Transcriptions of East Suffolk Gazette and Beccles and Bungay Weekly News April 1869

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 April 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

COOPER --- COOPER. On the 18th March, at the Congregational Chapel, King-street, Great Yarmouth, by the Rev W. GRIFFITH, M.A., Abraham Shearing COOPER, to Matilda Emney COOPER, BOTH OF THE ABOVE PLACE.

MONK --- BUXTON. On the 21st March, at St Gabriel's Church, Pimlico, London, by the Rev W.H. LANGHORNE, Walter, second son of William MONK, of Upminster, Essex, to Emma, youngest daughter of Edward BUXTON, of Bungay, Suffolk.

SILVERS --- FISH. On the 28th March, at Yarmouth, by the Rev F.C. CLUTTERBUCK, Mr Brightin [sic] SILVERS, draper, to Abiel [sic] Ann, youngest daughter of Mr Simon FISH, master mariner.

TURNER --- REID. On the 25th March, at St Nicholas' Church, by the Rev F.C CLUTTERBUCK, Mr Charles TURNER, of Upton, to Maria, widow of the late Mr William REID, solicitor.

DEATHS

DAWSON --- On the 26th March, at Yarmouth, Mr William DAWSON, aged 79.

FORMAN --- On the 26th March, at Southwold, aged 68, Charlotte, wife of Mr Daniel FORMAN, late master mariner.

HOWES --- On the 1st April, at Yarmouth, Mr Joseph HOWES, aged 77.

OSBORNE --- On the 26th March, at Southwold, aged 25, Mr Frederick William OSBORNE.

ROUNCE --- On the 30th March, at Southwold, aged 76, Mr Thomas ROUNCE, formerly of Halesworth.

STANNARD --- On the 1st April, at Southwold, aged 78, Mr Robert STANNARD, for many years employed in the banks of Messrs. HARVEY and HUDSON, at Southwold, Diss, and Bury St Edmund's.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 April 1869 Page 4, columns 3 & 4

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

THE DUST OF TOWNS AND CITIES A microscopist, Mr DANCER, F.R.A.S., has been examining the dust of our cities. The results are not pleasing. We had always recognised city dust as a nuisance, and had supposed that it derived the peculiar grittiness and flintiness of its structure from the constant macadamizing [sic] of city roads. But it now appears that the effects produced by dust, when, as is usual, it finds its way to our eyes, our nostrils, and our throats, are as nothing compared with the mischief it is calculated to produce in a more subtle manner. In every specimen examined by Mr DANCER animal life was abundant. But the "molecular activity" - such is the euphuism under which what is exceedingly disagreeable to contemplate is spoken about - is variable according to the height at which the dust is collected. And of all heights which these molecular wretches could select for the display of their activity, the height of five feet is that which has been found to be the favourite. Just at the average height of the foot passenger's mouth these moving organisms are always waiting to be devoured, and to make us ill. And this is not all. As if the animal abominations were insufficient, a large proportion of vegetable matter also disports itself in the light dust of our streets. And the observations show that in thoroughfares where there are many animals engaged in the traffic, the greater part of the vegetable matter thus floating about "consists of what has passed through the stomachs of animals," or has suffered decomposition in some way or other. This unpleasing matter, like the "molecular activity," floats about at a height of five feet, or thereabouts. After this, one begins to recognise the manner in which some diseases propagate themselves. What had been mysterious in the history of plagues and pestilences seems to receive at least a partial solution. Take cholera, for example. It has been shown that this disease is not propagated in any way save one - that is, by the actual swallowing of the cholera poison. In Professor THUDICHUM's masterly paper on the subject in the monthly Microscopical Journal, it is stated that doctors have inhaled a full breathing from a person in the last stage of this terrible malady without any evil effects. Yet the minutest atom of the cholera poison received into the stomach, will cause an attack of cholera. A small quantity of this matter drying on the floor of the patient's room, and afterwards caused to float about in the form of dust, would suffice to prostrate a houseful of people. We can understand then, how matter might be flung into the streets, and after drying, its dust wafted through a whole district, causing the death of hundreds. One of the lessons to be learned from these interesting researches of Mr DANCER is clearly this, that the watering-cart should be regarded as one of the most important of our hygienic institutions. Supplemented by careful scavengering [sic] it might be effective in dispossessing many a terrible malady which now holds sway from time to time over our towns.

