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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

S

 

Sabden, in Pendle Forrest

B.

Sabden Bridge, 2 miles N. of Padiham

B.

Saddleside, 2 miles N. of Chipping

B.

St. Andrew's Moor, (Furness) 2 miles E. of Cartmel

L.

St. Domingo, on the north-side of the township of Everton

W.D.

St. HELLENS, (N. lat. 53. 25". W. lon. 20. 39") 4 miles E.N.E. of Prescot; 12 miles E.N.E. of Liverpool; 51/4 miles S.W. of Ashton-in-makerfield; 10 miles N.W. of Warrington; and 198 miles from London. This flourishing place is in the parish of Prescot, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Prescot. Here are also a dissenting chapel, and a Quakers' meeting house, in a part of the town called Hardshaw, the name by which the place was formerly known, but the titulary saint of the chapel of ease, soon after it was built, gave it a new name, and that of Hardshaw is now nearly forgotten. St. Hellens has risen, during the present reign, from a small inconsiderable village, to a large well built populous town

W.D.

St. Hellens, (Furness) 11/2 mile W. of Dalton

L.

St. Lawrence's Chapel, 5 miles S. of Garstang, is in the parish of Preston, and is a domestic chapel belonging to - Shuttleworth, Esq

A.

St. MICHAEL-LE-WYRE, 3 miles S.S.W. of Garstang, a parish in the deanry of Amounderness. The living is a vicarage: patron, - Swamson, Esq.

A.

SALFORD, (N. lat. 53. 25". W. lon. 2. 10".) is situated on the N.W. bank of the river Irwel, forming a part of the apparent town of Manchester, tho' a distinct township, and governed by its own officers. It is united to Manchester by three stone, and one wooden bridge, and to the township of Broughton by a newly erected stone bridge. If Salford was insulated it would be deemed a large town; but situated as it is, it only serves to swell the magnitude of Manchester, of which with Hulme, Ardwick, and Chorlton Row, it seems by the close junction of the buildings to be a part. Salford contains two churches of the establishment; the first of which is Trinity Chapel, a handsome stone building, with a tower steeple, in which are six musical bells. This edifice is built on the foundation of another church founded in 1635, which being built of an admixture of stone, timber, and mud, soon fell into decay. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron, Sir Robert Gore, Bt. The other church is a handsome brick one, with a brick tower, dedicated to St. Stephen, and consecrated July 23. 1794. The presentation to this curacy is in the family of the founder, the Rev. N.M. Cheek, for 60 years from the date of the consecration deeds, after which it is vested in the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate church of Manchester. Besides the above places of worship, there are also in Salford, a large methodist chapel, an independant chapel, and a chapel where a modification of the doctrines of Emanuel Swedenburg are taught. To this place of worship is attached a piece of burial ground, in which, in the course of seven years, not less than 5000 bodies have been interred. It ought, however, to be noticed, that few of these were, when living, of the Swedenburg persuasion, or even attenders on this place of worship; but a small charge for the reception of a corpse in a common grave, has induced the surviving friends to deposit the remains of the members of their families in this mound of mortality. In this town, which has the honour to give name to the Hundred in which it is situated, is the New Bayley-Prison, for the confinement of the criminals of the Hundred. It was built after the plan of the late celebrated John Howard, & opened for the reception of prisoners in April 1790. In front of the prison, and indeed included within its walls, and forming the entrance to it, is a handsome stone, rusticated building; on the ground floor of which are apartments for the turnkey and his family, and rooms for the security of suspected persons, previous to their confinement by order of the magistrates in the prison itself. Over these, are a large and convenient sessions room, in which the weekly and quarterly sessions are held; and adjoining to it, are withdrawing rooms for the magistrates, council, jurors, witnesses, &c. Near the prison is the Lying-in Hospital. (see Manchester) Salford can boast of one of the finest home views in the county, from the Crescent, a scene which never fails to arrest the eye of taste. Salford has no market, but participates in the advantage of those of Manchester. It has, however, two fairs, annually: viz., on Whit-Monday for horses, cattle, and woollen cloth; and on Nov. 17 for the same articles. Each of These fairs, (which, in the lists published, are called Manchester fairs) last nearly a fortnight for the sale of woollen cloth, blankets, rugs, hardware, &c. For a further account of Salford, see the article, Manchester; in this work, and the "Manchester Guide" written and published by the author of this local Gazetteer.

S.

