT Elizabeth F 45   Y
  LOTT Mary F 13   Y
  LOTT Richard M 12   Y
  LOTT Fanny F 8   Y
  WACKLEY John M 15 Apr Y
  SQUANCE Jane F 87 Pauper Y
  PAW Joseph M 82 Carpenter Y
   
South Yeo BRUTON Charles M 60 Ind Y
  BRUTON Frances F 50 Ind Y
  BRUTON June F 20 Ind Y
  BRUTON W Meddon M 20 Collegian (crossed out) Y
  HUNT Frances F 55 F.S. Y
  MORRISH Richard M 30 M.S. Y
  MOORE Susana F 20 F.S. Y
  CORY Elizabeth F 20 F.S. Y
  BROWN WIlliam M 15 M.S. Y
   
Halsbury Mills SQUANCE William M 40 Farmer Y
  SQUANCE Elizabeth F 50   Y
  SQUANCE John M 15   Y
  PIPER John M 11 M.S. Y
   
Bulland MATHEWS William M 62 Ag Lab Y
  MATHEWS Sarah F 65   Y
  HOCKING Richard M 8   Y
   
  ACKLAND William M 40 Ag lab Y
  ACKLAND Mary F 35   Y
  ACKLAND Mary F 9   Y
  ACKLAND Rebeckah F 7   Y
  ACKLAND James M 5   Y
  ACKLAND Hariot F 3   Y
  ACKLAND Jane F 1   Y
   
  SHORTRIDGE William M 45 Ag Lab Y
  SHORTRIDGE Mary F 45   Y
   
Halsbury MOAST James M 55 Farmer Y
  MOAST Jane F 50   Y
  MOAST George M 25   Y
  MOAST Noah M 22   Y
  MOAST Faney F 20   Y
  MOAST Elizabeth F 17   Y
  MOAST James M 14   Y
  MOAST Jane F 14   Y
  SHUTE Richard M 24 M.S. Y
  LEE Sarah F 23 F.S. Y
  EASTERBROOK John M 15 M.S. Y
  LEE Philip F 13 M.S. Y
  ACKLAND John M 11 M.S. Y
   
Bowden CADDY Elizabeth F 50 Ind Y
  CADDY Mary Arnold F 25   Y
  CADDY Caroline A F 25   Y
  CADDY Thomas A M 17   Y
  CADDY Susan F 10   Y
  CADDY Ann F 10   Y
  CADDY Ellen F 5   Y
  EASTERBROOK Mary F 20 F.S. Y
  LEWIS Eliza F 17 F.S. Y
  HARRISE Sarah F 13 F.S. Y
  HARDING George M 20 M.S. Y
  SHORT Humphrey M 15 M.S. Y
  HARDIN James M 15   Y
   
East Stone HEAL John M 50 Farmer Y
  HEAL Betsey F 40   Y
  HEAL Mary F 18   Y
  HEAL John M 16   Y
  HEAL Elizabeth F 14   Y
  HEAL Henery M 11   Y
  HEAL Jane F 9   Y
  HEAL Catharine F 6   Y
  HEAL Thomas M 3   Y
  MAAS Johanna F 15 F.S. Y
  BOWDEN William M 15 M.S. Y
  SHORTRIDGE Thomas M 15 M.S. Y
  TALLAMY William M 8 M.S. Y
Totals: 193 houses occ 23 unoccup 513 males 482 female 995 persons  

 

Appendix 6. TITHE APPORTIONMENT FOR PARKHAM OF 1842

OWNER OCCUPIER NO. ESTATE NAME LAND USE A. R. P.
Jane Ashton John Baglow & William Lashbrook 1517   Plot arable 0 1 30
Jane Ashton James Lane 1479 Part of Northway Hill arable 0 1 21
Jane Ashton James Lane 1500 Part of Northway Seezmore arable 1 0 31
Jane Ashton James Lane 1501 Part of Northway Seezmore arable 0 3 16
Jane Ashton James Lane 1512 Part of Northway Barn barn 0 0 2
Jane Ashton James Lane 1513 Part of Northway Barn field arable 1 0 16
Jane Ashton James Lane 1515 Part of Northway New Close arable 2 0 6
Jane Ashton James Lane 1528 Part of Northway Copse copse 0 0 33
Jane Ashton James Lane 1529 Part of Northway Barley Hay meadow 0 2 23
Jane Ashton PhilipYeo 1508   House House 0 0 2
Jane Ashton PhilipYeo 1509   Garden garden 0 0 2
Jane Ashton PhilipYeo 1511   Garden garden 0 0 8
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 384 Bonds Ash Moor park arable 4 0 17
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 636 Bonds Ash Stone land arable 2 0 36
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 641 Bonds Ash Smaller park arable 1 1 7
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 649 Bonds Ash Willis arable 0 1 35
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 660 Bonds Ash Meadow meadow 1 0 8
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 661 Bonds Ash Orchard orchard 0 1 19
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 662 Bonds Ash House, Buildings, Court and garden House etc. 0 1 15
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 730 Bonds Ash Bons field arable 2 1 19
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 733 Bonds Ash Long Close arable 1 0 8
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Pickard 602 Bonds Ash Menna Ground   0 0 20
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lessee William Please 615   House and Garden House etc. 0 1 15
William Bates William Bates 1365   Ellis Cottage House etc. 0 0 10
William Bares William Bates 1367   Garden garden 0 1 8
William Bates William Bates 1366   Garden garden 0 0 4
William Bates William Bates 1362a Church Hays House House 0 0 5
William Bates William Bates 1363a Church Hays Garden garden 0 0 13
William Bates William Bates 1364a Church Hays Garden garden 0 0 11
William Beckalick William Beckalick 865   Cottage and garden House etc. 0 0 6
William Beckalick William Beckalick 870   Garden garden 0 0 18
William Braund John Bagelow and William Lashbrook 1493   Garden garden 0 1 1
William Braund John Bagelow and William Lashbrook 1494   Garden garden 0 0 20
William Braund John Bagelow and William Lashbrook 1495   Garden garden 0 0 10
William Braund John Bagelow and William Lashbrook 1496   House etc. House etc. 0 0 6
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2149 South Yeo Shillivere arable 3 1 5
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2150 South Yeo Higher down arable 3 1 3
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2151 South Yeo Higher down arable 3 2 10
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2152 South Yeo Head Wares arable 2 0 18
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2153 South Yeo Coppice coppice 1 2 18
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2154 South Yeo Georges Meadow meadow 0 1 32
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2155 South Yeo Pond pond 0 0 6
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2156 South Yeo Lawn pasture 5 2 0
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2157 South Yeo Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 15
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2158 South Yeo Mansion & Buildings mansion etc. 0 1 25
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2159 South Yeo Kitchen Garden Gardens 0 0 31
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2160 South Yeo Shrubbery shrubberry 0 0 15
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2161 South Yeo Garden Gardens 0 0 31
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2162 South Yeo Linhay & Road linhay etc. 0 0 26
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2163 South Yeo Waste waste 0 0 10
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2164 South Yeo Orchard orchard 0 2 25
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2165 South Yeo Plantation Plantation 0 3 6
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2166 South Yeo South Yeo Meadow arable 1 2 30
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2167 South Yeo Orchard orchard 0 1 34
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2168 South Yeo Dry Close arable 1 2 30
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2169 South Yeo Mill Close arable 3 2 10
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2170 South Yeo Pond Meadow arable 2 1 35
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2171 South Yeo Plantation Plantation 0 0 3
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 1947 Tucking Mill Higher ham meadow 1 3 24
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 1948 Tucking Mill Plantation Plantation 0 0 33
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2058 Tucking Mill Shrubbery shrubbery 0 0 5
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2059 Tucking Mill Shrubbery shrubbery 0 0 9
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2060 Tucking Mill Ham meadow 0 3 36
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2068 Tucking Mill Plantation Plantation 0 1 12
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2069 Tucking Mill Middle ham meadow 1 3 12
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2070 Tucking Mill Aller Beer meadow 0 3 28
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2071 Tucking Mill Lower Orchard orchard 0 3 38
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2074 Tucking Mill Shrubbery shrubbery 0 0 20
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2075 Tucking Mill Buckland Meadow arable 0 2 12
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2076 Tucking Mill Horse park arable 3 3 2
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2077 Tucking Mill Plantation Plantation 0 1 6
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2078 Tucking Mill Road road 0 0 30
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2079 Tucking Mill Tucking Mill Lawn arable 1 2 0
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2080 Tucking Mill Rick Park arable 2 1 11
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2081 Tucking Mill Road Close arable 3 2 7
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2082 Tucking Mill Hem to do coppice 0 3 0
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2083 Tucking Mill Coppice coppice 1 3 36
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2084 Tucking Mill Four Acres arable 3 3 31
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2085 Tucking Mill Five Acres arable 5 1 20
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 1941 Tucking Mill Plantation Plantation 0 0 9
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2086 Tucking Mill Squance Close arable 3 2 13
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 1946 Tucking Mill Plantation Plantation 0 0 9
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2088 Tucking Mill Cleave Wood Coppice coppice 5 1 4
Charles Bruton Esquire Charles Bruton Esquire 2089 Tucking Mill Greenapark arable 7 1 30
Charles Bruton Esquire Let Robert and Thomas Palmer 2072 Part of Tucking Mill House, Buildings and Court House etc. 0 1 9
Charles Bruton Esquire Let Robert and Thomas Palmer 2073 Part of Tucking Mill Garden garden 0 0 6
Charles Bruton Esquire Let Robert and Thomas Palmer 2087 Part of Tucking Mill Garden garden 0 3 4
Charles Bruton Esquire Rev. Richard Walter 681a Pynes Moor Pines Moor meadow 5 3 17
Charles Bruton Esquire Rev. Richard Walter 681 Pynes Moor Pines Moor meadow 5 3 17
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 217 Pearn's Steart Meadow meadow 0 2 37
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 218 Pearn's Steart Meadow arable 0 2 31
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 219 Pearn's Steart Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 7
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 220 Pearn's Steart House and Garden House etc. 0 0 33
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 221 Pearn's Steart Garden garden 0 0 24
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 222 Pearn's Steart Hill arable 0 1 29
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 223 Pearn's Steart Ease arable 0 0 39
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 224 Pearn's Steart Hill arable 0 1 0
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 229 Pearn's Steart Jellis arable 0 1 20
Lewis William Buck Esquire Richard Bate 231 Pearn's Steart Jellis arable 2 2 4
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 791 Sedborough Horses flat Rowden meadow 22 0 17
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 792 Sedborough Wester flat Rowden meadow 12 0 11
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 793 Sedborough Wester flat Rowden meadow 15 2 2
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 797 Sedborough Wester Justment arable 1 3 20
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 798 Sedborough Justment Marsh arable 0 2 10
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 799 Sedborough Easter Justment arable 3 0 18
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 800 Sedborough Fourth Rowden arable 8 0 26
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 801 Sedborough Third Rowden arable 8 3 13
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 802 Sedborough Second Rowden arable 10 3 21
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 803 Sedborough First Rowden arable 7 3 24
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 804 Sedborough Hall Meadow Copse copse 1 2 21
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 807 Sedborough Little Justment arable 0 1 38
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 812 Sedborough Hall Meadow arable 22 3 20
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 813 Sedborough Hall Park arable 21 3 1
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 814 Sedborough Wester Cross Park arable 9 0 20
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 815 Sedborough Middle Cross Park arable 5 2 17
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 816 Sedborough Easter Cross Park arable 14 0 26
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 817 Sedborough Wester Lady Park arable 14 0 4
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 818a Sedborough Wheat Park meadow 6 1 36
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 818 Sedborough Asner Lady park arable 9 1 12
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 819 Sedborough Asner Lady park arable 4 0 16
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 820 Sedborough Road road 0 1 3
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 821 Sedborough Furze park arable 16 3 7
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 822 Sedborough Buck piece arable 0 2 33
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 823 Sedborough Garden garden 0 1 36
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 824 Sedborough Rookery garden 0 1 34
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 825 Sedborough House, Buildings & Court House etc. 1 1 6
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 826 Sedbprough Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 31
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 827 Sedborough Orchard orchard 0 1 39
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 828 Sedborough Garden garden 0 1 0
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 829 Sedborough White park orchard orchard 0 2 19
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 830 Sedborough Alder Bear Orchard orchard 0 3 1
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 831 Sedborough Alder Bear arable 2 1 13
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 832 Sedborough Alder Bear arable 0 2 31
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Becka;ick 833 Sedborough Flat Meadow meadow 3 0 0
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 834 Sedborough Gamber Meadow meadow 1 3 39
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 835 Sedborough Oak Park meadow 2 3 0
Lewis William Buck Esquire Willam Beckalick 836 Sedborough Lamb park arable 3 3 18
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 837 Sedborough Garden garden 0 0 25
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 838 Sedborough Lower ham meadow 6 2 5
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 839 Sedborough Middle ham meadow 5 3 6
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 840 Sedborough Higher ham meadow 4 3 35
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 841 Sedborough Old orchard orchard 1 2 3
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 842 Sedborough Thorny park arable 3 2 32
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 843 Sedborough Moor park meadow 12 0 36
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 844 Sedborough Easter Furzes park arable 9 3 22
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 928 Sedborough Copse copse 1 2 20
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 929 Sedborough Easter Dowland arable 9 1 31
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 930 Sedborough Wester Dowland arable 10 3 21
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 931 Sedborough Peet arable 3 2 19
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 932 Sedborough Og Marsh meadow 3 0 34
Lewis William Buck Esquire William Beckalick 933 Sedborough Dowland Marsh meadow 3 3 4
Lewis William Buck Esquire John Dark 845   House and Garden House etc. 0 1 18
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lessee Daniel Glover 277   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 10
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lessee Daniel Glover 278   Orchard orchard 0 0 35
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lessee Daniel Glover 280   Croft arable 0 3 10
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lessee Daniel Glover 282   Croft arable 0 2 25
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lessee John Bond 279   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 11
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 1 Bowden Cooks Bowden arable 7 1 34
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 2 Bowden Great Bowden arable 8 3 34
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 3 Bowden Plantation Plantation 0 0 28
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 4 Bowden Orchard orchard 0 0 34
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 5 Bowden Orchard orchard 0 2 28
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 6 Bowden Cooks Bowden Orchard orchard 17 1 38
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 7 Bowden Cooks Bowden Orchard orchard 0 1 9
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 8 Bowden Cooks Bowden Orchard orchard 0 1 19
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 9 Bowden Wood wood 0 2 12
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 10 Bowden Wood wood 0 1 4
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 11 Bowden Wood wood 2 0 20
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 12 Bowden Lower Bales Close arable 7 3 18
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 13 Bowden Great Bush Close arable 7 2 24
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 14 Bowden Higher Bales Close arable 7 1 5
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 15 Bowden Little Bush Close arable 2 1 15
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 16 Bowden Little Bowden meadow 3 2 38
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 17 Bowden House, Buildings & Court House etc. 0 2 5
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 18 Bowden Gardens garden 0 0 37
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 19 Bowden Plantation Plantation 0 0 15
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 20 Bowden Orchard orchard 0 2 31
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 21 Bowden Town Place arable 1 1 23
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 22 Bowden Davis Meadow arable 6 1 1
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 24 Bowden Lower Bowden Mead arable 3 2 10
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 25 Bowden Higher Bowden Meadow arable 4 0 28
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 26 Bowden Mowhay [mowhay] 0 1 21
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 27 Bowden Mowhay plot arable 0 1 3
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 28 Bowden Road road 0 1 7
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 29 Bowden Plantation Plantation 0 0 5
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 30 Bowden Western Close arable 3 6 22
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 31 Bowden Three Cornered Close arable 6 0 7
Elizabeth Caddy Elizabeth Caddy 32 Bowden Waste waste 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles Smale James Braund 1144   Garden garden 0 0 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles Smale James Braund 1145   House and Court House etc. 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles Smale James Braund 1146   Garden garden 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles Smale James Braund 1147   Garden garden 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Braund James Vethers Braund 1137   House and Court House etc. 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Joseph Braund Joseph Braund 1138   House and Court House etc. 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Joseph Braund Joseph Braund 1139   Court court 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessess Harvey & Charles Smale James Braund 1110   Garden garden 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles Smale James Braund 1111   House & Court House etc. 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles Smale James Braund 1148   South Wood wood 10 2 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Brawn John Brawn 1132   Garden garden 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Brawn John Brawn 1133   Garden garden 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Brawn John Brawn 1134   Garden garden 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Michael Chalk 1614 Part of Goldworthy Barton House garden 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Michael Chalk 1615 Part of Goldworthy Barton Garden garden 0 1 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Michael Chalk 1616 Part of Goldworthy Barton Garden garden 0 0 39
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Michael Chalk 1617 Part of Goldworthy Barton Little Croft Park arable 1 1 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1796 Bank Hole Marsh arable 0 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1797 Bank Hole Hill Close arable 0 3 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1708 Bank Hole Poor Land arable 0 0 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1812 Bank Hole Long Orchard orchard 0 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1813 Bank Hole Marsh Field arable 0 1 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1814 Bank Hole Three Corner field arable 1 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1815 Bank Hole Garden park arable 1 1 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1816 Bank Hole Orchard orchard 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1817 Bank Hole Buildings & court buildings etc. 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Broom John Chapple 1818 Bank Hole Garden garden 0 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing John Ching 1895   Buildings buildings 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing John Ching 1896   Garden garden 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1850 Bartons Goldworthy Lower Cross park arable 4 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1851 Bartons Goldworthy Hem to Cross Park coppice 0 1 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1852 Bartons Goldworthy Moor arable 1 2 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1872 Bartons Goldworthy Plot arable 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1973 Bartons Goldworthy Moor Meadow meadow 6 0 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1874 Bartons Goldworthy Drews Down arable 4 2 39
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1875 Bartons Goldworthy Moor arable 3 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1881 Bartons Goldworthy Down arable 3 2 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1884 Bartons Goldworthy North Close arable 4 3 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1885 Bartons Goldworthy Rick Park arable 1 2 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1892 Bartons Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1893 Bartons Goldworthy North Close Meadow arable 1 1 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1894 Bartons Goldworthy Back Meadow meadow 1 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1891 Bartons Goldworthy Barn & Waste Barn & waste 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1906 Bartons Goldworthy Calves plot meadow 0 2 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1909 Bartons Goldworthy Calves plot arable 0 1 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1914 Bartons Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1915 Bartons Goldworthy Pool park arable 2 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1918 Bartons Goldworthy Small Coppice coppice 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1919 Bartons Goldworthy Lower Pool Meadow arable 1 3 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1920 Bartons Goldworthy Pool Meadow arable 1 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1931 Bartons Goldworthy Fold arable 1 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1932 Bartons Goldworthy Fold arable 1 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1933 Bartons Goldworthy Wood wood 0 2 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1954 Bartons Goldworthy Red lands arable 4 1 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1957 Bartons Goldworthy Garden garden 0 1 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1960 Bartons Goldworthy Hay down arable 4 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1962 Bartons Goldworthy Lower Meadow meadow 1 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1964 Bartons Goldworthy Cross park arable 3 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1970 Bartons Goldworthy Long Close arable 1 1 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1971 Bartons Goldworthy Hay down arable 3 3 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1972 Bartons Goldworthy Hay down arable 3 3 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1973 Bartons Goldwortgy Freezes Brake arable 2 1 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1974 Bartons Goldworthy Garden arable 0 0 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1976 Bartons Gokdworthy Garden arable 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1985 Bartons Goldworthy Hill arable 0 3 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 1986 Bartons Goldworthy Quarry quarry 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 2040 Bartons Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Thomas Ching 2041 Bartons Gokdworthy Garden garden 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Anthony Clements 1965   Garden garden 0 0 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Anthony Clements 1966   Garden garden 0 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Anthony Clements 1967   House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing Anthony Clements 1968   Waste waste 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak John Cloak and others 1618   House & Garden House & garden 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak John Cloak and others 1619   Garden garden 0 1 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin 1937   Wood wood 1 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin 1945   Wood wood 1 1 38
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin 1956   Wood wood 4 1 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1379 Hoops Inn Buildings and land buildings etc. 0 0 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1368 Prestons Holwell Higher Cock pit field arable 2 3 38
