We are in the process of upgrading the site to implement a content management system.

Granby

"Granby is a well-built village overlooking the delightful vale of Belvoir, 4 miles south-east of Bingham, and near the borders of Leicestershire. It is remarkable for giving the title of Marquis to the Duke of Rutland, whose ancestor, Sir John Manners, purchased the estate of Lord Viscount Savage, to who, it had been granted by Henry VII, after the attainder Henry Lord Lovel, whose unhappy and mysterious fate will be noticed under the heading of East Stoke. After the Conquest, Granby and Sutton were of the fee of the Lords D'Ayncourt, and continued their principal seat till the reign of Henry VI, when their sole heiress married Lord Lovel. The parish includes the hamlet of Sutton, and contains 515 inhabitants, and 2,236 acres of land, which has generally a fertile soil, and is noted for several excellent limestone quarries. The commons were enclosed in 1794, when land was allotted as a commutation of all the tithes of the parish, most of which belongs to the Duke of Rutland, who is lord of the manor, impropriator, and patron of the vicarage, which is valued in the King's books at £6 3s 6d, (now £123), and is enjoyed by the Rev. John Bradshaw. The glebe consists of 75 acres. Elizabeth Blagden and Matthew Hall have also estates here, and there are in the parish several small freeholders." [WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Cemeteries

  • Granby parish and the hamlet of Sutton, to the north-east, have a joint Cemetery of 1/2 acre on Sutton Lane, formed in 1895. The first burial there was in August, 1897. The Cemetery is administered by the Parish Council.

Census

  • The parish was in the Bingham sub-district of the Bingham Registration District.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
CensusYear Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 853
1861 R.G. 9 / 2484
1891 R.G. 12 / 2717

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Granby area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • There is evidence that a Roman temple stood here. An Roman altar stone was dug up in the churchyard in 1812.
  • Granby had a church at the time of the 1086 Domesday Book.
  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to All Saints.
  • The church was built in the 12th century.
  • The church tower was damaged by lightning in 1777.
  • The church was restored in 1888.
  • The church is a Grade I building with British Heritage.
  • The church seats 120.
  • Richard CROFT has a photograph of All Saints' Church on Geo-graph, taken in November, 2008.

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish register dates from 1567.
  • The church was in the rural deanery of Bingham.
  • The Wesleyan Methodists had a chapel built here before 1881. The Methodist congregation dwindled away and the chapel was converted to a private residence around 2002.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Bingham sub-district in the Bingham Registration District.
  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

Granby is both a village and a parish near the border of Leicestershire in the Vale of Belvoir, 1 mile north-east of Barnston, 4.5 miles south-east of Bingham, 14.5 miles east of Nottingham and 118 miles north of London. The parish covers 2,420 acres. Sutton is a hamlet 1 miles north-east of Granby village.

The River Whipling runs just south of the village. If you are planning a visit:

  • By automobile, take the M1 motorway to the A52 trunk road and turn east. At the second roundabout, you are at Bramcote. Exit to the right.
  • There is bus service to and from Nottingham and Melton Mowbray.
You can see pictures of Granby which are provided by:

Directories

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Granby has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

History

  • Stop in at the Marquis of Granby Pub to chat with the locals. Operating since 1565, it has a long tradition of greeting visitors.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SK750362 (Lat/Lon: 52.917971, -0.885996), Granby which are provided by:

Names, Personal

  • The Duke of Rutland is lord of the manor here and his eldest son takes the title of Marguis of Granby from this parish.

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Nottingham county and it became a modern Civil Parish when those were established.
  • This parish was in the northern division of the county in the north division of the Bingham Hundred or Wapentake.
  • You may contact the Granby Parish Council regarding civic or political matters, but they are NOT staffed to help you with family history searches.
  • District governance is provided by the Rushcliffe Borough Council.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Bingham petty session hearings every other Thursday.
  • A charity set up by Matthew WILLIAM and Henry HALL in 1816 (additional funds provided in 1821 and 1824) established £25, the interest from this was used to aid the poor of the village.
  • After the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, this parish became part of the Bingham Poor Law Union.

Population

Year Inhabitants
1801 329
1831 342
1851 515
1861 479
1881 288
1901 380

Schools

  • A National School was built here in 1871 to hold 97 students.
  • The school closed late last century and now serves as the village hall.
We are looking for somebody who can help with the maintenance of this page, which currently has a status of Care and maintenance - The section has a maintainer assigned who is correcting broken links, and staying in touch with the GENUKI system administrator and Trustees but is not active in updating the section's web pages. For more information about what helping us entails, look at our help wanted page. If you would like to consider helping us then please contact Lou Mills.