Salford Hundred, the most southerly hundred in the county of Lancaster, is bounded on the W. and N.W. by West Derby hundred, on the N.N.W. by Leyland hundred, on the N. by Blackburn hundred, on the N.N.E. and N.E. by the county of York, and on the S. and S.W. by the county of Chester. It is divided into three parts, which, together, form one of the most populous districts in the kingdom, and which appeared by the census of 1801, to contain

 

 

Inhabited Houses.

No. of Persons.

Manchester Division

21,615

139,407

Bolton Division

12,060

67,580

Middleton Division

12,330

74,392

This hundred contains eleven parishes, five market towns, and 49 townships; it pays 14/100 of the county rates; and raises 293 men for the old militia. The quarterly sessions are holden at the New Bayley court house, in Salford, the first week after Epiphany; the first week after the close of Easter; the first week after the translation of Thomas-a-Becket, or July 7th; and the first week after Michaelmas day, at each of which the business is so multiferious, that the court is often obliged to sit five or six successive days.

 

Salt Coats, 2 miles N.E. of Lytham

A.

Salt Coats, (Low Furness) on the north shore of Pile Harbour, 2 miles W. of Furness Abbey

L.

Salter (Higher and Lower), 3 miles S. of Wray

L.

SALWICK, 5 miles W.N.W. of Preston

A.

Salwick Hall, in the township of Salwick

A.

SAMLESBURY, 3 miles E.N.E. of Preston, is in the parish of Blackburn, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Blackburn

B.

Sand Beds, (Furness) west-side of Winander Mere, 21/2 miles E. of Hawkshead

L.

Sand Field, 3 miles W.N.W. of Middleton

S.

Sand Fold, (corruptly called "Sunt hole") 1 mile S. of Gorton chapel

S.

Sand Haw, (Furness) on the W. bank of Leven Water, 11/2 miles S.E. of Ulverston

L.

Sand Hills, near the shore, 2 miles N. of Liverpool

W.D.

Sand Holm, 2 miles S. of Garstang

A.

Sand Scale, (Low Furness) 2 miles W. of Dalton

L.

Sand Side, (Furness) 1/2 mile W. of Kirkby chapel

L.

Sand Side, 1 mile N.W. of Pilling chapel

A.

Sand Side Haws, (Furness) on the banks of Duddon Water, 3 miles W.S.W. of Dalton

L.

SANKEY (Great), 3 miles W. of Warrington, is in the parish of Prescot, under which it has a chapel of ease, often admired for its neat and rural appearance. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron, R.A. Gwillam, Esq. This place gives the name of the Sankey Canal, to the first artificial navigation formed in this kingdom

W.D.

Sankey (Little), the next township, on the west, to Warrington

W.D.

Sankey Brook, a rivulet which rises near Prescot, from whence taking a northerly direction, it flows near St. Hellens, soon after which it turns towards the south, and after passing near Winwick, and through Sankey, it falls into the Mersey, at Penketh

W.D.

Sankey Canal, the first artificial river which was made in England. It originated in the year 1755, in a company which obtained an act of parliament to make Sankey Brook navigable from the river Mersey, to the neighbourhood of St. Hellens. This scheme did not succeed; and a new act was obtained in 1761, to cut a Canal, distinct and detached from Sankey Brook, to communicate with the Mersey at Fidler's Ferry. Its length from the last mentioned place to the place where it separates into three branches, is 91/4 miles; the whole distance in the farthest branch 113/4 miles. There are two double, and eight single locks upon this Canal, to meet a fall of about 60 feet.

W.D.

Sankey Green, 2 miles W.N.W. of Warrington

W.D.

Sasco, 1 mile E. of Croston

LL.

SATTERTHWAITE, (Furness) the township N. of Rusland, is in the parish of Hawkshead, under which it has a chapel of ease; the minister is chosen by the land owners.

L.

Saw How, 11/2 mile W. of Cartmel Fell Chapel

L.

Scale, 2 miles S.E. of Wray

L.

Scale Hall, 1 mile N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Scales, (Low Furness) 4 miles S. of Ulverston

L.

SCALES (with Newton), 2 miles E.S.E. of Kirkham

A.

Scar, a mountain in Furness, 2 miles N.W. of Torver Chapel

L.

Scar Cliff, on the border of Yorkshire, 1 mile N.W. of Todmorden

S.

Scar Moor, a large common, bordering on Yorkshire, on the E. of Holme Chapel

B.