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1369 Prestons Holwell Little Northern field arable 1 3 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1370 Prestons Holwell Little Northern field arable 2 1 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1375 Prestons Holwell Moor arable 0 3 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1376 Prestons Holwell Little Meadow meadow 0 1 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1377 Prestons Holwell Lower Cock pit field arable 2 2 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Cloak Richard Crang 1378 Prestons Holwell Garden arable 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert Davey Robert Davey 1135   Garden garden 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert Davey Robert Davey 1136   House House 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert Davey James Downing 1578 Goldworthy Barton West Field arable 8 3 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1580 Goldworthy Barton East Great field arable 13 3 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1620 Goldworthy Barton Cross park arable 4 3 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1621 Goldworthy Barton New Close arable 4 3 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1622 Goldworthy Barton Higher Gratton arable 6 1 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1623 Goldworthy Barton Lower Gratton arable 10 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1624 Goldworthy Barton Lower Batteries arable 10 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1625 Goldworthy Barton Horse copse 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1626 Goldworthy Barton Higher Batteries arable 9 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1627 Goldworthy Barton Brake arable 1 1 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1628 Goldworthy Barton Hill arable 2 2 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1620 Goldworthy Barton Six Acres arable 5 3 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1630 Goldworthy Barton Ten Acres arable 10 3 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1631 Goldworthy Barton Four Acres Meadow arable 4 3 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1632 Goldworthy Barton Garden garden 0 0 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1633 Goldworthy Barton Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1634 Goldworthy Barton Buildings and barns buildings etc. 0 3 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1635 Goldworthy Barton Orchard orchard 0 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1636 Goldworthy Barton Mowhay [mowhay] 0 1 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1637 Goldworthy Barton Garden garden 0 1 18
Rev, John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1638 Goldworthy Barton Will park arable 5 0 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1639 Goldworthy Barton Megs [?] Moor arable 9 2 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1640 Goldworthy Barton Little plot arable 0 1 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Dowmey 1642 Goldworthy Barton Higher Marsh meadow 11 2 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1643 Goldworthy Barton Orchard orchard 0 2 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1644 Goldworthy Barton Little Meadow arable 1 1 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1646 Goldworthy Barton Forty Acres arable 0 1 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1647 Goldworthy Barton Hern copse 0 1 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1648 Goldworthy Barton Lower Marsh meadow 4 1 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1649 Goldworthy Barton Hern to Marsh copse 0 1 33
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1650 Goldworthy Barton Orchard orchard 0 0 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1651 Goldworthy Barton Hele park Coppice coppice 4 1 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1652 Goldworthy Barton Horse park Meadow arable 3 1 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1653 Goldworthy Barton Hem to Nine Acres copse 0 1 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1654 Goldworthy Barton Nine Acres arable 10 0 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing James Downing 1655 Goldworthy Barton Brake arable 10 2 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing John Elliott & others 1897   Garden garden 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin John Ellott & others 1898   House House 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin John Ellott & others 1899   Garden Gardens 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1171 Brittons Worthyeat Ridge park arable 2 1 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1203 Brittons Worthyeat Higher Moor Close arable 1 8 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1206 Brittons Worthyeat New Close arable 1 2 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1207 Brittons Worthyeat Barn barn 0 2 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1208 Brittons Worthyeat New plot arable 0 1 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1229 Brittons Worthyeat Mill Meadow arable 2 19 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1193 Brittons Worthyeat Little park arable 1 3 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1402 Brittons Worthyeat Part of [?] meadow 2 1 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1404 Sloo West Park meadow 4 3 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1405a Sloo West Sloo park arable 2 3 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1405 Sloo East Sloo park arable 2 3 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1407 Sloo Shute Close arable 3 1 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1412 Sloo Back Close arable 1 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1416 Sloo Moor arable 5 1 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1417 Sloo Three Corner field arable 2 2 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1418 Sloo Square plot arable 1 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1419 Sloo Lower Bowden park arable 2 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1420 Sloo Bowden park arable 5 0 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1421 Sloo A Gistment arable 4 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1422 Sloo Road road 0 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1423 Sloo Meadow meadow 1 1 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1424 Sloo Meadow meadow 1 2 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1425 Sloo Garden garden 0 10 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1426 Sloo Garden garden 0 0 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1427 Sloo Garden garden 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1428 Sloo Buildings and Coirt buildings etc. 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1429 Sloo Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1430 Sloo Mowhay [mowhay] 0 2 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1431 Sloo Road and Waste Road & waste 0 20 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1432 Sloo Park Meadow meadow 1 2 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1433 Sloo Pool park meadow 2 3 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1434 Sloo Back Meadow arable 1 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1435 Sloo Rick park meadow 2 0 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1436 Sloo Waste spot [?] arable 1 3 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1437 Sloo Cleave meadow 1 3 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1438 Sloo Three Acres meadow 3 0 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin George Ford 1439 Sloo Six Acres arable 5 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Grigg William Grigg 1611   House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Grigg William Grigg 1612   Garden House 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1811 Goldworthy Mill Lower ham arable 1 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1819 Goldworthy Mill Stick arable 0 2 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1820 Goldworthy Mill Square Close arable 1 2 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1821 Goldworthy Mill Goldworthy Meadow arable 0 3 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1822 Goldworthy Mill Orchard arable 0 1 18
Rev, John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1823 Goldworthy Mill Garden garden 0 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin. Lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1824 Goldworthy Mill Lower Garden garden 0 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1825 Goldworthy Mill Well plot arable 0 1 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1826 Goldworthy Mill Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 1 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1827 Goldworthy Mill Mill Pond pond 0 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1828 Goldworthy Mill Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1829 Goldworthy Mill Long Close arable 0 2 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Grigg John Grigg 1830 Goldworthy Mill Little ham arable 0 2 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Davey William Hamlyn 1116   Garden garden 0 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Davey William Hamlyn 1118   Garden garden 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Davey William Hamlyn 1119   House garden 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1660 Hunger Road Hill arable 1 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1661 Hunger Road Long field arable 0 3 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1662 Hunger Road Meadow arable 0 1 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1663 Hunger Road Meadow arable 0 1 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1664 Hunger Road Garden garden 0 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1665 Hunger Road Buildings and Court buildings 0 0 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1650 Hunger Road Road road 0 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1666 Hunger Road Barn barn 0 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1667 Hunger Road Back field arable 9 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Downing William Harris 1668 Hunger Road Outer field arable 1 1 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1150 Glovers Worthyeat Half acre arable 2 12 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1149 Glovers Worthyeat Berrys meadow 5 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1190 Glovers Worthyeat Many park arable 2 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1169 Glovers Worthyeat Berry park arable 4 3 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1172 Glovers Worthyeat Thistle park arable 1 3 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1187 Glovers Worthyeat Hem arable 0 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1150 Glovers Worthyeat Hem arable 0 2 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1180 Glovers Worthyeat Hill Will [?] arable 2 3 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1170 Glovers Worthyeat Down arable 6 3 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1192 Glovers Worthyeat Go Her field [?] arable 6 2 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1194 Glovers Worthyeat Little park arable 1 1 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1195 Glovers Worthyeat Badjers premises [?] arable 1 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1196 Glovers Worthyeat Road road 0 1 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1197 Glovers Worthyeat Linhay linhay 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1198 Glovers Worthyeat Great Close arable 0 3 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1199 Glovers Worthyeat Long Ridge arable 1 2 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1200 Glovers Worthyeat Long Ridge arable 0 3 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1202 Glovers Worthyeat Long Close arable 2 3 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1204 Glovers Worthyeat Mow park arable 2 0 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1213 Glovers Worthyeat Hayes meadow 0 3 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1220 Glovers Worthyeat Buildings and Court buildings 0 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1221 Glovers Worthyeat Plot arable 0 0 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1222 Glovers Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1223 Glovers Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1224 Glovers Worthyeat Crocky arable 0 1 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1225 Glovers Worthyeat Glovers Meadow arable 2 1 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1226 Glovers Worthyeat South Park arable 2 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1406 Glovers Worthyeat North Meadow arable 1 2 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1409 Glovers Worthyeat Holwell park arable 2 3 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1413 Glovers Worthyeat Moor arable 3 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1414 Glovers Worthyeat Many Meadow meadow 1 3 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1415 Glovers Worthyeat Safron land meadow 1 1 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin Joseph Haywood 1214 Glovers Worthyeat Plot meadow 0 1 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1440 Peppercombe Long Close arable 2 3 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1441 Peppercombe Bramble meadow 3 2 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1442 Peppercombe Hollow Bean arable 1 3 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1443 Peppercombe Big field arable 3 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1444 Peppercombe Cleave meadow 3 3 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1445 Peppercombe Castle meadow 0 1 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1446 Peppercombe Old Castle ley arable 1 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1447 Part of Goldworthy Barton Road road 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1458 Peppercombe Waste and furze Waste & furze 14 2 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1450 Peppercombe Castle hill park arable 3 1 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1460 Peppercombe Slade park arable 1 3 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1461 Peppercombe Middle hill park arable 2 2 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1462 Peppercombe Higher hill park arable 2 2 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1463 Peppercombe Long field arable 2 3 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1464 Peppercombe Northern Meadow meadow 1 3 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1465 Peppercombe Lower Broady park arable 2 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch hortop 1466 Peppercombe Higher Broady park arable 2 2 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1467 Peppercombe Easter Broady park arable 2 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1468 Peppercombe Grey hairs Meadow meadow 1 3 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1469 Peppercombe Johns Meadow arable 1 1 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1470 Peppercombe Calves plot meadow 0 1 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1471 Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1472 Peppercombe Waste waste 0 2 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1473 Peppercombe Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1474 Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1475 Peppercombe Buildings and Court buildings 0 2 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1476 Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1477 Peppercombe Little Meadow arable 0 2 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch Hortop Ann Blinch Hortop 1478 Peppercombe Orchard orchard 0 3 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Jewell Thomas Jewell 1987 New Haven Orchard orchard 0 0 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Jewell Thomas Jewell 1988 New Haven House, Court etc. House etc. 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Jewell Thomas Jewell 1989 New Haven Garden Gardens 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Jewell Thomas Jewell 1990 New Haven Court court 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Jane Ashton Samuel Jones 1890   House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Jane Ashton Samuel Jones 1891   Garden garden 0 1 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1380 Lower Holwell Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1381 Lower Holwell Garden garden 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1382 Lower Holwell Meadow meadow 0 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1383 Lower Holwell Little plot arable 0 0 38
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1384 Lower Holwell Marsh meadow 1 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1385 Lower Holwell Barn Close arable 2 2 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1386 Lower Holwell Barn park arable 3 2 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1397 Lower Holwell Garden Close arable 4 1 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance Keivell John Keivell 1390 Lower Holwell Square field arable 3 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John Metheral 1114   Garden garden 0 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John Metheral 1115   House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John Metheral 1117   Garden garden 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John and William Moise 1976a   House House 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John and William Moise 1978   Garden garden 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Metheral John and William Moise 1979   Garden garden 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1847 Shapleys Goldworthy Griggs ham arable 1 2 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1848 Shapleys Goldworthy Cross park arable 5 1 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1849 Shapleys Goldworthy Hem in park arable 0 0 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1853 Shapleys Goldworthy Hem copse 0 1 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1854 Shapleys Goldworthy Hem arable 1 3 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1855 Shapleys Goldworthy Big knowls arable 5 2 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1856 Shapleys Goldworthy Rusowles Copse copse 0 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1879 Shapleys Goldworthy Big Mogs Moor arable 3 2 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1880 Shapleys Goldworthy Little Mogs Moor arable 1 3 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1882 Shapleys Goldworthy Down arable 5 3 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1883 Shapleys Goldworthy Little Down arable 0 7 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1886 Shapleys Godworthy Rick Park meadow 1 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1901 Shapleys Goldworthy Little plot arable 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1902 Shapleys Goldworthy Little plot arable 0 0 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1900 Shapleys Goldworthy Meadow meadow 0 1 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1903 Shapleys Goldworthy Orchard orchard 0 1 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1904 Shapleys Goldworthy Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 1 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1905 Shapleys Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1929 Shapleys Goldworthy Little Meadow meadow 0 2 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1934 Shaoleys Goldworthy Red land Copse copse 0 1 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1953 Shapleys Goldworthy Redland arable 2 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1958 Shapleys Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1959 Shapleys Goldworthy Hill Copse copse 1 1 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1983 Shapleys Goldworthy Hill arable 0 3 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Peard James Peard 1916 Shapleys Goldworthy Little Knowle arable 2 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles Smale Samuel Penetent 1112   House House 0 0 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles Smale Samuel Penetent 1113   Garden garden 0 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard Richard Pennington 1108   Garden garden 0 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard Richard Pennington 1109   Garden garden 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard James Prance 1215 Strouds Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard James Prance 1216 Strouds Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard James Prance 1217 Strouds Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard James Prance 1218 Strouds Worthyeat Garden garden 0 0 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard James Prance 1219 Strouds Worthyeat Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard John Prance 1449   House House 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Pickard John Prance 1450   Garden garden 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1520 Pearce's Northway Wood wood 2 0 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1521 Pearce's Northway Ham arable 1 2 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1522 Pearce's Northway Cross park arable 3 1 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1523 Pearce's Northway Green away arable 3 0 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1524 Pearce's Northway Old orchard meadow 0 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1525 Pearce's Northway Wood park arable 1 3 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1526 Pearce's Northway Meadow meadow 1 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1527 Pearce's Northway Hill meadow 1 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1519 Pearce's Northway Waste waste 0 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1537 Pearce's Northway Orchard orchard 0 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1538 Pearce's Northway Buildings and Court buildings 0 1 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1584 Pearce's Northway New Close arable 2 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1590 Pearce's Northway Hayes arable 0 0 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1592 Pearce's Northway Garden garden 0 0 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1593 Pearce's Northway Garden park arable 0 3 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1595 Pearce's Northway Long Close arable 0 3 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1597 Pearce's Northway Three Corners arable 1 2 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Adams Thomas Pridham 1598 Pearce's Northway Littlefield arable 0 3 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Becklake John Landers 1120   House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Becklake John Landers 1121   Garden garden 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Becklake John Landers 1122   Garden garden 0 0 9
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel Rooker Samuel Shepherd 1910   House House 0 0 1
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel Rooker Samuel Shepherd 1912   Garden garden 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel Rooker Samuel Shepherd 1911   Chapel chapel 0 0 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1126   House House 0 0 2
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1127   Garden garden 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Shortridge William Slee 1165   Garden garden 0 0 13
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Shortridge William Slee 1166   House and Waste House & Waste 0 0 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Shortridge William Slee 1167   Garden garden 0 1 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Shortridge William Slee 1168   South Wood plot arable 1 1 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1140   Culmer Court Culmer Court 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1141   Lime kiln lime kiln 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1442   Waste waste 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1143   Old Culmer Court Culmer Court 0 0 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1448   Ware House Warehouse 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1451   Lime kiln limekiln 0 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1452   Part of Cliffs arable 1 2 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1453   Dwelling Houses & Court houses etc. 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1454   Lawn pasture 2 3 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1455   Garden garden 0 1 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire William Tardrew Esquire 1456   Waste waste 0 0 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew Esquire Willam Tardrew Esquire 1457   Plot pasture 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary Dark William Vanstone 1123   Garden garden 0 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary Dark William Vanstone 1124   House House 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary Dark William Vanstone 1125   House House 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Richard Vown and others 1129   Garden garden 0 0 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Richard Vown and others 1130   House House 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Richard Vown and others 1131   Court court 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Various Occupiers 1403   Cliffs cliffs etc. 136 2 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Lewis Southcombe Hele 1940 Part Brittons Galworthy Forty Acres arable 0 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Lewis Southcombe Hele 1943 Part Brittons Galworthy Hem arsble 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James Dunn Lewis Southcombe Hele 1944 Part Brittons Galworthy Bread Park arable 4 1 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Marjery Dark William Bartlett 1863   House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Marjery Dark William Bartlett 1864   Garden garden 0 0 18
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Dart John Harding 915   Spears Bocombe arable 1 1 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Dart John Harding 916   Higher Spears field arable 3 1 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 796 Watershutt Blinches Marsh meadow 1 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 808 Watershutt Blinches Clove park arable 6 3 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 809 Watershutt Blinches Higher Senden arable 2 3 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 810 Watershutt Blinches Lower Senden arable 4 0 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 949 Watershutt Blinches Moles Hill arable 5 2 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1294 Watershutt Blinches Moles Hill arable 3 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 961 Watershutt Blinches Cross park arable 4 1 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 962 Watershutt Blinches Moor park arable 4 2 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 963 Watershutt Blinches Five Acres arable 5 1 39
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 965 Watershutt Blinches Fordy park arable 3 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 966 Watershutt Blinches Fordy park arable 3 3 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 980 Watershutt Blinches Four Acres arable 4 0 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 984 Watershutt Blinches Three Acres arable 3 0 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 985 Watershutt Blinches Higher Calves Close arable 2 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 987 Watershutt Blinches Well plot arable 0 38 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 988 Watershutt Blinches Lower Calves Close meadow 3 13 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 991 Watershutt Blinches Well plot arable 0 0 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 992 Watershutt Blinches Garden garden 0 0 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 996 Watershutt Blinches Well orchard orchard 0 3 11
