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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

P

 

Padgate, 2 miles E.N.E. of Warrington

W.D.

PADIHAM, in the parish of Whalley, 4 miles W. of Burnley, has a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron Legendre Starkie, Esq. This place has not a market, but it has two annual fairs, viz. May and September 26th. for coopers and other wooden-ware

B.

Pail, 1 mile S. of Chipping

B.

Palace House, 11/2 mile W. of Burnley

B.

Palate, in Quarlton

S.

PARBOLD, 3 miles W.N.W. of Standish

LL.

Parbold Hall, 3 miles W. of Standish

LL.

Park, near Tatham

L.

Park, (Furness) near Trover

L.

Park, 2 miles N.N.W. of Ashton-under-Line

S.

Park, 4 miles N. of Bury

S.

Park, the seat of Robert Philips, Esq. 1/2 mile W. of Prestwich church

S.

Park Chapel, (a dissenters' chapel) in Toxteth Park

W.D.

Park Farm, 3 miles S.W. of Manchester

S.

Park Hall, 11/4 mile S.E. of Blackrod

S.

Park Hall, 23/4 miles N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Park Head, 1 mile E. of Garstang

A.

Park House, (Furness) in the township of Skelwith

L.

Park House, (Furness) 1 mile N.W. of Ruslam church

L.

Park House, 3 miles N.E. of Tunstall

L.

Park Houses, 2 miles S.W. of Haslingden

B.

Park Lane, in Toxteth Park

W.D.

Park Side, near Prescot

W.D.

Parlike Pike, 2 miles N.W. of Chipping

B.

PARR, 1 mile E. of St. Hellens, abounds with coals and iron-stone

W.D.

Parr Hall, 1 mile E.N.E. of St. Hellens

W.D.

Parrs, 4 miles N.N.E. of Prescot

W.D.

Parsonage, 1 mile S.S.W. of Chipping

B.

Pasture, 3 miles W. of Colne

B.

Pasture Barn, at the north end of Longworth

S.

Pasture Yate, on the north-east side of Edgworth

S.

Pastures, 2 miles N.W. of Walmsley chapel

S.

Patterson How, (Furness) 2 miles S.S.W. of Cartmel Fell chapel

L.

Peacock Hill, in Bleasdale

A.

Pear Tree, (Furness) 13/4 mile N. of Kirkby Ireleth

L.

Pear Trees, 4 miles W.N.W. of Preston

A.

Peasholmes, (Furness) 1 mile S.S.E. of Leece

L.

Peasley Crofts, 3/4 mile S.E. of St. Hellens

W.D.

Pecks Mill, 3 miles S.E. of Prescot

W.D.

Peel, in Widness

W.D.

Peel, 4 miles W. of Kirkham

A.

Peel Chapel, 81/2 miles N.W. of Manchester, a chapel of ease in the parish of -

S.

Peel Hall, between Peel chapel and Warton chapel, 9 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

Peel Hall, 81/2 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

PEMBERTON, 2 miles W.S.W. of Wigan

W.D.

Pemberton Hall, an ancient, half-timbered house, the property of Robert Markland, Esq. and for a long series of years, the residence of his ancestors

W.D.

Pendle Forest, the district between Pendle Hill, Colne and Marsden

B.

Pendle Hall, 2 miles N.E. of Padiham

B.

Pendle Hill, a lofty mountain, the highest in the county, 4 miles N.E. of Whalley

B.

PENDLEBURY, 4 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

PENDLETON, 2 miles N.E. of Whalley

B.

PENDLETON, 2 miles W.N.W. of Manchester, is a large populous, and thriving village, containing many capital houses, and continually increasing; the whole forming a large suburb to the towns of Manchester and Salford, to which it is almost joined, by the continuance of the building, though in the year 1780, it was a small rural village, having a may-pole, round which the lads and lasses danced, after bedecking it with garlands. The pole still remains, but the rural fete has no longer its innocent attractions. Pendleton boasts a handsome square, recently built, and some good streets. It is in the parish of Eccles, under which it has a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. Thomas; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the vicar of Eccles. This place also contains a Methodist chapel, and a burial place for the Jews. In the valley below the village, is a Danish tumulus

S.

Pendleton Hall, 3 miles N.E. of Whalley

B.

PENKETH, 21/2 miles W. of Warrington

W.D.

PENNINGTON, (Furness) 2 miles S.W. of Ulverston, a parish in the deanry of Furness and Cartmel; the living is a perpetual curacy: patron the king

L.

PENNINGTON, the township attached to that of Leigh, to which it is joined on the north

W.D.

Pennington Hall, 2 miles E. of Wigan

S.

Pennington Hall, 1/2 mile S. of Leigh

W.D.

PENWORTHAM, 2 miles S.W. of Preston, a parish in the deanry of Blackburn; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, - Barton, Esq.

