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Help and advice for North Muskham

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

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North Muskham

"North Muskham Parish contains the three townships of North Muskham, Bathley and Holme, in which are 1,021 inhabitants and 3,290 acres of fertile land, which was enclosed in 1771 when 91 acres were awarded to the vicar, and 300 acres to the Earl of Falconberg, in lieu of the tithes. The Earl has since sold the impropriate lands to various persons. North Muskham is a pleasant village on the west bank of the Trent, and partly on the Great North Road, 3½ miles north of Newark. Its township contains 663 inhabitants and 1,090 acres of rich land. Mrs Edge of Strelley is lessee, under the prebendary, for the manor who, with the Duke of Newcastle, are the principal owners. Muskham House, a superb mansion, buily by the Pocklingtons in 1793, was taken down a few years ago. Muskham Grange, a fine ancient mansion occupied by John Handley Esq., was the seat of the late William Dickenson Hastall Esq., who distinguished himself as a topographer of some of the most interesting parts of his native county.
The church, dedicated to St Wilfred, is a neat gothic structure with nave, chancel, side aisles and tower, in which are two bells. The living is a vicarage, valued in the King's books at £5 6s 8d, now £173. The prebendary of North Muskham is patron and appropriator, and the Rev. Joseph Markham Parry A.M. incumbent."
[WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Census

  • The parish was in the Kneesal sub-district of the Southwell Registration District.
     
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
     
Census
Year
Piece No.
1861 R.G. 9 / 2474
1871 R.G. 10 / 3537
1891 R.G. 12 / 2710

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the North Muskham area or see them printed on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Wilfred (spelling variations abound!).
     
  • The church was constructed circa 1190.
     
  • The church chancel was rebuilt circa 1530.
     
  • The church was entirely restored in 1906 and 1907.
     
  • The church is Grade 1 listed by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.
     
  • Julian P. GUFFROGG has a good photograph of St.Wilfrid's tower on Geo-graph, taken in January, 2016.
     
  • Alan MURRAY-RUST has a photograph of St.Wilfrid's Church on Geo-graph, taken in July, 2014.
     
  • Richard CROFT has a photograph inside St.Wilfrid's nave on Geo-graph, taken in April, 2012.
     

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish register dates from 1706 for all entries, but is in poor condition.
     
  • The church was in the rural deanery of Southwell.
     
  • The Wesleyan Methodists had a chapel built here in 1814. They moved to a new chapel in 1905.
     
  • Richard CROFT has a photograph of the Methodist Chapel on Geo-graph, taken in August, 2009.
     

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Kneesal sub-district of the Southwell Registration District.
     
  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.
     

Description and Travel

This village and parish are about 128 miles north of London and 3 miles north of Newark-on-Trent. The parish covered 1,096 acres in 1881.

The village is on the west bank of the River Trent. If you are planning a visit:

  • By automobile, the village is just off of the A1 motorway north of Newark.
     
  • Trevor RICKARD has a photograph of Main Street at North Muskham on Geo-graph, taken in September, 2011.
     
  • Alan MURRAY-RUST has a photograph of the approach to Bathley (just west of North Muskham on Geo-graph, taken in July, 2014.
     
  • Michael WESTLEY has a photograph of the Village sign on Geo-graph, taken in January, 2010.
     

You can see pictures of North Muskham which are provided by:

Directories

Gazetteers

Ask for a calculation of the distance from North Muskham to another place.

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which North Muskham has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

History

  • The village had a ferry across the Trent River to the village of Holme for centuries. You must drive north to High Marnham to find a bridge over the River Trent.

Medical Records

The Great War Bulletin for February 15th, 1915; tells us that Violet COGAN had a "makeshift" hospital in North Muskham during World War I. Hospitals were not required to archive patient records and it appears that the hospital closed after the war.

Ms. COGAN's Voluntary Aid Detachment Hospital is also mentioned in a July 19th Bulletin, where it notes that Major Francis John Leslie COGAN of the Royal Field Artillery was also promoted to Squadron Commander in the Royal Flying Corps (the future RAF).

One of Ms. COGAN's patients, a Belgian refugee named Alfonse Van GOMPEL, was noted in that July Bulletin as being recovered and ready to return to Belgium to fight for his country.

Military History

The Great War Bulletin for December 7, 1914 tells us that two men of North Muskham, J. PRICE and E. SLATER, had been appointed as "Special Constables" to assist the police force in the event of a German invasion.

The Great War Bulletin for April 26th, 1915 tells us that a local lad was alive and serving at the front lines: Langstroth G. BROWN who had enlisted in the Princes Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. The PPCLI was formed in August of 1914 and the whole unit landed in France in December, 1914 - the first Canadian field unit to enter the trenches.

