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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

W

 

Walkden, 1 mile S.W. of Walmesley chapel

S.

Walkden Moor, (under which are valuable coal mines) 7 miles N.W. of Manchester

S.

Walker's Ground, (Furness) near Hawkshead

L.

Walker-lane-ends, 1 mile N.W. of Beacon Fell

A.

Wall, 1 mile W. of Great Eccleston

A.

Wall Clough, 2 miles S. of Chipping

B.

Wall End, (Furness) 1 mile E. of Broughton

L.

Wall End, (Furness) 1 mile N. of Kirkby chapel

L.

Walls, 2 miles S.E. of Goodshaw chapel

B.

WALMESLEY, the hamlet N. of Bury of which parish and township it is a part

S.

Walmesley Bridge, 4 miles S.E. of Garstang

A.

Walmesley Chapel, (in the parish of Bolton-le-Moors,) 11/2 mile W. of Turton chapel, is a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron vicar of Bolton-le-Moors. Here is also a dissenting chapel, not far from the established chapel

S.

WALNEY, an island on the south of Low Furness, from which it is separated by a narrow channel at the north end, and by Pile Harbour on the south. The island is about 9 miles long from the south end Haws, to the extremity of the north end Haws, and is of various breadths, from one quarter of a mile, to a mile. It contains several small hamlets (viz. North End, North Scales, Bigger, and South End) and a chapel of ease under Dalton (of which parish it forms a part) the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the vicar of Dalton. At the south end of this island, a light house was erected in 1790, which has proved of great service to mariners. It is about sixty-eight feet high, and its lamps and reflectors are made to revolve on a vertical axle by a piece of clock work of ingenuous construction.

L.

Walshaw Hall, 2 miles N.W. of Bury

S.

Walshaw Lane, 2 miles N.W. of Bury

S.

Walthew House, 2 miles W. of Wigan, a venerable mansion, erected in 1650 by Robert Walthew Esq., from whom it passed, by the marriage of his daughter, to the family of Markland, and from them to the Percivals, and is now let to a number of tenants

W.D.

WALTON, a parish in the deanry of Warrington, and a township united with Fazackerley. The parish contains, beside the parish church (which is 3 miles N. of Liverpool) five chapels of ease. Altho' the living is a rectory, the church is a vicarage, the patrons of which are the lay impropriators of the rectory

W.D.

WALTON, (Furness) the township adjoining on the N.W. to Cartmel

L.

Walton Hall, (Furness) 1/2 mile W. of Cartmel

L.

Walton Hall, (the seat of Sir H. Houghton, Bart.) near Walton-le-Dale

B.

WALTON-LE-DALE, 2 miles S.E. of Preston, is in the parish of Blackburn, under which it has a chapel of ease, (sometimes called Low, or Law Church) the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the vicar of Blackburn

B.

Warble Hey, 21/2 miles N. of Blackburn

B.

WARBRECK, 2 miles W. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde

A.

Warbreck Moor, 5 miles E.N.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Ward Hall, 2 miles N.W. of Ribchester

B.

Ward's House, 3 miles E. of Kirkham

A.

Ward's House, 3 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Ward's Stone, (on the Moors) 2 miles S.W. of Mallowdale Pike

L.

Wardle (Brown), near Whitworth

S.

Wardle (High), near Whitworth

S.

Wardle (Low), 3 miles N.E. of Rochdale

S.

Wardless, 1 mile W. of Hambleton chapel

A.

Wardlesworth, 1 mile N. of Rochdale

S.

Wardley, 2 miles N. of Chipping

B.

Wards, 4 miles W. of Turton Chapel

S.

Warland, 3 miles S. of Todmorden

S.

