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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

L

 

Ladlaw, on Boulsworth Hill

B.

Lady Barn, 5 miles S.S.E. of Manchester

S.

Lady House, 1 miles S. of Milnerow

S.

Lamb Row, 1 miles N. of Whalley

 

Lamberhead Green, 3 miles W.S.W. of Wigan

W.D.

LANCASTER, (N. lat 54, W. long. 2 42"), the county town and a parish in the deanry of Amounderness, is situated on the banks of the Loyne, is 11 miles N. of Garstang, 10 miles S. of Burton, Westmoreland; 14 miles S.W. of Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmoreland; 531/4 miles N.N.W. of Manchester, 533/4 miles N. of Liverpool, and 2391/2 miles from London. Lancaster is said to have been the "Caer Werid," that is, the Green Town of the Britons. Afterwards, the Romans, under Agricola, occupied the eminence where the church and castle now stand, which he erected into a station A.D. 79, calling it LONGOVICUM. On the evacuation of the Romans, the present town was built by the Saxons. King John granted Lancaster a most ample charter, which was confirmed by Charles II. Henry III created his second son Edmund, Duke of Lancaster. It suffered so much in the wars of the contending Plantagenets, that in 1609 Camden speaks of it as a poor town, inhabited by husbandmen. Lancaster Castle, which stands on a commanding situation, and affording, from its battlements, a most charming and extensive prospect, both of land and water, is supposed to have been built by Edward III. During the present reign some magnificent additions have been made to it. It serves for the county jail, which is managed in a manner that does honour to the humanity of the goaler, Mr. Higgins. The County Hall is also in the Castle, where the Assizes are held, and other public business is transacted.

Of late years Lancaster has become a port of some importance; the trade to the Baltic and the West Indies being considerable. Owing to the shallows near the town, vessels of burden are obliged to unload near Glasson point, about 4 miles S. of Lancaster, from whence their cargoes are sent up to the merchants' warehouses in small craft. The advantage of a canal (from Liverpool to Kendal, &c.), in addition to the Assizes being held here, and the town being a great thoroughfare towards the north, has contributed to increase it very much. The old bridge over the Loyne was long complained of, as very narrow and inconveniently situated; but the new bridge is an object of universal admiration. It was built at the expence of the county, has five eliptical arches, is 549 feet long, and cost 14,000l. The parish church is situated on the hill near the Castle. The living is a vicarage, of which Dr. Marton is the patron. Beside the old church, Lancaster has a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. John; patron, the vicar of Lancaster.

The town of Lancaster was made a borough in the fourth year of Richard I & sends two members to Parliament. By the charter, freemen only have a vote. They are either the sons of freemen, or have served an apprenticeship to freemen. The returning officers are the Mayor and two Bailiffs. The corporation consists of a Mayor, Recorder, twelve Aldermen, two Bailiffs, twelve Capital Burgesses, twelve Common Burgesses, a Town Clerk, and two Serjeants at Mace. In the Year 1801, the town contained 1611 houses, and 9030 inhabitants. The market day is Saturday. The fairs are holden on May 1, for cattle, cheese, and pedlary; July 5, for the same articles, and wool; and Oct. 10, for cattle and cheese

L.

Lancaster Sands, 3 miles N.N.W. of Lancaster, reckoning from Hest, where travellers generally enter upon the sands, under the direction of a guide, who is necessary to conduct them in safety to Cartmel. The sands are about 8 miles across, and are often fatal to unwary travellers. A plan was once formed, some years ago, to recover these sands from the tide, and convert them to agricultural purposes. The expence was estimated at about 160,000l. and the land expected to be recovered 32,510 acres. This patriotic scheme, notwithstanding the offer of Mr. Wilkinson, of Castle Head, to lead a subscription with 50,000l. fell to the ground.

L.

Land Mark, at the mouth of the river Alt, near Formby

W.D.

Land of Nod, in Pendleton

S.

Land's End, 5 miles N. of Manchester

S.

Landings, south-end of Winander Mere

L.

Landscale, 3 miles E. of Garstang

A.

Landshaw, south-west side of Tatham township

L.

Landside, 2 miles S. of Leigh

W.D.

