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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

R

 

RADCLIFF, 71/2 miles N.N.W. of Manchester, a township and parish in the deanry of Manchester. The living is a rectory; patron, the Earl of Wilton, who is also the lord of the manor.

S.

RADCLIFF BRIDGE, a populous village in the township of Radcliff, and so called from having a bridge over the Irwell. It has no market, but has a fair April 29th, for cattle, horses, &c., and another on September 28th and 29, for wool, cloth, pedlary, &c.

S.

Raddivals, 1 mile S. of Bury

S.

Ragged Gill, (Furness) 2 miles W. of Ulverston

L.

Rainacre Hall, 31/2 miles N.E. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Rainford Mills, 3 miles N.N.W. of St. Hellen's

W.D.

RAINHILL, 3 miles S.E. of Prescot

W.D.

Rainhill Hall, 3 miles S.S.E. of Prescot

W.D.

Rainhill Stoops, 31/2 miles S.E. of Prescot

W.D.

RAINSFORD, 5 miles N. of, and in the parish of Prescot, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Prescot. Here is also a dissenting chapel. This place affords a clay remarkable for making good bricks

W.D.

Rainspool, 21/2 miles S. of Cockerham church

L.

Rake Foot, in Chardgeley

B.

Rake's Hall, near Blackpool

A.

Rake's Head Fold, 1 mile S.E. of Newchurch, in Rossendale

B.

Rakes, 1/2 mile N.E. of Clifton

A.

Rakes, 1 mile S. of Bolton-le-moors

S.

RAMPSIDE, the most southerly township in Low Furness, 7 miles S.S.W. of Ulverston; it is in the parish of Dalton, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Dalton

L.

RAMSGREAVE, 2 miles N. of Blackburn

B.

Ratcliffe, 2 miles E.S.E. of Old Accrington

B.

Raven Castle, a point of land which marks the boundaries of the counties of York and Lancaster, at the S.S.E. extremity of Tatham

L.

Raven Holme, 41/2 miles E.N.E. of Clithero

B.

Raven's Winder, (Furness) 3 miles S.W. of Cartmel

L.

Raven's Wings, 3 miles W.N.W. of Blackburn

B.

Ravenhead, near St. Hellen's, a place justly celebrated for the manufactory of Plate Glass, which is here brought to a perfection equal to the best glass ever imported from the continent. Convex mirrors have been made here 36 inches in diameter! and cast plate mirrors, 142 inches in height, and 72 inches wide! These extensive works contain nearly twenty acres of ground, and afford employment to nearly 300 persons. The room in which the plates are cast, is 200 feet long, and 78 feet wide. The table on which the plate glass is cast, is a solid piece of copper, 14 feet long, 8 feet broad, and 7 inches thick. Two large steam engines of great power are employed in grinding and polishing the plates.

At Ravenhead also are large works, where 30 tons of copper are weekly manufactured into small bars (about 7 ounces each) for the east India Company, which are sent to China, where they are said to circulate in lieu of coin.

W.D.

RAVER'S MEOLS, on the sea shore, 1 mile S.W. of Formby

W.D.

RAWCLIFFE, 6 miles W.S.W. of Garstang

A.

Rawcliffe Hall, 13 miles E.S.E. of Rawcliffe

A.

Rawconstall, 21/2 miles E. of Haslingden

B.

Rawson Nook, 11/2 mile S. of Astley chapel

W.D.

Rawton Hall, 2 miles E. of Haslingden

B.

READ, 1 mile N.W. of Padiham

B.

Read Bridge, 21/2 N.W. of Padiham

B.

Read Hall, 2 miles N.W. of Padiham

B.

Readers, 3 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Readley, 1 mile S. of Little Marsden church

B.

Reaps, 2 miles N.W. of Blackburn

B.

Red Hazzles, 1/2 mile W. of Prescot

W.D.

Red Home, 1 mile N.W. of Winwick

W.D.

Red Lane, (Low Furness) 2 miles S. of Ulverston

L.

Red Lee, 1 mile S.S.W. of Tockholes chapel

B.

Red Moss, 1 mile S.E. of Blackrod

S.

Red Syke, north-end of Little Bowland

B.