WARRINGTON, (N. lat. 53 2". W. lon. 2 30".) 18 miles W. of Manchester; 18 miles E. of Liverpool; 12 miles S. of Wigan; 10 miles E.S.E. of Prescot; 523/4 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster; and 188 miles from London, is situated on the river Mersey, which divides it from the parish of Groppenhall, in Cheshire, part of which parish forms a suburb to, and appears to be a part of the town of Warrington, to which it is joined by a stone bridge, built by the Earl of Derby, in the reign of Henry VII. The principal part of the town of Warrington, consists of four streets, which cross in the centre. There was formerly an Augustine priory, in this place, (founded in 1379) of which no traces now remain. Of the earlier antiquities of Warrington, we have little more than tradition. It has been said that Warrington was a Roman station, but the opinion has not much, if any conclusive evidence to rest itself upon. The trade of Warrington chiefly consists of glass and sail cloth manufacturies, tho' it has a portion of the check and cotton trade. The parish church, which is a rectory, stands at the E. side of, and at the extremity of the town; patron, the heirs of R.A. Gwillam, Esq. Besides the mother church, there is a handsome chapel of ease, patrons, the heirs of the late T. Leigh, of Lyme, Esq. and in the Cheshire suburb, another chapel, under the parish church of Groppenhall. The parish church has under it the chapels of Burton-wood and Hollinfare. The town has also places of worship for dissenters of almost every persuasion. The market day is Wednesday; and the annual fairs are held July 18, and November 30, for horses, cattle, and woollen cloth: the latter fair lasting near a fortnight. Warrington gives title of Earl to the noble family of Grey, the title being borne by the same nobleman who is also Earl of Stamford. In 1801, Warrington contained 2,296 houses, and 10,567 inhabitants

W.D.

WARTON, a parish in the deanry of Kirkby Lonsdale, 7 m. N. of Lancaster; the living is a vicarage; patron -

L.

WARTON, 3 miles S.S.W. of Kirkham, of which parish it forms a part, and has a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the vicar of Kirkham

A.

Warton, (a dissenting) chapel; near Peel Hall, and 1/2 mile N. of Peel chapel, in Little Hulton

S.

Warton Hall, (in Little Hulton) 2 miles E. of Chowbent

S.

Warton Mill, 1/2 mile S. of Warton

L.

Water End, (Furness) south end of Coniston Water

L.

Water Gates, in Elswick

A.

Water Houses, 2 miles N.N.W. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Water Side, 1 mile E. of Darwen Chapel

B.

Water Side, 1/2 mile E. of Ribchester

B.

Water Side, (on north-side of the Wyre) opposite Larbrick

A.

Water Yate, (Furness) south end of Coniston Water

L.

Water Yeat, 2 miles W. of Chipping

B.

Waterhead Mill, 2 miles E.N.E. of Oldham

S.

Watson Croft, (Furness) 2 miles N.N.E. of Broughton

L.

WAVERTREE, (a village often mentioned for its beauty and delightful situation.) in the parish of Childwall, 3 miles E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Wavertree Hall, 2 miles E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Wavertree Nook, 31/2 miles E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Weatherlow, a mountain in Furness, 2 miles N.W. of the head of Coniston Water

L.

Weekly House, 4 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

WEETON, 1 mile N. of Great Plumpton. This place has an annual fair, on the first Tuesday after Trinity Sunday, for Cattle and Cloth

A.

Welby Cragg, 4 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Welch Hall, 1 mile N.W. of Aughton

W.D.

WELCH WHITTLE, 1 mile E.N.E. of Standish

LL.

Well House, (Low Furness) 3 miles S.E. of Ulverston

L.

Well Stile, 11/2 mile N.N.W. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Wenning, (The river) rises in Yorkshire, and enters the county of Lancaster at Bentham, where taking a N.W. direction, it proceeds to Wennington, when it turns S.W. by Tatham and Hornby, falling into the Loyne, about 1 mile W. of Hornby after being augmented, at that place, by the river Roboran

L.

Wenning Foot, 1 mile W. of Hornby

L.

WENNINGTON, the township on the E. of Melling, and adjoining on the E. to the county of York

L.

Werneth Hall, 1 mile S.W. of Oldham

S.