Landthwaite, (Furness) 1 mile N. of Hawkshead

L.

Lane Ditch, 2 miles S.E. of Wray

L.

Lane End, near Farrington

LL.

Lane End, 21/2 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Lane Ends, 1 mile S. of Old Accrington

B.

Lane Ends, 3 miles N.E. of Kirkham

A.

Lane Ends, Blackpool

A.

Lane Head, 11/2 mile N.N.E. of Burnley

B.

Lane Head, 21/2 miles E.S.E. of Oldham

S.

Lane Head, (Furness) 2 miles N.W. of Hawkshead

L.

Lane Head, 4 miles E. of Manchester

S.

Lane Head, 5 miles N.N.E. of Garstang

L.

Langley Hall, 1 mile N.E. of Middleton

S.

Lango Green, in the parish of Blackburn, 2 miles W. of Whalley, has a chapel of ease; patron, the Vicar of Blackburn

B.

Langroyd, 1 mile N. of Colne

B.

Langshaw, 1 mile S. of Blackburn

B.

LANGTREE, 1 mile N.N.W. of Standish

LL.

LARBRICK, 31/2 miles W. of St. Michael's-le-Wyre

A.

Larbrick Hall, 11/2 mile W.N.W. of Preston

A.

Lark Hall, 3 miles N.N.W. of Ribchester

B.

Lark Hill, 3 miles N.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Lark Hill, 1 mile W. of Manchester

S.

Lately Common, 2 miles S.S.E. of Leigh

D.W.

LATHAM, the township adjoining on the E. to Ormskirk

W.D.

Latham Hall, the seat of Edward Wilbraham Bootle, Esq. 3 miles E.N.E. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Lathebents, 11/2 mile E. of Tunstall

L.

Law, or Low Church, or Walton-le-Dale, 2 miles S.S.E. of Preston, in the parish of Blackburn, to which the church is a chapel of ease; patron, the Vicar of Blackburn

B.

Law Tarn, (Furness) a lake 2 miles W.N.W. of Coniston

L.

Lawns, 1/2 mile S. of Up Holland

W.D.

Lawrence, see St. Lawrence

A.

Layshaw Bridge, 2 miles E.N.E. of Colne

B.

LAYTON (Great), the township N. of Great Marton

A.

Layton (Little), 1 mile N.N.E. of Great Layton

A.

Layton Hall, 1 mile E. of Blackpool

A.

Layton Heys, 1 mile S.W. of Great Marton

A.

LEA, 3 miles W. of Preston

A.

Lea Green, 2 miles S. of St. Hellen's

W.D.

Lea Hall, 3 miles W. of Preston

A.

Leach Hall, 4 miles W.S.W. of Preston

A.

Leach House, 3 miles S. of Lancaster

L.

LEAGRAM, the township N. of Chipping

B.

Leasey Point, the most westerly point of Low Furness, adjoining to Dudden sands, opposite the north end of Walney Island

L.

LECK, 21/2 miles N.E. of Tunstall, in which parish it is situated, and under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the Vicar of Tunstall

L.

Leck Beck, a rivulet which rises near the N.E. extremity of Graygarth Fell, passes through the townships of Leck and Burrow, and falls into the Loyne, about 1 mile N. of Tunstall church

L.

Leck Mill, 2 miles E.S.E. of Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmoreland

L.

Lee, near Rushton

B.

Lee, in Little Woolton

W.D.

Lee (Higher), 61/2 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Lee (Lower), 71/2 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Lee Wood, 9 miles S. of Lancaster

L.

Lees (or Hay) Chapel, 2 miles E. of Oldham, is in the parish of Ashton-under-line; is a chapel of ease, the curacy of which is in the Rector of Ashton

S.

Lees Hall, 1/2 mile W. of Oldham

S.

LEESE, 1 mile S. of Dendren, Low Furness

L.

Legh House, 2 miles W. of Tarleton

LL.