REDDISH, 5 miles S.E. of Manchester, separated from Cheshire by the river Tame, a short distance from its junction with the Mersey

S.

Reddish Green, 5 miles S.E. of Manchester

S.

Reddish Hall, 51/2 S.E. of Manchester

S.

Reddish Mill, 6 miles S.E. of Manchester

S.

Reddish Shore, in Hundersfield, 2 miles N. of Littlebrough

S.

Reding, (Furness) 2 miles S.E. of Coulton church

L.

Reed, 11/4 mile S.W. of Cockerham church

L.

Reediford Bridge, (over the Calder) at Great Marsden

B.

Resthwaite, (Furness) in Suberthwaite

L.

RIBBEY (with WRAY), 2 miles W. of Kirkham, in which parish it is situated, and has under it a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Kirkham

A.

Ribble, (The river) takes its rise in the high moors of Craven, from whence it flows southerly by the mountains of Ingleborough and Pennigant, and first washes Lancashire about 1 mile N. of Downham Church; it then proceeds S.W. by Clitheroe, forming the boundary of the counties of York and Lancaster, till at Little Mitton it is joined by the rivers Hodder and Calder, when it fully enters the county, and proceeds in nearly the same direction, by Dinkley, Ribchester, and Osbaldiston, from which place, by Baldiston, Elston, Ribbleton, Fishwick, Walton-le-dale (near which it is joined by the Darwent) and Preston, to Penwortham, it forms the boundary of the hundreds of Amounderness and Blackburn. From Penwortham it proceeds W. and is the boundary between the hundreds of Amounderness and Leyland, opening into a wide estuary (into which the Douglas empties itself near Much Hool) and at its mouth, where it falls into the Irish sea, between North Meols and Lytham, making a great gap in the sea-coast line of the country, being nearly 5 miles across at high water. It is only navigable to Preston by small coasters, tho' formerly, there is good reason to imagine, large vessels were navigated, at least as high is Ribchester.

A.

RIBBLETON, 11/2 mile N.E. of Preston

A.

RIBCHESTER, (N. lat. 53. 46". W. long. 2. 27".) 8 miles E.N.E. of Preston; 51/2 miles W. of Whalley; 5 miles N.N.W. of Blackburn and 2251/4 miles from London. This place (situated on the Ribble) is a parish in the deanry of Amounderness; the living a rectory; patron the bishop of Chester. This parish, (as well as Chipping) was taken out of the parish of Whalley. The church had formerly two chantries; one belonging to the Lords of the manor, and the other to the Townleys of Ditton. But these are things of yesterday, compared to the much higher antiquities which Ribchester can boast; for Dr. Whittaker, the learned and judicious historian of Whalley, has satisfactorily proved, that Camden was right in his conjecture, when he supposed it to be the Coccium of Antonius; so that, notwithstanding Ribchester is now reduced to a poor, and almost insignificant village, it was once a military Roman station, and from the antiquities which have been found here at various times, it must have been a place of very considerable dignity. (See Dr. Whittaker's history of Whalley, the 4th volume of the Vestuta Monumenta, and 13th volume of the Archaelogio.) Many of these monuments of Roman enterprise are deposited in the museum of Charles Townley, Esq. particularly a fine helmet, which the learned and Rev. Stephen Weston, in Archaeologia, vol. 13, calls a singular and elegant specimen of ancient art, and the best Roman work on the Greek model. It is ornamented with a very great number of figures of warriors, both horse and foot, in basso-relievo, and the visor is a most beautiful female face which is supposed to have been made anterior to the other part.

A rampart, and a foss, exhibit their remains near the church, where anchors and rings of ships have been found; and in sinking a well some years ago, the remains of a ship were found in nearly the same place, now called Anchor Hill. Such have been the revolution of eighteen centuries! From this place a Roman road, called Watling street, takes a northern course over Longridge Fell, Thornby, Chardgeley, and Bowland, to the Cross of Greet, the northern boundary of the original parish of Whalley.

In the time of Camden, the lower class of people had this rhyming tradition, often in their mouths:

"It is written upon a wall in Rome,

"Ribchester was as rich as any town in Christendom."