WESHAM, 1 mile N. of Kirkham

A.

WEST DERBY, a township which gives the name to the hundred in which it is situated, and the title of Earl to the noble family of Stanley. It has a chapel of ease under Walton, of which parish it is a part; patrons the lay impropriators of the rectory of Walton. The chapel is situated 4 miles N.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

West Derby Hundred, is bounded by the river Mersey which divides it from Cheshire on the south; by the Irish channel on the west; by Leyland hundred on the north; and by Salford hundred on the north-east and east. It contains fifteen parishes, six market towns, (one of which is the second seaport in the kingdom,) and 103 townships. It pays 24/100 of the county rates (which is much more than any other hundred pays) and raises 202 men for the old Militia of 800.

By the population act, of 1801, it appears to have contained

 

 

Houses.

 

Inhabitants.

In the Ormskirk Division

3,136

 

16,718

Prescot Division, which includes Liverpool

17,927

 

110,265

Warrington Division

11,914

 

62,744

 

32,977

 

189,727

West End, (Low Furness) 2 mile S.S.E. of Ulverston

L.

West Field, 11/2 mile E.N.E. of St. Lawrence's Chapel

A.

West Field, 2 miles S. of Garstang

A.

West Field, 1 mile N. of Halton

A.

West Flat, (Low Furness) 2 miles N. of Dalton

L.

West Haughton, 4 mile N. of Leigh, and 131/2 miles N.W. of Manchester, is in the parish of Dean, under which it has a chapel of ease; the living is a perpetual curacy; patron the vicar of Dean

S.

West Head, 2 miles E. of Ormskirk

W.D.

WEST LEIGH, the township N. of the town of Leigh

W.D.

WESTBY, 21/2 miles W. of Kirkham

A.

Westby Hall, 1 mile N. of Ribby Church

A.

Westby Mills, N. of Ribby Church

A.

WESTHAM, 11/2 mile N.N.W. of Kirkham

A.

Westwood, 1/2 mile W. of Wigan

W.D.

Westwood Gate, 3 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

Weurdal, 2 miles N.E. of Rochdale

S.

WHALLEY, 6 miles N.E. of Blackburn; 4 miles S. of Clitheroe, a small village, but an extensive parish, having no fewer than sixteen chapels of ease under it. It is in the deanry of Blackburn, the living is a vicarage; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Of the chapels of ease, seven were founded before 1284, and the remainder at different periods, since 1400, of which Bacap in Rosendale was the last in 1788. The parish church of Whalley is very ancient. The cylindrical columns of the north aisle are the most ancient part of the building; and the choir was built about 1235. In the church yard are three stone crosses, which are supposed by Dr. Whitaker to have been raised in the time of Paulinus, the apostle of Northumbria, whose ministry commenced in 625, and terminated on his expulsion from that kingdom in 631.

In the village of Whalley is a small school, of the foundation of Edward the sixth. This school, in conjunction with those of Middleton and Burnley, have thirteen scholarships in Brazen-nose College, Oxford. The township of Whalley contained (distinct from the other parts of the parish) 154 houses, and 876 inhabitants, in the year 1801.

For a description of this church, and for further particulars respecting the next article in this local Gazetteer, the author respectfully refers the reader to the learned and Reverend Dr. Whitaker's valuable history of Whalley.

B.

Whalley Abbey, at Whalley, on the banks of the Calder, the remains of a Monastry belonging to monks of the Cistertian order. It was built in 1296 by the munificence of Henry Laci, Earl of Lincoln, and flourished till 1536. The last abbot of Whalley was John Paslew, who was convicted of high treason, and the Abbey with all its appurtenances, was seized by the king, in 1537. The site of the Abbey contained thirty-six acres, three roods, and fourteen perches, as a recent survey hath ascertained. See Dr. Whitaker's "History of Whalley"

B.

Whalley Nab, 1/2 mile S. of Whalley

B.