LEIGH, (N. lat. 53 28". W. lon. 2 26".) 10 miles N.N.E. of Warrington, 12 miles W.N.W. of Manchester, 8 miles S.S.W. of Bolton-le-Moors, and 198 miles from London. Leigh is a joint township with Pennington, and a parish in the deanry of Warrington: the living is a vicarage; patrons, Messrs Starkie and Gwillum, Esqrs. This parish is famous for its excellent cheese. Market day, Saturday. A branch of the Duke of Bridgewater's canal comes up to this place from Worsley

S.

Leigh (West), see "West Leigh"

W.D.

Leigh Place, 11/2 mile N.N.W. of Wigan

W.D.

Leighton Beck, a rivulet which rises near Hilderstone, from whence it forms the boundary between Lancashire and Westmoreland, till it is joined by another rivulet, which rises in Silverdale: soon after that junction it falls into the Ken about 2 miles N.E. of Arnside Point

L.

Leighton Hall, 11/2 mile N. of Warton

L.

Lenforth Hall, in Over Wyer's Dale, 1/2 mile W. of Abbeystead

L.

Lenshaw, 2 miles E.N.E. of Eatonfield chapel

S.

Leven, (the river) which discharges the water from Winander Mere, affording, on its passage many valuable mill seats; after which it falls into the estuary formed by the Leven and the Crake, near Egton Church; the united streams flowing through Ulverston sands, to the sea.

L.

Leven Sands, the space left dry, on the recess of the tide from Leven Water

L.

Leven Water, (Furness) the estuary formed by the Leven and the Crake, about 6 miles long, reckoning northward from the line of Cartmel Wharf to Haverthwaite; and is about 3 miles wide at the mouth, growing gradually narrower to the north. At high water, this is a beautiful sea lake, but at low water, it is fordable with a guide, from Hoskar to Ulverston Carter's house

L.

LEVENSHULME, 4 miles S.S.E. of Manchester. Here is a small endowed school, and a Methodist chapel.

S.

LEVER (GREAT), 2 miles S. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

LEVER (LITTLE), 11/2 mile S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Lever Hall, 11/2 mile S.S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

LEYLAND, a pleasant village, 6 miles S. of Preston, and 4 miles N.W. of Chorley, a parish in the Deanry of Leyland. The living is a vicarage; patron the Rev. T. Baldwin. The church is 63 feet by 33 feet, without a pillar. This place gives the name to the hundred and to the Deanry in which it is situated. Sir William Farrington Bart. is Lord of the manor

LL.

Leyland Hundred, (the smallest in the county) is bounded on the N. by the hundred of Blackburn and Amounderness; on the N.E. by Blackburn hundred; on the N.W. by the estuary of the Ribble; on the S. and S.W. and the W. by West Derby hundred; and on the S.E. by Salford hundred - It pays 9/100 of the county rates, and raises 44 men for the old Militia of 800. - It contains 7 parishes and 42 townships. In the year 1801, it contained according to the census, 5,522 houses and 30,461 inhabitants

LL.

Leyland Lane, 1 mile W. of Leyland

LL.

Lickham, 2 miles N.N.E. of Chipping

B.

LIDIATE, 10 miles N. of Liverpool, contains the venerable ruins of a church, formerly a chapel of ease to Halsall, in which parish the township is situated

W.D.

Lidiate, 11/2 mile E.N.E. of Croston

LL.

Lidiate, 1 mile E. of Colne

B.

Lidiate Cross, 2 miles W. of Aughton

W.D.

Lidiate Hall, Lidiate

W.D.

Light Ash, in Myerscough, on the river Wyer

A.

Light Oak, 21/2 miles E.S.E. of Leigh

W.D.

Lightboun Hall, 3 miles N.E. of Manchester

S.

Lightshaw Hall, 2 miles W. of Leigh

W.D.

Lightwood, 11/2 mile W.N.W. of Cartmel Fell chapel

L.

Lillys, 3 miles N. of Ribchester

B.

Lime Kilns, 2 miles S.W. of Chipping

B.

Lime Side, 2 miles S. of Oldham

S.

Lime Works, 1 mile E. of Chipping

B.

Lime Works, 1/2 mile N. of Clitheroe

B.

Linacre, 4 miles N. of Liverpool, a pleasant village in the parish of Walton, situated near the sea

W.D.

