MUCH MARCLE, Herefordshire - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"MUCH MARCLE, (was Marcle, Much -RL 2003) a parish in the hundred of Greytree, county Hereford, 5½ miles S.W. of Ledbury, its post town. It is situated on the high road to Ross, and contains the chapelry of Yatton. It formerly belonged to the Lacier and Mortimers, who had a castle here. At Marclay Hill is a spot called the Wonder, where a singular landslip occurred in 1575. The hill finally placed itself in a higher position, sweeping everything away in its progress. The original site is now a chasm 40 feet in depth and 30 in length. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in agriculture. The land is partly in hop grounds.

The tithes, belonging to the Bishop of Hereford, have been commuted for £430, and the vicarial tithes for a rent-charge of £333, besides a portion of land set apart on the enclosure of the parish in 1795. The living is a vicarage* with the curacy of Yatton annexed, in the diocese of Hereford, value £841. The church, which is situated on rising ground, is dedicated to St. Bartholomew, a large stone structure, with a square castellated tower containing six bells. The church has tombs and effigies of the Mortimers. The parochial charities produce about £31 per annum, of which £6 goes to the National school. W. M. Kyrle, Esq., of Whetham, a descendant of the "Man of Ross", is lord of the manor."

"MUCH-MARCLE, a parish in the hundred of Greytree, county Hereford, 5½ miles S.W. of Ledbury, its post town, and 7½ from Ross. The village is situated on the high road leading to Ross, and is wholly agricultural. The parish, which is of large extent, contains the township of Yatton. A portion of the land is laid out in hop-grounds. At a spot called the Wonder, near Marclay Hill, an extensive landslip took place in the reign of Elizabeth, carrying with it houses, fences, and cattle. The living is a vicarage* with the curacy of Yatton annexed, in the diocese of Hereford, value £841.

The church, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, is a commodious stone structure with a square tower containing six bells. The church contains monuments of the Mortimer and Kyrle families, to which latter the "Man of Ross" belonged. The parochial charities produce about £25 per annum. There is a National school for both sexes endowed with an annuity of £6. Yatton chapel is a stone structure of recent erection. At Quarry Wood in this parish are traces, of Ellingham Castle. William Money Kyrle, Esq., is lord of the manor."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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