Transcriptions of Beccles and Bungay Weekly News

 

January 1867 Beccles & Bungay Weekly News

>Transcribed from microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library
Janelle Penney --- 2000, 2001

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 1 January 1867 Page 4, column 5 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

On the 24th December, at the parish church, Lowestoft, by the Rev A. HANHAM, Mr Robert PORTER, to Miss Elizabeth Harris SAUNDERS, both of Lowestoft.

On the 25th December, at the parish church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, Mr Isaac VERTIGEN, jun., accountant, Beccles, to Eliza, fourth daughter of Mr Henry TAYLOR, tailor, Shod Friars, South End, Boston, Lincolnshire.

On the 25th December, at the parish church, Lowestoft, by the Rev A. HANHAM, Mr Elijah SNOWLING, to Miss Sarah Ann GRAY, both of Lowestoft.

On the 25th December, at the parish church, Lowestoft, by the Rev A. HANHAM, Mr Benjamin James SUTTON, to Miss Sarah Ann HARMER, both of Lowestoft.

On the 25th December, at the parish church, Beccles, William Richard HOWARD, to Elizabeth TYE, both of Beccles.

On the 26th December, at Wangford Church, by the Rev J.R. CROWFOOT, Mr Joseph MANTRIPP, of Swaffham, Norfolk, to Annie, second daughter of Mrs Sarah WALES, of Wangford.

On the 31st December, at the parish church, Beccles, by the rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, Edward SAMPSON, to Elizabeth Ann OXBOROUGH, both of Beccles.

On the 31st December, at the parish church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, Charles BEALES, to Emma BARBER, both of Beccles.

DEATHS

On the 18th December, at Fakenham, Edward HORSLEY [sic], in his 22nd year, second son of Mr Richard HORSELY [sic], registrar, etc.

On the 23rd December, at Bungay, in his 72nd year, Mr Robert ROWE, for many years cabinet maker in that town.

On the 26th December, at Bungay, in her 17th year, Bertha, youngest daughter of Mr George BAKER.

On the 26th December, in her 25th year, Ellen Sophia Nelson, the only daughter of John PRENTICE, Esq., surgeon, Lowestoft.

No marriages or deaths announced. Instead: -

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 8 January 1867 Page 4, column 4 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS ....Died at Norwich, on the 10th December last, John MANN, for many years Color-Sergeant [sic] in the 47th Regiment. He joined the above corps in the year 1803, and was present in the Peninsula from the beginning of that struggle to the end of it. He had a medal with five clasps, for the following battles: - Nives, Nivelle, Vittoria, Barossa, St Sebastian, and several minor affairs. He subsequently served in the East Indies, in the Mahratta War, Rangoon, Ava (medal). He died st the age of 79 years, beloved by his family and respected by his friends.

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 15 January 1867 Page 4, column 4 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

DEATHS

On the 6th January, at Earsham, Elizabeth, widow of the late Mr Benjamin SAYER, of Stow Park, near Bungay, aged 79.

On the 7th January, at Beccles, Frank, infant son of Mr John SEAGO, bricklayer, aged 11 months.

On the 8th January, at Beccles, Mr Isaac PIPER, tailor, aged 64.

On the 9th January, at Beccles, Mr Robert TAYLOR, late of Geldeston, aged 78 years.

In addition to the above: -

In addition to the above: -

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 15 January 1867 Page 4, columns 2 & 3 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

SOUTHWOLD Fatal Accident..---On Saturday last [12 January] several families of our fishermen were thrown into great grief by the unfortunate fate of some of their relatives through the upsetting of a boat. The names of its crew were Thos. [sic] Henry HURR, aged 28, William and Henry BARBER, 14 and 17; and Samuel WATSON, 22, who alone lived to tell the sad tale, being fortunately rescued by the Mary, of Perth, whilst swimming with an oar. He received every attention from the kind-hearted Captain, C. WAIN, who after restoring him from his exhaustion sent him ashore with a dry suit. WATSON supported one of the boys until the poor lad succumbed to the cold. We regret to say that HURR leaves a wife and young family, the last of which are infant twins. Our esteemed incumbent and other friends have promoted a subscription for the family, which has been liberally responded to.

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 22 January 1867 Page 4, column 4 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library.

DEATHS

On the 19th January, at Beccles, aged 7 months, Charlotte Elmar, infant daughter of Mr Edward SEXTON, brewer, Catton, Norwich.

