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Hucknall Torkard

"Hucknall Torkard is a large village and parish, consisting principally of one long street, seven miles north by west of Nottingham, and eight miles south of Mansfield. It contains 3,270 acres of land, and 2,970 inhabitants, many of whom are framework knitters and occupy small farms. The Duke of Portland is the principal owner and lord of the manor. The church is a neat structure with a tower and three bells. The vicarage is valued in the King's Books at £4 18s 1d, now at £135, and was anciently in the patronage of Newstead Priory, but the Duke of Portland is now the patron. The Rev. Curtis Jackson M.A. is the incumbent. In the chancel is a mural monument to the memory of Richard Lord Byron, dated 1679. John Curtis, gent, is remembered on a neat marble stone in the church, as the last survivor of the family who resided here upwards of 500 years; it is dated 1777. The Baptists, Wesleyan, New Connexion, the Original Methodists and the Primitive Methodists have each a chapel here, and in the parish is a Club Mill belonging to several Friendly Societies. Forge Mill, situated on the River Leen, now employed in grinding corn, is said to have been first an iron forge, and afterwards a cotton mill. Bulwell Wood Hall, an ancient farm house, was once an occasional seat of the Byron family of Newstead. In the village is a fine box tree, upwards of 400 years old, and said to be the largest in England. Here are several friendly societies and a lodge of foresters. Mr Richard White, framework knitter, and Mr Hy. Daws, farmer, natives, and still residents in this parish; the former in his 95th and the latter in his 93rd year of age, both of whom are still middling active; and Mrs Eliz. Featherstone, a native of Pentrich, Derbyshire, but resided here the last thirty years of her life, and died on the 12th January 1852, in her 98th year. The Nottingham and Mansfield Railway passes through this parish, and has a neat station here." [WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Cemeteries

  • A cemetery of 8 acres with one motuary chapel was opened here in 1877. It was under the controlk of the Parish Council Burial Board.

Census

  • The parish was in the Hucknall Torkard sub-district of the Basford Registration District:
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
CensusYear Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 858
1851 H.O. 107 / 2127
1861 R.G. 9 / 2442
1891 R.G. 12 / 2672 thru 2675

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Hucknall Torkard area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Mary Magdalene.
  • The church was origianlly built here by the Anglo-Saxons.
  • There are some records saying that the church was dedicated to St. James.
  • The church was restored in 1872.
  • Phil EVANS has a photograph of St. Mary Magdalene Church on Geo-graph, taken in July, 2008.

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish register dates from 1558 and is in good condition.
  • The church was was in the rural deanery of Mansfield.
  • The Baptist church was founded in 1806 and opened on Gilbert Road in 1835 after several years of services held in various places. They moved to Watnall Road in 1876. to learn more, visit the Watnall Road Baptist Church site.
  • David BEVIS has a photograph of the Baptist Church on Geo-graph, taken in November, 2009.
  • David BEVIS also has a photograph of the Central Methodist Church on Geo-graph, taken in December, 2012.
  • Lord BYRON was buried in the parish church on 16 July 1824.
  • Countess Ada Lovelace was buried in the parish church in 1852.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Hucknall Torkard sub-district of the Basford Registration District:
  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

Hucknall Torkard is both a village and a parish near the River Leen and lying about 7 miles north of the centre of Nottingham, 8 miles south of Mansfield, and 133 miles north of London. On most maps, the village is rendered as "Hucknall".

  • Anderby is just off the A52 to the east.
You can see pictures of Hucknall Torkard which are provided by:

Directories

Genealogy

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Hucknall Torkard has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

History

  • You must check out the History of Hucknall Torkard from Maureen NEWTON.
  • This parish has a long association with the BYRON family.
  • Phil EVANS has a photograph of Lord Byron's Epitaph on Geo-graph, taken in July, 2008.
  • A Public Hall was built here in 1875.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SK530490 (Lat/Lon: 53.035641, -1.211064), Hucknall Torkard which are provided by:

Military History

  • In 1916 the Royal Flying Corps opened a training station at Hucknall.
  • In 1918 the United States Army Air Service arrived.
  • In 1919 Hucknall aerodrome was closed and sold to a local farmer.
  • Near Titchfield Park is the Hucknall Cenotaph where the war dead of the town are remembered. The War Memorial was commemorated in 1922.
  • In 1927 the RAF decided it needed room for expansion and the aerodrome was reopened.
  • In 1942 the village adopted the Royal Navy destroyer HMS Vimy.
  • In 1953 the "Flying Bedstead" was tested here. It would later become the Harrier jump jet.
  • In 1957 the RAF closed their station at Hucknall.

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Nottingham county and it became a modern Civil parish when those were established.
  • The parish was in the northern division of the county.
  • This parish was in the northern division of the Broxtowe Hundred or Wapentake.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • The Common Land was enclosed here in 1771.
  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Nottingham petty session hearings.
  • After the Poor Law Amendment Act reforms of 1834, this parish became a part of the Basford Poor Law Union.

Population

Year Inhabitants
1811 1,793
1841 2,680
1851 2,970
1861 2,836
1871 4,257
1881 10,023