WHARLESS, 3 miles N.N.E. of Kirkham

A.

Whatland Rigg, (Furness) 2 miles N.N.E. of Broughton

L.

Wheat Hill, 11/2 mile E.N.E. of Childwall church

W.D.

Wheatland Hall, in Lower Wyre's Dale

A.

Wheatley Lane, 2 miles N.W. of Little Marsden chapel

B.

WHEELTON, 3 miles N.N.E. of Chorley

LL.

Wheelton Stocks, 3 miles N.E. of Chorley

LL.

WHILPSHIRE, 3 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

Whinney, 1 mile N. of Great Marton

A.

Whinney Hill, in Aughton

L.

Whinney Lane, 2 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

Whinney Lane, 2 miles N. of Blackburn

B.

Whirley, 1/2 mile N.E. of Wigan

W.D.

WHISTON, 11/2 mile S. of Prescot

W.D.

White Bricks, 2 miles E.N.E. of Blackburn

B.

White Carr, 2 miles S. of Whalley

B.

White Chapel, in the parish of Kirkham, 3 miles N. of Goosenargh. This is a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of Kirkham

A.

White Hall, 2 miles W.N.W. of St. Michael's-le-Wyre

A.

White Hill, in Reddish, 3/4 mile N. of Stockport

S.

White Hough, 1 mile N.W. Tockholes chapel

B.

White Lane, 11/2 mile N.W. of Walmesley chapel

S.

White Lee, N.E. end of Padiham Heights

B.

White Lee, 11/2 mile N.N.W. of White chapel

A.

White Lim, 2 miles W. of Lancaster

L.

White Moss, a large morass, 1 mile E.N.E. of Blackley

S.

White Otter, a lake on Halsall moss, 2 miles N.W. of Halsall

W.D.

White Smithy, 21/2 miles N. of Manchester

S.

White Steaks, 2 miles S. of Penwortham

LL.

White Stock Hall, (Furness) 1 m S.W. of Rusland chapel

L.

White Well Bottom, 3 miles N.W. of Bacap

B.

Whiteacre, 1/2 mile S. of Littleborough

S.

WHITEFIELD, 6 miles N. of Manchester

S.

Whitefield, in Crompton, 11/2 mile N. of Shaw chapel

S.

Whitefield, 2 miles N.W. of Hale

W.D.

Whitefield Hall, 11/2 mile N. of Shaw Chapel

S.

Whitlow Head, on the north side of the township of Entwisle

S.

Whitraw, 3 miles S. of Tatham

L.

Whitrull Chapel, in the parish of Whalley, situated at Bacap; patron, vicar of Whalley

B.

Whittim, 3 miles W. of Lancaster

L.

WHITTINGHAM, the township S. of Goosenargh

A.

Whittingham Hall, 5 miles N.N.E. of Preston

A.

WHITTINGTON, 121/2 miles N.E. of Lancaster, and 1 mile S.W. of Kirkby Lonsdale; a parish in the deanry of Kirkby Lonsdale; the living is a rectory; patron, the Rev. Geoffry Hornby

L.

Whittle (Higher and Lower), 2 m. N.W. of Middleton

S.

Whittle Mill, in Welsh Whittle

LL.

WHITTLE-IN-THE-WOODS, 2 miles N. of Chorley

LL.

Whitworth, 3 miles N. of Rochdale, of which parish it is a part, and under which it has a chapel of ease; the curacy of which is in the patronage of the vicar of Rochdale. This place is well known for the residence of Mess. Taylors - "The Whitworth Doctors"

S.

Wide Moss Gap, 2 miles S. of Poulton-in-the-Fylde

A.

WIDNESS, 6 miles W. of Warrington, united with Appleton as a township

W.D.

Wig's Daw, on Scholfield Moor

S.