Lindal, (Furness) 2 miles N.E. of Dalton

L.

LINDALE, (Furness) 3 miles N.E. of Cartmel, in which parish it is situated, and has a chapel of ease; patron, Lord George Cavendish

L.

Lindeth, 2 miles N.W. of Warton

L.

Ling Crag, (Furness) 1 mile S.W. of Blawith chapel

L.

Lion's House, near Great Woolton

W.D.

Litchfield Hall, 4 miles N.N.E. of Manchester

S.

Lithe, S. end of Tatham township

L.

LITHERLAND, (a joint township with Ayntree, Orrel and Ford, in the parish of Sephton), 5 miles N. of Liverpool

W.D.

Little Bispham, see "Bispham"

A.

Little Bolton, near Bolton-le-Moors, see "Bolton, Little"

S.

Little Bolton, 3 miles W. of Manchester

S.

LITTLE BOWLAND, the township N.E. of Leagram

B.

Little Britain, 1 mile N.N.W. of Knowsley chapel

W.D.

Little Carleton, see "Carleton, Little"

A.

Little Clegg, 2 miles N.E. of Rochdale

S.

Little Crosby, see "Crosby, Little"

W.D.

Little Green, 1/2 mile E. of Middleton

S.

Little Green, 1 mile N.E. of Manchester

S.

LITTLE HARWOOD, see "Harwood, Little"

B.

Little Heath, 7 miles W. of Warrington

W.D.

LITTLE HEATON , see "Heaton, Little"

S.

LITTLE HOOL, 1 mile N.N.E. of Much Hool

LL.

LITTLE HOUGHTON, see "Houghton, Little"

S.

LITTLE HULTON , see "Hulton"

S.

Little Layton, see "Layton, Little"

A.

LITTLE LEVER, see "Lever, Little"

S.

Little London, 11/2 mile S. of North Meols

W.D.

LITTLE MARSDEN, see "Marsden, Little"

B.

Little Marton, see "Marton"

A.

Little Mearley, 1/2 mile N.E. of Mearley

B.

LITTLE MITTON, see "Mitton, Little"

B.

Little Moss, 2 miles N.W. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Little Plumpton, see "Plumpton"

A.

Little Poulton, see "Poulton"

A.

Little Sankey, see "Sankey"

W.D.

Little Town, 3 miles N.E. of Winwick

W.D.

Little Town, 1/2 mile N. of Littlebrough

S.

Little Wardle, 3 miles N.N.E. of Rochdale

S.

Little Wood, 11/2 mile N. of Croston

LL.

Little Wood, 11/2 mile N. of Bury

S.

Little Woolden, 2 miles N. of Holling's Green

S.

LITTLE WOOLTON, see "Woolton, Little"

W.D.

Littlebound, 3 miles W.N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Littlebrough, 31/2 miles N.E. of Rochdale, in which parish the hamlet is situated, and has a chapel of ease; patron of the curacy, the Vicar of Rochdale. That eccentric genius, John Collier (better known as "Tim Bobbin"), has given some celebrity to this village, by making it the scene of a principal adventure of his Lancashire Clown

S.

Littledale, 5 miles E. of Lancaster, in the parish of Lancaster, has a chapel of ease. The curacy is in the gift of the inhabitants

L.

