Transcriptions of East Suffolk Gazette and Beccles and Bungay Weekly News July 1869

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 July 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

AMIS --- FISHER. On the 26th May,at St Nicholas' Church, Yarmouth, by the Rev J.W COLVIN, Mr John AMIS, to Sarah FISHER, of Yarmouth.

NEWLING --- SEAMAN. On the 1st July, at Hopton, Suffolk, by the Rev J. Padmor NOBLE. William Alfred, eldest son of Mr D. NEWLING, of Melbourne House, Spalding, to Ellen Bertha, second daughter of Mr Charles SEAMAN.

DEATHS

ELVIN --- On the 29th June, at Beccles, Anna Maria, wife of George ELVIN, labourer, aged 34.

JARRALL --- On the 30th June, at Beccles, William JARRALL, aged 75.

MAPLESTON [sic] --- On the 27th June, at Market-road, Yarmouth, Mary, widow of James MAPLESTONE [sic], house carpenter, aged 75 years.

SMAIL -- On the 20th May, suddenly, at Nowow, East India, John SMAIL, son-in-law of the late John JONES, of Beccles.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 July 1869 Page 4, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

BECCLES ......Council Chamber. Tuesday, June 26.---Before E.B. FISKE, Esq. (Mayor) An Old Offender. William WRIGHT (alias Bucky WRIGHT) was brought up, charged with stealing two petticoats, two pocket handkerchiefs, and one jacket top, value 10 Shillings, the property of Louisa Jane YOUNGMAN, on the 29th June. The prosecutrix said: I am an assistant in the shop of Mr W. GARNHAM, draper, Beccles. The two petticoats, two pocket handkerchiefs, and jacket top (now produced) are mine. They are all plainly marked with my name in ink. They were last in my possession yesterday (Monday). On that morning I did them up in a parcel and left them in my bedroom, to be sent to the wash. I did not see them again until Inspector COLE brought them to me. Mrs WRIGHT, the prisoner's wife, washed for me, and it was the duty of Mr GARNHAM's servant to take my clothes to the wash. Sarah WRIGHT: I am daughter of the prisoner, and live with him. My mother washes for Mr GARNHAM's assistants. On Monday morning a servant brought a parcel of linen to the house to be washed. It was laid upon a chair, I think it was half-past nine when I saw it lying on the chair. I left it there. I went in again between 10 and 11, and the clothes were gone. I first saw my father about this time in the Horse and Groom lane. I saw a little boy, named SUGGETT, come out of the back door carrying a parcel and my father followed him; and they went down the lane towards Mr HOUGHTON's shop. It was a large parcel tied up in a table cloth, and I could see something white where the cloth did not meet. I asked my father what he had got there, and he abused me. I then went into the house and missed the parcel. I immediately went a little way down the lane, and saw my father standing by Mr JULEN's rag shop, and I heard him say, "If you do not buy them, I'll take them to Mr BUCK's." I saw the parcel taken out of the house lying on the floor of the shop. I then went to the shop with Inspector COLE and found the parcel, and took out of it the clothes now produced, and gave them to Inspector COLE. The clothes are plainly marked with Miss YOUNGMAN's name. My father can both read and write, for I have heard him read and seen his writing. We have no clothes resembling them belonging to us, and none of ours are marked. Arther [sic] JULENS said: I am a marine store dealer, living at Beccles. The prisoner came to my grandfather's shop, where I serve, between 10 and 11, I think. He brought a bundle of rags, as he called them, wrapt [sic] in a kind of bed ticking. I weighed them, and told him they were worth 3 Shillings, and he agreed to take that money. When I shot them out, I saw they were petticoats, pillowcases, sheets, pocket handkerchiefs, and other articles. I sent for my grandfather, but before he came, Inspector COLE came and looked at the clothes. The clothes now produced were among the things the prisoner brought. They remained in my charge about an hour when the prisoner's daughter and Inspector COLE came to the shop, and Sarah WRIGHT sorted the things, took some away, and Mr COLE took those now produced. I did not know what they were when I offered 3 Shillings for them. The prisoner said he wanted to sell the bundle to make up the rent. Inspector COLE said: I am inspector of the police at Beccles. From information I received this morning, I went to the shop of the last witness, where I saw the articles now produced. I then went to the prisoner and charged him with stealing them. He said he believed they were his. I took him to the shop and showed him Miss YOUNGMAN's name upon the petticoat. He said he did not know it. I then took him to the police station, and went to the shop and took possession of the clothes. Prisoner said he did not know but what the things were his or his wife's property till Mr COLE showed him the name upon the petticoat. He was committed for trial to the sessions, and sentenced, on Friday, as will be seen by our report in another column, to 18 months' hard labour. [This largely repeated the details given above. Additional information included: William WRIGHT's age as 50; Arthur JULEN's shop as being in Falcon lane; and that William WRIGHT had 12 previous convictions for various offences.]