WIGAN, (N. lat. 53 31". W. lon. 2 32".) 12 miles N. of Warrington; 16 miles S. of Preston; 181/4 miles S. of Manchester; 481/4 miles S. of Lancaster; and 2001/4 miles from London. This is a borough by prescription, governed by a mayor and 12 aldermen, a recorder and two bailiffs. Its privileges have been confirmed by charters from Henry the Third, Edward the Second, and Third, Richard the Second, and Charles the Second. It returns two members to parliament; the right of election is vested in about 200 free burgesses. Returns appear as early as the 23d and 35th of Edward the First; but the privilege, it seems, lay dormant for a long series of years; as no return was made afterwards till the First of Edward the Sixth; the rector of the parish, for the time being, is also lord of the manor. The church is very ancient. The present church is stated by Mr. Britton, in his account of Lancashire, to have superceded another still more ancient, so early as the seventh century, being built at the expence of an ancestor of lord Bridgeman, the present patron of the living. There is also in the town, a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. George; three dissenting chapels, and a Roman Catholic place of worship. There is also a free school, liberally endowed; and a blue coat hospital for thirty boys, founded by lady Bradshaigh. Here is also a handsome dispensary, supported by the voluntary contribution of the inhabitants of the town and its vicinity. At the N. end of the town is a monumental pillar, commemorating the valour of Sir Thomas Tyldesley, who was slain on the spot, in 1651. Wigan has long enjoyed the advantages of a navigation: the river Douglas being close to the town, and the Liverpool and Leeds canal has still more contributed to its prosperity. The manufactures are chiefly checks, cotton goods, and brass-work, a manufactory of earthenware having lately failed here. The market day is Friday: the fairs are held on Holy Thursday, and October 28, for horses, horned cattle, and cloth. Another fair also, held at Scroles, (see the next article) adjoining the town, on June 27, for cattle. In 1801, the population of Wigan, consisted of 10,989 inhabitants who appear to be the occupiers of 2,236 houses

W.D.

Wigan Spa, (by some called New Harrogate) is a strong sulphurous water, discovered some years ago, in boring for coals, in a field near Scroles Bridge. It is said to be highly serviceable in all scorbutic and scrophulous cases. A convenient building has been erected over it, with comfortable baths, (which may be used either cold or warm) and neat conductors of the water for those who drink it

W.D.

Wigshaw, in Culcheth

W.D.

Wilder's Wood, 1 mile N. of Horwich chapel

S.

Wilderspool, in the township of Barton, and parish of Eccles, 1 mile S. of Barton Bridge

S.

Wildman, 3 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

Wilson House, (Furness) 1 mile E.N.E. of Lindale chapel

L.

Win Lane End, 11/2 mile S.E. of Hambleton chapel

A.

Winander Mere, the largest piece of fresh water in England, forms the boundary line of the counties of Lancaster and Westmorland from Brath Bridge to the river by which Easthwaite Water is discharged into Winander Mere, the whole of which to the south of this point being in Lancashire; the whole to the north being in Westmorland. This lake is about 15 miles long from north to south, and about 1 mile in breadth upon an average, but in some places not more than 500 yards wide. Its greatest depth is near Eccleserig Crag, which was found to be 201 feet. The islands in this beautiful lake are all in that part which belongs to the county of Westmorland, an account of them therefore does not come under the plan of this work. But a description of the whole and the picturesque scenery of this charming spot may be found in the various tours to the lakes, which a growing taste for the beauties of nature has lately made so frequent

L.

Winburn, (the river) rises about 2 miles N. of Haslingden, and flows northerly by Old Accrington church, Dunkey park, Rushton, and Clayton-le-Dale, and falls into the Calder, near Altham

B.

Winder, in the north part of Roboransdale, and 2 miles N.E. of Litherland chapel

L.

Winder Moor, a common, south end of Cartmel Fells, and adjoining the Bay of Morcombe

L.

WINDLE, 1 mile N. of St. Hellens

W.D.

Windleshaw Chapel, (the ruins of) in the township of Windle

W.D.

Windy Arbour, 1 mile N.E. of Heapey chapel

LL.