On the 20th January, at the residence of her son, Mr W.H. TAYLER, New Market-place, Beccles, Mary Ann, relict of the late Mr James Alfred TAYLER, of Warminster, Wilts, aged 70 years.

In addition to the above: -

In addition to the above: -

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 22 January 1867 Page 4, column 4 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library.

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS ....On Saturday night, the 12th January, about ten o'clock, the dwelling-house of Mr Benjamin BLAKE, Sprowston, was entered during his absence, by two men with the aid of skeleton keys, and every room ransacked. It fortunately happened that between ten and eleven Mr BLAKE's son who was going home with his sweetheart, observed a light at the back window of his house, and knowing that his father was not at home, and the house unprotected, he knocked up a neighbour and requested the young woman to call another neighbour to fetch the policeman. The officer (SPALDING), who was in immediate attendance, at once entered the house, and found two old thieves named William LIPTHORP, of New Catton, and William SPENDLOVE, of St Augustine's, shoemakers, in the back premises. Having removed the prisoners to the lock-up, SPALDING returned to Sprowston, searched the house of BLAKE for housebreaking implements, and found 18 skeleton keys, a jemmy, and a dark lanthorn.

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 29 January 1867 Page 4, column 5 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library.

DEATHS

On the 18th January, at Worcester Park, Surrey, S.W., Mr Charles CHALKER, late of Raveningham, Norfolk, in his 83rd year.

On the 22nd January, at North Cove, aged 2 years and four months, Jane Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Mr GOFFIN, machine maker, of the above parish.

On the 22nd January, at Beccles, aged 56 years, Mr Thomas PAIN, son of the late Mr David PAIN.

On the 24th January, at Harleston, Mr John CALEY, auctioneer, etc, aged 45 years.

On the 26th January, at Beccles, aged 44 years, Mr Thomas GOLDSMITH, bricklayer.

In addition to the above: -

In addition to the above: -

Beccles & Bungay Weekly News 29 January 1867 Page 4, column 2 

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library.