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1007 Watershutt Blinches Pigs Meadow arable 1 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1009 Watershutt Blinches Lower Moor park meadow 1 3 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1010 Watershutt Blinches Higher Moor park arable 1 2 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1025 Watershutt Blinches Blake field arable 1 3 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1028 Watershutt Blinches Lane end arable 1 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1029 Watershutt Blinches Woodland Meadow arable 3 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1052 Watershutt Blinches Horns Orchard meadow 0 3 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1053 Watershutt Blinches Big Meadow meadow 2 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1054 Watershutt Blinches House, Building, Court & Garden House etc. 0 2 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1055 Watershutt Blinches Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1056 Watershutt Blinches Lawn pasture 0 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1057 Watershutt Blinches Barn park arable 3 0 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1058 Watershutt Blinches Ray park arable 3 1 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1088 Watershutt Blinches Marsh meadow 0 3 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1089 Watershutt Blinches Woodland Marsh meadow 0 3 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1151 Watershutt Blinches Garden garden 0 1 0
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1152 Watershutt Blinches Garden garden 0 1 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1164 Watershutt Blinches Back Wood wood 5 1 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1175 Watershutt Blinches Water Shut Wood wood 2 3 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1176 Watershutt Blinches Clay park arable 1 3 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1178 Watershutt Blinches Great Woodland arable 4 1 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1179 Watershutt Blinches Potatoe Garden garden 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1180 Watershutt Blinches Potatoe Garden garden 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1181a Watershutt Blinches Colts Close arable 1 2 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George Delve George Delve 1181 Watershutt Blinches Wood wood 2 2 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 846 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe West Close arable 2 2 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 847 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Marsh arable 4 2 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 848 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Easter Close arable 4 2 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 849 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe South Close arable 3 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 852 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Seven Acres arable 7 2 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 853 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Road road 0 1 31
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 854 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Eight Acres arable 8 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 855 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Strap arable 8 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 856 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Coppice coppice 0 2 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 857 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe West four acres arable 4 3 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 858 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Lower four acres arable 4 1 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 859 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Orchard orchard 0 0 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 860 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Calves plot arable 0 1 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 861a Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Garden garden 0 1 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 862 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe House, Buildings & Court House etc. 0 3 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 863 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Mowhay [rickyard] 0 1 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 864 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Garden garden 0 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 866 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 867 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Garden garden 0 0 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 868 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Meadow meadow 0 3 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 869 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Lower Meadow meadow 0 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 871 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Middle park arable 1 3 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 872 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Higher Middle park arable 2 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 873 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Higher four acres arable 4 1 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 874 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Part of three acres meadow 1 2 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 875 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Part of three acres arable 1 1 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 876 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Wester Close arable 3 0 39
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 877 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Easter Close arable 2 3 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 917 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Claves arable 1 3 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 920 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Easter Meadow meadow 2 0 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 920a Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe   arable 0 0 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 921 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Wester Meadow meadow 2 2 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Dunn Richard Dunn 861 Nethercott and Shortridges Bocombe Garden arable 0 0 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 64 Hawkes Stone Plot arable 0 3 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 65 Hawkes Stone Slade Marsh arable 1 1 39
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 67 Hawkes Stone Slade arable 3 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 85 Hawkes Stone Vearn hill arable 2 1 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 92 Hawkes Stone Copse Close arable 2 0 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 98 Hawkes Stone Coppice arable 0 1 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 99 Hawkes Stone Hawkes's Down meadow 4 3 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 100 Hawkes Stone Lane end field arable 1 3 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 120 Hawkes Stone End Meadow meadow 2 1 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 121 Hawkes Stone Garden garden 0 0 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 122 Hawkes Stone House and Garden etc. House etc. 0 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 124 Hawkes Stone Little Meadow meadow 0 2 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 137 Hawkes Stone Stone Common plot arable 1 0 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 105 Haynes Cabbacott Little park arable 3 1 1
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 107 Haynes Cabbacott Middle park arable 5 2 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 108 Haynes Cabbacott Hosk [?] arable 5 2 35
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 151 Haynes Cabbacott Moor meadow 2 1 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 152 Haynes Cabbacott Barn park meadow 2 2 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 153 Haynes Cabbacott Garden garden 0 1 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 154 Haynes Cabbacott House, Building etc. House etc. 0 1 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 171 Haynes Cabbacott Low the Way arable 1 1 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 245 Haynes Cabbacott Above Way arable 1 3 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 2000 Haynes Cabbacott Lower Greena park arable 4 0 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 2093 Haynes Cabbacott Higher Greena park arable 3 1 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 2094 Haynes Cabbacott Cross park arable 4 2 18
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 253 Haynes Cabbacott Fosk Green meadow 1 3 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1282 Broady Parkhan Tenement House House 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1283 Broady Parkham Tenemrnt Garden garden 0 0 28
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1284 Broady Parkham Tenement Lower Moor arable 1 2 19
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1285 Broady Parkham Tenemrnt Middle Moor arable 4 0 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1287a Broady Parkham Tenement Higher Moor arable 5 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1337 Broady Parkham Tenement Willis meadow 1 0 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1340 Broady Parkham Tenement Lower Broad park arable 2 2 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1342 Broady Parkham Tenement Long Close arable 1 1 20
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1343 Broady Parkham Tenement Higher Broad park arable 1 1 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1346 Broady Parkham Tenement Northern field arable 4 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1347 Broady Parkham Tenement Great Close arable 3 3 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1348 Broady Parkham Tenement Three Corners arable 1 1 36
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1690 Broady Parkham Tenement Marsh arable 1 1 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1691 Broady Parkham Tenement Higher park arable 4 2 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1700 Broady Parkham Tenement Meadow meadow 1 3 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1707 Broady Parkham Tenement Linhay linhay 0 0 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1709 Broady Parkham Tenement Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 17
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1710 Broady Parkham Tenement Mowhay and Orchard orchard etc. 0 1 37
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1708 Broady Parkham Tenement Orchard orchard 0 0 25
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1711 Broady Parkham Tenement Plot arable 0 0 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward George Edward George 1712 Broady Parkham Tenement Garden garden 0 0 21
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 340 Olivers Parkham Town Old Orchard & House Orchard & House 0 2 5
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 342 Olivers Parkham Town Houses, Maltkiln & Garden House etc. 0 0 26
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 352 Olivers Parkham Town Calves park arable 3 1 32
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 369 Olivers Parkham Town Giddys field arable 3 1 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 372 Olivers Parkham Town Three Corners arable 1 3 7
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 378 Olivers Parkham Town Pond Meadow meadow 2 3 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 379 Olivers Parkham Town Garden garden 0 0 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 380 Olivers Parkham Town Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 381 Olivers Parkham Town House and Court House etc. 0 0 12
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1807a Olivers Parkham Town Higher West Hill arable 2 0 8
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1808 Olivers Parkham Town Lower West Hill arable 1 3 24
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1809 Olivers Parkham Town Wester Marsh Hill arable 1 0 15
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1810 Olivers Parkham Town Wester Marsh arable 1 1 4
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1831 Olivers Parkham Town Clay park arable 2 0 33
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1832 Olivers Parkham Town Park Marsh arable 4 2 16
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1833 Olivers Parkham Town Easter Marsh arable 1 2 13
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1834 Olivers Parkham Town Middle hill arable 5 1 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1835 Olivers Parkham Town Lower Easter hill arable 1 1 29
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 1836 Olivers Parkham Town Higher Easter hill arable 1 1 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 330   Chapel chapel 0 0 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 341   House and Garden etc. House 0 0 23
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1587 Part of Northway Garden garden 0 0 9
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1588 Part of Northway Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 6
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1589 Part of Northway House and Court House etc. 0 0 10
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1579 Part of Northway Road park arable 1 0 27
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1581 Part of Northway Higher piece arable 0 2 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1585 Part of Northway Barn Close arable 0 2 3
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1586 Part of Northway House Close arable 0 1 22
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1582 Part of Northway Broad Park arable 1 2 30
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1583 Part of Northway Cross park arable 1 2 2
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1591 Part of Northway Garden field arable 0 1 34
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Gill William Gill 1594 Part of Northway Garden garden 0 0 14
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John Harding John Harding 767   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 24
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1641 East Goldworthy Mogs Moor arable 1 0 32
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1844 East Goldworthy Salmons park meadow 3 2 16
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1845 East Goldworthy Salmons park meadow 1 3 16
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1846 East Goldworthy Salmons patk arable 1 1 35
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1876 East Goldworthy Harris's park arable 1 2 8
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1877 East Goldworthy East down arable 3 2 24
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1878 East Goldworthy West down arable 5 2 0
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1887 East Goldworthy Yard's close arable 0 3 38
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1888 East Goldworthy Poor close aranle 1 3 6
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1889 East Goldworthy Plot arable 0 0 23
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1917 East Goldworthy Long Close arable 1 1 28
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1913 East Goldworthy Hankhay meadow 0 3 26
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1921 East Goldworthy Orchard orchard 0 0 30
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1922 East Goldworthy Barms Close arable 1 1 6
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1923 East Goldworthy Orchard orchard 0 0 9
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1924 East Goldworthy Barn and Mowhay barn 0 0 20
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1925 East Goldworthy Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 1 3
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1926 East Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 8
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1927 East Goldworthy Town plot meadow 1 1 31
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1928 East Goldworthy Orchard orchard 0 1 17
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1930 East Goldworthy Lane end field arable 0 2 38
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1938 East Goldworthy Wood wood 0 2 2
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1942 East Goldworthy Wood wood 0 2 9
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1949 East Goldworthy Wood wood 3 0 37
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1950 East Goldworthy Holwill arable 3 3 3
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1951 East Goldworthy Clay park arable 1 3 15
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1952 East Goldworthy Broad Park arable 2 3 20
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1955 East Goldworthy Way downs arable 5 2 30
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1961 East Goldworthy Higher Moor and Meadow meadow 3 1 8
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1963 East Goldworthy Vord lane arable 6 2 9
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1960 East Goldworthy Cross park arable 2 2 28
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1991 East Goldworthy Meadow meadow 0 3 20
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 2007 East Goldworthy Moor Meadow meadow 0 2 10
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John Ching Thomas Ching 1939 East Goldworthy Doctors Meadow arable 0 2 38
Walter Haywood Esquire Thomas Ching 2052   Lower plot arable 0 0 14
Walter Haywood Esquire Thomas Ching 2053   Plot arable 0 0 7
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1173 Worthgate Broad Close arable 4 3 7
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1174 Worthgate Wood arable 12 0 0
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1227 Worthgate Lamb park arable 1 2 0
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1228 Worthgate Pearsens Meadow meadow 1 3 18
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1230 Worthgate Barns Close arable 2 3 8
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1231 Worthgate Buildings and Court buildings 0 1 4
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1232 Wortgate Garden garden 0 0 23P
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1233 Worthgate Town Meadow arable 3 0 26
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1234 Worthgate Nursery nursery 0 1 15
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1235 Worthgate Nine Acres arable 9 0 23P
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1236 Worthgate Seven Acres arable 7 0 18
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1237 Worthgate East Marsh meadow 1 2 34
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1238 Worthgate Meadow Marsh meadow 2 1 18
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1182 Worthgate Wood wood 2 0 16
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1183 Worthgate Ten Acres arable 9 3 37
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1184 Worthgate Woody Close arable 3 2 0
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1185 Worthgate West four acres arable 4 3 24
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1186 Worthgate Hem arable 0 2 35
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1191 Worthgate Stone park arable 3 2 31
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1408 Worthgate Holwill Meadow arable 2 0 15
Thomas Hockridge and William Hockridge Thomas Hockridge & William Hockridge 1410 Worthgate Holwill Meadow arable 1 1 25
Matilda Mary Hucks John Bates 1669 Part of Lower Fox Down Way hill Marsh arable 2 1 36
Matilda Mary Hucks John Bates 1670 Part of Lower Fox Down Lower Way hill arable 2 1 4
Matilda Mary Hucks John Bates 1671 Part of Lower Fox Down Higher Way hill arable 2 1 8
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 393 Paynes Cleave Garden garden 0 0 35
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 394 Paynes Cleave Panes Cleave arable 0 2 11
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 395 Paynes Cleave Brake furze 4 0 19
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1776 Paynes Cleave Mill Close Mead meadow 0 3 24
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1779 Paynes Cleave Plantation Plantation 1 3 0
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1780 Paynes Cleave Plantation Plantation 2 1 25
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1781 Paynes Cleave Two Acres arable 1 3 5
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1782 Paynes Cleave Higher furze plot arable 0 3 24
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1783 Paynes Cleave One Acte arable 0 3 13
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1784 Paynes Cleave Plantation plot arable 0 2 11
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1785 Paynes Cleave Plantation Plantation 0 1 20
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1786 Paynes Cleave Higher plantation field arable 2 3 21
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1787 Paynes Cleave Lower plantation field arable 3 2 7
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1656 Lower Fox Downs Gulworthy Meadow arable 2 0 10
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1657 Lower Fox Downs Bagels Farden garden 0 1 16
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1658 Lower Fox Downs Plantation Plantation 0 1 9
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1673 Lower Fox Downs Fish pond Meadow arable 0 2 24
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1674 Lower Fox Downs Plantation Plantation 0 1 5
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1675 Lower Fox Downs Garden garden 0 0 22
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1676 Lower Fox Downs Garden Meadow meadow 0 3 27
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1677 Lower Fox Downs Part of Lawn pasture 0 1 6
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1678 Lower Fox Downs Lawn pasture 2 2 15
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1679 Lower Fox Downs Plot arable 0 0 30
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1680 Lower Fox Downs Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 31
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1681 Lower Fox Downs Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 1 15
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1682 Lower Fox Downs Garden garden 0 1 25
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1683 Lower Fox Downs Orchard orchard 0 2 3
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1684 Lower Fox Downs Mow Close plot arable 0 1 5
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1685 Lower Fox Downs Mow Close plot arable 1 2 27
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1686 Lower Fox Downs Pease field arable 3 2 22
Matilda Mary Hucks Matilda Mary Hucks 1672 Lower Fox Downs Waste waste 0 0 10
Matilda Mary Hucks George Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks 1778 Lilleford House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Matilda Mary Hucks George Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks 1777 Lilleford Lilleford Meadow meadow 0 3 20
Matilda Mary Hucks George Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks 1746 Lilleford Garden garden 0 0 2
Matilda Mary Hucks George Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks 1747 Lilleford House House 0 0 21
Matilda Mary Hucks George Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks 1748 Lilleford Garden garden 0 0 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Thomas Andrew 451   Garden garden 0 1 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Thomas Andrew 452   Smiths House & Shop House etc. 0 0 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Simon Becklake 1387 Prance Cottage Little Meadow arable 0 1 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Simon Becklake 1388 Prance Cottage Will Meadow meadow 0 3 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Simon Becklake 1389 Prance Cottage Garden garden 0 0 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Simon Becklake 1390 Prance Cottage Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Passmore Simon Becklake 1391 Prance Cottage Shop Meadow meadow 0 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 362 Part of Hore Hill Orchard orchard 0 1 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 364 Part of Hore Hill Garden garden 0 0 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 365 Part of Hore Hill Garden garden 0 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Willam Bond 366 Part of Hore Hill House and Court House etc. 0 0 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 1999 Part of Hore Hill Orchard hill arable 0 1 21
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 2000 Part of Hore Hill Clay park arable 0 3 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Bond 267 Part of Hore Hill Hem to park arable 0 1 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1492 Galsworthy Copse copse 0 1 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1497 Galsworthy Copse copse 0 1 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1506 Galsworthy Ridge hill arable 2 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1507 Galsworthy Plot arable 0 1 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1514 Galsworthy Luzium [?] arable 2 1 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1516 Galsworthy Big Wood wood 2 2 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1518 Galsworthy Plot arable 0 2 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1534 Galsworthy Budds orchard orchard 0 1 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1542 Galsworthy Little plot meadow 0 1 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1543 Galsworthy Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1544 Galsworthy Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1545 Galsworthy Linhay and Waste Linhay etc. 0 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1546 Galsworthy Mill Close arable 1 1 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1547 Galsworthy Garden garden 0 0 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1548 Galsworthy Budds Close arable 1 3 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1550 Galsworthy Long Close arable 1 3 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1552 Galsworthy Little Burrow Park meadow 1 3 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1553 Galsworthy Big Burrow Park meadow 1 3 21