LIVERPOOL, (N. lat. 53 23", W. long. 25 54"), 18 miles W. of Warrington, 37 miles W. of Manchester, 533/4 miles S. of Lancaster, and 2061/2 miles from London. This large and opulent town is the second sea port in the kingdom, and is situated on the eastern banks of the Mersey. The name of Liverpool has created many disputes as to its etymology; some contending that it is derived from Lever, the name of an ancient family in the county of Lancaster; others from a bird, called a Liver, which was said to have formerly been found here. The other part of the name, viz. pool, is generally agreed to be derived from a pool of water, which formerly overspread what is now the lower part of the town, the docks, &c. Charters were granted to Liverpool by Henry I John, Henry II and III by Edward III Richard III and Henry IV; and in 1752, by George II. Until the year 1699 the town of Liverpool was in the parish of Walton, having only one church, which was a chapel of ease under Walton; but in that year an act was obtained to form the town into a distinct parish of itself, in the deanry of Warrington. In the year 1565 there were in Liverpool only 138 householders, or cottagers, and ten barks (the largest of 40 tons), and two boats; the whole 223 tons, and navigated by 25 men. So long ago as 1790 (since which the increase has been very great) 4223 ships were cleared out of the port of Liverpool. And from June 1800, to June 1801, 5060 ships arrived at Liverpool, of the united burden of 482,719 tons. And by the general census taken in that year Liverpool appeared to have 11,784 houses, and 77,653 inhabitants, exclusive of those families which are absolutely dependant on the trade and prosperity of the town, but whose dwelling houses are in Everton, Kirkdale, Toxteth Park, &c. This surprising increase has been in a great measure owing to the judicious application of the funds belonging to the corporation which have been employed in the improvement of the town and port, and particularly in the construction of the docks, the first of which was formed about 80 years ago, now increased to five, viz. the Old Dock, George's Dock, Salt-house Dock, the King's, and the Queen's Dock (which, together, are capable of containing at once 20,000 tons of shipping), beside the dock belonging to the Duke of Bridgewater, five graving docks, and three dry docks. Liverpool sends two members to Parliament. The right of election is in the freemen, who are also free of Bristol, and of Wexford and Waterford, in Ireland. Liverpool is governed by a Mayor (annually chosen by the Burgesses, on St. Luke's Day), a Recorder, and 41 Common Council-men, who, having served the office of Mayor, are thenceforward called Aldermen. The Mayor has a personal allowance of 800l. for his private contingencies during the time he fills the office. General sessions are holden four times a year, and by adjournment every Monday. A court of requests is also held every Wednesday. The corporation are (by purchase) Lords of the Manor. The greater part of the town is leasehold, under the corporation, for three lives, and a further term of 21 years, with a ground-rent. The leases renewable under a fixed fine, which, with town's dues and tolls, produce a revenue, continually increasing, and now nearly 30,000l. a year.

Liverpool contains fifteen churches belonging to the establishment, viz. St. Nicholas, (the Old Church) - St. Peter's, built in 1704, which, with St. Nicholas, are the parish churches, the livings of which are rectories. St. George's, consecrated in 1734, a very handsome edifice. St. Thomas' consecrated in 1750. St. Paul's consecrated in 1769. St. Ann's, built in 1770. St. John's, finished 1784. Trinity, consecrated 1792. St. James', not directly in the parish, but in Toxteth Park, built in 1774. St. Catherine's, St. Stephen's, and St. Matthew's, St. Mark's, All Saint's, and St. Mary's. There are also meeting-houses for Dissenters of all the various denominations, a Jew's synagogue, and three Roman Catholic chapels.

Of the public buildings of a charitable nature we must mention the Blue Coat Hospital, built in 1726, in which school 230 boys and 50 girls are educated and protected. The General Infirmary is a part of a building, which also contains in it the Seaman's Hospital (opened in 1752), which forms the wings. It was opened in 1749, since which time upwards of 70,000 in and out-patients have partaken of the charity. The Seaman's Hospital is intended for the maintenance of decayed seaman belonging to the port of Liverpool. We ought also to mention the Poor House, the Alms House adjoining, the Lunatic Hospital adjoining the Infirmary, the Dispensary, instituted in 1778, and the Asylum for the Blind, established in 1790. All these speak loudly in favour of the active benevolence of the inhabitants of Liverpool, as do the Exchange, the Exchange Buildings, the Atheneum, the Lyceum, the Union, Libraries, and News Rooms, the Theatre, the Music Hall, St. James' Walk, and the Botanic Garden, of their public spirit and taste.

Liverpool at present is not well provided with a prison, the old one being very inconvenient, confined, and insecure. The new one, which, during the war which commenced in 1793, was chiefly occupied by French prisoners of war, is now shut up, the corporation of Liverpool having unthinkingly erected it on land the property of the Earl of Derby. On the north shore is a large fort, which has a formidable battery of heavy metal, over which a strong guard is mounted every day.