And also: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 April 1869 Page 4, column 6

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

YARMOUTH The Yarmouth News-Dog.---In the middle of Yarmouth Market-place, on six mornings of the week, a fine dog may be seen entering the shop of Mr OVEREND, the grocer and tea-dealer, with the 'Daily Telegraph' in his mouth. This sagacious animal has been so well trained by Mr OVEREND that he has become one of his most useful servants. Every weekday the dog marches off to the newsman's shop for the paper. This he carefully conveys to his master. His daily mission, however, is not yet done. Mr OVEREND has a friend in the town who takes in the 'Morning Star', with whom he has agreed to exchange papers. When Mr OVEREND, therefore, has read all he desires in the Telegraph, he calls his dog and desires him to "go with this and get the 'Star'." Off bounds the noble animal - never loitering in the street - to the friend's house, where he delivers the paper, and will not page without the other in exchange! "Noble dog! how useful thou art!" - 'British Workman', April 1st, 1869 (with illustration). [This evidently was not an April Fool's joke. An 1869 Post Office Directory of Norfolk lists a John Gartside OVEREND as a grocer of 23 Market place and Hall Quay, Yarmouth].

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 13 April 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

GREENWOOD --- BARKWAY. On the 8th April, at St Michael's Church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, Mr Colin T. GREENWOOD, compositor, of Truro, Cornwall, to Mary Ann, eldest daughter of the late Mr Samuel BARKWAY, innkeeper, Beccles.

SELWYN --- DUPUIS. On the 2nd April, at Kirby, by the Rev the Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, D.D., the Right Hon. Sir Charles Jasper SELWYN, Lord Justice of Appeal, of Richmond, Surrey, to Catherine Rosalie, daughter of Colonel GREENE, C.B., of Kirby Cane Hall, Norfolk, and widow of the Rev Harry DUPUIS, vicar of Richmond and rural dean.

WEBB --- NORMAN. On the 6th April, at Bracondale, by the Rev W.T. MOORE, John Raphael WEBB, Esq., of Rose Hall, Bungay, to Hamet [sic], fifth daughter of Mr Richard Briton NORMAN, of New Catton.

DEATHS

BALLLS --- On the 11th April, at Beccles, John BALLS, painter, aged 63 years.

BANYARD --- On the 7th April, Mr James BANYARD, of Weston, aged 83 years.

BARNBY --- On the 8th April, at Beccles, Mary Ann, youngest daughter of the late Mr William BARNBY, farmer.

COPEMAN --- On the 4th April, at Loddon, Norfolk, Ernest James Henry, the beloved and only child of James Cole and Rose COPEMAN, aged five months.

KEABLE --- On the 1st April, at Henham, much respected, in the 73rd year of his age, Mr Robert KEABLE, for upwards of thirty years head carpenter on the estates of the Right Hon. the Earl of Stradbroke.

MOSELEY --- On the 4th April, at 1, Fonthill Villas, Tollington Park, Robert MOSELEY, Esq., late General Manager of the Great Eastern Railway, aged 54.

WOODS --- On the 31st March, at Hastings, Louisa, second daughter of the late John Jex and Ann WOODS, of Oulton, near Lowestoft.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 13 April 1869 Page 5, column 3

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF SUFFOLK NEWS ......The Bicycle Velocipede.---Young Ipswich - indeed, Ipswich of any age - has not far to go to find itself suited with one of those popular means of locomotion, a two-wheel velocipede. Mr Henry WARNER, King-street, has made arrangements for running his in the Corn Exchange, on Wednesday afternoon and evening. Mr WARNER will give lessons in the management of the velocipede; and every gentleman on Wednesday afternoon will be allowed to have a ride for nothing. Already velocipedes are running in Ipswich ; and possibly ere long, we may witness a velocipede race round the race course. The novelty of the thing attracts general attention. It was only the other day that a lady of ancient mein [sic - mien], and very short sighted, exclaimed, "Why, la bless me! there's a man flying along the road" - the fact being that he was mounted on a velocipede, which he worked with skill and steered with precision. On dit the velocipedeans intend to challenge an ordinary Great Eastern train. - 'Suffolk Chronicle'.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 20 April 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

BRAY --- CAWSTON. On the 6th April, at New Walsingham, by the Rev Septimus Lee WARNER, Mr W. BRAY, of Bungay, Suffolk, to Eliza, widow of the late Mr Fryer CAWSTON, of Blakeney, in this county.

GOOSE --- MABSON. On the 8th April, at St Nicholas' Church, Yarmouth, by the Rev H.R. NEVILL, Mr Agas Henry GOOSE, of Norwich, to Francis, eldest daughter of Mr William MABSON, Bauleal Cottage, Great Yarmouth.