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire William Braund 1555 Galsworthy Long Close meadow 1 3 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Briant 449   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 15
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1795 Harrises Hill Drews Marsh arable 1 0 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1799 Harrises Hill Drews Marsh arable 1 1 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1800 Harrises Hill Long Close arable 1 2 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1801 Harrises Hill Commons arable 1 2 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1802 Harrises Hill Clay park arable 2 1 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman John Chapple 1803 Harrises Hill Horse park arable 2 1 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Lemon Thomas Dark 954   Moor arable 2 0 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Lemon Thomas Dark 955   Moor arable 0 1 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Lemon Edward George 113 Smiths Cabbacott First Meadow arable 1 2 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 142 Smiths Cabbacott Downs arable 6 1 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 143 Smiths Cabbacott Downs arable 3 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 148 Smiths Cabbacott East park arable 2 1 29
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 149 Smiths Cabbacott East park meadow 0 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 155 Smiths Cabbacott House and Garden House etc. 0 0 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 156 Smiths Cabbacott Middle Meadow meadow 1 0 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 157 Smiths Cabbacott Barn and Court barn etc 0 1 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 164 Smiths Cabbacott Plot arable 0 1 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 170 Smiths Cabbacott Water park pasture 2 3 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 182 Smiths Cabbacott Moor arable 3 0 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 215 Smiths Cabbacott Ham pasture 1 2 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 216 Smiths Cabbacott Ham Hill arable 0 3 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 244 Smiths Cabbacott Above Way arable 1 3 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 255 Smiths Cabbacott Fosk arable 3 3 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 257 Smiths Cabbacott Cross park pasture 4 0 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 2091 Smiths Cabbacott Bare Down arable 4 2 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward George Edward George 2092 Smiths Cabbacott Higher Bare down arable 3 3 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Richard Grigg 370 Part of Hoar Hill Lower field arable 2 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Richard Grigg 371 Part of Hoar Hill Higher field arable 2 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 328 Linches Parkham Town Grannary Meadow meadow 1 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 331 Linches Parkham Town House,Buildings & Court House etc. 1 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 332 Linches Parkham Town Garden garden 0 0 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 428 Linches Parkham Town Square Close arable 4 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 429 Linches Parkham Town Lower Close arable 4 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 439 Linches Parkham Town North Lawford arable 5 1 31
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 444 Linches Parkham Town Mowhay [rickyard] 0 0 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 445 Linches Parkham Town Meadow meadow 2 3 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 446 Linches Parkham Town Path Meadow meadow 1 2 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 453 Linches Parkham Town Lower Lawford arable 3 2 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headon 462 Linches Parkham Town Higher Lawford arable 3 1 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 265 Part of Hore Hill Big Marsh meadow 1 2 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 367 Part of Hore Hill Barn park arable 2 3 15
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1992 Part of Hore Hill Gorrells Garden arable 0 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1993 Part of Hore Hill Clay park hill arable 0 2 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1994 Part of Hore Hill Pickards Close arable 4 0 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1995 Part of Hore Hill Orchard field arable 2 2 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1996 Part of Hore Hill Clay park arable 1 1 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1997 Part of Hore Hill Hem to Clay park arable 0 2 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1998 Part of Hore Hill Little Marsh pasture 0 2 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 2001 Part of Hore Hill Copse copse 0 0 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 368 Part of Hore Hill Mowhay Mowhay 0 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 950 Pearce's Broad Parkham Furze park arable 3 3 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1338 Pearce's Broad Parkham Long Close arable 1 2 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1287 Pearce's Broad Parkham Mery plot arable 1 0 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1288 Pearce's Broad Parkham Hoodland arable 6 0 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1289 Pearce's Broad Parkham Higher four acres arable 4 1 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1290 Pearce's Broad Parkham Lower four acres arable 4 0 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1304 Pearce's Broad Parkham Slideland arable 6 1 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1308 Pearce's Broad Parkham Splat arable 1 0 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1322 Pearce's Broad Parkham Moor arable 7 1 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1325 Pearce's Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1326 Pearce's Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1328 Pearce's Broad Parkham Lower Meadow arable 0 3 5
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1329 Pearce's Broad Parkham Higher Meadow meadow 1 2 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1330 Pearce's Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1332 Pearce's Broad Parkham Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 25
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1323 Pearce's Broad Parkham New plot pasture 0 2 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1333 Pearce's Broad Parkham Court court 0 0 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1334 Pearce's Broad Parkham Mowhay mowhay 0 0 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1335 Pearce's Broad Parkham park arable 3 1 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1339 Pearce's Broad Parkham Waggadown arable 1 1 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 1341 Pearce's Broad Parkham Need park arable 0 2 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance John Lang 805 Pearce's Broad Parkham Furze furze 2 3 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 951 Shorts Cottage Moor arable 2 3 39
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1206 Shorts Cottage West Broady park arable 3 3 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1297 Shorts Cottage East Broady park arable 2 2 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1324 Shorts Cottage Higher Meadow arable 0 1 34
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1327 Shorts Cottage West Meadow arable 2 0 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1352 Shorts Cottage Easter hill arable 2 0 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1353 Shorts Cottage Marsh arable 2 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1354 Shorts Cottage Lower Way Wood House arable 2 2 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1356 Shorts Cottage Higher Way Wood House arable 1 3 19
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1692 Shorts Cottage Tom Short's Meadow arable 1 3 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1718 Short's Cottage Mowhay arable 0 0 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1719 Short's Cottage Garden garden 0 0 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1720 Short's Cottage House and Court House etc. 0 0 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore John Lang 1721 Short's Cottage Garden garden 0 0 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 926 Whitefields Broad Parkham Moles hill Marsh arable 0 3 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 927 Whitefields Broad Parkham Moles hill Marsh arable 0 2 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1302 Whitefields Broad Parkham Hill arable 1 0 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1303 Whitefields Broad Parkham Long Close arable 2 0 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1305 Whitefields Broad Parkham Square field arable 1 2 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1344 Whitefields Broad Parkham Lower North Ground arable 3 2 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1345 Whitefields Broad Parkham Higher North Ground arable 2 3 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1722 Whitefields Broad Parkham House and Court House etc. 0 0 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1731 Whitefields Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1732 Whitefields Broad Parkham Higher Meadow arable 1 2 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria Passmore Thomas Lemon 1733 Whitefields Broad Parkham Lower Meadow arable 0 2 15
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 167 Babeleigh Weasal arable 2 2 39
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 168 Babeleigh Coppice coppice 0 1 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 174 Babeleigh Lower Mow Close arable 5 0 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 175 Babeleigh Higher Mow Close arable 9 2 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 176 Babeleigh Little Can park arable 1 3 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 177 Babeleigh Crooked Close arable 6 1 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 178 Babeleigh Great Can park arable 5 0 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 179 Babeleigh West Close arable 8 2 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 180 Babeleigh East Close arable 7 1 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 181 Babeleigh Little East Moor arable 1 2 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 183 Babeleigh Lower East Moor pasture 11 1 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 184 Babeleigh Easter Marsh pasture 5 2 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 185 Babeleigh Higher Easter Moor pasture 10 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 186 Babeleigh Long Moor pasture 16 2 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 187 Babeleigh New plot arable 1 2 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 188 Babeleigh Gallsrys Linhay field pasture 2 1 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 189 Babeleigh Higher Platts arable 1 3 21
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 190 Babeleigh Coppice coppice 0 1 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 191 Babeleigh Robbins plat pasture 0 2 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 192 Babeleigh Long Calves plat pasture 0 3 31
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 193 Babeleigh Orchard orchard 0 0 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 194 Babeleigh Waste waste 0 0 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 195 Babeleigh Little plot arable 0 1 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 196 Babeleigh Garden garden 0 0 19
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 197 Babeleigh House, Buildings & Court House etc. 1 1 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 198 Babeleigh Garden garden 0 0 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 199 Babeleigh Waste waste 0 0 15
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 200 Babeleigh Mowhay plot arable 0 1 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 201 Babeleigh Orchard orchard 0 3 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 202 Babeleigh Higher long Meadow meadow 1 2 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 203 Babeleigh Half Acre Meadow meadow 0 2 25
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 204 Babeleigh Long Meadow meadow 2 2 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 205 Babeleigh Pond Meadow meadow 0 1 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 206 Babeleigh Coppice coppice 0 1 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 208 Babeleigh Lower pond Meadow meadow 1 2 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 209 Babeleigh Two Acres meadow 2 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 210 Babeleigh Four Acres arable 4 1 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 211 Babeleigh Cross park arable 4 1 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 212 Babeleigh Cross park Wood wood 3 3 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 283 Babeleigh Wester Wood wood 3 2 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 284 Babeleigh North Close pasture 4 2 21
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 285 Babeleigh Lower Neck field arable 5 3 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 286 Babeleigh Higher Neck field arable 3 3 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 287 Babeleigh Higher Western Wood wood 7 2 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 288 Babeleigh North Mill Close arable 3 1 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 289 Babeleigh Bulls plot pasture 2 0 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 290 Babeleigh Calves plot pasture 1 1 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 291 Babeleigh South Mill Close pasture 4 1 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 292 Babeleigh Plantation Plantation 0 0 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 293 Babeleigh Plantation Plantation 1 3 19
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 294 Babeleigh Plantation Plantation 0 0 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 295 Babeleigh Lower Holley Moor arable 5 2 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 296 Babeleigh Higher Holley Moor arable 4 3 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 297 Babeleigh Waste and Road waste etc. 1 2 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 298 Babeleigh New Moor arable 4 0 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 299 Babeleigh Road Moor arable 8 3 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 300 Babeleigh Little Moor pasture 1 1 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 301 Babeleigh Higher Moor pasture 24 1 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 302 Babeleigh Near Wester Marsh pasture 9 3 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 303 Babeleigh Alder Spot [no entry] 0 1 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 304 Babeleigh Rushy Moor pasture 8 3 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 305 Babeleigh Corner Moor arable 7 3 19
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 306 Babeleigh Lower Moor pasture 13 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter Glubb William May 486 Babeleigh Far Wester Marsh pasture 6 0 18
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 572 Palmers Ash Middle hills pasture 0 2 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 574a Palmers Ash Middle hills pasture 2 3 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 614 Palmers Ash Strang pasture 0 0 39
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 650 Palmers Ash Willis arable 0 2 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 654 Palmers Ash Garden garden 0 0 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 755 Palmers Ash House and Garden garden 0 0 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 760 Palmers Ash Garden park pasture 1 3 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 765 Palmers Ash Pool park arable 2 0 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Norman Thomas Robins 776 Palmers Ash North Moor arable 3 0 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Samuel John 360 Part of Hore Hill Clay park arable 0 3 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Samuel John 361 Part of Hore Hill South Meadow arable 0 3 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance Samuel John 363 Part of Hore Hill Back Meadow meadow 0 3 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 388 Part of Harrises Stile field arable 1 3 39
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 389 Part of Harrises Meadow [pasture] 0 0 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 390 Part of Harrises Path field arable 1 3 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire,.lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 1805 Part of Harrises Higher Harrises arable 2 2 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 1806 Part of Harrises Lower Harrises arable 3 1 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Samuel John 1807 Part of Harrises Hundred yard arable 0 2 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1036 Higher Waytown Hem in Green hall [?] 1 1 23
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1041 Higher Waytown Green hall arable 3 3 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire. Lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1073 Higher Waytown West Down arable 2 2 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1075 Higher Waytown Pond Meadow arable 0 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1076 Higher Waytown Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 2 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1077 Higher Waytown Stable Meadow meadow 0 2 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1078 Higher Waytown Higher park arable 4 3 33
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1079 Higher Waytown Lower park arable 1 2 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1240 Higher Waytown Cross park arable 3 1 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1241 Higher Waytown Garden garden 0 1 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1242 Higher Waytown Linhay linhay 0 0 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1243 Higher Waytown Plot arable 0 0 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1244 Higher Waytown Lower ley park arable 1 0 26
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1245 Higher Waytown Middle lery park arable 2 0 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1246 Higher Waytown Higher ley park arable 1 3 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1247 Higher Waytown Ley park arable 1 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1258 Higher Waytown Shrubbery shrubbery 0 0 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1259 Higher Waytown Garden garden 0 0 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1260 Higher Waytown Garden garden 0 0 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1261 Higher Waytown Garden garden 0 0 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1262 Higher Waytown Mowhay mowhay 0 0 14
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1263 Higher Waytown Barn barn 0 0 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1264 Higher Waytown Garden garden 0 0 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1265 Higher Waytown Will plot pasture 0 1 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1266 Higher Waytown Lower Moor arable 1 2 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1267 Higher Waytown East Meadow arable 0 3 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1268 Higher Waytown West Meadow arable 0 3 31
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1269 Higher Waytown Dark Meadow meadow 0 2 1
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1270 Higher Waytown West Town arable 3 2 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1271 Higher Waytown Higher Down arable 6 1 27
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1272 Higher Waytown Higher Moor arable 1 3 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1355 Higher Waytown Higher Berrys arable 4 1 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1357 Higher Waytown Lower Berrys arable 1 2 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1358 Higher Waytown Lower Berrys arable 2 0 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1359 Higher Waytown Over Marsh pasture 4 2 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1361 Higher Waytown Little Holwill Mead pasture 0 1 35
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1362 Higher Waytown Cleave arable 4 2 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1363 Higher Waytown Higher Piece arable 0 3 37
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James Shortridge James Shortridge 1364 Higher Waytown Higher Lower piece arable 0 3 0
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood 373   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood   374   House House 0 0 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood 375   Garden garden 0 0 38
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood 376   Garden garden 0 0 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood 377   Garden garden 0 1 19
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Squance William Squance 266   Copse copse 0 0 32
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman Robert Stanlake 329   Garden garden 0 0 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman Robert Stanlake 330   House, Garden & Stable House etc. 0 0 9
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John Norman Robert Stanlake 450   Garden garden 0 1 3
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Tardrew Mary Tardrew 335 Bears Parkham Town Barton Plantation plot arable 0 1 21
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Tardrew Mary Tardrew 336 Bears Parkham Town Barton Garden garden 0 0 17
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary Tardrew Mary Tardrew 337 Bears Parkham Town Barton House and Buildings House etc. 0 0 13
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 338 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Plantation pasture 0 2 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 354 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Brewers Meadow arable 0 3 22
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 385 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Pond Meadow arable 4 2 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 387 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Broad park arable 2 3 25
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 440 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Relvinstone Marsh pasture 3 2 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Tardrew 424 Harrises Parkham Town Barton Long Close pasture 3 0 25
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Vaggers William Vaggers 1984 New Haven Orchard orchard 0 1 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Vaggers William Vaggers 1980 New Haven Garden garden 0 0 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Vaggers William Vaggers 1981 New Haven Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William Vaggers William Vaggers 1982 New Haven Garden garden 0 0 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 74 Honnocotts West Stone Easter field arable 4 0 2
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 80 Honnocotts West Stone Garden garden 0 0 30
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 81 Honnocotts West Stone Orchard orchard 0 1 12
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 82 Honnocotts West Stone House, Buildings & Court House etc. 0 0 34
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 83 Honnocotts West Stone Potatoe plot arable 0 0 36
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 84 Honnocotts West Stone Above town arable 3 3 31
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 86 Honnocotts West Stone Higher Road Close Road & waste 2 2 33
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 91 Honnocotts West Stone Copse Close arable 3 [?] 7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 93 Honnocotts West Stone Road road 0 0 16
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 94 Honnocotts West Stone Lower Road Close arable 4 0 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 118 Honnocotts West Stone Wel Park arable 2 2 10
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neae 125 Honnocotts West Stone Higher Meadow arable 2 0 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 128 Honnocotts West Stone Slaid arable 2 1 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 129 Honnocotts West Stone Slaid Marsh pasture [?] 2 24
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 134 Honnocotts West Stone Little Meadow arable 1 0 4
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 136 Honnocotts West Stone Little plot arable 0 1 20
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 144 Honnocotts West Stone Down arable 4 3 11
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie Esquire John Neale 146 Honnocotts West Stone Lower Meadow meadow 2 0 8
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard Walter Rev. Richard Walter 470 Venn   arable 2 1 6
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard Walter Rev. Richard Walter 471 Venn   arable 1 1 25
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard Walter Rev. Richard Walter 482a Venn   arable 2 0 28
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard Walter Rev. Richard Walter 483a Venn   arable 1 1 32
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1536 Easter Holwill Five Acres arable 5 2 6
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1557 Easter Holwill Seven Acres arable 7 2 14
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1558 Easter Holwill Marsh arable 1 1 18
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1559 Easter Holwill Marsh arable 1 0 25
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1560 Easter Holwill Half Acre Marsh arable 0 3 2
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1561 Easter Holwill Two Acres arable 1 2 33
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1562 Easter Holwill Garden garden 0 0 34
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1563 Easter Holwill Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 26
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1564 Easter Holwill Mowhay mowhay 0 0 20
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1565 Easter Holwill Garden garden 0 0 11
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1567 Easter Holwill Plantation Plantation 0 0 9
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1568 Easter Holwill Plantation Plantation 0 0 14
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1569 Easter Holwill Six Acres arable 5 3 15
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1570 Easter Holwill Three Acres arable 2 3 8