Liverpool is supplied plentifully with provisions of every kind, every day in the week; but its chief markets are on Wednesday and Saturday. The fairs are July 25 and November 11, for cattle and horses, beside a small fair every fortnight, for cattle.

W.D.

LIVESEY, 2 miles S.W. of Blackburn

B.

Livesey Fold, 31/2 miles S. of Blackburn

B.

Livesey Hall, 2 miles S.W. of Blackburn

B.

Lodge, 2 miles S.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Lodge, 1 mile N. of Burnley

B.

Lomax Fold, 2 miles E.S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Lomax Wives, 3 miles N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Long Bank, E. side of the township of Tatham

L.

Long Field, a boundary mark on Blackstone edge, between the counties of York and Lancaster, 7 miles N.E. of Rochdale

S.

Long Field House, 3 miles E.S.E. of Garstang

A.

Long House, 1 mile E. of Eccleshill

B.

Long Lane, 2 miles S.E. of Ribchester

B.

Long Mire, (Furness) 1 mile N.E. of Coulton church

L.

Long Moor, 4 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Longdale Tarn, a lake in Furness, on the N.N.W. extremity of the county, adjoining to Westmoreland

L.

Longford, 31/2 miles S.S.W. of Manchester

S.

Longridge Fell, a mountain 3 miles N. of Ribchester

B.

Longshaw Head, 11/2 mile S.E. of Darwen chapel

B.

Longsight, 3 miles S.S.E. of Manchester

S.

Longthwaite Hill, 2 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

LONGTON, 5 miles S.W. of Preston, is in the Parish of Penworthan, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, - Barton, Esq. of Penworthan

LL.

LONGWORTH, a place well designated by its name, laying between Turton and Anglezark, and extending N.N.W. from Sharples nearly 6 miles

S.

Longworth Hall, 1 mile N.W. of Turton

S.

Longworth Mill, 1 mile W. of Turton chapel

S.

Lonsdale Hundred, is the most northerly of the six hundreds contained in the county. It is divided into two parts, south of the Sands, and north of the Sands. The latter is completely separated from the rest of the county by Lancaster Sands, and are called Furness Fells, which are bounded on the W. by part of Cumberland, on the N. and E. by Westmoreland, and on the W. by the Irish Sea. The south part is bounded on the N. by Westmoreland, on the E. by Yorkshire, on the S. by Amounderness Hundred, and on the W. by the Bay of Morecombe and the Irish Sea. It pays 16/100 of the county rates, and raises 74 men for the old militia of 800. It contains 61 townships and 20 parishes, of which nine are in Furness Fells. In 1801 there were north of the Sands 3702 houses, and 17,787 inhabitants. On the south of the Sands 4836 houses, and 25,190 inhabitants. Total 8538 houses, and 52,977 inhabitants.

 

Lord Lane, 1 mile E. of Newton chapel

S.

LOSTOCK, 4 miles W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Lostock, 4 miles S.W. of Manchester

S.

Lostock, (the river) rises in Wheelton, about 3 miles N.N.E. of Chorley, from whence it flows to the S.W. to Shaw Hill, when it turns N.N.W. to Cuerden, which it nearly encircles, and for about 2 miles becomes the boundary line between the hundreds of Leyland and Blackburn. It then turns S.W. till about 1 mile W. of Croston it forms a junction with the Yarrow, their united streams falling into the Douglas about 1 mile S.W. below

LL.

Lostock Brow, 2 miles S.W. of Leyland

LL.

Lostock Hall, 31/2 miles W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Lostock Hall, 31/2 miles S.S.E. of Preston

B.

Lothwaite, 2 miles S. of Cockerham church

L.

Lott, in Roboransdale

L.

Love Clough, 1 mile N. of Goodshaw chapel

B.

Loveley Hall, near Clayton-le-Dale

B.

Low, 2 miles S.W. of Wigan

W.D.

Low Beck, (Furness) at the N. end of Cartmel Fells

L.

Low Church, see "Law"

B.

Low Crompton, 1/2 mile N.W. of Shaw chapel

S.

Low Fold, 11/2 mile E.S.E. of Heapey chapel

LL.

Low Furness, that part of Furness S. of Ulverston

L.

Low Green, 2 miles S. of Wigan

W.D.