SCARISBRICK, (in the parish of Ormskirk) the township N.E. of Halsall

W.D.

Scarisbrick Hall, (the seat of T. Eccleston, Esq. the spirited drainer of Marton Mere,) in Scarisbrick

W.D.

Scarth Hill, 11/2 mile S.S.W. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Scarthwaite (High), 1 mile N.N.W. of Egton church, in Furness

L.

Scarthwaite (Low), 1 mile S.W. of Egton church. in Furness

L.

Scholefield Hall, 2 miles S. of Littlebrough

S.

Scholefield Moor, a common S.E. of Littlebrough adjoining Blackstone Edge

S.

SCORTON, 3 miles W. of Garstang

A.

SCOTFORTH, 1 mile S. of Lancaster

L.

Scour Croft, 1 mile E. of Middleton

S.

Scout Mill, 3 miles N.E. of Ashton-under-line, a rural and romantic situation, rendered remarkable for having been, for many years, occupied by the keeper of an Asylum, for the most melancholy and lamentable of all human sufferings

S.

Scowley, 2 miles E. of Prescot

W.D.

Seaman's Fields, 2 miles N.N.E. of Oldham

S.

SEATHWAITE, the most N.W. township in Furness, separated from Cumberland on the W. by the river Duddon.

L.

Seathwaite Chapel, (Furness) 6 miles N. of Broughton, is in the parish of Kirkby Ireleth, to which it is a chapel of ease; patron, W. Penny Esq.

L.

Seathwaite Tarn, a lake 2 miles N.E. of Seathwaite chapel

L.

Seawood Hall, (Low Furness) 31/2 miles S. of Ulverston

L.

Sedgley, (the seat of George Philips, Esq.) 31/2 miles N. of Manchester

S.

Sedgreaves Lane, 3 miles N.W. of Preston

A.

Seed Field, 1 mile N.N.E. of Bury

S.

Seed House, near Samlesbury chapel

B.

Seedley, in Pendleton, 3 miles W. of Manchester

S.

SEPHTON, 7 miles N.N.E. of Liverpool, is situated on the little river Alt, and is united as a township, with Netherton and Lunt. The parish of Sephton is in the deanry of Warrington. The church (built in the reign of Henry VIII on the site of one still more ancient) is a handsome gothic building with a spire steeple

W.D.

Sephton Town, 1 mile S.S.W. of Sephton church

W.D.

Serrythwaite, (Furness) 3 miles N. of Broughton

L.

SHACKERLEY, the township adjoining on the S.E. to Chowbent

W.D.

Shackerley Hall, 11/2 mile S.E. of Chowbent

W.D.

Shadsworth, 11/2 mile S.E. of Blackburn

B.

Shar Lane, 3 miles N.E. of Ribchester

B.

Shara Green, 3 miles N. of Preston

A.

Shard Ferry, (over the Wyre) 11/2 mile S. of Hambleton chapel

A.

Sharp Island, a small isle in Pile Harbour, 1 mile W. of Pile of Foudray

L.

SHARPLES, 3 miles N. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Sharples Hall, 21/2 miles N. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Shaving Lane, 1 mile N. of Worsley Mills

S.

Shaw Chapel, 3 miles N.N.E. of Oldham, is in the parish of Prestwich, to which it is a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the rector of Prestwich

S.

Shaw Field, 2 miles N.W. of Rochdale

S.

Shaw Green, 2 miles W. of Euxton chapel

LL.

Shaw Hall, (the seat of - Farrington Esq.) 3/4 mile S. of Leyland

LL.

Shaw Hall, a curious old house, in Flixton

S.

Shaw Place, 1/2 mile N.W. of Rivington chapel

LL.

Shaw Town, 1 mile E. of Flixton church

S.

Shawforth, 2 miles N. of Whitworth

S.

Sheading, on Scar Moor

B.

Sheah Brow, near Blackburn

B.

Sheep House, 3 miles N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Sheepcot Hills, in the township of Burscough

W.D.

Shelford, 1/2 mile E. of Ashworth chapel

S.

Shepherds, 3 miles N.N.E. of Preston

A.

Shepley Hall, 2 miles S.S.W. of Ashton-under-Line

S.

SHEVINGTON, the township S. of Wrightington

LL.

Shindley Hall, 4 miles S. of North Meols

W.D.

Shipton, 1 mile N.W. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Shire, 3/4 mile N.W. of Littlebrough

S.

Sholver, 2 miles E. of Royton chapel

S.