Windy Bank, 4 miles N.N.W. of Bacap

B.

Windy Hill, in Butterworth

S.

WINNARLEY, 2 miles N.W. of Garstang

A.

Winnerah Ground, (Furness) 3 m. N.N.W. of Broughton

L.

WINSTANLEY, (in the parish of Wigan) the township N. of Billinge and S. of Pemberton, produces coals of a superior quality

W.D.

Winstanley Hall, 3 miles S.W. of Wigan

W.D.

Winster, (the river) rises in Westmorland, and becomes the boundary between Westmorland and Lancashire at High House, the N. end of Cartmel Fells; from whence it flows full south, and falls into the Ken, near Castle Head

L.

Winter Hill, 1 mile N.E. of Rivington Pike

S.

WINTON, 11/2 mile W.N.W. of Eccles

S.

Winwall, 2 miles E. of Colne

B.

WINWICK, 3 miles N. of Warrington, a township united with Hulme, and a parish in the deanry of Warrington. The church has a fine spire, which is seen from a great distance in several directions. The living, which is said to be worth 3000l. a year, is remarkable for being the richest rectory in England. This valuable patronage is vested in the Earl of Derby. The parish is not only large, rich, and fertile, but the whole township of Winwick (one estate excepted) is glebe land; and the rector has the patronage of Ashton in Makerfield, New Church, and Lowton, which are in this parish. Newton in the Willows (also, in the parish of Winwick) being in the gift of the heirs of the late T. Leigh, of Lyme, Esq. There is a free grammar school in the village.

On the south side of the church is a latin inscription in old characters, which states this place to have been a favourite seat of Oswald, king of Northumberland, and as the church is dedicated to St. Oswald, king and martyr, it has been thought that Winwick and not Oswestry (as stated by Camden and several other writers) was the place where Oswald was slain. Besides, Bede, says, that the place where Oswald was killed, was called in the English tongue, Macerfeith, and we know that this parish was anciently called Macrefield, and that to this day, Ashton, in this parish, is called Ashton in Makerfield. Archbishop Usher, in his notes on Gildas, gives it as his opinion, that Winwick was the cair Guntquic, one of the twenty eight British cities, mentioned by that ancient writer

W.D.

WISEWALL, 1 mile N.E. of Whalley

B.

Wisewall, 1 mile N.W. of Newton-in-the-Willows

W.D.

Withen Trees, 3 miles N.E. of Preston

A.

Withen Trees, 2 miles S.S.E. of Walton-le-Dale

B.

WITHINGTON, in the parish of Manchester, and distant from that town 4 miles S. on the turnpike road to Wilmslow. W. Egerton Esq. of Tatton, is lord of the manor, and holds a court baron, and a court leet here

S.

WITHNELL, 4 miles N.E. of Chorley

LL.

WITTON, the township W. of Blackburn

B.

Woden's Ford, an ancient name for that part of the river Irwell, near Hulme hall, where the new bridge is situated

S.

Wolf House, 1 mile N.W. of Chipping

B.

Wolfall Hall, 2 miles W. of Prescot

W.D.

Wolfenden Booth, 11/2 mile N.N.W. of Bacap

B.

Wood Crate, in Clifton

S.

Wood End, 1 mile S.S.W. of Turton chapel

S.

Wood Fold, 5 miles N.E. of Chorley

LL.

Wood Fold, in Catforth

A.

Wood Fold, 3 miles W. of Blackburn

B.

Wood Hall, in Reddish, 1 mile N. of Stockport

S.

Wood Head, 2 miles N.E. of Darwen chapel

B.

Wood Hey, 1 mile S. of Holcombe chapel

S.

Wood Houses, near Failsworth

S.

WOOD PLUMPTON, 4 miles N.N.W. of Preston, is a part of the parish of St. Michaels-le-Wyre, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the vicar of St. Michals

A.

Wood Yate, 2 miles W. of Blackburn

B.