B.

RICHMOND, 1 part of the apparent town of Liverpool, but situated in the parish of Walton, under which it has a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. Ann; patrons, the Corporation of Liverpool

W.D.

Richmond House, 1 mile W. of Chipping

B.

Ridding, (Furness) 4 miles N. of Ulverston

L.

Ridding, 4 miles N.N.W. of Whalley

L.

Ridding Side, (Furness) 1/2 mile S. of Coulton Church

L.

Rider's Brow, in Gorton

S.

Ridge, near Burnley

B.

Ridge, 1 mile E. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Ridge Hill, 11/2 mile E.N.E. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Rigg, (Furness) 2 miles N.N.E. of Broughton

L.

Rigshaw Hall, 3 miles S. of Chorley

LL.

Ringley Bridge, (over the Irwell) 8 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

Ringley Chapel, (in the parish of Prestwich, to which it is a chapel of ease) near Ringley Bridge. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the presentation of the rectors of Prestwich, Middleton, and Bury

S.

Ringley Fold, 7 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

Rinkton, 1 mile N.W. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde

A.

RISLEY, 4 miles N.E. of Warrington. Here is a dissenting chapel

W.D.

Risley Moss, a large morass, 3 miles E.N.E. of Warrington

W.D.

RIVINGTON, 6 miles W.N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors, of which parish it makes a part, and under which it has a chapel of ease: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the inhabitants. Here is also a dissenting chapel, and a grammar school, founded by Pilkington, bishop of Durham, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, endowed with lands, in the bishopric of Durham. Lostock and Anglezark, are hamlets under Rivington

S.

Rivington Hall, 6 miles W.N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Rivington Pike, an ancient Beacon, commanding a most extensive prospect, 5 miles N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

RIXTON, 5 miles E. of Warrington

W.D.

Rixton Hall, 41/2 miles E. of Warrington

W.D.

Road Moss, (Furness) 21/2 miles N.W. of Ulverston

L.

Roads, in Little Heaton

S.

Robin Hood, 21/2 miles W.N.W. of Standish

LL.

Roboran, (The river) rises in the moors, about 3 miles S.E. of Mallowdale Pike; and in Roboransdale, it is augmented by several other small streams, and runs N. to Wray, where it is joined by another branch which rises in the south part of the township of Tatham, the united streams fall into the Wenning, about 1 mile E.N.E. of Hornby

L.

Roboransdale, 71/2 miles E. of Lancaster

L.

ROBY, 1 mile W.S.W. of Huyton

W.D.

Roch, (The river) rises from three springs on Blackstone Edge, which form a junction at Littleborough, whence, proceeding southwesterly, at Hamer, it is increased by two other branches, one of which rises near Oldham, and the other near Hague Fold, the river still keeping a S.W. direction, passes by Rochdale, Ormrod, and Heywood, till, at about 1 mile E. of Bury, it turns almost full S. and falls into the Irwell at Radcliff

S.

Roch Cliff, near Bacap

S.

ROCHDALE, (N. lat. 53. 35". W. lon. 2. 5") is seated on the river Roch, 12 miles N.N.E. of Manchester, 7 miles N.E. of Bury, and 198 miles from London. This is a flourishing market town, and a parish in the deanry of Manchester. The living is a vicarage, which is said to be the richest in the kingdom, although it was only valued at 11l. 4s. 91/2d. in the reign of Henry the Eighth. Patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury, to whom the tythes belong. The several dues arise from Lands and Houses, the vicar being enabled to grant building leases for ninety-nine years. Rochdale is not named in the official return of the population of 1801, but was included in the returns of the townships of Castleton and Spotland, in which Rochdale is situated. It is supposed, however, to contain nearly 10,000 inhabitants; and the whole parish at nearly 50,000. But then it should be considered that Lydyate, Saddleworth, and Dobcross, all in Yorkshire, are in this parish besides Littleborough, Milnrow, Todmorden, Whitworth and Frier meer chapels of ease, which are all chapels of ease (in Lancashire) under Rochdale. Besides the parish church there is also a chapel of ease in the town, patron, the vicar of Rochdale; and meeting houses for dissenters of the Presbyterian persuasion, the Baptists, the Quakers, and the Methodists. The parish abounds with coal, slate, and stone; and the commercial spirit of many of its merchants, has long ago lifted it up to consequence, in a national point of view. Its manufactures are chiefly Baize, Flannels, Kerseys, and Woollen Cloths, which are made in very considerable quantities. The market days are Monday and Saturday; and its fairs are holden on May 14th, Whit-Tuesday, and November 7th, for cattle, horses, &c.