Shore Edge, in Crompton

B.

Shoreley Hall, 1 mile S.S.E. of Ribchester

B.

Shorrock's Green, 4 miles W. of Blackburn

B.

SHUTTLEWORTH, 5 miles N. of Bury

S.

Siddal Fold, 2 miles N.N.W. of Middleton

S.

Siddal Moor, a large common, 2 miles N.N.W. of Middleton

S.

Side Beat, 2 miles N.E. of Blackburn

B.

Side Garth, near Aughton chapel

L.

Silcock Houses, 1 mile S. of Garstang Church Town

A.

SILVERDALE, 4 miles N.N.W. of Warton

L.

Simestone End, 2 miles N.E. of Ashton in Makerfield

W.D.

SIMMONS WOOD, 2 miles N. of Kirkby

W.D.

Simon's Fold, 11/2 mile N.N.E. of Heapey chapel

LL.

SIMONSTONE, the township W. of Padiham

B.

Simonstone Hall, 1 mile W. of Padiham

B.

Simpson Ground, (Furness) 2 miles W.S.W. of Cartmel Fell chapel

L.

Sindle Hall, in Over Hulton

S.

SINGLETON (Great), 21/2 miles W.S.W. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde, is in the parish of Kirkham, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, - Shaw, Esq.

A.

SINGLETON (Little), 2 miles W. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde, and 1 mile N.N.W. of Great Singleton

A.

Singleton Lodge, near Poulton, the seat of Joshua Marriot, Esq.

A.

Singleton Lodge, (the seat of Thomas Philips, Esq.) 3 miles N. of Manchester

S.

SKELMERDALE, the township South of Latham, is in the parish of Ormskirk, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, vicar of Ormskirk

W.D.

Skeltham House, on Pilling Moss, 3 miles W. of Garstang Church Town

A.

SKELWITH, (Furness) 3 miles N. of Hawkshead

L.

SKERTON, the township N. of Lancaster, on the W. side of the Loyne

L.

Skinner, (Furness) near Hawkshead

L.

Skippool, 1 mile N.N.E. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde

A.

Slack, 6 miles N. of Rochdale

S.

Slack Yate, 1 mile S.E. of Bacap

S.

Slade Hall, (generally called Slate Hall) 31/2 miles S.E. of Manchester, an old fashioned house which has been in the family of the present owner and occupier, Mr. Siddall, upwards of 500 years

S.

Sladin, 1 mile N. of Littlebrough

S.

Slang End, (Furness) the north-side of Tibblethwaite, separated from Westmoreland, by the river Brath

L.

Slate Quarries, (Furness) in the township of Tibblethwaite

L.

Slate Quarries, (Furness) 1 mile E. of Seathwaite

L.

Slock Clough, 1 mile N.W. of Tockholes chapel

B.

SLYNE, 2 miles N.W. of Halton

L.

Slyne Hall, 2 miles N.W. of Halton

L.

Slyne Head Green, in Great Sankey

W.D.

Smalleys, 1/2 mile E. of Balderston chapel

B.

Smeatham Lane, 1 mile W. of Wavertree

W.D.

Smedley Hall, 2 miles N.N.E. of Manchester, once the property of, and the residence of the last of the family of the Cheethams

S.

Smethurst's Barn, 5 miles N.N.W. of Manchester

S.

Smith Green, 2 miles S.S.E. of Ellol chapel

L.

Smith's Mill, 2 miles N.N.W. of Kirkham

A.

Smithel's Dean, 5 miles N.W. of Bolton-le-moors

S.

Smithel's Hall, 2 miles N.N.W. of Bolton-le-moors, a curious old mansion, formerly the property and seat of the ancient family of Fauconberg

S.

Smithfold, in the township of Ainsworth, 21/2 miles E. of Bolton-le-moors

S.

Smithy Brook, 2 miles S.W. of Wigan

W.D.

Smithy Green, (Furness) in Egton, to the S. of the chapel

L.

Smithy Green, 1 mile S.E. of Wigan

W.D.

Smithy House, 3 miles E. of Downham

B.

Snape, 3 miles S. of North Meols

W.D.

Snob Green, 2 miles N.W. of Melling

L.

Sod Hall, (on the Moss) 2 miles S.W. of Longton chapel

LL.

Sontergate, (Furness) 1 mile S.S.W. of Kirkby chapel

L.

South End, a small hamlet in the island of Walney, 2 miles S. of Biggar

L.