LL.

Pepper House Fold, 1/2 mile N.E. of Balderston chapel

B.

Persons, 21/2 miles N. of Haslingden

B.

PESFURLONG, 3 miles E. of Winwick

W.D.

Pheasant Fold, 1 mile N.E. of Burnley

B.

Picked Hall, (Furness) south end of Coniston Water

L.

Picked Hole, (Furness) 2 miles N. of Broughton

L.

Pickerings, in Balderston

B.

Picot, 2 miles N. of Grimsarg

A.

Pier Hall, 4 miles S.S.W. of Lancaster

L.

Pierce Clough, 2 miles N. of New Church, in Rossendale

B.

Pile Harbour, a harbour between the island of Walney, and Low Furness

L.

Pile of Foundray, a small island in Pile Harbour, on which there are the ruins of an old castle

L.

PILKINGTON, 6 miles N.N.W. of Manchester

S.

PILLING, 6 miles W.N.W. of Garstang, in which parish it is situated, and under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, Rev. Geoffry Hornby

A.

Pilling Lane, 1 mile W. of Pilling chapel

A.

Pilling Moss, a large morass, which is situated between Pilling and Garstang

A.

PILSWORTH, 21/2 miles S.E. of Bury

S.

Pimmet Bridge, near Colne

B.

Pinkpank Lane, part of the ancient highway between Manchester and Stockport, but now overgrown with trees and shrubs, 4 miles S.E. of Manchester, and about 1/2 mile E. of the present road between the town above mentioned

S.

Pitsley, 1/2 mile S.S.W. of Balderston church

B.

Plain Trees, 2 miles S.W. of Burnley

B.

Plate Bridge, 2 miles S. of Wigan

W.D.

Platt Chapel, (belonging to a respectable congregation of Presbyterians) 3 miles S.S.E. of Manchester

S.

Platt House, the seat of T.C. Worsley, Esq. 23/4 miles S. of Manchester

S.

PLEASINGTON, 3 miles W.S.W. of Blackburn

B.

PLUMPTON (Great and Little), about 1/2 a mile distant from each other, and 3 miles W.N.W. of Kirkham

A.

Plumpton Hall, (Furness) 11/2 Mile E. of Ulverston

L.

Point of Comfort, a point of land in Low Furness, in the bay of Morcomb, 2 miles S.E. of Dendron

L.

Pot House, 1/2 mile E. of Darwen chapel

B.

Potter's Fold, 11/2 mile W. of Whalley

B.

POULTON (in the Fylde), situated in N. lat. 53 48". W. long. 2 54". - 81/2 miles N.W. of Kirkham; and 2343/4 miles from London. The parish is in the deanry of Amounderness; the living is a vicarage; patron, R. Hesketh, Esq. The market day is Monday; and the fairs are holden February 13, and May 2, for cattle and smallwares. In 1801, the town contained 197 houses, and 769 inhabitants

A.

POULTON, 3 miles W.N.W. of Lancaster, in which parish it is situated, and has a chapel of ease; the living a perpetual curacy; patron, vicar of Lancaster

L.

POULTON, 2 miles E. of Warrington

S.

PREESALL, 71/2 miles W. of Garstang

A.

Preese Hall, 1 mile S. of Great Leighton

A.

PRESCOT, (N. lat. 53 24". W. long. 2 43") 8 miles E.N.E. of Liverpool, 101/4 miles W.S.W. of Warrington, and 1981/4 miles from London. This parish is in the deanery of Warrington; the living is a vicarage; patrons, the Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. It has the following chapels under it, viz. St. Hellens, Farnworth, Rainstorth, and Sankey. The parish church, which is situated on high ground, and seen from a great distance, has a spire 156 feet high. The town is famous for the manufactory of watch-maker's tools, and fine files. The market day is Tuesday. The fairs are holden June 2, (which continues three days) and October 21st. By the census in 1801, Prescot appears to have 734 houses, and 3465 inhabitants

W.D.

Presto Lee, 4 miles S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

PRESTON, (N. lat. 53 44". W. long. 2 37".) 221/4 miles S. of Lancaster. 311/2 miles N.N.E. of Liverpool, 15 miles N. of Wigan, 311/4 miles N.W. of Manchester, and 2171/4 miles from London. This place is said to owe its name to a corruption from Priest's Town, as it was once called, owing to the religious foundations here. Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry the Third, founded a college of Grey Friars on the north-west side of the town, and here was a religious hospital, in 1291.