COUNTY COURT Held at the Town Hall, on Saturday, January 26th, before John WORLLEDGE, Esq., Judge. This was a special day appointed by the judge for the last examination of George COOKE, a bankrupt, and also for the said bankrupt to make application for his discharge. George COOKE (the above-named bankrupt) filed a petition in this court on the 22nd day of October, 1866, in which he described himself, as late of Thurlton, in the county of Norfolk, blacksmith, and now of St Augustine's Gates, in the city of Norwich, in no business or employment, and was duly adjudicated a bankrupt on such petition the same day. The eighteenth of December last, (the court day at Beccles) was the day originally appointed for the said bankrupt to pass his last examination and to make application for his discharge, when owing to a heavy cause list, and as it was understood the bankrupt would be opposed by some of his creditors, the judge appointed this a special court for the purpose of hearing the case, as he considered there would not be sufficient time to thoroughly investigate the matter on an ordinary court day. The opposing creditors were Charles BECK, Joseph GRICE, and William SPORE (bankrupt's late landlord), of Thurlton, and Charlotte LEMAN, of Norton Subcourse, widow. Mr C. DIVER supported the bankrupt, and Mr COSTERTON appeared for the opposing creditors. The bankrupt, having been sworn, underwent a long examination by Mr COSTERTON, on behalf of the creditors, from which it appeared--that the bankrupt commenced business as a blacksmith about six years ago; that he took the business of William SPORE, of Thurlton, having previously been in his employ about seven years, during which period he received his board and 7 Shillings per week. When he took the shop SPORE valued the fixtures and stock-in-trade to him at 60 Pounds, and as he was going to have the business he agreed to pay that sum. It was to have been paid by instalments of 10 Pounds per year. He paid three instalments amounting to 30 Pounds, and the fourth year he paid 3 Pounds, making altogether 33 Pounds paid by him on that account, and leaving 27 Pounds still due. It appeared that up to the year 1865, the bankrupt had been able to meet his engagements, but after that date he failed to do so, owing to the increased expenses of his family and the insufficiency of his earnings. He had always paid his rent till last year, when, as he was unable to do so, and was also in arrear with the instalments due on the valuation, his landlord (SPORE) gave him notice to quit, which he did about a fortnight before Michaelmas last, taking with him, to Norwich (his present residence), all his household furniture and most of his tools and stock-in-trade, and leaving only a few fixtures on the premises at Thurlton. It further appeared that the bankrupt began business without capital, having the valuation of 60 Pounds hanging over his head, and also owing a further sum of 10 Pounds borrowed money. He had never possessed much furniture, and what he had was worth very little, most of it being second-hand when he bought it. After his removal to Norwich, and before filing his petition, he sold part of his furniture for 2 Pounds, and he also sold a grindstone and sundry tools of his trade, for which he obtained altogether 4 Pounds 19 Shillings 10 Pence. Previous to going to Norwich, the bankrupt collected various sums on account of bills due to him, and out of what he so collected and the sum realised by the sale of his furniture, tools, etc he paid for the removal of his family and goods from Thurlton to Norwich; and he also paid his solicitor Mr HARTCUP, of Bungay, 8 Pounds, for taking him through the court, and the remainder of the money he had spent for the maintenance of himself and family, as he had been out of employment from a fortnight before Michaelmas last to the date of filing his petition. The bankrupt had in his possession, at the date of his bankruptcy, the remainder of his furniture. Those things were seized by the bailiff of the court, who estimated their value at 26 Shillings, when the bankrupt, thinking they were worth more than that to him, procured a friend to purchase them. This sum and a few small debts collected by the official assignee represented the sum total of the bankrupt's assets, and amounted to between 2 and 3 Pounds. Bankrupt knew he was in difficulties about money matters at least a year and a half before filing his petition. He first found that out when Mr MULLENGER of Beccles, Ironmonger, put him into court in April, 1865. In 1866 Mrs Charlotte LEMAN refused to give him credit any longer, when (although he knew he was hopelessly insolvent) he told her he could and would pay her. He told her that to induce her to give him further credit, which she did, believing he intended to pay her. At the time he promised her, he could not see exactly how he should do so. He had made similar promises to Mr BECK, (another of his creditors) but it did not appear that he afterwards obtained goods of him. If he had not received notice to quit, he did not think he could have paid his rent, neither did he think he could have gone on much longer. He admitted he had spent a considerable sum of money in public houses, but stated that Mr SPORE (who is now an innkeeper), had received the greater part of it. Charles BECK, William SPORE, and Charlotte LEMAN, three of the opposing creditors were sworn and examined as to the debts, dealings, and transactions of the bankrupt prior to his bankruptcy. Mr COSTERTON then addressed the court on behalf of the creditors, and submitted to His Honour that the Bankrupt had been guilty of a misdemeanour within the meaning of the 221 sec. of the B.A. [Bankruptcy Act?] 1861. The bankrupt was here subjected to a further examination, but nothing of importance was elicited, and Mr DIVER then briefly addressed the court on his behalf. The Judge having reviewed the evidence stated with regard to the bankrupt's removal from his late residence at Thurlton, that having received notice to quit, he was bound to obey it, and the act of leaving could, therefore, be looked upon as his voluntary act, and for this reason, he could not take that into account against him. With respect to the debts due from the bankrupt, his Honor [sic] stated that if he had not contracted liabilities after he was fully aware of his insolvency, and consequent inability to satisfy them, he (the Judge) would have granted his order of discharge at once, but in this matter he had done wrong. However, he was not satisfied that the bankrupt had been guilty of misdemeanour under the 221 sec. of the B.A. 1861, and it had been decided that a mere suspicion of fraud was not sufficient ground to justify a commissioner in bankruptcy in directing a prosecution for that offence. In the present case there was certainly nothing to justify that course. By the 3rd clause of the 159 sec., he had the power under certain circumstances of refusing or suspending the order of discharge of a bankrupt, and also of sentencing him to be imprisoned for any period of time not exceeding one year from the date of such sentence. His Honor [sic]stated he was of the opinion the bankrupt could not have had, a the time he contracted a certain debt, proved under the bankruptcy of Mrs Charlotte LEMAN to be due to her, any reasonable or probable ground of expectation of being able to pay the said debt, and he therefore, considered it a public duty to punish him for that offence. He thought, however, that it was not necessary to be severe in this instance, and he, therefore, adjudged that the said George COOKE, for his offence, should be imprisoned in the castle at Norwich for the period of one calendar month, and expressed a hope that this would be a warning to persons in similar circumstances to act with honesty and integrity.

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