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1571 Easter Holwill Five Acres arable 4 3 0
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1572 Easter Holwill Four Acres arable 3 3 0
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1573 Easter Holwill Higher Hill arable 2 0 9
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1574 Easter Holwill Lower Hill arable 1 0 32
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1575 Easter Holwill Marsh pasture 1 1 9
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1576 Easter Holwill Easter Marsh pasture 1 1 28
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1577 Easter Holwill Easter hill arable 2 1 o
Thomas Nance Kivell William Nance Kivell 1566 Easter Holwill Chapel chapel 0 0 3
James Lane John Ashton 1532   House House 0 0 1
James Lane John Ashton 1533   Garden garden 0 0 5
James Lane James Lane 1604   Garden garden 0 0 4
James Lane James Lane 1607   House House 0 0 6
James Lane James Lane 1605   House House 0 0 4
James Lane James Lane 1530 Part of Northway Lower field pasture 0 3 22
James Lane James Lane 1531 Part of Northway Higher field pasture 1 0 5
James Lane James Lane 1535 Part of Northway Meadow pasture 0 1 9
James Lane James Lane 1536 Part of Northway New Close pasture 0 1 28
James Lane James Lane 1539 Part of Northway Town place pasture 0 0 17
James Lane James Lane 1540 Part of Northway Town place pasture 0 0 34
James Lane James Lane 1541 Part of Northway Town place pasture 0 0 27
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1857 Sewells Goldworthy Lower field arable 1 1 8
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1858 Sewells Goldworthy Middle field arable 1 0 16
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1859 Sewells Goldworthy Square Close arable 0 3 10
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1860 Sewells Goldworthy Pigs Meadow meadow 0 2 34
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1861 Sewells Goldworthy Garden garden 0 0 18
Josiah Lane Josiah Lane 1862 Sewells Goldworthy Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 8
Richard Lane Robert Harris 401   Plot arable 0 1 4
Richard Lane Robert Harris 402   House House 0 0 11
Ricard Lane Robert Harris 403   Garden garden 0 0 12
Richard Lane Robert Harris 404   Orchard orchard 0 0 36
Richard Lane Richard Lane 405 Bocombe Lower North Meadow meadow 1 2 4
Richard Lane Richard Lane 406 Bocombe Orchard orchard 0 1 1
Richard Lane Richard Lane 407 Bocombe Higher North Meadow meadow 1 0 3
Richard Lane Richard Lane 408 Bocombe Plantation Plantation 0 1 14
Richard Lane Richard Lane 409 Bocombe House,building etc. House etc. 0 3 3
Richard Lane Richard Lane 410 Bocombe Mowhay mowhay 0 0 34
Richard Lane Richard Lane 411 Bocombe Orchard orchard 0 3 2
Richard Lane Richard Lane 412 Bocombe Garden garden 0 0 30
Richard Lane Richard Lane 413 Bocombe Orchard orchard 0 0 30
Richard Lane Richard Lane 414 Bocombe Lower Dunsfield arable 1 3 14
Richard Lane Richard Lane 415 Bocombe Higher Dunsfield arable 1 1 27
Richard Lane Richard Lane 416 Bocombe Butter hill pasture 1 1 4
Richard Lane Richard Lane 417 Bocombe Coppice coppice 0 2 24
Richard Lane Richard Lane 418 Bocombe Orchard orchard 0 1 35
Richard Lane Richard Lane 419 Bocombe Well Meadow meadow 2 1 0
Richard Lane Richard Lane 850 Bocombe Part of twelve Acres arable 6 2 36
Richard Lane Richard Lane 880 Bocombe Higher Nine Acres arable 10 1 10
Richard Lane Richard Lane 881 Bocombe Higher Moor arable 3 2 35
Richard Lane Richard Lane 882 Bocombe Big Moor arable 5 0 26
Richard Lane Richard Lane 883 Bocombe Little Moor pasture 2 3 3
Richard Lane Richard Lane 886 Bocombe Lower quarry park pasture 3 0 5
Richard Lane Richard Lane 887 Bocombe Higher quarry park arable 4 1 36
Richard Lane Richard Lane 888 Bocombe Lower Nine Acres arable 9 3 30
Richard Lane Richard Lane 889 Bocombe Bottom park arable 3 1 30
Richard Lane Richard Lane 890 Bocombe Bottom park Marsh pasture 0 1 23
Richard Lane Richard Lane 891 Bocombe Bottom park Marsh pasture 0 3 26
Richard Lane Richard Lane 892 Bocombe Bottom park arable 2 2 25
Richard Lane Richard Lane 893 Bocombe Road road 0 2 12
Richard Lane Richard Lane 894 Bocombe Higher thorn close arable 6 0 36
Richard Lane Richard Lane 895 Bocombe Lower thorn close arable 6 2 19
John Lee Lee Esquire William Ackland 2216   Orchard orchard 0 0 37
John Lee Lee Esquire William Ackland 2224   Orchard orchard 0 1 4
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry Parr William Ackland & William Shortridge 2222   House House 0 0 3
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Lewis Ashton 2100   Garden garden 0 0 8
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Lewis Ashton and John Glover 2099   House and Buildings House etc. 0 0 6
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Glover 2095   Garden garden 0 0 7
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Glover 2101   Orchard orchard 0 2 21
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2122 Worden Seven Acres arable 8 1 4
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2123 Worden Big Ganders Lake arable 8 1 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2124 Worden Hem to Big Ganders Lake copse 0 1 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2125 Worden Hem copse 0 1 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2126 Worden Worden Meadow meadow 3 0 28
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2127 Worden Hem to Meadow copse 0 0 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2128 Worden Waste waste 0 0 21
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2129 Worden Road road 0 0 38
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2130 Worden Hem copse 0 1 34
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2131 Worden Nursery nursery 0 0 24
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2132 Worden Little potatoe Ham arable 0 1 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2133 Worden Quarry Close arable 4 3 3
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2134 Worden Hem copse 0 3 8
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2135 Worden Worden Meadow arable 0 1 17
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2136 Worden Worden Meadow Coppice coppice 0 1 31
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2137 Worden Worden Meadow Orchard orchard 1 1 31
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2138 Worden Little Ganders Lake arable 3 1 22
John Lee Lee Esquire James Hamlyn 2230 Worden Potatoe Ham arable 1 0 33
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 33 East Stone Cream park arable 6 2 35
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 34 East Stone Linhay Marsh arable 0 2 16
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 35 East Stone Higher Marsh arable 4 1 27
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 41 East Stone Stone Copse copse 7 2 11
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 42 East Stone Crooked park arable 5 1 36
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 43 East Stone Gradden arable 8 0 10
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 44 East Stone Road road 0 0 26
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 45 East Stone Little Marsh pasture 0 2 13
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 46 East Stone Griggs Meadow arable 3 0 31
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 47 East Stone Lower Marsh pasture 2 1 25
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 48 East Stone Little Well Meadow pasture 0 1 26
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 49 East Stone Well Meadow pasture 3 2 22
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 50 East Stone Horse park arable 4 1 1
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 51 East Stone lawn arable 1 3 8
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 52 East Stone Orchard orchard 0 1 34
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 52a East Stone Hay Mow [rickyard] 0 0 16
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 53 East Stone House, Buildings & Court House etc. 1 2 6
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 54 East Stone Mowhay [mowhay] 0 1 5
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 55 East Stone Garden garden 0 1 9
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 57 East Stone Plantation Plantation 0 1 0
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 58 East Stone East horse Stone arable 3 1 18
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 59 East Stone Above town arable 4 0 21
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 60 East Stome Clarkes Meadow arable 2 3 23
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 61 East Stone Newer park arable 6 1 36
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 62 East Stone Great Slew arable 5 0 36
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 63 East Stone Slew Marsh arable 1 2 28
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 66 East Stone Little Slew arable 2 0 33
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 69 East Stone Higher horse Stone arable 6 0 20
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 70 East Stone Wester horse Stone arable 3 2 21
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 71 East Stome Higher ladies Meadow arable 2 1 14
John Lee Lee Esquire John Heal 72 East Stome Lower ladies Meadow arable 1 3 0
John Lee Lee Esquire John Lee Lee Esquire 2139 Part Halsbury Halsbury Coppice coppice 24 3 12
John Lee Lee Esquire John Lee Lee Esquire 2233 Part Halsbury Beef park Coppice coppice 2 0 35
John Lee Lee Esquire John Lee Lee Esquire 2191   Pickards Wood wood 11 2 36
John Lee Lee Esquire John Lee Lee Esquire 2193   Part Pickards Wood wood 0 1 33
John Lee Lee Esquire John Lee Lee Esquire 2190   Part Pickards Wood wood 0 0 11
John Lee Lee Esquire William Williams 2219   House House 0 0 2
John Lee Lee Esquire William Williams 2215   Garden garden 0 1 26
John Lee Lee Esquire William Williams 2217   Garden Gardens 0 0 17
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 23 Halsbury Barton Deen park arable 16 1 24
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 36 Halsbury Barton Nodgel Moor pasture 7 0 17
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 37 Halsbury Barton Higher Nodgel arable 16 0 34
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 38 Halsbury Barton Higher Middle Nodgel arable 12 2 0
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 39 Halsbury Barton Lower Middle Nodgel arable 10 2 35
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 40 Halsbury Barton Lower Nodgel arable 13 0 36
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2102 Halsbury Barton Hem to Lower Nodgel arable 0 1 32
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2103 Halsbury Barton Hem to Lower Nodgel arable 0 1 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2104 Halsbury Barton Buckland Mead pasture 10 1 0
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2105 Halsbury Barton Hem to Buckland Mead copse 0 0 28
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2106 Halsbury Barton Little Orchard orchard 0 2 10
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2107 Halsbury Barton Buildings and Court buildings etc. 2 0 28
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2108 Halsbury Barton Garden garden 0 1 10
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2109 Halsbury Barton Orchard orchard 0 2 12
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2110 Halsbury Barton Parkham Meadow meadow 7 3 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2111 Halsbury Barton Plantation Plantation 0 0 28
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2112 Halsbury Barton Waste waste 0 0 36
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2113 Halsbury Barton Little plot arable 0 0 17
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2114 Halsbury Barton Pond pond 0 0 11
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2115 Halsbury Barton Bulls plot pasture 2 1 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2115a Halsbury Barton Calves plot arable 1 3 11
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2116 Halsbury Barton Mowhay [mowhay] 0 1 17
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2117 Halsbury Barton Little Meadow pasture 2 2 0
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2118 Halsbury Barton Waste waste 0 1 15
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2119 Halsbury Barton Orchard orchard 2 0 13
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2120 Halsbury Barton Higher Meadow arable 7 1 27
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2143 Halsbury Barton Road road 1 2 26
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2144 Halsbury Barton Pool park arable 11 3 36
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2145 Halsbury Barton Waste waste 0 0 19
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2146 Halsbury Barton Higher Shilleven arable 10 1 16
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2142 Halsbury Barton Higher Long Close arable 9 3 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2147 Halsbury Barton Little furze down pasture 7 1 13
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2148 Halsbury Barton Lower Shilliven arable 8 2 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James moase 2194 Halsbury Barton Coppice coppice 3 3 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2195 Halsbury Barton Great furze down arable 11 0 34
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2196 Halsbury Barton Long land arable 17 0 15
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2197 Halsbury Barton Lower Long Close arable 14 2 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2198 Halsbury Barton Higher Green close arable 10 1 7
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2199 Halsbury Barton Lower Green close arable 7 3 14
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2200 Halsbury Barton Halsbury Moor arable 27 2 15
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2201 Halsbury Barton Little plot arable 0 1 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2202 Halsbury Barton Spot Coppice coppice 0 0 7
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2203 Halsbury Barton Spot Coppice coppice 0 0 18
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2204 Halsbury Barton Spot Coppice coppice 0 0 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2205 Halsbury Barton Spot Coppice coppice 0 0 13
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2209 Halsbury Barton Collins Ham pasture 6 1 26
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2210 Halsbury Barton Little Oak park arable 3 2 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2211 Halsbury Barton Great Oak park arable 9 1 36
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2212 Halsbury Barton Seven Acres arable 7 3 32
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2213 Halsbury Barton Road and Waste road 0 2 37
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2214 Halsbury Barton Little Moor arable 2 1 20
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2121 Halsbury Barton Lower Meadow arable 7 2 9
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2140 Halsbury Barton Hem [?] 0 1 18
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2141 Halsbury Barton Bramley arable 3 1 3
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2218 Halsbury Barton Court court 0 1 35
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2220 Halsbury Barton Barn barn 0 0 3
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2221 Halsbury Barton Mowhay mowhay 0 0 14
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2225 Halsbury Barton Little plot arable 0 2 5
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2226 Halsbury Barton Round hill arable 11 2 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2227 Halsbury Barton Hem to Round hill arable 0 0 39
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2228 Halsbury Barton Hem to Round hill arable 0 2 11
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2229 Halsbury Barton Near hill arable 6 2 26
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2231 Halsbury Barton Rowland Meadow pasture 1 2 6
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2232 Halsbury Barton Little hill arable 1 1 6
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2234 Halsbury Barton Beef park arable 5 2 30
John Lee Lee Esquire James Moase 2235 Halsbury Barton Barn park arable 8 2 37
John Lee Lee Esquire William Shortridge 2223   Garden garden 0 0 8
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2172 Halsbury Mill Plantation Plantation 0 0 2
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2173 Halsbury Mill Plantation Plantation 0 0 5
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2174 Halsbury Mill Orchard orchard 0 0 27
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2175 Halsbury Mill Garden garden 0 0 34
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2176 Halsbury Mill Orchard orchard 0 1 18
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2177 Halsbury Mill Plot garden 0 0 34
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2178 Halsbury Mill Pond pond 0 0 10
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2179 Halsbury Mill Buildings and Court buildings 0 0 26
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2180 Halsbury Mill Mowhay mowhay 0 0 13
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2181 Halsbury Mill Wood plot pasture 1 1 28
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2182 Halsbury Mill Hem pasture 0 1 15
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2183 Halsbury Mill Lower pickards close arable 1 3 6
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2184 Halsbury Mill Hem arable 0 1 15
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2185 Halsbury Mill Higher pickards close arable 4 1 23
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2186 Halsbury Mill Middle pickards close arable 2 1 28
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2187 Halsbury Mill Mill Close pasture 2 1 12
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2188 Halsbury Mill Spot arable 0 0 4
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2189 Halsbury Mill Spot arable 0 0 6
John Lee Lee Esquire William Squance 2192 Halsbury Mill Little pickards close arable 1 3 15
John May George Brend 1865 Robins Goldworthy Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 10
John May George Brend 1868 Robins Goldworthy Higher field arable 1 2 14
John May George Brend 1869 Robins Goldworthy Square Close arable 0 3 28
John May George Brend 1870 Robins Goldworthy Middle field arable 1 1 0
John May George Brend 1871 Robins Goldworthy Lower field arable 0 3 8
John May John Lang 1866   House House 0 0 5
John May John Lang 1867   Garden garden 0 0 23
John May Samuel Wakeley & James Wakeley 1975 New Haven House House 0 0 3
John May Samuel Wakeley 1977 New Haven Garden garden 0 0 24
John May Samuel Wakeley 1974a New Haven Garden garden 0 2 12
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Grace Neale 1502 Part of Peppercombe House House 0 0 2
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Grace Neale 1503 Part of Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 26
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Grace Neale 1504 Part of Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 8
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2206 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 0 0 7
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2207 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 0 0 18
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2208 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 0 0 6
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2236 Parkham Side Higher Ash park arable 8 2 6
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2237 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 0 0 25
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2238 Parkham Side Lower Ash park arable 5 3 10
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2239 Parkham Side Great hill Coppice copse 3 3 26
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2240 Parkham Side Road road 0 1 34
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2241 Parkham Side Bridge Meadow Copse wood 1 2 23
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2242 Parkham Side Bridge Meadow pasture 1 0 20
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2243 Parkham Side Buildings buildings 0 0 4
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2244 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 1 0 23
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2245 Parkham Side Little plot arable 0 0 8
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2246 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 5 0 26
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2247 Parkham Side Coppice coppice 0 0 27
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2248 Parkham Side Plantation Plantation 0 0 8
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2249 Parkham Side Road road 0 1 4
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2250 Parkham Side Lambs Close arable 7 3 18
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2251 Parkham Side Bolland Wood arable 11 0 23
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2252 Parkham Side Hem in Great Hill copse 0 1 24
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2253 Parkham Side Hem in Great Hill copse 0 1 12
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2254 Parkham Side Great Hill pasture 18 1 0
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2256 Parkham Side Alder Spot arable 0 0 9
anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2257 Parkham Side Little Meadow pasture 0 3 5
Anna Rolle Morrison and others Anna Rolle Morrison and others 2258 Parkham Side Waste waste 0 0 30
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee John Neale 1371 Part of Peppercombe House House 0 0 2
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee John Neale 1372 Part of Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 2
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee John Neale 1373 Part of Peppercombe Garden garden 0 0 11
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee John Neale 1374 Part of Peppercombe Garden garden 0 2 1
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee Grace Neale 1505 Part of Peppercombe Meadow meadow 1 2 7
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lessee Grace Neale 1554 Part of Peppercombe Chanters park [meadow] 4 1 7
John Norman William Bates 1205 Hammetts Worthgate Long Meddon meadow 1 3 11
John Norman William Bates 1209 Hammetts Worthgate Garden garden 0 1 6
John Norman William Bates 1210 Hammetts Worthgate Buildings and Court buildings 0 0 24
John Norman William Bates 1211 Hammetts Worthgate Garden garden 0 0 22
John Norman William Bates 1201 Hammetts Worthgate North field arable 3 0 37
John Norman William Bates 1212 Hammetts Worthgate Acre Meadow pasture 1 0 24
John Norman William Bates 1309 Hammetts Worthgate Great South Down arable 3 0 22
John Norman William Bates 1460 Hammetts Worthgate Little South Down arable 3 1 6
John Norman William Bates 1401 Hammetts Worthgate North field arable 3 0 2
John Norman William Bates 1411 Hammetts Worthgate Wet Meadow arable 1 0 11
John Norman Nathaniel Hancock 2008   Park Meadow meadow 1 2 8
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2006 Old Mell West Meadow meadow 0 1 12
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2009 Old Mell Long Close arable 0 3 2
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2031 Old Mell West hill arable 1 1 20
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2032 Old Mell Garden garden 0 0 20
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2035 Old Mell Little plot pasture 0 0 28
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2036 Old Mell Mill pond pond 0 0 8
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2037 Old Mell Buildings, Court & Waste buildings etc. 0 0 33
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2034 Old Mell Marsh arable 0 3 13
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2038 Old Mell Little Ham pasture 0 0 25
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2039 Old Mell Great Ham pasture 0 2 22
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2044 Old Mell Orchard Orchard & House 0 0 10
John Norman, lessee John Genn Nathaniel Hancock 2045 Old Mell East Hill arable 1 1 12
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1480 Part of Bishops Northway Higher field arable 0 2 16
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1481 Part of Bishops Northway Plot arable 0 0 28
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1482 Part of Bishops Northway Copse copse 1 1 37
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1483 Part of Bishops Northway Middle field arable 0 1 14
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1484 Part of Bishops Northway Lower field arable 0 3 13
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1485 Part of Bishops Northway Buildings & Mowhay buildings etc. 0 0 5
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1486 Part of Bishops Northway House etc. House etc. 0 0 11
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1487 Part of Bishops Northway Garden garden 0 0 16
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1488 Part of Bishops Northway Orchard orchard 0 0 3
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1491 Part of Bishops Northway Garden garden 0 0 36
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1498 Part of Bishops Northway Wood wood 1 1 13
Samuel Paddon Samuel Paddon 1499 Part of Bishops Northway Plot arable 0 0 31
Samuel Paddon James Paddon and Elizabeth Hutchings 1489   House and Court House etc. 0 0 10
Parkham Poor Walter Haywood 981   Poor land arable 2 3 4
Parkham Poor Walter Haywood 1008   Poor land arable 0 2 24
Parkham Poor Walter Haywood 1085   Poor Land Moor wood 0 1 0
Parkham Poor Walter Haywood 1086   Poor land arable 0 3 33
Parkham Parish Samuel Martin 344   School house and Court School house etc. 0 0 10
Henry Parr Henry Parr 261 Higher Dendridge Furze park arable 2 0 7
Henry Parr Henry Parr 262 Higher Dendridge Little furze park arable 0 1 29
Nenry Parr Henry Parr 263 Higher Dendridge Little furze park arable 0 1 32
Henry Parr Henry Parr 264 Higher Dendridge Furze park Marsh pasture 0 3 15
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2017 Higher Dendridge Hill arable 0 1 5
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2018 Higher Dendridge Little Broady park arable 0 1 36
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2019 Higher Dendridge Long Close arable 1 0 30
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2020 Higher Dendridge Little plot arable 0 0 34
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2021 Higher Dendridge Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 29
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2022 Higher Dendridge Orchard orchard 0 0 8
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2023 Higher Dendridge Three Corner field arable 1 2 32
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2024 Higher Dendridge New plot arable 0 2 26
Henry Parr Henry Parr 2025 Higher Dendridge Broady park arable 1 2 18
James Peard James Peard 1935 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Holy Well Copse copse 0 1 20
James Peard James Peard 1936 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Holy Well Copse copse 0 2 22
