Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted

Help and advice for Herne

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it.

We are in the process of upgrading the site to implement a content management system.

Herne

"HERNE, a parish in the hundred of Bleangate, lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 6 miles N.E. of Canterbury, its post town, and 3 N.E. of the Sturry railway station, on the South-Eastern line. The London, Chatham, and Dover line has a station at Herne Bay. It was formerly a market town, and includes the watering-place of Herne Bay. The land is well wooded, and is partly laid out in hop-grounds. The prevailing timber is oak and elm, with ash, maple, and hazel. The soil is chiefly clay, resting on a substratum of gravel, and produces good wheat crops. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £1,474 19s., and the vicarial for £557 19s. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Canterbury, value £360, in the patronage of the archbishop. This living was held by Bishop Ridley from 1538 to 1550, when he was translated to the see of London. There is also a district church at Herne Bay, the living of which is a perpetual curacy The parish church, dedicated to St. Martin, is a fine structure with a square tower, and contains some brasses bearing date from 1420, and tombs of the Fineuxes, Milles, &c. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans-the former at Herne Bay, the latter in the village of Herne, also National schools. In 1565 two girls were born joined together, resembling the Siamese twins, but they lived only a few days. The Blean Union poorhouse is situated on Herne Common. On the confines of this parish are the remains of an ancient episcopal palace in which Archbishop Cranmer resided. In the Channel near the bay numerous fragments of Roman earthenware have been found, supposed to be the vestiges of a cargo of pottery wrecked whilst the Romans were in Britain. A pleasure fair is held at Herne on Easter Tuesday."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2010]

Church Records

Church records relating to the name

Description and Travel

You can see pictures of Herne which are provided by:

Gazetteers

"BELTINGE, a hamlet in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, and lathe of St. Augustine, in the county of Kent, 6 miles to the N.E. of Canterbury."

"HAMPTON, a hamlet in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 5 miles N. of the Sturry railway station, and 7 from Canterbury. It is situated near the sea-coast."

"HAW, a hamlet in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 6 miles N.E. of Canterbury."

"HERNE BAY, a chapelry and watering-place in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, and lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 9 miles from Canterbury, and 65½ S.E. of London by the London, Chatham, and Dover line of railway, on which it is a station. Steamboats of a superior class run daily during the season to and from London. The town of Herne Bay is situated on a bay on the northern coast of the county of Kent, and presents a remarkably pleasing appearance from the river. It has considerably increased of late years, and became an ecclesiastical district by an order in council in 1841. The town, which is laid out on a large scale, is only partially built, consisting principally of several range of houses fronting the bay, with some very good inns. It is lighted with gas and paved, and has a parade 50 feet wide, extending for nearly a mile in front of the town. Its government is vested in 24 commissioners, who hold their meetings in the townhall. On the Parade, where the baths are situated, is a clock tower, which is of use to the mariners as a landmark. Opposite the parade is the wooden T-shaped pier, 3,000 feet in length, and 400 feet at the end, having an inclined plane 20 feet in width, for the convenience of landing passengers at all times of the tide. There are assembly and billiard rooms, and a library. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Canterbury. The church, called Christ Church, has accommodation for 800 persons. The Independents have a chapel, and there are National and infant schools."

"STROOD, a hamlet in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 5 miles N.N.E. of Canterbury."

"THORNDEN, a hamlet in the parish of Herne, hundred of Bleangate, lathe of St. Augustine, county Kent, 4 miles N.E. of Canterbury."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2010]

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Herne has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Ask for a calculation of the distance from Herne to another place.