Arthur MEE tells us that the "crucifix shrine" in St. Wilfred's Church is "made of wood from the Naval cadet training ship, HMS Britannia." The memorial lists 8 men who died, six of them during the Great War.

There is a War Memorial plaque in the Methodist chapel as well. There is some overlap in the names with the above memorial and some men are Methodists from outside North Muskham.

Military Records

The Great War Bulletin for January 1st, 1915; tells us that A. WESSON volunteered to fight in the Great War (in the 8th btln. Sherwood Foresters).

These are the names listed on War Memorial plaque in Saint Martin's church:

  1. private Frederick Wilson BOULTON, 2/4th Bn Lincolnshire Regt.
  2. sergeant Edward GASCOIGNE, 17th Bn Sherwood Foresters
  3. private John Arthur GUY, Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars
  4. private John Thomas HOUGH, 6th Bn King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
  5. gunner John KNOWLES, 17th Bde Royal Field Artillery
  6. private George Henry TALBOT, 1/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters
  7. private Charles Belfield WALTON, 7th Bn King's Shropshire Light Infantry
  8. sergeant Frederick WARD, 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters

These are the eleven names listed on War Memorial plaque in the Methodist chapel:

  1. private William Henry BECKETT, 10th Bn Sherwood Foresters, name misspelled on memorial.
  2. sergeant Edward GASCOIGNE, 17th Bn Sherwood Foresters
  3. able seaman Charles Richard GASCOIGNE, HMS Moth
  4. private Arthur D GRAVES, 1st Bn Royal Warwickshire Regt.
  5. private John Arthur GUY, Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars
  6. private Alfred PARR, 1/7th Bn Royal Fusiliers
  7. private Arthur SMITH, 1/8th Bn Manchester Regt.
  8. private George Henry TALBOT, 1/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters
  9. private Charles Belfield WALTON, 7th Bn King's Shropshire Light Infantry
  10. sergeant Frederick WARD, 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters
  11. lance corporal Frederick WILSON, 10th Bn., The Queen's Royal West Surrey Regt.
     

HMS Moth, above, was a 237-foot gunboat which entered service in 1916. She was scuttled in Hong Kong in December 1941 when the Royal Navy had to abandon her.

The Newark Great War Bulletin for June 7th, 1915; tells us that private Charles HERROD of the KOYLI had written home from the front lines to his sister to tell her of the constant danger and how lucky he was to be unharmed.

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Nottingham county, and became a modern Civil Parish when those were established.
     
  • At the time of the 1086 Domesday Book, the parish was in the Lythe Hundred.
     
  • The parish was in the northern division of the Thurgarton Wapentake in the southern division of the county.
     
  • The Bathley township was split off as its own Civil Parish in December, 1866.
     
  • The Holme chapelry was split off as its own Civil Parish at the same time.
     
  • You may contact the North Muskham parish council regarding civic or political matters, but they are NOT funded to help you with family history searches. At last check, some of the pages at this site were not completed (2018).
     
  • District governance is provided by the Newark and Sherwood District Council.
     

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • The Common Land was enclosed here in 1771.
     
  • As a result of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act reforms, this parish became part of the Southwell Poor Law Union.
     
  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Newark petty session hearings.
     

Population

 Year North Muskham Bathley Holme
1811 336 179 109
1831 681    
1851 663 214 144
1871 552    
1881 542    
1901 559 171 100

Schools

  • Mary WOODHOUSE endowed a school which was built as a one-room school in 1798.
     
  • A school board was formed of 7 members in 1875.
     
  • A Board School was built here in 1880 on a site previously devoted to the Mary Woodhouse endowed School. This school closed circa 1965.
     
  • The new school was opened in 1966. This school has its own Web site with a history section, but no mention of earlier students.
     

The Great War Bulletin for December 7, 1914 tells us that:

"MISS SLATER and her fellow ‘assistants’ to the North Muskham School head master, Joseph Woodward, quickly became involved in preparing the children to stage a concert in aid of the village’s Belgians. After a fortnight of rehearsals, the performance took place in the large schoolroom on the evening of 27 November. There is no mention in the School Log Book of the programme that was performed; but the children were routinely taught patriotic songs – usually around Empire Day each year – and were accustomed to learning recitations for Church and Chapel Sunday School anniversaries. The evening was so successful that it raised the sum of £5 8s 6d (£5.42½).
It meant that the 28 soldiers and three refugees who had been found room in either The Grange or unoccupied cottages in North Muskham, each received 3s 6d (17½p) - and the knowledge that each was welcome in the community."