DEATHS

BURWOOD --- On the 5th April, at Yarmouth, Ann, widow of Mr Wm. sic] BURWOOD, aged 88 years.

COPEMAN --- On the 17th April, at Beccles, William, infant son of Barrington COPEMAN, hay dealer.

DURRANT --- On the 6th April, at Yarmouth, Mr Wm. [sic] DURRANT, aged 75 years.

LAMB --- On the 9th April, at Yarmouth, Mr John LAMB, aged 70 years.

HOLMES --- On the 8th April, at Norwich, aged 58, Mrs Sarah Ann HOLMES, relict of George HOLMES, Esq., West Square, Southwark.

TRINHAM --- On the 8th April, at Yarmouth, Elizabeth, widow of Mr Jno. [sic] TRINHAM, aged 93 years.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 20 April 1869 Page 6, column 1

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

WALSINGHAM A Centenarian.--- A few days since there died in the Great Snoring Union House an old woman, named Mary MUSSETT, aged 101 years. She enjoyed good health, and till a few days prior to her decease, was able to walk upstairs without help. She had been used to smoke tobacco for a great many years past, and the afternoon before her death she asked for a pipe which she smoked with great zest. She died without a groan or struggle.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 April 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

APPLEWHAITE [sic] --- GRIMMER. On the 20th April, at St Stephen's Church, Norwich, by the Rev C. BALDWIN, M.A., assisted by the Rev M.B. HUTCHISON, B.A., Ernest Gaskin Basett [sic], third surviving son of Edward Arches APPLE WAITE [sic], Esq., of Pickenham Hall, Norfolk, to Ada Mary, only child of Frederick GRIMMER, Esq., of Bracondale and Thurlton.

BARBER --- NAPIER. On the 16th February, at the residence of the bride's father, by the Rev John TURNER, George Page, eldest son of the late George Simpson BARBER, Esq., of Norfolk, to Eleanor, only daughter of Thomas NAPIER, Esq., J.P., Rose Bank, Essendon, Australia.

BULWER --- HODGSON. On the 20th April, at St Saviour's, Pimlico, by the Rev John WALKER, incumbent, the Rev H. Earle BULWER, of Kidlington, Oxford, to Helen Mary, only daughter of the late Rev John HODGSON, vicar of Hoxne, Suffolk.

KEMP --- YOUELL. On the 22nd April, at the Friends' Meeting House, Great Yarmouth, Henry Holmes KEMP, son of Richard KEMP, of Upper Holloway, London, to Elizabeth Ellen, eldest daughter of the late John Fuller YOUELL, of the former place.

PLAYFORD --- HAYWARD. On the 26th April, at Beccles Church, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, John PLAYFORD, to Fanny HAYWARD, both of Beccles.

DEATHS

CHASE --- On the 20th April, at Bungay, of acute peritonitis, Harry, third son of Mr Robert CHASE, of Bungay, Suffolk, aged 35 years.

CHASE --- On the 26th April, of structure [sic] in the gullet, aged 73 years, Mr Robert CHASE, sen., of Bungay, deeply regretted by his family and friends.

CRABB --- On the 20th April, at Bungay, Mr W. CRABB, V.S., aged 57 years.

FOLKARD --- On the 22nd April, at Hedenham, Mr Thomas FOLKARD, blacksmith, aged 85 years.

LOCKWOOD --- On the 16th April, at Yarmouth, Charlotte, widow of Mr George LOCKWOOD, aged 46 years.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 April 1869 Page 4, column 1

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

VELOCIPEDES! The Improved Bicycle Velocipedes. J. L. KENT & Son, Ironmongers, Beccles, Are now having these Machines made of the very best materials and Workmanship, with Turned Steel Spindles and Bearings, adjustable Spring, and Saddle that can be raised or lowered 3 inches, at pleasure, to suit different lengths of leg, and other new improvements. These machines are very strongly made, and accurately fitted. Weight from 50 to 60 pounds. Price of the Best Machines, for Cash, 7 Pounds 7 Shillings. Cheaper ones made to price required. Purchasers will do well to inspect these Machines before ordering.

GOOD AND CHEAP FLOWERS, PLANTS, SEEDS, And everything required for the Summer Decoration of the Garden. Geraniums, Verbenas, Fuschias, Petunias, Heliotropes, Gazanias, Lobelias, Asters, Stocks, And other Bedding Plants in great variety. Choice Pelargoniums, Ferns & Greenhouse Plants. Thomas A. LAWS, The Nursery, Beccles.

