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Nottingham

"Nottingham, the principal seat and emporium of the lace and hosiery manufactures, is an ancient, populous and well-built market and borough town, as well as being the capital of the shire and archdeaconry to which it gives its name, It is in the diocese of Lincoln, and in the midland circuit of England. It occupies a picturesque situation on a sandy rock, which rises in broken declivities, and in some places in precipitous, above the north bank of the little River Leen which, at a short distance to the south-east, falls into the River Trent, near the opposite locks of the Grantham and Nottingham canals, and a little below that magnificent and noble structure, the Trent bridge, which is connected to Nottingham by a flood road, raised at great expense above the intervening meadows, which are often subject to inundation. There is great reason to believe that anciently the River Trent covered all the vale, and that the tide flowed up to Nottingham, which certainly is one of the most ancient towns in England, but its origin is hid in the impenetrable gloom which is cast over the aborigines of Britain. The town holds a central situation betwixt Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Portsmouth to the north and south, and betwixt Newcastle-under-Lyne and Boston to the west and east. It is in the south-western division of Nottinghamshire, at the junctions of the hundreds of Broxtow, Thurgarton and Rushcliffe, at a distance 125 miles north-west of London, 80 miles south of York, 20 miles south-west by west of Newark, 14 miles south of Mansfield, 15 miles north by east of Derby, 27 miles north of Leicester, and 39 miles south by east of Sheffield, and is at 53 degrees north latitude, and at 1 degree 13 minutes west longitude from the meridian of Greenwich." [WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Archives and Libraries

The Local Studies Library has family history resources:

  • Nottingham Centra Library
  • Angel Row
  • Nottingham, Notts, NG1 6HP
  • Tele: 0115 915 2828

Cemeteries

Census

  • The parish was in the Bulwell sub-district of the Nottingham Registration District.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
CensusYear Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 869 - 871
1861 R.G. 9 / 2457
1871 R.G. 10 / 3513
1881 R.G. 11 / 3351
1891 R.G. 12 / 2692
1901 R.G. 13 / 3180 thru 3187& 3191

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Nottingham area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church Records

There were three Anglican parishes in Nottingham (taken from White's 1853 Directory and provided by [John MELLORS]:

  1. St Mary's Parish - largest of the three parochial divisions of the Town, and county of the Town of Nottingham as it contains about four fifths of the buildings and population. It includes all of the buildings and land on the south side of the (River) Leen, betwixt the Trent and the parishes of Sneinton & Lenton; and all that part of the town on the North Side of the Leen, lying east of Sussex St, Middle Hill, Market St, & Fletchergate; whence its boundary turns westward, and includes all the buildings north of Bottle Lane, Poultry, Timber Hill, Beast Market Hill, Chapel Bar, and the Park until it joins the parish of Radford.
  2. St Nicholas Parish - averages about 500 yds in length and 250 in breadth. It is bounded on the West by Brewhouse Yard, the Castle Wall, Standard Hill, the General Infirmary and Park Row; and on the North by Chapel Bar, Angel Row & Beast Market Hill; whence its boundary, including the greater part of Friar Lane passes in an irregular line behind the Friends Meeting House and Independent Chapel across Castle Gate to Greyfriar Gate down which it passes to the Leen; which forms the southern limit of the parish.
  3. St Peter Parish - the smallest of the 3 is encompassed by St Mary & St Nicholas parishes and averages about 450 yards in length and 200 yards in breadth. It extends from Timber Hill, the Poultry, and Bottle Lane to the North Bank of the Leen and is bounded on the east by Sussex St, Middle Hill, Middle Pavement and the buildings behind Market St & Fletcher Gate; and on the West by Grey Friar Gate, the Independent Chapel and Friends Meeting House and the North end of Friar Lane.

In the late 1800s an additional parish, St. George in the Meadows, opened down by the River Trent. Construction started in 1887 and the church opened for services in 1888. The chancel was added in 1897 and the Lady Chapel in 1911. This church is now a Grade II listed structure by British heritage. The parish is on the south side of the city, but north of the River Trent, in the area known as "The Meadows".
John SUTTON has a photograph of the War Memorial just outside the church on Geograph, taken in September, 2012.

Holy Trinity parish was formed in 1842. The church is in Milton Street.

All Saints parish was created out of St. Mary's parish in November, 1864. The church was in Raleigh Street. It will seat 830.

Saint Ann's parish was created out of St. Mary's parish in May, 1865 and extends part-way into Basford parish. The church was in St. Ann's Well Road and was built in 1864. It will seat 1,200.

Emmanuel parish was created out of St. Ann's parish in 1886. The church was on Woodborough Road and was built in 1884-85.

Saint Bartholomew's parish was created out of St. Ann's parish in 1905. The church was on Blue Bell Hill and was built in 1902.

Saint Matthew's parish was created out of St. Mary's parish in 1856. The church was in Talbot Street and opened in 1853.

Saint Paul's parish was created out of St. Mary's parish in February, 1839. The church was in George Street, built in 1822. The register dates from 1839.

Saint Philip's parish was created out of St. Luke's parish in February, 1880. The church was in Pennyfoot Street, built in 1879. The register dates from 1880.

Saint Saviors parish was created out of St. Mary's parish in May, 1865. The church was in Arkwright Street, built in 1865.