South End Haws, the southerly end of Walney island

L.

South Port, near North Meols

W.D.

South Shore, that part of the shore of the Mersey, S. of Liverpool

W.D.

SOUTHWORTH, 2 miles E. of Winwick, a township united with those of Croft, Middleton and Orbury

W.D.

SOWERBY, 1 mile S.S.W. of St. Michaels-le-Wyre

A.

Sowerby Green, in the township of Samlesbury

B.

Sowerby Hall, (Low Furness) 2 miles W.N.W. of Furness Abbey

L.

Sowerby House, 1 mile S.W. of St. Michaels-le-Wyre

A.

Sowerby Lodge, (Low Furness) 2 miles W.N.W. of Furness Abbey

L.

Sowerby Wood, (Low Furness) 11/2 mile W. of Dalton

L.

SOWERCARR, 1 mile S.S.W. of Stalmin

A.

Spallow House, near Walton

W.D.

Spaw, near to, and on the south-side of Burnley

B.

SPEAK, 3 miles W.N.W. of Hale

W.D.

Speak Hall, 21/2 miles S.E. of Garston chapel

W.D.

Spooners Close, at the north end of Cartmel Fells, near Winander Mere

L.

SPOTLAND, one of the four townships in the parish of Rochdale, laying to the north of the town of Rochdale

S.

Spotland Bridge, 1 mile N.W. of Rochdale

S.

Spout House, 5 miles N. of Garstang

A.

Stack Yate, S.W. side of Longridge Fell

B.

STAINALL, 1 mile S.S.W. of Stalmin

A.

STAINING, 21/2 miles E. of Blackpool

A.

Staining Mill, 21/2 miles E. of Blackpool

A.

Stainton, (Low Furness) 11/2 mile S.E. of Dalton

L.

Stake Hill, 3 miles N.N.E. of Middleton

S.

STALMIN, 7 miles W. of Garstang, is in the parish of Lancaster, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron the vicar of Lancaster

A.

Stand, in Pilkington, a very populous hamlet in the township of Pilkington. Here are two dissenting chapels, one belonging to a congregation of Presbyterians, and the other to a society of Independants

S.

Stand Hall, 6 miles N.N.W. of Manchester

S.

Stand House, 2 miles S.W. of Knowsley chapel

W.D.

Stand House, 1/2 mile W. of Childwall church

W.D.

Standen (Lower), 2 miles N. of Whalley

B.

Standen Hall, 2 miles N.E. of Whalley

B.

Standing Stones, a boundary mark of Yorkshire and Lancashire, 6 miles E. of Great Marsden

B.

STANDISH, 31/2 miles N.N.W. of Wigan, a parish in the deanry of Blackburn. The church built in the year 1584, is a handsome structure with a spire steeple. The living is a rectory; patron - Standish Esq. There is only one chapel of ease in this parish which is that of Coppul. Standish is not a market town, altho' it has two annual fairs, viz. on June 20, and November 22 for horses, cattle and toys. This place abounds with coal, and the parish is benefited by the Lancaster canal passing through it

LL.

Standish, (Furness) 3 miles W.N.W. of Ulverston

L.

Standish Hall, 1 mile S.E. of Standish, an old house belonging to the ancient family of Standish

LL.

Standish Wood, 2 miles S. of Standish

LL.

Standred, 1 mile E.N.E. of Colne

B.

Stank, (Low Furness) 1 mile W. of Dendron church

L.

Stanley Gate, 3 miles S.S.W. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Stanley House, 3 miles N.W. of Blackburn

B.

Stansfield 11/2 mile N. of Littleborough

S.

Stanworth, in the township of Whitnal

LL.

Star Stones, 1 mile S.W. of Todmorden

S.

Starling, E. side of Cockey Moor

S.

STAVELEY, (Furness) 4 miles N. of Cartmel, in which parish it is situated, and under which it has a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, Lord George Cavendish

L.

STAYLEY BRIDGE, 11/2 mile E.S.E. of Ashton-under-Line, a flourishing and populous village in the parish of Ashton, under which it has a very handsome chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the Earl of Stamford

S.

Steady Holes, in the township of Little Harwood

B.

Stena, 21/2 miles N. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde

A.

Sterperdon, on Scar Moor, border of Yorkshire

B.

Stevenage Ground, (Furness) 5 miles N.N.E. of Broughton

L.

Stewards House, 1 mile N. of Lytham

A.

Stewards House, 2 miles W.N.W. of Standish

LL.