Low Hill, 11/2 mile E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Low House, 2 miles E. of Rochdale

S.

Low House, 2 miles N. of Halsall

W.D.

Low Moor Head, 5 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Low Moss, 2 miles W. of Leyland

LL.

Low Newton, near Upper Allithwaite, Cartmel Fells

L.

Low Park, at the most northerly part of Furness

L.

Low Wood, (Furness) on the south bank of the river Leven, in Upper Holker

L.

Low Wray, (Furness) between Bletham Tarn and Winander Mere

L.

Low Yew Dale, (Furness) at Monk Coniston

L.

Lower Ballum, 4 miles W. of Kirkham

A.

Lower Bradley, 1 mile N. of Little Marsden

B.

Lower Bridge, (over the Hodder) 3 miles N.W. of Whalley

B.

Lower College, 2 miles W.N.W. of Ribchester

A.

Lower Cowden, 2 miles W.S.W. of Whalley

B.

Lower Darwen, 2 miles S. of Blackburn, see "Darwen"

B.

Lower Gate, 2 miles E. of Downham

B.

Lower Gore, 2 miles W. of Chipping

B.

Lower Hall, 1 mile E.N.E. of Preston

B.

Lower Heyside, 1 mile E. of Royton chapel

S.

LOWER HOLKER, 2 miles S.W. of Cartmel

L.

Lower House, in Leyland

LL.

Lower House, 1 mile N. of Old Accrington

B.

Lower House Fold, 1 mile E. of Heapey Chapel

LL.

Lower Lane, 2 miles S.W. of Ashton-in-the-Willows

W.D.

Lower Lane, near Milnerow

S.

Lower Moor, 1 mile N.E. of Oldham

S.

Lower Place, 1 mile S.S.E. of Rochdale

S.

Lower Singleton, see "Singleton"

A.

Lower Standen, 2 miles N. of Whalley

B.

Lower Urswick, near Monk Urswick

L.

Lower Whittle, 2 miles N.W. of Middleton

S.

Lower Wyer's Dale, see "Wyer's Dale"

A.

Lowgill, in the township of Tatham, 4 miles S.E. of Wray

L.

LOWICK, (Furness) 4 miles N. of, and in the parish of Ulverston. The chapel of ease is 5 miles N. of the mother church; patron, W.F. Blencowe, Esq.

L.

Lowick Bridge, (Furness) over the Crake, 5 miles N. of Ulverston

L.

Lowick Hall, (Furness) near Lowick chapel

L.

LOWTON, 3 miles S.W. of Leigh, a township united with Kenyon, in the parish of Winwick, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the Rector of Winwick

W.D.

Loyne, (the river) or Lune, as it is sometimes improperly called, rises in the Fells of Westmoreland, and enters Lancashire near Kirkby Lonsdale, whence it proceeds S. increased by the Lechbeck, about 1 mile N. of Tunstall, by the Greta, 1 mile S. of Tunstall, and by the Winning, 1/2 mile W.S.W. of Hornby, proceeding by Arkholme, Gressingham, Claughton, and Halton, to Lancaster, below which it forms a considerable estuary, and valuable harbour; discharging itself into the Irish Channel, at Sunderland Point

L.

Lucas Green, 2 miles N. of Chorley

LL.

Lum, 3 miles S. of Haslingden

S.

Lumas Fold, 1 mile E. of Haywood chapel

S.

Lun, 2 miles E. of Crawshaw Booth

B.

Lund Chapel, 21/2 miles E.S.E. of Kirkham, in which parish it is situated, and for which it is a chapel of ease; patron, the Vicar of Kirkham

A.

Lune, (the river) see "Loyne"

L.

LUNT, 1 mile W.N.W. of Sephton

W.D.

LYTHAM, 12 miles W. of Preston, a village and a parish, in the deanry of Amounderness; the living is a curacy to an Impropriation; patron the Prior of Durham. Lytham has of late years become a fashionable bathing place, as the shore is fine, and the water pure, as it is situated at the mouth of the estuary of the Ribble

A.

Lytham Common, extends from Lytham several miles to the N.W.

A.


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com
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