James Pickard James Pickard 768 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Welcom Moor arab;e 3 0 27
James Pickard James Pickard 769 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Second Welcom Moor pasture 2 0 1
James Pickard James Pickard 787 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Third Welcom Moor arable 7 1 31
James Pickard James Pickard 788 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Sixth Welcom Moor arable 1 3 36
James Pickard James Pickard 789 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Fourth Welcom Moor arable 3 2 30
James Pickard James Pickard 790 Part of Shapleys Goldworthy Third Welcom Moor arable 5 2 10
Jasper Pickard Jasper Pickard 1062   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 268 Parkham Town Barton Wood park Coppice coppice 4 0 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 269 Parkham Town Barton Garden garden 0 1 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 270 Parkham Town Barton Part of Breake arable 0 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 271 Parkham Town Barton Enclosure [?] 0 0 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 272 Parkham Town Barton Breake arable 7 1 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 273 Parkham Town Barton Breake        
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 274 Parkham Town Barton Enclosure arable 0 0 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 275 Parkham Town Barton Poor land arable 1 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 276 Parkham Town Barton Poor land arable 1 1 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 281 Parkham Town Barton Poor land arable 0 2 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 323 Parkham Town Barton Plot arable 0 3 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 324 Parkham Town Barton Garden garden 0 0 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 325 Parkham Town Barton House, Building & Court House etc. 0 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 326 Parkham Town Barton Mowhay mowhay 0 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 327 Parkham Town Barton Orchard orchard 0 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 333 Parkham Town Barton Pound Meadow arable 4 0 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 350 Parkham Town Barton Pound Meadow pasture 4 1 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 351 Parkham Town Barton Garden garden 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 355 Parkham Town Barton Culver park arable 5 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 356 Parkham Town Barton Culver park Copse copse 2 1 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 357 Parkham Town Barton Little hill plot arable 0 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 358 Parkham Town Barton Wood park arable 8 1 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 359 Parkham Town Barton Little Wood park arable 1 1 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 382 Parkham Town Barton North Close arable 5 3 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 384 Parkham Town Barton Middle Close arable 4 1 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 434 Parkham Town Barton Nine Acres arable 9 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 435 Parkham Town Barton Long Close arable 6 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 436 Parkham Town Barton Three Acres arable 3 3 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 437 Parkham Town Barton Five Acres arable 5 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 438 Parkham Town Barton Intake arable 0 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 441 Parkham Town Barton Plot arable 0 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 442 Parkham Town Barton Part Lawford arable 4 3 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 443 Parkham Town Barton North Lawford arable 5 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 884 Parkham Town Barton Little Copstone arable 3 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 885 Parkham Town Barton Copstone arable 14 2 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 1837 Parkham Town Barton Lower North Close arable 5 1 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Ann Andrew 383 Parkham Town Barton Costy Loss arable 3 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 554 Part of Melbury North Moor arable 24 2 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 555 Part of Melbury Middle Moor arable 26 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 556 Part of Melbury Middle Moor arable 27 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 557 Part of Melbury Higher thistle park arable 17 2 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 558 Part of Melbury Lower thistle park arable 17 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 559 Part of Melbury Little thistle park arable 0 1 20
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 560 Part of Melbury Clover Close arable 19 3 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 561 Part of Melbury Wester Marsh arable 21 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 562 Part of Melbury North Marsh arable 15 3 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Mary Andrew 563 Part of Melbury Marsh arable 2 1 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Ashton William Ashton 235   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 528 Kerswell Higher Moor arable 5 2 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 529 Kerswell Vetch field arable 3 2 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 530 Kerswell Six Acres arable 8 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 531 Kerswell Ridgey Moor pasture 16 1 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 532 Kerswell Winter Close arable 3 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 533 Kerswell Long Moor pasture 3 2 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 534 Kerswell Square Moor pasture 3 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 535 Kerswell Crooked Moor pasture 5 3 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 536 Kerswell Crooked Moor pasture 1 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 537 Kerswell Rush Moor pasture 7 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 538 Kerswell Wester Moor arable 1 1 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 539 Kerswell Wester moor arable 1 3 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 540 Kerswell Furze Brahe furze 4 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 541 Kerswell Higher Moor arable 5 1 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 597 Kerswell Splat arable 2 0 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 598 Kerswell Road road 0 2 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 599 Kerswell Pond Meadow meadow 1 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 600 Kerswell Srang meadow 0 2 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 601 Kerswell Croft meadow 2 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 605 Kerswell West Meadow meadow 2 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 666 Kerswell West park meadow 2 1 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 667 Kerswell Baker park meadow 2 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 668 Kerswell Mowhay arable 0 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 669 Kerswell House, Building & Court House etc. 0 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 670 Kerswell Shipen Meadow arable 0 2 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 671 Kerswell Nails Meadow arable 1 3 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 672 Kerswell Nails Moor pasture 6 0 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 673 Kerswell Nails Moor arable 5 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 674 Kerswell Nails Moor arable 2 2 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 675 Kerswell Nails Moor arable 2 3 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 706 Kerswell Morridge arable 1 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 707 Kerswell Broada park arable 3 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 708 Kerswell Lower lane end field arable 2 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 709 Kerswell Longer park arable 1 3 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 710 Kerswell Elder park arable 1 1 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 711 Kerswell Lower Garden park arable 1 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 712 Kerswell Garden garden 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 713 Kerswell Hays arable 0 1 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 714 Kerswell Garden garden 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 715 Kerswell Orchard orchard 0 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 716 Kerswell Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 717 Kerswell Mowhay field arable 1 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 718 Kerswell Higher Garden park arable 1 3 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 719 Kerswell Higher park arable 3 1 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 720 Kerswell Road road 0 1 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 721 Kerswell Higher lane end field arable 3 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 722 Kerswell Newer park arable 3 1 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 726 Kerswell Easter Cross park arable 6 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey Richard Bailey 727 Kerswell Wester Cross park arable 4 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Richard Bate 172 Reckards Steart Justment Copse arable 2 0 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Richard Bate 173 Reckards Steart Justment arable 1 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Richard Bate 213 Reckards Steart Justment arable 1 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Richard Bate 214 Reckards Steart Justment arable 1 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Richard Bond 503 Part of Melbury Ten Acres arable 11 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Richard Bond 504 Part of Melbury Sixteen Acres arable 17 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Richard Bond 505 Part of Melbury Eight Acres arable 8 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Richard Bond 506 Part of Melbury Twenty Acres arable 28 1 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Bailey James Braund 728   House, Court and Garden Gardens 0 0 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Cann William Cann 1061   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing   564   Garden garden 0 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing   565   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Anthony Clement 225   Garden garden 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Wiliam Squance Anthony Clement 226   Croft arable 0 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Anthony Clement 227   Copse copse 0 3 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Squance Anthony Clement 228   Justment arable 2 2 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 68 West Stone Shillan arable 7 0 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 73 West Stone Little park arable 1 3 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 75 West Stone Pear park arable 5 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 76 West Stone Garden garden 0 0 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 77 West Stone Mow plot pasture 0 2 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 78 West Stone House, Building & Court House etc. 0 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 79 West Stone Plot arable 0 1 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 87 West Stone Higher Windy park arable 4 3 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 88 West Stone Copse copse 1 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 89 West Stone Lower Windy park arable 5 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 90 West Stone Copse copse 4 0 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 95 West Stone Quarry park Copse copse 1 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 119 West Stone Vel park arable 1 2 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 123 West Stone Garden garden 0 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 126 West Stone Measow pasture 2 1 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 130 West Stone Down arable 1 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 131 West Stone Plot arable 0 0 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 132 West Stone Down arable 2 3 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 133 West Stone Down arable 2 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 145 West Stone Lower Meadow pasture 3 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 147 West Stone Lower Broom Hill arable 2 3 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clements Joseph Clements 150 West Stone Higher Broom Hill arable 1 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1066 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1067 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham House plot pasture 0 1 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1068 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham Plot pasture 0 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1069 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham Clover field pasture 1 0 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee WilliamTurner Thomas Dark 1070 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham Middle field pasture 1 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1071 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham Higher field pasture 1 1 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Turner Thomas Dark 1365 Part of Hortops Broad Parkham Lower piece pasture 0 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 811 Limebury Cleave arable 5 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 934 Limebury Thorn Close Marsh pasture 1 1 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 935 Limebury Middle Marsh arable 1 3 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 936 Limebury Marsh arable 2 1 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 937 Limebury Meadow pasture 1 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 938 Limebury Road road 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 939 Limebury Garden garden 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 940 Limebury House, Building and Court House etc. 0 2 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 941 Limebury Mowhay mowhay 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 942 Limebury Mowhay plot arable 0 3 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 943 Limebury Will plot arable 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 944 Limebury Clover field arable 3 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 945 Limebury Little plot arable 0 0 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 946 Limebury Middle hill arable 2 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 947 Limebury Road road 0 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 948 Limebury Thorn Close arable 6 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 956 Limebury Horse park arable 3 1 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 957 Limebury Over Marsh arable 0 2 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 958 Limebury Middle Marsh arable 0 3 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 959 Limebury First Marsh arable 1 1 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle Joseph Dark 980 Limebury Broad Close arable 6 2 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 952 Mouse Hills Over land arable 3 2 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1292 Mouse Hills Moulls hill arable 3 2 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1293 Mouse Hills Hem to Moulls hill copse 0 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1295 Mouse Hills Middle Moulls hill pasture 1 1 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1299 Mouse Hills Hem copse 0 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1300 Mouse Hills Hem copse 1 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1298 Mouse Hills Lower Moulls hill arable 6 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Joseph Dark 1301 Mouse Hills Part Moulls hill arable 0 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Thomas Dark 1723   Garden garden 0 0 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sergeant Thomas Dark 1724   House House 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Dunn William Dunn 1713   House and Court House etc. 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pennington William Dunn 924 Daniels Broad Parkham South Down arable 3 2 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pennington William Dunn 925 Daniels Broad Parkham South Down arable 1 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pennington William Dunn 1306 Daniels Broad Parkham South Down arable 4 0 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1276 Daniels Broad Parkham Five Acres arable 5 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1277 Daniels Broad Parkham Four Acres arable 4 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1278 Daniels Broad Parkham Square field arable 3 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1279 Daniels Broad Parkham Middle field arable 3 3 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1280 Daniels Broad Parkham Moor arsble 4 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Ford George Ford 1281 Daniels Broad Parkham Three Corners arable 2 3 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 2096 Bishops Cabbacott South Broad park arable 5 3 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 2097 Bishops Cabbacott Coppice coppice 4 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 2095 Bishops Cabbacott North Broad park arable 5 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 112 Bishops Cabbacott Meadow pasture 2 3 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 162 Bishops Cabbacott Garden garden 0 0 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 165 Bishops Cabbacott Croft arable 1 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 166 Bishops Cabbacott Croft arable 2 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 169 Bishops Cabbacott Croft arable 1 2 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 243 Bishops Cabbacott Ridge park pasture 3 2 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 243a Bishops Cabbacott Ridge park pasture 1 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 246 Bishops Cabbacott Road road 0 1 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 247 Bishops Cabbacott Machine plot pasture 0 3 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 248 Bishops Cabbacott Barn park arable 1 3 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 256 Bishops Cabbacott Fosk arable 4 3 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Junior 258 Bishops Cabbacott Stone [Pck?] pasture 9 3 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 96 Cabbacott Barton Much or More pasture 2 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 97 Cabbacott Barton Wood wood 3 3 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 101 Cabbacott Barton Great East arable 7 3 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 102 Cabbacott Barton Lower East arable 5 2 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 103 Cabbacott Barton Alder Spot arable 0 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 104 Cabbacott Barton Much land arable 6 3 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 109 Cabbacott Barton Little East arable 3 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 110 Cabbacott Barton Worst Moor pasture 1 3 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 111 Cabbacott Barton Lane End arable 3 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 114 Cabbacott Barton Mowhay mowhay 0 1 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 115 Cabbacott Barton Broad Meadow pasture 3 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 116 Cabbacott Barton Moory Meadow pasture 1 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 117 Cabbacott Barton Stone park arable 4 2 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 138 Cabbacott Barton Stone Common arable 0 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 139 Cabbacott Barton Moor arable 1 2 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 140 Cabbacott Barton Mppr arable 1 3 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 141 Cabbacott Barton Moor arable 3 2 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 158 Cabbacott Barton Mowhay plot arable 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 159 Cabbacott Barton House, Buildings & Court House etc. 0 1 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 160 Cabbacott Barton Garden garden 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 161 Cabbacott Barton Garden garden 0 0 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 163 Cabbacott Barton Lower Meadow pasture 4 1 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 232 Cabbacott Barton North Hill arable 2 1 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 233 Cabbacott Barton Road road 0 0 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 236 Cabbacott Barton Stone [?] hill arable 4 3 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 237 Cabbacott Barton Spot arable 0 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 238 Cabbacott Barton Lay hill arable 1 2 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 239 Cabbacott Barton Marsh arable 1 3 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 240 Cabbacott Barton Lay hill arable 2 0 23P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 241 Cabbacott Barton Goose hill arable 2 0 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 242 Cabbacott Barton Oat park arable 2 2 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 250 Cabbacott Barton Townsend pasture 3 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 251 Cabbacott Barton Road road 0 1 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 252 Cabbacott Barton Lay arable 9 3 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 254 Cabbacott Barton Road road 0 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 259 Cabbacott Barton Dendery Down arable 7 2 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 260 Cabbacott Barton Three Corner Close arable 5 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 2046 Cabbacott Barton Lower Down arable 7 2 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Senior Edward George Senior 230 Cabbacott Barton Garden garden 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 341 Hen House Five Acres arable 5 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 392 Hen House Nine Acres arable 5 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1788 Hen House Hen House Commons arable 3 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1793 Hen House Hen House Commons arable 3 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1794 Hen House Hen House Commons arable 5 0 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1790 Hen House Road road 0 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1791 Hen House Three Corners arable 2 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1789 Hen House Little plot arable 0 0 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1792 Hen House Northern Nine Acres arable 9 0 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks Edward George Junior 1804 Hen House Twu Acres arable 2 1 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 676 Moor West Moor arable 3 3 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 677 Moor Middle Moor pasture 4 2 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 678 Moor Little Moor arable 2 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 679 Moor Lower Easter Moor arable 7 2 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 680 Moor Higher Easter Moor pasture 6 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 695 Moor Tansy park pasture 3 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 696 Moor Tansy park Meadow arable 0 3 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 697 Moor Little Moor plot arable 0 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 698 Moor Road road 0 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 699 Moor Well Meadow arable 1 0 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 700 Moor Mowhay [mowhay] 0 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 701 Moor House, Building, Court and Garden House etc. 0 3 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 701a Moor Road road 0 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 702 Moor Barn park arable 2 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 703 Moor Four Acres arable 3 3 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 704 Moor Broad Meadow arable 4 2 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 705 Moor Long Close arable 2 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 723 Moor Windabout arable 3 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 724 Moor Middle field arable 3 0 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George Edward George 725 Moor West field arable 3 1 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 345 Public House House and Court House etc. 0 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard Grigg Richard Grigg 353 Public House Garden garden 0 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Hallett Joseph Haywood 1064 Part of Daniels Broady Parkham West Cross park arable 1 1 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Hallett Joseph Haywood 1065 Part of Daniels Broady Parkham West Cross park arable 2 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1032 Berryments Watershute New Orchard orchard 1 1 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1084 Berryments Watershute Hem [?] 0 1 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1090 Berryments Watershute Little Snaps arable 2 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1091 Berryments Watershute Great Snaps arable 2 3 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1092 Berryments Watershute Snaps Wood wood 1 1 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 983 Berryments Watershute Long Meadow arable 0 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 986 Berryments Watershute Long Meadow arable 0 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 994 Berryments Watershute Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1002 Berryments Watershute House, Buildings, Garden and Court House etc. 0 0 27
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter Haywood Walter Haywood 1003 Berryments Watershute Drang Meadow arable 0 3 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 964 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Fordy park arable 2 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 982 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Higher Shovel park arable 3 2 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 989 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Plot arable 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 990 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Orchard orchard 0 0 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 993 Harrises Watershute and Berryments House, buildings etc. house erc. 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 995 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden garden 0 0 35