Stid Church, 1/2 mile N.E. of Ribchester, in which parish it is situated and for which it has a chapel of ease; patron vicar of Ribchester

B.

Stirk Close, 1 mile S.W. of Tatham chapel

L.

Stock Beck, (Furness) 4 mile N.N.E. of Broughton

L.

Stock Bridge, (over the Calder) near Padiham

B.

Stock Bridge, 1 mile N. of Tatham chapel

L.

Stockfield, 1 mile W. of Oldham

S.

Stocks, in Little Lever

S.

Stocks, 1 mile N. of Manchester, formerly called Bent's and latterly, Ridings' Stocks

S.

STODDAY, 11/2 W. of Lancaster

L.

Stone Edge, 3 miles E.N.E. of Walton church

W.D.

Stone Hall, near Ashurst Beacon

W.D.

Stone Head, 6 miles N.N.E. of Garstang

A.

Stone House Fold, in the township of Cliveger

B.

Stonester, (Furness) 3 miles N.N.W.

L.

Stoney Crag, (Furness) 2 miles N. of Ulverston

L.

Stoney Edge Common, a moor on the N.E. side of Hundersfield township

S.

Stoney Hurst, in the township of Aighton, 31/2 miles N.W. of Whalley, a princely mansion, for many generations the habitation of the Sherburnes. It was begun to be built by Sir Richard Sherburne, who died in 1594, and finished by his son; but the Cupolas were added by Sir Nicholas Sherburne, about the year 1695. The appartments are very spacious, particularly the hall, and the two long galleries. It is now the property of Thomas Weld Esq. of Corfe Castle, in Dorsetshire; his father being heir at law to the Duchess of Norfolk, being descended from the only sister of her father, Sir Nicholas Sherburne Bart. The building is now occupied as a Roman Catholic Seminary, for which it seems to be very well calculated. A very handsome oratory has been recently fitted up, which has superceded the use of the old chapel which was formerly (according to a common custom) over the gateway

B.

Stoney Knowls, 3 miles W.N.W. of Haslingden

B.

Stoney Knowls, 2 miles N. of Manchester

S.

Stoop's Hillock, in the township of Over Darwen

B.

Storr's Hall, 1 mile W. of Melling

L.

Stownes, (Low Furness) 1 mile E.N.E. of Kirkby Ireleth

L.

Stowning, 3 miles S.S.E. of Wray

L.

Strangeways, a suburb to, and on the N. of Manchester

S.

Strangeways Hall, (an ancient seat of the Hartleys, now the property of Lord Ducie, but occupied by Joseph Hanson, Esq.) 1/2 mile N. of Manchester

S.

Street, 1 mile N.N.W. of Rivington chapel

LL.

Stretfold, in Moston

S.

Stretford, 4 miles S.S.W. of Manchester, on the S.W. extremity of the county, being separated from Cheshire, by the river Mersey. It is in the parish of Manchester, under which it has a chapel of ease; patrons, the warden and fellows of the Collegiate church of Manchester

S.

Stubley, 3/4 of a mile W. of Littlebrough

S.

Studley, in the township of Osbaldiston

B.

Stump Cross, 1 mile E. of Holme chapel

B.

SUBBERTHWAITE, (Furness) the township S. of Blawith

L.

Summer Hall, 4 miles E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Summer House, near Gatacre

W.D.

Summer's Gill, 21/2 miles S.S.W. of Tatham chapel

L.

Sunbrick, (Low Furness) 1 mile E. of Much Urswick church

L.

Sunderland, on the west side of the mouth of the Loyne

L.

Sunderland Hall, in the township of Osbaldiston

B.

Sunderland Point, the west point of the mouth of the Loyne

L.

SUTTON, the township S. of St. Hellens, which abounds in iron-stone, coals, and coarse potter's clay

W.D.

Sutton Hall, 11/2 mile S. of St. Hellens

W.D.

Sutton Heath, 2 miles S. of St. Hellens

W.D.

Swanset Hall, near the east end of Lower Wyer's Dale

L.

Swarth, (Low Furness) 1 mile S.W. of Ulverston

L.

Sweet Clough, 2 miles W. of Padiham

B.

Sweet Clough, 11/2 mile N. of Haslingden

B.

Swine Clough, 1 mile S. of Oldham

S.

Swinton, 5 miles N.W. of Manchester, is in the parish of Eccles, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron the vicar of Eccles

S.

 


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com