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Help and advice for Hackney

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Hackney

Business and Commerce Records

The first plastics in Britain were manufactured in Hackney. Alexander Parkes invented Parkesine in 1862, and from 1866-1868 the Parkesine Company had a factory in Wallis Road, Hackney Wick. The company went bankrupt but Parkes' works manager Daniel Spill continued on the same site with the Xylonite Company, and from 1877 at 124 High Street, Homerton as the British Xylonite Company, which moved to Brantham in Suffolk in 1887. Apart from the accounts on the Plastiquarian website there is also an account in the Victoria County History.

Cemeteries

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Hackney area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church Directories

Parishes in this Rural Deanery in 1903

Anglican churches in Hackney in 1890 - Information about churches, showing dates of creation of parishes, and the name used for the records in the London Metropolitan Archives, and elsewhere. The ancient parishes were split into many smaller ones as London grew. This web page has links to other directories of churches in Hackney.

Outline map of Parishes in 1903

Description and Travel

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"HACKNEY, a parish and an extensive suburb of the metropolis, in the N.E. division of the Tower Hamlets, hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 2½ miles N. by E. of London, commencing about a mile from Shoreditch church. " (There is more of this description).

"BEAUVOIR, (or De Beauvoir Town), a hamlet in the parish of Hackney, hundred of Ossulstone, in the county of Middlesex, 2 miles to the N. of London. The village, which forms part of the northern suburbs of London, is entirely of recent construction, and is situated near the Kingsland-road. The houses, though unpretending, are commodious, and many have neat gardens attached to them. The soil is gravel, and the neighbourhood considered healthy. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of London, of the value of £200, in the patronage of R. B. De Beauvoir, Esq., the founder of the church, which is dedicated to St. Peter.

"DALSTON, a hamlet in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, in the county of Middlesex, 2½ miles N.E. of St. Paul's, London. It is situated on the North London railway, extending from the village of Hackney towards Kingsland. It has greatly increased of late years, and has some old mansions and numerous neat houses of modern erection. Here is the German hospital, which was founded in 1846; and also a refuge for the destitute, as Dalston House, removed hither from Hackney-road. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of London value £350 in the patronage of the Rector of St. John's Hackney. The church is dedicated to St. Philip. It was erected in 1841, at a cost of £5,700, and can accommodate 1,000 persons. The School of Industry, in Dalston-lane, was erected by subscription in 1837."

"HOMERTON, a hamlet in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 3 miles N.E. of St. Paul's, London. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of London, value £150, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is dedicated to St. Barnabas. There are three chapels, Robinson's almshouses for 12 ministers' widows, and the Protestant Dissenters' College, for 20 students, founded soon after the Revolution, and rebuilt in 1823."

"KINGSLAND, a hamlet and suburban district in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 2 miles N.E. of St. Paul's, London. It is a station on the North London railway, and omnibuses run to the city. Previously to the middle of the 15th century, here was a hospital or house for lepers, which, after the Reformation, served as an out ward to St. Bartholomew's hospital till 1761. The chapel of the priory was suffered to remain as a proprietary chapel, in the patronage of the governors of the hospital, till 1847, when it was taken down. This place, which has recently vastly increased in population, extends along the road from London to Tottenham and Edmonton, and several streets and numerous houses of recent erection branch off on either side. The site of the hospital and part of the market gardens are now built over."

"LOWER CLAPTON, a hamlet in St. James's district, in the parish of Hackney, in the Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, in the county of Middlesex, 3½ miles to the N.N.E. of St. Paul's. It is within the County Court district of Hackney, and the north-eastern postal division, and is now a suburb of the city of London, containing about 3,000 inhabitants. Near the Lea Bridge station of the Great Eastern railway is a large india-rubber manufactory. Until recently it was a pretty rural spot, chiefly inhabited by wealthy London merchants. The houses are mostly old, but well built. Here are St. John's Foundation School for the sons of clergymen, and Hackney Grammar School in connection with King's College, London. Brook House, the ancient seat of the Earls of Northumberland, is now a lunatic asylum.

"SHACKLE WELL, a hamlet in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of Ossulstone hundred, county Middlesex, 3 miles N.E. of St. Paul's, London. It is situated on Hackney brook, and was formerly the seat of Mrs. Heron, daughter of Sir T. More. Spottiswoode's Bible printing office is situated in this district, which is now studded with villas."

"STAMFORD HILL, an ecclesiastical district in the parish of Hackney, lower division of Ossulstone hundred, county Middlesex, 3½ miles N.E. of St. Paul's. It is situated on the line of the ancient Ermine Street, near the Cambridge section of the Great Eastern railway, and forms part of the borough of the Tower Hamlets. The village, now a rising suburb of the metropolis, is beyond Abney Park Cemetery, overlooking the valley of the river Lea. It had a population in 1861 of 5,483. The New Asylum for Infant Orphans was founded in 1844. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of London, value £207, in the patronage of the Rector of Hackney. The church, dedicated to St. Thomas, which stands in the road to Hackney, was built in 1850, from designs by Mr. L. Vulliamy, at a cost of £8,700. See Hackney."

"UPPER CLAPTON, a hamlet in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, in the county of Middlesex, 4 miles to the N.N.E. of St. Paul's. It is a flourishing suburban district, studded over with pleasant villa residences, extending from the banks of the river Lea on the E. to Stoke Newington Common on the W., where it is bounded by Hackney Brook; on the S. it adjoins Lower Clapton at the obelisk facing the Lea Bridge-road, and on the N.W. it unites with Stamford Hill, in which district it is partly included. There is a proprietary chapel, and a chapel belonging to the Independents.

Description(s) from "The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland" (1868), transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003; intended for personal use only, so please respect the conditions of use.

You can see pictures of Hackney which are provided by:

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Hackney has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Ask for a calculation of the distance from Hackney to another place.

Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TQ350846 (Lat/Lon: 51.544103, -0.054576), Hackney which are provided by:

Societies

  • The Hackney Society includes amongst its aims "educate and foster public interest in the history" of the Borough