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 997 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Bean plot pasture 0 1 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 998 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Harris's plot arable 0 3 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 999 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Plot arable 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1000 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Plot arable 0 0 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1001 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Buildings and Mowhay buildings etc. 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1004 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Plot pasture 0 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1005 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Lower Shovel park pasture 0 2 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1006 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Three Corner Meadow pasture 1 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1011 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Higher Moor park pasture 3 0 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1012 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Lower Moor park pasture 0 3 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1024 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Blakewell arable 2 3 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1026 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Blakefield arable 1 1 23
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1027 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Deep Meadow arable 3 0 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1030 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Marsh arable 0 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1031 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Ratwood Orchard orchard 0 1 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1033 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Wood wood 0 1 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1038 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden garden 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1040 Harrises Watershute and Berryments House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1050 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Wood wood 0 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Hatwood Joseph Haywood 1051 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Hop Orchard orchard 0 2 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1059 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Cross park Marsh arable 0 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1060 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Cross park arable 2 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1087 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Colts Close arable 2 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1153 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Waste part, Harris's Wood waste 0 0 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1154 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden Gardens 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1155 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Harris's Wood wood 3 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywoos 1156 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Lower Hill arable 0 2 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1157 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Higher Hill arable 1 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1158 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Furzy hill pasture 1 3 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1159 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Harris's Hill pasture 0 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1160 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden garden 0 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1161 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Waste waste 0 1 2
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1162 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden garden 0 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1163 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Garden garden 0 0 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1177 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Easterway arable 1 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Haywood Joseph Haywood 1093 Harrises Watershute and Berryments Blakewell Wood wood 0 3 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 322 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Garden garden 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 421 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Little Copse copse 1 0 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 422 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Big Copse copse 5 1 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 430 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Big Marsh arable 2 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 432 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Long Close arable 3 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Thomas Headen 433 Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton Big Marsh arable 3 2 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 460 Part of Blindlake Lower Close arable 5 3 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 461 Part of Blindlake Higher Close arable 6 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 463 Part of Blindlake North close arable 6 3 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 458 Blind Lake Orchard orchard 0 3 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 459 Blind Lake Hill arable 5 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 461a Blind Lake Mow Close arable 4 2 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 464 Blind Lake South Close arable 5 3 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 465 Blind Lake Clay park arable 1 2 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 466 Blind Lake Poor Close arable 2 3 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 467 Blind Lake Barn park arable 2 3 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 468 Blind Lake Garden garden 0 0 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 469 Blind Lake House, Building, Court and Road House etc. 0 2 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 472 Blind Lake Big Moor arable 1 2 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 472a Blind Lake Big Moor arable 2 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 473 Blind Lake Little Moor arable 1 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 474 Blind Lake Little park arable 1 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 473 Blind Lake Three Corners arable 2 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 476 Blind Lake Break arable 3 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Headen Thomas Headen 477 Blind Lake Long Close arable 4 1 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1336 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Rocky arable 0 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1693 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Dipple arable 2 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1701 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Brake furze 0 2 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1702 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Hill arable 1 0 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1703 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1704 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Middle hill arable 0 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1705 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Orchard Plot arable 0 1 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1706 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Batis field arable 0 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon Ann Haydon 1714 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Buildings buildings 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1331 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham House House 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1734 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Corner Walleys arable 0 0 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1735 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Miiddle Walleys arable 0 1 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1736 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Lower Walleys arable 0 3 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1764 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Higher Cleave arable 0 1 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1765 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Middle Cleave arable 0 1 27P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1766 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Copse copse 0 2 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann Haydon John Jewell 1767 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Marsh pasture 0 1 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2049 Part of Bishops Cabbacott House House 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2050 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Barn meadow arable 0 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2051 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Orchard orchard 0 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2054 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Meadow meadow 0 2 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2055 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Garden garden 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2056 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Cleave arable 1 1 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2057 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Marsh arable 0 1 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2061 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Hem arable 0 0 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2062 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Lower Close arable 0 2 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2063 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Middle Close arable 0 2 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2064 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Three Corner hill arable 0 3 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2065 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Cross park arable 0 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2066 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Hem arable 0 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Sewell Thomas Sewell 2067 Part of Bishops Cabbacott Cross park arable 0 1 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth Jollaph Elizabeth Jollaph 1044   House and Garden House etc. 0 1 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1349 Higher Fox Down Moor arable 1 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1350 Higher Fox Down Moor arable 1 3 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1351 Higher Fox Down Bushy Park arable 10 3 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1687 Higher Fox Down Two Acres arable 2 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1688 Higher Fox Down Seven Acres arable 7 3 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1689 Higher Fox Down Three Corners arable 1 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1694 Higher Fox Down Seven Acres arable 7 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1695 Higher Fox Down Seven Acres Break furze 2 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda Hucks William Rievell 1695a Higher Fox Down Part of Lawn pasture 0 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1035 Waytown Wood wood 0 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1037 Waytown Dens land arable 2 3 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1042 Waytown Bean field arable 2 2 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1043 Waytown Three Corners park arable 3 0 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1045 Waytown Lower Down arable 5 3 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1045a Waytown   [?] 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1046 Waytown Higher Down arable 3 1 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1047 Waytown Cross park arable 4 0 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1048 Waytown Rerish arable 1 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1049 Waytown Rerish arable 1 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1072 Waytown Pren arable 1 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1074 Waytown Mills Down arable 4 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1080 Waytown North Gate Close arable 2 3 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1081 Waytown Hem arable 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1082 Waytown Woodland Close arable 1 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1083 Waytown Hem arable 0 3 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1239 Waytown Meadow pasture 4 1 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1250 Waytown Will park arable 1 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1251 Waytown Orchard orchard 0 1 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1249 Waytown Middle park arable 3 1 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1252 Waytown Orchard orchard 0 1 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1253 Waytown Garden garden 0 0 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1254 Waytown Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 2 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1255 Waytown Garden garden 0 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1256 Waytown Garden garden 0 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1257 Waytown Mowhay mowhay 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1248 Waytown Lower park arable 3 2 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1273 Waytown Little plot arable 0 3 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1274 Waytown West Close arable 4 1 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1275 Waytown East Close arable 3 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Rievell John Rievell 1360 Waytown Holwill Meadow meadow 3 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 908 Smiths Broad Parkham Cleave arable 0 3 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 911 Smiths Broad Parkham Cleave arable 2 1 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 912 Smiths Broad Parkham Cleave arable 1 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 913 Smiths Broad Parkham Cleave arable 2 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 918 Smiths Broad Parkham Long Close arable 2 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 919 Smiths Broad Parkham Little hill arable 0 2 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievell William Nance Kievall 922 Smiths Broad Parkham South Down arable 1 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 923 Smiths Broad Parkham South Down arable 0 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 953 Smiths Broad Parkham Moor arable 2 0 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1286 Smiths Broad Parkham Little Sladeland arable 1 1 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1291 Smiths Broad Parkham Fire Bing arable 5 2 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 918a Smiths Broad Parkham Pease Hill arable 0 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1307 Smiths Broad Parkham Wester field arable 4 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1309 Smiths Broad Parkham Sladeland arable 7 [0?] 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1310 Smiths Broad Parkham Middle field arable 13 2 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1311 Smiths Broad Parkham South Down arable 1 1 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1312 Smiths Broad Parkham Orchard orchard 0 0 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1313 Smiths Broad Parkham Hill arable 0 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1314 Smiths Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1315 Smiths Broad Parkham Pond Meadow arable 0 1 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1316 Smiths Broad Parkham Buildings and Court buildings 0 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1317 Smiths Broad Parkham Back Meadow arable 0 2 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1318 Smiths Broad Parkham Meadow plot arable 0 3 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1319 Smiths Broad Parkham Mowhay arable 0 0 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1320 Smiths Broad Parkham Clover field arable 4 1 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1321 Smiths Broad Parkham Road road 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1730 Smiths Broad Parkham Clay park arable 1 1 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 909 Smiths Broad Parkham Little plot arable 0 0 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance Kievall William Nance Kievall 1770 Smiths Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1838 Broom Hill Higher field arable 0 3 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1839 Broom Hill Middle field arable 1 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1840 Broom Hill Lower field pasture 1 2 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1841 Broom Hill Garden and Orchard Garden & orchard 0 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1842 Broom Hill House and Court House etc. 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Lang John Lang 1843 Broom Hill Garden garden 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George Ford John Nichols and John Glover 1394   House and Court House etc. 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George Ford John Nichols and John Glover 1395   Garden garden 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George Ford John Nichols and John Glover 1396   Garden garden 0 0 38
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 573 Fortescues Ash Middle hills pasture 1 3 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 574 Fortescues Ash Middle hills pasture 4 3 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 582 Fortescues Ash Lower Moor park arable 1 1 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 583 Fortescues Ash Lower Moor park arable 1 2 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 585 Fortescues Ash Higher Moor park furze 3 2 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 595 Fortescues Ash Mena Ground arable 0 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 596 Fortescues Ash Mena Ground furze 0 2 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 608 Fortescues Ash Long Stile arable 0 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 616 Fortescues Ash Strange arable 0 1 27P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 618 Fortescues Ash Way park arable 1 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 634 Fortescues Ash Beat Land arable 3 0 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 640 Fortescues Ash Lang park arable 2 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 643 Fortescues Ash Lane End arable 0 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 653 Fortescues Ash Higher Hill park arable 3 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 658 Fortescues Ash Lower Hill park pasture 3 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 731 Fortescues Ash Ash Meadow arable 1 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 735 Fortescues Ash Long Close arable 1 3 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 740 Fortescues Ash Ash Meadow arable 1 3 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 746 Fortescues Ash Mowhay arable 0 1 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 747 Fortescues Ash Garden garden 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 748 Fotesscues Ash House, Buildings & Court House etc. 0 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 749 Fortescues Ash Plot arable 0 0 10P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 761 Fortescues Ash Park arable 3 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 773 Fortescues Ash Welland arable 4 3 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 774 Fortescues Ash North Moor arable 3 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 781 Fortescues Ash Bonny ford arable 6 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 655 Fortescues Ash Will park arable 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel Norman Samuel Norman 656 Fortescues Ash Will park arable 0 0 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 633   Bates land arable 0 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth George Henry Parr 2002 Part of Stone Higher long land pasture 0 1 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth George Henry Parr 2003 Part of Stone Middle land arable 0 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth George Henry Parr 2004 Part of Stone Middle land arable 0 2 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth George Henry Parr 2005 Part of Stone Lower land arable 0 2 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1715 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham House and Court House 0 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1716 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1717 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Meadow meadow 0 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1737 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Higher park arable 1 3 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1738 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Plot arable 0 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1739 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Lower park arable 1 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1740 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Higher Cleave arable 0 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1741 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Midd;e Cleave arable 0 2 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1742 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Lower Cleave arable 0 1 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1743 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Copse copse 0 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1744 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1745 part of Daniels Broad Parkham House and Waste House & Waste 0 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1749 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Orchard orchard 0 0 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1750 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Little plot arable 0 0 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1751 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Orchard orchard 0 0 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1752 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Marsh pasture 0 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1753 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Little plot arable 0 0 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1754 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Little Copse arable 0 0 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1755 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Plot arable 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1756 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Little plot arable 0 0 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1757 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Daisy plot arable 0 1 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1758 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Brake furze 0 2 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1759 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Hill arable 0 1 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1760 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Higher plot arable 0 1 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1761 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Brake furze 0 0 37