S.

Roger Ground, (Furness) 1/2 mile S. of Hawkshead

L.

Rook's End, (Furness) 1 mile E.S.E. of Broughton

L.

Rooley Hall, 1 mile E. of Burnley

B.

Rooley House, 31/2 miles N.W. of Rochdale

S.

Rooley Moor, 3 miles N.W. of Rochdale

S.

Roose, (Furness) 2 miles W.S.W. of Dendron church

L.

Roose Coat, (Low Furness) 2 miles S.S.W. of Dendron church

L.

Roosebeck, on the sea shore in Low Furness, on the Bay of Morcombe, 11/4 mile S.S.W. of Leece

L.

Rose Greve, 2 miles W.S.W. of Burnley

B.

ROSEACRE, 3 miles N. of Kirkham

A.

ROSENDALE FOREST, a district which extends from the township of Eccleshill to that of Bacap

B.

ROSSALL, the township N. of Little Bispham

A.

Rossall Hall, 2 miles N. of Little Bispham

A.

Rossall Point, on the sea shore, 2 miles W. of the mouth of the Wyer

A.

Rosthwaite, (Furness) 2 miles N.E. of Broughton

L.

Rotten Row, in Hindley

W.D.

Rotten Row, 1 mile N. of Great Eccleston

A.

Rough Hey, near New Accrington

B.

Rough Hey, 2 miles N.E. of Blackburn

B.

Rough Lee, 31/2 miles W. of Colne

B.

Round Head, (Low Furness) 2 miles N.W. of Dendron

L.

Round House, in West Derby township, 31/2 miles E.N.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Round-about-Smithy, 4 miles W.N.W. of Preston

A.

Rowden Fold, 3 miles N.W. of Haslingden

B.

Rowe Green, 1 mile S.E. of Preston

A.

Royal Oak, 21/2 miles E.N.E. of Maghull

W.D.

Royle, 1 mile N.N.W. of Burnley

B.

ROYTON, 2 miles N. of Oldham, in the parish of Prestwich-cum-Oldham, under which it has a chapel of ease. Besides which, here is a Quaker's Meeting. Great quantities of coal, of a good quality, are got in this township, which contains upwards of 3000 inhabitants, chiefly employed in the cotton manufactories.

S.

Royton Hall, in Royton, the seat of Joseph Pickford, Esq. formerly the property of the Byron family. In the house is a curious stone staircase, remarkable for its strength

S.

RUFFORD, 21/2 miles S.W. of Croston, in which parish it is situated, and under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the rector of Croston. It has a fair May 1st, for cattle.

LL.

Rufford Hall, 1 mile N.N.W. of Rufford chapel

LL.

RUMSFORD, 3 miles W.S.W. of Bolton

S.

RUMSWORTH, 21/2 miles S.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Running Pump, near Catforth

S.

Rush, (The rivulet) a stream which rises in Audenshaw, and the S.W. side of Ashton Moss, runs S.W. by Gorton Hall, crosses the turnpike road between Manchester and Stockport, proceeds to Rusholme, where it crosses the turnpike road in front of Platt House, soon after which it is joined by the Leven and Black Brook, (two small streams which rise in Levensholme and Reddish) when it proceeds nearly W. and at Chorlton falls into the river Mersey

S.

Rushford Bridge, 31/4 miles S.S.E. of Manchester

S.

RUSHTON, 4 miles S.E. of Blackburn

B.

RUSHULME, a pleasant village 21/2 miles S.S.E. of Manchester

S.

Rushulme Green, 21/2 miles S. of Manchester

S.

RUSLAND, (Furness) 5 miles S. of Hawkshead, is in the parish of Coulton, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the curate of Coulton

L.


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com
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