Wood Yate, (Furness) 1 mile S.W. of Lowick chapel

L.

Woodacre Hall, 11/2 mile N. of Garstang

A.

WOODLAND, (Furness) in the parish of Kirkby Ireleth, under which it has a chapel of ease (3 miles N.E. of Broughton) The perpetual curacy is in the gift of the land owners

L.

Woodlands, in Crumpsall (the seat of Thomas Robinson Esq.) 21/4 miles N.N.E. of Manchester

S.

Woodside, 2 miles N.N.W. of Hale church

W.D.

Woolden (Little), on the W. side of Chat Moss, and 2 miles N. of Hollin's Green

S.

Woolden Hall, 11/2 mile N. of Hollin's Green

S.

WOOLSTON, (united with Poulton,) 2 miles E. of Warrington

W.D.

WOOLSTONHOLME, the township N. of Ashworth

S.

Woolstonholme Hill, 1 mile N. of Ashworth Chapel

S.

WOOLTON (Great), 4 miles N.W. of Hale

W.D.

Woolton (Little), 1 mile N. of Great Woolton. Here is a dissenting chapel

W.D.

WORSLEY, in the parish of Eccles, 6 miles W.N.W. of Manchester, a very populous township which contained in the year 1793, no less than 817 families consisting of 4,693 persons. At this place is the famous tunnel, from the Canal of the late Duke of Bridgewater, leading into the very heart of his coal-mines, which were the primary inducement for his Grace to undertake that astonishing work, (for so it is, when it is recollected to have been done at the expence of an individual,) the Canal from Manchester to Worsley and Leigh, and the branch through Cheshire to Runcorn, without a single lock!!

S.

Worsley Hall, in Worsley, a plain brick house, in which the late Duke of Bridgewater (whose property it was) spent much of his life

S.

Worsley Mills, 2 miles N.W. of Eccles

S.

WORSTHORN, 2 miles E. of Burnley

B.

WORSTON, 2 miles E.N.E. of Clitheroe

B.

WORTHINGTON, 1 mile E.N.E. of Standish

LL.

WRAY, 11/2 E.S.E. of Hornby

L.

Wray, a joint township with, and adjoining to Ribby

A.

WRAYTON, 1 mile N.E. of Melling

L.

WRIGHTINGTON, the township W. of Standish

LL.

Wrightington Hall, (the seat of W. Dickinson Esq.) 2 miles W. of Standish, is an old stone house, remarkable for having had the first sash windows in the county. It is situated in a small but beautiful park

LL.

Writhen Stone, 3 miles N.W. of Ribchester

B.

Wycoller, 3 miles E.S.E. of Colne

B.

Wycoller Hill, in Wycoller

B.

WYER'S DALE (Lower), the district extending from Garstang to the north part of Amounderness hundred

A.

WYER'S DALE (Over), the district extending E. from Ellol chapel, to the boundary line of Yorkshire. It has a chapel of ease to the parish church of Lancaster, (from which it is distant, 6 miles N.W.) patron, the vicar of Lancaster

L.

Wyersdale Forest, the district called Wyersdale, through which the river Wyre runs. It contains about 20,000 acres of open and inclosed land, belonging to the crown, of which the greater part of the former description abounds with game

L.

Wyre, (the river) rises in Brinan Tarn, on the edge of Yorkshire, and flows westward to Abbey Stead, in Over Wyer's Dale, when it is joined by another stream, which rises in the moors N.E. of Over Wyer's Dale. The stream then flows southerly through Lower Wyre's Dale by Garstang, below which it is joined by the little rivers Calder and Myer. From St. Michaels it proceeds westerly to the neighbourhood of Larbrick, when it spreads out into a wide estuary, and forms Wyre Water; falling into the Irish Sea, near Hackersall

A.

Wyre Water, the estuary formed by the river Wyer, at its mouth, previous to its discharge into the sea. By many people this estuary is supposed capable of being converted into a good harbour for ships of burden

A.


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com