And again: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 April 1869 Page 4, column 2

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

VELOCIPEDES! VELOCIPEDES! The New Bicycle, With All The Latest Improvements. Those manufactured by Richard MARTIN, millwright, machinist, etc, Peddar's Lane, Beccles, Are pronounced to be the best constructed and most elegant in appearance in the neighbourhood. They are made in a superior manner, of the best materials, and embrace the advantage of being both light and strong. Price - Six Guineas and upwards.

And also: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 April 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS ......Felo De Se.---The Deputy-Coroner (Mr S.H. ASKER) held an inquest on the body of man named Edward POINTER, a groom and carter in the employment of Mr Henry SNOWDON, draper, of St George's Bridge-street, Norwich, on Saturday morning. POINTER was about 40 years of age, and groom and carter; and from the evidence it appeared he had been caught in the act of robbing his employer. About a quarter of an hour after, he went out of the warehouse through the shop, and in a very short time news was brought that he had drowned himself. A Juror expressed his opinion that there was no evidence tending to show insanity at any time in the deceased. He believed that, having committed a robbery, he was afraid of the exposure before the public in a police-court, and to escape it he determined to make off with himself. After consulting together and discussing the evidence, the jury, all of whom seemed to have known deceased familiarly, adopted the above opinion, and on being asked if they agreed to their verdict, the Foreman answered, "We have. It is that of felo de se." The Coroner quite agreed with the jury. The interment took place the same night, in accordance with the terms of the amended Act of Parliament. The warrant for this purpose was made out and handed to the Chief Constable, who deputed two police-officers to attend. These, with Mr WOLVERIDGE, the master of the Workhouse, and four paupers, who conveyed the body to the cemetery, the only witnesses of the burial. A substantial oak coffin having been supplied by the benefit society to which the deceased belonged, permission was given for the body to be interred in it, in lieu of the workhouse coffin which had been sent down ; and at half-past nine at night the interment took place on the Episcopal side of the cemetery, without funeral services, and in the absence of relatives and friends.

And lastly: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 April 1869 Page 6, column 1

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

YARMOUTH POLICE Saturday, April 17.---Before R. HAMMOND, Esq. (chairman), W. WORSHIP, Esq., R.D. BARBER, Esq., J.SCOTT, Esq., C.E. BARTRAM, Esq., J. OWLES, Esq., and J.FENN, Esq. ......Leaving A Family Chargeable. Horace PERFECT, an engineer, formerly in the employ of the Trinity Company, was brought up on a warrant charged with leaving his family chargeable to the parish. Mr CUFAUDE, clerk to the guardians, appeared to prosecute on behalf of the Board, who, he stated, had been put to an expense of 20 Pounds by the prisoner for the maintenance of his family and the costs of his apprehension ; the children having been in the Workhouse since June last. On the guardians ascertaining his whereabouts in London, he was written to, stating that if he could pay for the maintenance of his family the warrant should not be executed; but, instead of making any offer to do so, he wrote stating that he was employed as a labourer at 1 Pound per week, and could not do anything for them, and that he was about to leave his place of work, so that the guardians had decided to have the warrant enforced, and the prisoner was apprehended in London on Saturday. Mr RUNBOLD, relieving officer, stated that on the 8th June last the prisoner, who had been residing in Yarmouth, and was an engineer in the Trinity service, went away leaving five children destitute and chargeable to the parish. His wife was away in London he believed at the time, and pageed to Yarmouth on 25th June. Before he went away prisoner called upon him (witness) and asked what he must do with the children, and he replied if they were destitute they could all be admitted to the house. He said he did not wish to go into the house himself, but wished the children to be taken in. He told him that could not be done, and if he left them without making some arrangement for their provision he would be apprehended. On the following Monday the five children came to say their father had gone away, and told them to go to the Workhouse. The children were consequently admitted, and had been in the house ever since, except the eldest boy, who had been placed out. He produced a letter received form the prisoner on the 7th April, in which he admitted his earnings were 1 Pound per week. The Chairman said the man was in some measure, he believed, to be pitied. Addressing the prisoner, he said : I knew you when you were a very respectable man, and earned your fourteen guineas a month. I believe you are broken down entirely from the bad habits of your wife. I commiserate you in your present position, but you have no right to leave your children chargeable to the Union, and must go to prison for one calendar month, with hard labour.