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Bleasby

"Bleasby is a pleasant but straggling village and parish, on the north bank of the Trent, 4 miles south of Southwell. Its parish, which is all in the liberty of Southwell and Scrooby, comprises the neighbouring hamlets of Goverton, Gibsmere and Notown, and contains 361 inhabitants and 1,468 acres of land, which was enclosed in 1777, when the tithes were exonerated by an allotment of 57a 2r 24p to the vicar, and 20a 1r 10p to the Chapter of Southwell. The principal landowners are the Archbishop of York, Sir Richard Sutton, bart., the vicar of Strelley, R. K. Kelham Esq., the Trustees of Retford School, Mr. W. Alderidge, Mr. S. Potter, Mr. T. Hind, Mr. Francis Brown and Mr. J. Marriott, the former is lord of the manor. The church is a small structure, dedicated to St Mary, and its vicarage is valued in the King's books at £4, now £107. The Chapter of Southwell are the patrons, and the Rev. John William Marsh is the incumbent, and resides at the vicarage house; a neat mansion near the church, erected in 1843. The curacy of Morton was consolidated with the vicarage of Bleasby in 1841. Bleasby Hall is a neat mansion, the property and residence of Robert Kelham Kelham Esq." [WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Cemeteries

Census

  • The parish was in the Southwell sub-district of the Southwell Registration District.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
CensusYear Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 865
1861 R.G. 9 / 2472
1891 R.G. 12 / 2708

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Bleasby area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Mary.
  • The church transept was added in 1845.
  • The church was enlarged and repainted in 1845 and 1852.
  • The church was restored in 1869.
  • The church seats 220.
  • You can view a portion of the church tower at Geograph.
  • You can view the whole church at Geograph.

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish register dates from 1563.
  • The church was in the deanery of Southwell.
  • You can scan the 1633 Parish Register transcripts online.
  • The Primitive Methodists built a chapel here in 1879.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Southwell sub-district of the Southwell Registration District.
  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

Bleasby is both a parish and a village on the north bank of the River Trent. The parish lies 141 miles north of London, 8 miles south-west of Newark, 1 mile north-east of Thurgarton and 4 miles south of Southwell. The parish covers 1,550 acres and includes the hamlets of Goverton and Gibsmere.

The River Trent used to be divided in two near the village and the island crated was called "The Knabs". The river has since been re-aligned and the low-lying lands used for reservoirs. If you are planning a visit:

  • By automobile, take the A612 trunk road south out of Southwell for about 3 miles. At Thurgarton, turn left (esst) in the village and follow the county road that leads to Bleasby.
  • Bleasby has an active railway station, and passenger service is provided by National Rail.
You can see pictures of Bleasby which are provided by:

Directories

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Bleasby has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Manors

  • Bleasby Hall was built in the 16th century.
  • Bleasby Hall was, in 1853, the residence and property of Robert Kelham KELHAM Esq.
  • By 1881, the Hall was occupied Mr. Robert KELHAM, Esq. J.P.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SK717495 (Lat/Lon: 53.037959, -0.932124), Bleasby which are provided by:

Military History

  • Richard CROFT has a photograph of the War Memorial outside the church on Geo-graph, taken in October, 2007.

Names, Geographical

  • The Saxon charter of 956AD records the name as Blisetune, named after a Scandanavian warrior named "Blesi".

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Nottinghamshire and became a modern Civil Parish when those were established.
  • The parish was in the southern division of the county.
  • The parish was in the Southwell and Scrooby Liberty between 1836 and 1837.
  • The modern Civil Parish was in the ancient Southwell division of the Thurgarton Wapentake or Hundred.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Southwell petty session hearings.
  • The Common Land was enclosed here in 1777.
  • As a result of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act reforms, this parish became part of the Southwell Poor Law Union.

Population

Year Inhabitants
1801 215
1811 269
1821 290
1831 324
1841 353
1851 358
1861 332
1871 279
1881 296
1891 282
1901 287
1911 278
1921 288
1931 301
1951 348
1961 434

Schools

  • A school for both sexes was built here in 1855.
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