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Help and advice for Osbournby

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  • A cemetery of about half an acre was formed in 1882 and placed under the control of the Parish Council.


  • The parish was in the Aswarby sub-district of the Sleaford Registration District.
  • In 1891, the parish was transferred to the Leadenham sub-district.
  • Check our Census Resource page for county-wide resources.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 621
1861 R.G. 9 / 2346
1871 R.G. 10 / 3353
1891 R.G. 12 / 2581


You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Osbournby area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul.
  • The church was restored and reseated in 1873.
  • The church seats about 350.
  • There is a photograph of St. Peter and St. Paul Church on the Wendy PARKINSON Church Photos web site.
  • Here is a photo of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, taken by Ron COLE (who retains the copyright):

Osbournby parish church

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish register dates from 1682.
  • We have a small Parish Register Extract text file. Your additions will be welcome.
  • The LFHS has published several marriage and burial indexes for the Lafford Deanery to make your search easier.
  • The Lincolnshire FHS has a Loan Library service which has the parish registers on microfiche for Baptisms from 1682 to 1812 and Marriages from 1682 to 1812.
  • There was a Wesleyan Methodist chapel built here in 1874. For more on researching these chapel records, see our non-conformist religions page.
  • Check our Church Records page for county-wide resources.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Aswarby sub-district of the Sleaford Registration District.
  • In 1891, the parish was transferred to the Leadenham sub-district.
  • Check our Civil Registration page for sources and background on Civil Registration which began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

Osbournby is both a village and parish which lies 109 miles north of London, 6 miles due south of Sleaford and 3 miles north of Folkingham parish. Spanby parish lies to the east.

If you are planning a visit:

  • The village is just north of the A52 trunk road and the A15 to Sleaford, which splits the village.
  • See our touring page for more sources.
You can see pictures of Osbournby which are provided by:

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Osbournby has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.


  • Bob HARVEY has a photograph of the Jubilee seat on Geo-graph, taken in October, 2012. The seat has an interesting history of its own..
  • Miss STEEL provides a photograph of the Whichcote Arms on Geo-graph, taken in October, 2010.


  • Osbournby Hall, the property of Isabella Marchioness of Exeter in 1912, was occupied that year by Draper MACKINDER.
  • Osbournby Hall was long the manor for the HUSSEY family. In 1537, John HUSSEY was found guilty of rebellion and was executed at Tyburn. The CARR family bought the HUSSEY estate. The estate is now owned by members of the WHICHCOTE family.


  • See our "Maps" page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TF069381 (Lat/Lon: 52.929650, -0.411099), Osbournby which are provided by:

Military Records

Osbournby Cemetery contains one Commonwealth war grave from World War I:

  1. Herbert COOPER, priv., 2nd/1st Btn. Lincolnshire Yoemanry, age 25, died 19 Sept. 1915. Son of Charles and Martha COOPER.

Names, Geographical

  • The name Osbournby is from the Old Scandinavian Asbjorn+by, or "village of a man named Asbjorn". In the 1086 Domesday Book, the village is given as Osbernebi.
    [A. D. Mills, "A Dictionary of English Place-Names," Oxford University Press, 1991].
  • The name is pronounced "Ozonby" or "Ossenby" by the locals.


Here's a newspaper clipping mentioning the village. Unfortunately, the newspaper's name is lost, but the date is 27 Oct. 1917. Right-hand columns are incomplete but I think it's possible to work out most of the context. I've used * to indicate gaps of lengths I could only guess at.: Diane MALTBY

The allo* holders on the Awarby esta* rent audit on Thursday, a * Arms Hotel, Osbournb* the transaction of the * business, the customary * vided.
Higgs for Smokers' R* kinds, Southgate, Sleaford *

Politics and Government

  • The parish was in the ancient Aswardhurn Wapentake in the North Kesteven division of the county, parts of Kesteven.
  • Before 1840, the parish was part of the Aveland Wapentake.
  • For today's district governance, see the North Kesteven District Council.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Sleaford petty session hearings every Monday.
  • The Commn Land for the poor was enclosed around 1805.
  • Mrs. Capp's Charity gave the interest from £100 to the poor as coal each year.
  • Lord Brownlow contributed £1 to the poor each year.
  • After the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act reforms, the parish became part of the Sleaford Poor Law Union.


Year  Inhabitants
1801 343
1841 599
1871 606
1881 496
1891 419
1911 387

Probate Records

Ros DUNNING provides a transcript of the will of Hannah ARNALL (ARNOLD) of Osbournby.


  • A Public Elementary School was built here in 1845 by Sir Thomas WHICHCOTE, baronet. The school was designed to hold 180 children.
  • For more on researching school records, see our Schools Research page.