Preston is a parliamentary borough, and sent members to parliament as early as the 23d of Edward the First, but ceased to send them from the 1st of Edward the Second, till the time of Edward the Sixth, when the neglected right was resumed. The House of Commons have determined that the right of election is in the inhabitants at large. Preston was incorporated by Henry the Second. The corporation consists of a Mayor, Recorder, eight Aldermen, four under Aldermen, seventeen Common Councilmen, and a Town Clerk. Preston has the singular privilege of holding a Guild-merchant, every twenty years. It was instituted in the reign of Henry the Third. The first Guild was held in the second year of Edward III; and the last makes the eighteenth, his present Majesty being the only Monarch of the twelve who have reigned since the institution, during whose reign three of these festive spectacles have been celebrated. The Guild is always held in August, of the years it falls on; and the last, in 1802, was remarkable for the splendour exhibited by the Nobility and Gentry who attended this provincial jubilee. By charter, the Guild is to be held every twenty years, in default of which, the right of sending members to parliament, and the elective franchises of the inhabitants, and the rights of the Burgesses, would be forfeited. The town crier proclaiming 28 days' grace, for people to renew their freedom whether acquired by ancestry or purchase. The sports and revelry which are concomitants of the Guild, and the procession of the various trades and occupations of the inhabitants, draw together on this occasion, immense crowds from every part of the kingdom; and Preston is the resort of all that is fashionable.

Preston is a parish in the deanry of Amounderness; the living is a vicarage: patron, Sir H. Hoghton, Bart. Beside the parish church, there is a chapel of ease in the town, dedicated to St. George.

Among the public buildings of Preston, most worthy of observation are the Town Hall, which is large and handsome; the Assembly Rooms, built at the sole expence of the Earl of Derby, and which are remarkably elegant: and the New Prison, built after the plan of the late Mr. Howard, at the joint charge of Lonsdale, Amounderness, Blackburn, and west Derby hundreds, being intended to serve as a place of confinement for Criminals from those hundreds.

The Duchy of Lancaster holds a Court of Chancery here. There is also a County Court sits every Tuesday, and issues writs to compel appearance without bail, for any sum above forty shillings. Another Court called the County Arrest, which does the same thing for sums under forty shillings. Another Court is also held here, similar to the last, but limited to the hundred of Amounderness. Writs, holding to bail, are issued from the Prothonotary's Office, upon which the Sheriff grants a warrant for apprehension. Other writs are also issued from this Office, not holding to bail, but by copy of process in the Court of Common Pleas. The Borough Court issues process for distress up to ten pounds, which compel appearance, or on failure of it, to attach goods in execution. The Court can also send Criminals to their Prison. The Quarter Sessions are held at Preston, by adjournment from Lancaster, on the Thursday in the week after Epiphany.

The market day at Preston is Saturday, and the fairs are held March 27th for cattle and horses; September 7th for coarse cloths and smallwares; and the first Saturday after January 6th, for horses chiefly. The trade of the town is benefited by the river Ribble, distant about one mile, which is navigable by small coasters; and by the Lancaster Canal, which has opened a communication with the rivers Mersey, Dee, Ouse, Trent, Severn, Humber, Thames, &c. The manufactures of this place are now chiefly cotton, which have of late years encreased in an astonishing degree; and one of its manufacturers has risen by his industry into consequence sufficient to rival the Earl of Derby's hereditary influence in the town, which formerly was supposed to influence the election of both the members which the borough sends to Parliament; but Mr. Horrocks (the manufacturer alluded to) is now one of the members. In the year 1801, Preston had 2231 houses, and 11,837 inhabitants

A.

Preston Moor, 1 mile N. of Preston

A.

PRESTWICH, 4 miles N.N.W. of Manchester, (but by the turnpike road considerably more) is a parish in conjunction with Oldham, which constitutes one rectory, (though in other respects separate) in the deanry of Manchester. The living is in the gift of the Rev. John Lyon. The parish of Prestwich, properly so called, consists of the following townships, viz. Prestwich, Great and Little Heaton, Whitefield, Unsworth, Outwood, Alkrington, and Tong, which contain together about 10,000 inhabitants. The parish Church of Prestwich is a fine old gothic building, with a tower and six bells. The church yard is most romantically beautiful, overlooking a charming country, rich with picturesque scenery

S.

Priest Hall, 4 miles N.W. of Ribchester

B.

Priest Hall, 2 miles N.E. of Ribchester

B.

PRIEST HUTTON, 21/2 miles N. of Warton

L.

Priory, 4 miles E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Pump House, near Bolton-in-the-sands

L.

Pyethorn, in Clayton-le-Dale

B.

Q

 

Quarry House, (Low Furness) 11/2 mile W. of Furness Abbey

L.

Quarton, 5 miles N.N.E. of Bolton-le-moors

S.

Quebec, a village on the road between Ashton-under-line and Stockport

S.

Quern Moor, 2 miles E. of Lancaster, in which parish it is situated, is a township comprising a forest belonging to the King. The inclosed and waste lands, make together about 3000 acres. Here is a Forest Court, held half-yearly by the master Forester of Amounderness, whose duty it is to hold the several Forest courts

L.


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com
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