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WELLINGTON, Shropshire

"WELLINGTON, a parish and market town in the hundred of Wellington, county Salop, 10½ miles E. of Shrewsbury, and 7½ S.W. of Newport. It has stations on the Great Western, Birmingham and Shrewsbury, and Shropshire Union railways. Here Charles I., on the breaking out of the civil war, first assembled his forces on the 19th September, 1642, and delivered in person the address recorded by Clarendon. The parish of Wellington, so called from its being situated on the ancient Watling Street, includes, besides the town of Wellington, the townships of Aston, Dothill, Hadley, Horton, Lawley, Lee Gomery, Walcot, and Wappenshall, with the chapelry of Ketley, the ecclesiastical district of Christchurch, and the hamlets of Arleston, Apley, Haybridge, Lawley Bank, and Newdale. The town of Wellington occupies a steep declivity about 2 miles N. of the Wrekin, which rises from the plain to the height of 1,320 feet above the sea-level, or 1,100 feet above the bed of the Severn, embracing from its summit an horizon from 350 to 400 miles in circumference, and comprising the greater part of 17 counties. This hill is said to be the highest in England for the circumference of its base, and has on its summit remains of an old fortification. In the immediate vicinity are the Shrewsbury and Shropshire Union canals, communicating directly with the navigable river Severn, and a part of the parish is bounded by the river Tern. The streets are mostly narrow, but have been much improved, and the town is lighted with gas under an Act of Parliament obtained in 1851. There are a townhall, newsrooms in the market place, gaol, union poorhouse, savings-bank, post-office, branch office of the Shropshire Banking Company, gas works, and baths at the Adminston Spa, situated about 1½ mile from the town. The malting trade is extensively carried on, and much business is done inagricultural and mineral produce. There are iron foundries, corn-mills, a tannery, glass-factory, and several nail and agricultural implement manufactories. The population of the parish in 1851 was 11,554, and in 1861, 12,198, but of the town 5,576. The town is under a mayor and constables, and two clerks, who regulate the markets. The county magistrates hold petty sessions for the hundred monthly, and the lord of the manor a court leet annually in November, at which the civil officers are appointed. The county-court is held monthly in the townhall, and the poor-law guardians meet fortnightly on Thursday. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £900. The parish church of All Saints, which formerly belonged to the Abbey of Shrewsbury, was rebuilt in 1790, and repaired in 1847. St. Saviour's was built in 1838 at a cost of £3,600. There are also the district church of Christ Church, the new church at Hadley, and the old church of Ketley. The Wesleyans, Independents, Baptists, and Roman Catholics have chapels. There are National schools, built in 1855, Roman Catholic schools at Mill-Bank, a small free school, and Ick's and other almshouses. The Poor-law Union comprises 10 parishes. The Dukes of Sutherland and Cleveland, and Lords Berwick and Forester, are the chief landowners. Market day is on Thursday. Fairs are held on 29th March, 22nd June, 29th September, 17th November, Monday week before Christmas day, and on the last Monday in each of the other months."

"APLEY, a hamlet in the parish of Wellington, in the hundred of Bradford, in the county of Salop, 1¼ mile N.N.E. of the town of Wellington."

"ARLESTON, a hamlet in the parish of Wellington, and hundred of South Bradford, in the county of Salop, 1 mile from Wellington."

"ASTON, a township in the parish of Wellington, in the Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, in the county of Salop, 2 miles from Wellington. The Wrekin rises on the east of this township, from the summit of which is a commanding view over 15 counties, bounded on the west by the Black Mountains of Wales, with the Severn, Avon, and Wey winding beneath. The slopes of the Wrekin are tastefully laid out in pine plantations, alternating with grassy lawns, and the ancient Roman road called Watling Street passes to the north of the township."

"HADLEY, a township in the parish of Wellington, county Salop, 1 mile E. of Wellington. It is situated near the Shrewsbury canal, and is a station on the Shropshire Union railway. The village, which is considerable, is chiefly inhabited by colliers."

"HORTON, a township in the parish of Wellington, county Salop, 3 miles N.E. of Wellington. It is situated near Shrewsbury canal."

"KETLEY, a township and district parish in the parish of Wellington, hundred of South Bradford, county Salop, 1 mile S.E. of Wellington. It is a station on the Wellington and Severn Junction branch of the Great Western railway. The township is situated in the iron and coal mining district of Shropshire. It is traversed by a canal and tram-rail, 1½ mile long, to Oaken Gates pits. Here are many ironstone and coal pits; also several blast furnaces for the smelting of iron. Fossils are frequently found in the coal and ironstone of the district. The village, which is very considerable is chiefly inhabited by miners. From the eminence on which the church stands a view is obtained of the Shropshire and Cheshire plains, with the Wrekin and Black mountains of Wales in the distance. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £158. The church is a stone structure, erected in 1839 at the sole expense of the Duke of Sutherland. There are chapels for Dissenters, and two schools with houses attached for the master and mistress."

"LAWLEY, a township in the parish of Wellington, county Salop, 2 miles S.E. of Wellington. At Lawley Bank is a station on the Wellington and Severn Junction branch of the Great Western railway. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the coal and sandstone pits, situated under Lawley Hill.,"

"NEW DALE, a hamlet in the parish of Wellington, hundred of South Bradford, county Salop, 2 miles from Wellington, and 10 E. of Shrewsbury. It is situated under the Wrekin, near the Shrewsbury canal and the line of the ancient Watling Street."

"WALCOTT, a township in the parish of Wellington, county Salop, 4 miles N.W. of Wellington. It is a station on the Shrewsbury and Birmingham railway. The township is situated on the river Tern."

"WATLING STREET, a hamlet in the parish of Wellington, county Salop, near Wellington."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2012

Gazetteers

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