Saint Stephen's parish was created out of St. Mary's and St. Matthew's parishes in April, 1869. The church was in Lower Parliament Street and was rebuilt in Bobbers Mill road in 1898.

Saint Thomas's parish was created out of St. Matthew's, St. Niocholas and St. Peter's parishes in 1873. The church was in Park Row.

There is a copy of the BADDER & PEAT 1745 map which shows the streets. For more detail, see:

  • St Mary Parish.
  • St Nicholas Parish.
  • St Peter Parish.
  • There is a photograph of the Wesleyan Chapel at Picture the Past, on page 41.
  • The Jewish synagogue in Chaucer Street was built in 1890.
  • The Baptist chapel in Derby Road was built in 1850. It seats 800. Another Baptist chapel was built in Milton Street in 1866.
  • The Catholic Church was dedicated to Our Lady and Saint Patrick. It was in the London Road, built in 1880. The church seats about 600.
  • There is also St. Edward's Catholic Church on Blue Bell Hill, erected in 1886. The church seats about 300.
  • St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church on Goldsmith Street was erected in 1870. The church seats about 500.
  • The Congregationalist chapel in East Circus Street was built in 1860. It seats 800.
  • The Castle Gate Independent Chapel was founded in the 1650s. A Meeting House was built in 1689. It was replaced with a chapel built in 1863. In 1972 both Castle Gate and St Andrew’s joined the new United Reformed Church denomination. The two churches joined to form St Andrew’s-with-Castle Gate United Reformed Church. The new church was based at St Andrew’s on Goldsmith Street, Nottingham. The Castle Gate church buildings were sold in 1980 to the Congregational Federation.

Civil Registration

  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.
  • The parish was in the Bulwell sub-district of the Nottingham Registration District.

Correctional Institutions

  • The old Nottingham House of Correction was closed in 1891 after its prisoners were transferred to Bagthorpe Prison. The old House of Correction was soon-after demolished.
  • H. M. Prison was north-west of the city proper, between Hucknall Raod and Mansfield Road. It generally held 200 male prisoners.
  • In 1894 a new cellblock was added to hold 40 female prisoners.

Description and Travel

Nottingham is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England. Nottingham is famed for its links to the legend of Robin Hood.

If you are planning a visit:

  • The city has the largest publicly owned bus network in the UK.
  • The city is also served by a large railway station (in addition to several suburban stations), and an expanding tram system.
  • East Midlands Airport is located just over 10 miles to the south-west of the city.
You can see pictures of Nottingham which are provided by:

Directories

Genealogy

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Nottingham has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SK560410 (Lat/Lon: 52.963429, -1.167714), Nottingham which are provided by:

Medical Records

  • The Nottingham General Hospital, on Standard Hill, was built in 1781 and enlarged in 1855.
  • Nottingham Women's Hospital, also known as "Peel Street" Hospital, was a maternity hospital for women which closed in November 1981.
  • The Hospital opened in 1923 as the result of a merger between Nottingham Castle Gate Hospital and Samaritan Hospital Nottingham.
  • Hospital records are archived with the University of Nottingham.
  • Most patient records are protected by Closure regulations.

Military History

  • In 1912, the Territorial Force stationed here was B Squadron of the South Nottingham Hussars and the Robin Hood's (7th) Battalion Nottingham and Derbyshire Regt.
  • Were you there during the Nottingham Blitz?

Military Records

David LITCHFIELD contributes this William Crane School list of students who went off to World War II.

Newspapers

  • The Nottingham Post has replaced the Nottingham Evening Post. The first edition was printed by Thomas FORMAN on 1 May 1878. In 1963, the Nottingham Evening News merged with the Post.
  • There is a monthly Bygones paper, published by the above, which features stories on the history of Nottingham.
  • For online news, try the This is Nottingham site.

Occupations

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Nottingham county.
  • This place was incorporated as a modern Civil Parish in late 1897.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Nottingham petty session hearings.
  • Barnaby WARTNABY's Almshouses, established in 1672, were pulled down in 1890 and the capital vested in trustees for the benefit of four pensioners.
  • BILBY's and COOPER's Almshouses were endowed and built in Colpit Lane in 1709 and were rebuilt in 1872.
  • UNWIN's Almshouse, established in 1817, allowed ten paupers to seek refuge here and get 3s per week and two tons of coal per year.
  • BURTON's Almshouses on the London road were built in 1859 by Miss Ann BURTON. They could hold 24 tenants.
  • After the Poor Law Amendment Act reforms of 1834, this parish became the heart of the Nottingham Poor Law Union.

Schools

  • Nottingham High School, Waverley Mount, Nottingham, NG7 4ED. Telephone: (0115) 978 6056
  • The Nottingham Bluecoat School and Technology College, Aspley Lane, Nottingham, NG8 5GY.
  • Beechdale Road, Aspley, Nottingham, NG8 3EZ. Tele: (0115) 929 6251
  • The Shepherd School, Harvey Road Bilborough Nottingham NG8 3BB. Tele: (0115) 915 3265. For over thirty years they have provided education & provision for pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties. They can be found on Facebook.
  • The William Crane School, Minver Crescent, Aspley, Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 5PN, was a comprehensive school consisting of infants, juniors and seniors. The school was built in 1930 and was closed in 2000/2001 and subsequently demolished.