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1762 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Copse copse 1 1 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1763 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Brake furze 0 1 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1696 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Lower plot arable 0 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1697 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Copse copse 0 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1698 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Middle field arable 0 1 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew Pickard Bartholomew Pickard 1699 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Combe Meadow arable 1 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 480 Beers Down Easter field arable 13 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 481 Beers Down Plot and Linhay arable 0 1 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 482 Beers Down North Middle field arable 10 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 483 Beers Down South Middle field arable 9 1 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 484 Beers Down West field arable 24 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 485 Beers Down Marsh pasture 4 2 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Pickard William Pickard 588 Beers Down Depps Meadow pasture 2 2 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 586 Weeks Ash Higher Moor park arable 4 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 587 Weeks Ash Moor park arable 4 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 594 Weeks Ash Weaks's Meadow arable 5 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 603 Weeks Ash Manna Ground arable 2 3 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 607 Weeks Ash Long Stile pasture 0 1 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 603 Weeks Ash Bonnyford arable 1 3 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 639 Weeks Ash Broada park arable 4 2 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 644 Weeks Ash Lane End arable 0 3 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 648 Weeks Ash Willis pasture 0 1 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 734 Weeks Ash Long Close arable 1 1 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 741 Weeks Ash Meadow pasture 1 1 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 742 Weeks Ash Mowhay mowhay 0 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 743 Weeks Ash House, Buildings and Court House etc. 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 744 Weeks Ash Garden garden 0 0 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 745 Weeks Ash Orchard orchard 0 0 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 777 Weeks Ash North Moor arable 4 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 590 Arnolds Moor Lord Moor arable 2 1 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 591 Arnolds Moor Lord Moor arable 3 3 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 592 Arnolds Moor Lord Moor arable 1 0 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle William Pickard 593 Arnolds Moor Furze furze 0 0 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 794 Steart Steart lake arable 2 3 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 795 Steart Steart lake arable 2 1 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 967 Steart Miny Meadow arable 4 2 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 968 Steart Moor arable 4 2 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 969 Steart Moor arable 3 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 970 Steart Moor arable 0 0 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 971 Steart Moor arable 5 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 972 Steart Moor arable 3 0 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 973 Steart Moor arable 2 1 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 974 Steart Far Daisy field arable 1 2 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 975 Steart Moor arable 2 0 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 976 Steart Road road 0 2 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 977 Steart Middle Daisy field arable 2 0 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 978 Steart Higher Church park arable 5 2 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 979 Steart South Easter Ground arable 2 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1014 Steart Easter Ground arable 6 1 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1015 Steart Church park arable 3 1 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1016 Steart Daisy field arable 2 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1017 Steart Moor pasture 1 2 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1018 Steart Malthouse field arable 2 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1018a Steart Hem   0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1019 Steart Wester Meadow meadow 2 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1021 Steart Short Close arable 2 2 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1022 Steart Long Meadow arable 1 3 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1023 Steart Clover field arable 2 2 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1094 Steart Hem (under) copse 0 1 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1095 Steart Orchard orchard 0 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1096 Steart East Meadow meadow 3 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1097 Steart Garden garden 0 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1098 Steart Orchard orchard 0 0 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1099 Steart Mowhay [mowhay] 0 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1100 Steart Plot arable 0 0 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1101 Steart Garden garden 0 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1102 Steart West Clay park arable 2 0 28
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1103 Steart Higher Clay park arable 0 1 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1104 Steart Clay park arable 0 2 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1105 Steart [Lackacres?] Garden garden 0 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1106 Steart Steart Wood wood 17 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1107 Steart Garden garden 0 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle James Pickard 1020 Steart Buildings, Court & Road buildings etc. 0 3 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Hall Jasper Pickard 1063   Croft arable 0 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 487 Melbury East Moor pasture 20 3 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 488 Melbury Cox's Ground pasture 5 2 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 489 Melbury Garden Garden & orchard 0 1 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 490 Melbury House and Garden House etc. 0 0 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 491 Melbury Cox's field pasture 15 1 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 492 Melbury South Moor pasture 23 0 15
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 493 Melbury Far Melbury hill pasture 28 0 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 494 Melbury North Marsh pasture 34 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 495 Melbury North field arable 18 3 28
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 496 Melbury Revel Marsh [?] 1 1 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 497 Melbury Long plot arable 0 2 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 498 Melbury Plot arable 0 1 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 499 Melbury Square Close arable 24 3 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 500 Melbury Melbury hill pasture 29 1 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 501 Melbury Middle Moor pasture 22 3 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 502 Melbury Fifteen Acres arable 19 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 507 Melbury New Meadow arable 48 1 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 508 Melbury Great Quarry field arable 21 2 9
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 509 Melbury Little Quarry field pasture 5 2 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 510 Melbury Little Wood Cock hill arable 3 2 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 511 Melbury Wood Cock hill pasture 23 2 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 512 Melbury Long plot pasture 1 3 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 513 Melbury Long grass Moor pasture 23 1 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 514 Melbury Lots field arable 12 3 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 515 Melbury Cottage Meadow arable 0 3 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 516 Melbury Lots house and Garden House etc. 0 0 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 517 Melbury Croft arable 0 2 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 518 Melbury Higher Great Close pasture 19 3 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 519 Melbury Marsh arable 30 0 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 520 Melbury Lower Marsh arable 20 2 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 521 Melbury Great field arable 24 3 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 522 Melbury Middle field arable 11 3 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 523 Melbury A Bove Town arable 13 0 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 524 Melbury Mowhay mowhay 0 1 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 525 Melbury House, Buildings and Court House etc. 1 1 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 526 Melbury Linhay and Mowhay linhay etc. 0 0 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 527 Melbury Back Meadow meadow 2 3 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 542 Melbury Road road 0 1 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 543 Melbury Square Moor pature 16 2 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Dowming William Pridham 544 Melbury Little Moor arable 4 3 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 545 Melbury North Meadow arable 1 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 546 Melbury Long Meadow pasture 2 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 547 Melbury Lower Garden Mead pasture 2 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 548 Melbury Garden Meadow pasture 1 0 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 549 Melbury Calves plot pasture 0 0 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 550 Melbury Garden garden 0 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle. Lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 551 Melbury Mowhay mowhay 0 0 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 552 Melbury Barley plot arable 0 3 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing William Pridham 553 Melbury Wills Meadow meadow 1 2 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 578 Part of Nicholls' Ash Middle hills pasture 2 0 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 579 Part of Nicholls' Ash Middle hills arable 4 3 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 606 Part of Nicholls' Ash Furze hill arable 1 0 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 610 Part of Nicholls' Ash Road road 0 0 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 611 Part of Nicholls' Ash Great Willis arable 2 3 4
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 613 Part of Nicholls' Ash Willis arable 0 2 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 635 Part of Nicholls' Ash Stone land arable 3 1 13
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 642 Part of Nicholls' Ash Broada park arable 2 2 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 652 Part of Nicholls' Ash Lane End pasture 2 1 28
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 659 Part of Nicholls' Ash Nicholas Meadow pasture 1 0 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 663 Part of Nicholls' Ash Buildings Garden etc. buildings etc. 0 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 664 Part of Nicholls' Ash Garden garden 0 0 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Andrew 665 Part of Nicholls' Ash Mow [?] 0 0 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 736 Part of Nicholls' Ash Long Close arable 1 3 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 766 Part of Nicholls' Ash Plot park arable 2 1 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 779 Part of Nicholls' Ash Part park Meadow pasture 2 3 19
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 772 Part of Nicholls' Ash Velland arable 6 0 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing Thomas Robins 780 Part of Nicholls' Ash North Moor arable 4 1 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sanders John Sanders 346   Two houses houses 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sanders John Sanders 347   Garden garden 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sanders John Sanders 348   House House 0 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John Sanders John Sanders 349   House House 0 0 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 334 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Lawn arable 2 2 30
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 423 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Little Marsh pasture [?] 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 425 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Crooked Close arable 3 3 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 426 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Five Axres pasture 4 2 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 427 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Green park arable 3 3 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Mary Andrew 431 Chapmans Parkham Town Barton Little Marsh pasture 1 1 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Trustees of Bideford Turnpike Road 1393   Toll house toll house 0 0 1
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William Keats Trustees of Bideford Turnpike Road 1392   Garden garden 0 0 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 577a Part of Nichols Ash Middle hills arable 1 2 2
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 575 Part of Nichols Ash Middle hills arable 2 2 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 576 Part of Nichols Ash Middle hills arable 1 2 27
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 577 Part of Nichols Ash Middle hills arable 0 3 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 580 Kingsland Ash Middle hills arable 4 0 25
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 581 Kingsland Ash Middle hills pasture 1 1 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 604 Kingsland Ash Furze hills arable 3 1 21
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 617 Kingsland Ash Range arable 0 2 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 632 Kingsland Ash Bate land arable 2 0 32
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 732 Kingsland Ash Cross park arable 3 1 22
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 737 Kingsland Ash Long Close arable 0 2 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 739 Kingsland Ash Kingsland Meadow arable 1 0 23P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 751 Kingsland Ash House and Court House etc. 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 752 Kingsland Ash Garden garden 0 0 23
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 753 Kingsland Ash Orchard orchard 0 1 5
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 763 Kingsland Ash Garden garden 0 0 10
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 764 Kingsland Ash Pool park arable 1 3 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 775 Kingsland Ash North Moor arable 4 2 11
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 783 Kingsland Ash Garden garden 0 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 784 Kingsland Ash House and Garden House etc. 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 785 Kingsland Ash Garden garden 0 1 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 782 Kingsland Ash Bonnyford arable 3 0 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 570 Gilberts Ash Middle hills pasture 6 2 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 571 Gilberts Ash Middle hills pasture 0 3 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 612 Gilberts Ash Willis pasture 0 3 29
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 589 Southcotts Ash Dippo pasture 1 0 20
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 609 Southcotts Ash Old Man Copse arable 1 1 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 619 Southcotts Ash Stone land Brake furze 3 0 37
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 620 Southcotts Ash Stone land [furze?] 2 0 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 631 Southcotts Ash Bate land arable 2 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 637 Southcotts Ash Stone land arable 3 1 0
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 638 Southcotts Ash Stone land arable 4 3 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 643 Southcotts Ash Broada park arable 2 0 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 647 Southcotts Ash Willis pasture 0 1 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 651 Southcotts Ash Long Meadow pasture 1 2 34
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 657 Southcotts Ash Old Mans Meadow pasture 1 3 3
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 738 Southcotts Ash Old Mans park arable 2 0 17
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 750 Southcotts Ash Court & House Court & house 0 0 26
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 754 Southcotts Ash Garden garden 0 1 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 756 Southcotts Ash House and Court House & court 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 757 Southcotts Ash Plot arable 0 0 39
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 758 Southcotts Ash Mowhay mowhay 0 0 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 759 Southcotts Ash Croft arable 3 0 31
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 762 Southcotts Ash Pool park arable 2 2 14
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 771 Southcotts Ash Old Man's Marsh pasture 2 0 35
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 778 Southcotts Ash North Moor arable 3 1 33
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 779 Southcotts Ash North Moor arable 3 0 8
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Philip Wade 786 Southcotts Ash North Moor arable 2 3 15
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Samuel Wakeley 1725 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham House and Court House etc. 0 0 6
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Samuel Wakeley 1726 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 7
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Samuel Wakeley 1727 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 8
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Samuel Wakeley 1728 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Garden garden 0 0 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas Norman Samuel Wakeley 1729 Part of Daniels Broad Parkham Clay park arable 1 1 12
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph Clement William Withycombe 135 Part of West Stone Plot arable 0 1 18
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Saunders Nathaniel Hancock 2033 Frys Orchard Orchard & House 0 0 22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Saunders Nathaniel Hancock 2042 Frys Fry's Lower Meadow meadow 0 1 16
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Saunders Nathaniel Hancock 2043 Frys Fry's Orchard orchard 0 0 24
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Saunders Nathaniel Hancock 2047 Frys Plot arable 1 1 36
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Saunders Nathaniel Hancock 2049 Frys House House 0 0 2
John Saunders John Saunders 1772 Bocombe Mill Orchard orchard 0 0 5
John Saunders John Saunders 1773 Bocombe Mill Buildings and Court buildings etc. 0 0 9
John Saunders John Saunders 1774 Bocombe Mill Garden garden 0 0 4
John Saunders John Saunders 1775 Bocombe Mill Little Marsh arable 0 1 9
John Saunders John Saunders 1768 Bocombe Mill Lower Marsh arable 0 0 37
John Saunders John Saunders 1769 Bocombe Mill Garden garden 0 0 13
John Saunders John Saunders 1771 Bocombe Mill Marsh pasture 0 1 13
John Saunders John Saunders 396 Bocombe Mill Marsh pasture 0 3 10
John Saunders John Saunders 397 Bocombe Mill Marsh arable 0 2 20
John Saunders John Saunders 397a Bocombe Mill Road road 0 0 20
John Saunders John Saunders 398 Bocombe Mill Plot arable 0 0 30
John Saunders John Saunders 400 Bocombe Mill Willow Spot arable 0 0 20
John Saunders John Saunders 902 Bocombe Mill Plot arable 0 0 10P
John Saunders John Saunders 903 Bocombe Mill Hill arable 1 1 38
John Saunders John Saunders 904 Bocombe Mill   arable 1 3 7
John Saunders John Saunders 905 Bocombe Mill Break arable 0 3 11
John Saunders John Saunders 906 Bocombe Mill Break arable 0 2 16
John Saunders John Saunders 907 Bocombe Mill Late plot pasture 0 2 28
John Saunders, lessee Adam Tucker Adam Tucker 399   House and Garden House etc. 0 0 13
William Squance Michael Chalk 1599 Part of Bishops Northway Cross park arable 2 1 5
William Squance Thomas Lee 1601   Garden garden 0 0 27
William Squance Thomas Lee 1608   House House 0 0 1
William Squance Thomas Lee 1609   Court court 0 0 3
William Squance William Setherd 1602   Garden garden 0 0 25
William Squance Thomas Squance 1549 Part of Bishops Northway Thistle park arable 3 0 15
William Squance Thomas Squance 1551 Part of Bishops Northway Burrow park arable 2 3 8
William Squance Tjhomas Squance 1596 Part of Bishops Northway South Meadow arable 0 1 10
William Squance William Wakeley 1600   Garden garden 0 0 31
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2014 Lower Dendridge Road road 0 0 15
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2015 Lower Dendridge Garden garden 0 0 26
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2016 Lower Dendridge Brake furze 0 3 14
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2026 Lower Dendridge Crooked Close arable 2 1 0
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2027 Lower Dendridge North Close arable 1 3 3
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2028 Lower Dendridge House park arable 1 0 36
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2029 Lower Dendridge South hill arable 0 1 35
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr Henry Parr 2030 Lower Dendridge North hill arable 0 3 20
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Vagars 2010   Garden garden 0 1 2
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Vagars and William Palmer 2011   House and Court House etc. 0 0 13
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Vagars and William Palmer 2012   Garden garden 0 0 7
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry Parr John Vagars and William Palmer 2013   Garden garden 0 0 33
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 878 Hoopers Bocombe Middle Close arable 3 1 5
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 879 Hoopers Bocombe South Close arable 4 2 28
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 896 Hoopers Bocombe Higher Close arable 1 3 39
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 897 Hoopers Bocombe Higher Wester Close arable 1 3 15
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 898 Hoopers Bocombe House, Garden etc. House etc. 0 1 34
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 899 Hoopers Bocombe Wester Close arable 1 2 27
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 900 Hoopers Bocombe Middle Ckose arable 1 3 15
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 910 Hoopers Bocombe Break pasture 4 1 34
William Tardrew Esquire John Harding 914 Hoopers Bocombe Little Meadow arable 1 1 37
William Tardrew Esquire Thomas Lemon 420 Higher Bocombe Jacobs Meadow pasture 2 0 12
William Tardrew Esquire Thomas Lemon 901 Higher Bocombe Six Acres arable 5 3 20
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 682 Hordiland Easter Marsh pasture 3 3 36
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 683 Hordiland Wester Moor pasture 4 0 28
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 684 Hordiland Easter Moor arable 5 3 22
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 685 Hordiland Little Park arable 2 0 24
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 686 Hordiland Middle Close arable 1 3 32
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 687 Hordiland Mowhay arable 0 1 37
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 688 Hordiland Garden garden 0 1 34
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 689 Hordiland House, Building and Court House etc. 0 1 3
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 690 Hordiland East park arable 4 3 4
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 691 Hordiland Middle park arable 4 1 20
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 692 Hordiland Middle Marsh arable 4 0 3
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 693 Hordiland West Marsh arable 3 3 20
Rev. Richard Walter Richard Dunn 694 Hordiland West park arable 7 2 7
Ann White Henry Veale 1603   Garden garden 0 0 8
Ann White Henry Veale 1606   House House 0 0 4
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 343 Glebe Church Yard church yard 0 3 6
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 307 Glebe Hem arable 1 3 12
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 308 Glebe Sanctuary arable 9 1 25
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 309 Glebe Three Corners arable 6 3 12
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 310 Glebe Six Acres arable 6 2 1
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 311 Glebe Clothes field arable 6 1 23
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 312 Glebe Mowhay [?] 0 0 24
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 313 Glebe Road road 0 1 19
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 314 Glebe East field arable 10 1 22
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 315 Glebe Parsonage Wood arable 21 0 15
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 316 Glebe Lamb park arable 4 1 5
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 317 Glebe Lawn pasture 2 2 35
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 318 Glebe Lawn pasture 0 3 19
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 319 Glebe House, Buildings & Court House etc. 1 0 0
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 320 Glebe Meadow meadow 5 3 18
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 321 Glebe Garden garden 0 2 8
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 447 Glebe Higher Turf park arable 4 1 29
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 448 Glebe Garden Garden & orchard 0 0 10
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 454 Glebe Marsh arable 4 0 3
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 454a Glebe Middle Turf park arable 2 2 39
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 455 Glebe Little Turf park arable 1 3 33
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 456a Glebe Hem arable 0 3 9
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 457 Glebe Moor pasture 8 0 7
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 478 Glebe Parsonage Moor pasture 5 3 6
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 479 Glebe Parsonage Moor pasture 17 1 20
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe) Rev. Richard Walter 456 Glebe Martins Meadow arable 2 3 29
    566 Ash Common Common common 4 1 15
    567 Ash Common Common common 19 0 23
    568 Ash Common Common common 10 2 32
    569 Ash Common Common common 7 2 16
    621 Ash Common Road and Waste road and waste 0 1 22
    622 Ash Common Common common 12 1 38
    623 Ash Common Common common 3 3 36
    624 Ash Common Common common 4 1 20
    625 Ash Common Common common 18 0 35
    626 Ash Common Common common 19 2 15
    627 Ash Common Common common 22 2 25
    628 Ash Common Common common 1 2 26
    629 Ash Common Common common 20 0 25
    629a Ash Common Common common 0 1 4
    646 Ash Common Road and Waste road and waste 2 1 31
    495a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 31
    684a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 13
    494a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 25
    497a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 23
    498a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 30
    315a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 22
    502a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 35
    503a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 17
    508a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 28
    506a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 0 20
    507a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 24
    656a Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 23P
    106 Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 2 35
    1013 Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 8
    1034 Waste Adjoining Roads Waste waste 0 1 26
        Roads roads 82 0 7
        River river 5 1 14