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Kirton

Cemeteries

Census

  • The parish was in the Kirton sub-district of the Boston Registration District.
  • For the 1891 census we have a Partial Census Extract.
  • Check our Census Resource page for county-wide resources.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
Census
Year
Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 608
1851 H.O. 107 / 2098
1861 R.G. 9 / 2331
1871 R.G. 10 / 3333 & 3346
1891 R.G. 12 / 2570
1901 R.G. 13 / 3040

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Kirton area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul.
  • The church tower was rebuilt in the early 1900s.
  • The church seats 700.
  • Here is a photo of the church, taken by (and copyright of) Norma CLARE (who retains the copyright):

Kirton Saints Peter and Paul parish church

  • Here is a photo of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, taken by Ron COLE (who retains the copyright):

Kirton Saints Peter and Paul parish church

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish registers exist from 1555.
  • The tombstones in the churchyard have been moved from their original locations. Some were placed around the edge of the graveyard, and some were built into the footpath and their engravings are being worn away.
  • We have a handful of entries in our parish register extract, and would be pleased if you would submsit some additions.
  • The parish is in the Holland West Deanery, for which several indexes exist.
  • There was a Wesleyan Methodist chapel built in 1820, a Primitive Methodist chapel built in 1859 and another at Skeldyke built in 1842. There was also a Congregationalist chapel built in 1821. Check our Non-Conformist Church Records page for additional resources.
  • Check our Church Records page for county-wide resources.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Kirton sub-district of the Boston Registration District.
  • Check our Civil Registration page for sources and background on Civil Registration which began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

This village and parish are 103 miles north of London and just over 4 miles southwest of Boston on the Spalding Road, partly bordering on "The Wash". Frampton parish lies to the north. Kirton Holme, Kirton End, Kirton Mears, Seadyke, Simon Weir and Skeldyke are hamlets within the parish.

When planning a visit:

  • Check our Touring page for additional resources.
You can see pictures of Kirton which are provided by:

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Kirton has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

History

  • Kirton is famous as the original estate and seat of the first Saxon kings in Lincolnshire.
  • It is one of the largest parishes in the county, extending over 14 miles in length.
  • Kirton was once a Market Town, but the trade diminished and the market days were abandoned, as were the two annual fairs.
  • In 1809, the large old church was dismantled and a new one built from the stones and debris.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TF305385 (Lat/Lon: 52.928032, -0.060040), Kirton which are provided by:

Military History

John EMERSON, who retains the copyright, provides these photographs of the war memorial at Kirton in Holland:

War memorial

south plaque  west plaque

north plaque  east plaque

Military Records

The Kirton Holme War Memorial can be seen on the Roll of Honour site along with a list of names of men who perished.

John EMERSON also provides this List of Names from the Kirton War Memorial.

Names, Geographical

  • In some ancient sources, the name is rendered as Kirktown. The name means "village with a church." It appears as Chirchetune in the 1086 Domesday Book.
    [A. D. Mills, "A Dictionary of English Place-Names," Oxford University Press, 1991]
  • Locals pronounce the name as "Keeuhn" (with the stress on the first syllable). [Simon Meeds, 2001]

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Lincoln county and became a modern Civil Parish when those were established..
  • The parish was in the ancient Kirton Wapentake in the Borough of Boston and in the South Holland district in the parts of Holland.
  • For today's district governance, visit the local Boston Borough Council.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • The parish had almshouses for four poor women, founded by Robert HUNT.
  • The parish had it's own small workhouse for the poor prior to 1842.
  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Kirton and Skirbeck petty session hearings held in Skirbeck every Wednesday.
  • After the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act, this parish was incorporated into the Boston Poor Law Union.
  • The Speak Almshouses were bequeathed by John SPEAK in 1928. They are on the south end of the village.

Population

Most of the population stats below are for the ecclesiastical parish. 1891 is for the civil parish.

Year  Inhabitants
1801 1,238
1831 1,763
1841 2,092
1851 2,299
1871 2,419
1881 2,345
1891 2,169
1911 2,444

Schools

  • A Free School was established here in 1624 by Sir Thomas MIDDLECOTT. But in 1841, only 11 students attended the school. The original school building was replaced before 1900, at which time 65 boys attended.
  • A Board School was built in Kirton Holme in 1879 to hold up to 144 children.
  • A Board School for infants was built in Skeldyke in 1897.
  • See our Schools page for more information on researching school records.