And also: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 6 July 1869 Page 4, column 6

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

BUNGAY Fatal Accident.---On Monday morning, the 28th June, a man named Robert FARROW, a labourer in the employment of Mr PURLING, of Earsham, farmer, was riding on the shafts of a waggon drawn by two horses, having a van chained at the back, and when near Earsham Park, the horses suddenly started off. FARROW was thrown to the ground; but he retained his hold of the reins, and was dragged some distance down the hill towards Buck Inn, when another man, who was riding in the van, jumped down and managed to stop the horses, but not until both vehicles had passed over FARROW's body, inflicting such injuries that he survived but a short time. A coroner's inquest, was held on the following day, when a verdict of 'Accidental death" was returned by the jury.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 13 July 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

ABBOTT --- KERSLAKE. On Tuesday last [6 July], at St Nicholas' Church, East Dereham, by the Rev B.J. ARMSTRONG, Leonard John ABBOTT, of East Dereham, to Caroline Lydia, eldest daughter of Mr Thomas KERSLAKE, High Bailiff of County Courts for the same county.

SKEET --- MILLS. On July 5, at the Congregational Chapel, Lowestoft, by the Rev F. GOODALL, Curtis SKEET, of Gorleston, to Ellen MILLS, of Mutford.

DEATHS

BIRCHAM --- On the 12th July, at Beccles, William Edward, infant son of Mr Simon Edward BIRCHAM, grocer, etc.

DURRANT --- On the 6th July, suddenly, at Golding Street, Heigham, of apoplexy, deeply regretted by her family and friends, aged 70, Dinah, the wife of Mr DURRANT, many years at the Norfolk Hotel, Norwich.

HUGGINS --- On the 9th July, at Beccles, John Gooch HUGGINS, carpenter, aged 28 years.

SAFFERY --- On the 5th July, at Bruce Grove, Tottenham, the Rev P. John SAFFERY, Secretary to the Religious Tract Society.

SMITH --- On the 10th July, at Tindal Hall, Ditchingham, near Bungay, John SMITH, Esq., aged 68 years.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 20 July 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

KEMPTHORN --- STEWART. On the 19th July, at Beccles Church, by the Rev W.W. TYLER, curate, Thomas KEMPTHORN, blacksmith, to Hannah STEWART, both of Beccles.

MOUZON --- BROWNE. On the 13th July, at St Nicholas', by the Rev A.P. HOLME, Mr James MOUZON, of Spitalfields, Middlesex, to Emma Jane, the only daughter of the late Mr James C. BROWNE, of Yarmouth.

DEATHS

LEIGHTON --- On the 12th July, at Beccles, Charles William, son of the late William LEIGHTON, gardener, aged 18 years.

SEABORN --- On the 12th July, after along illness, at his residence, High Street, Ipswich, Robert SEABORN, in his 59th year, deeply regretted by a large circle of friends.

SPURGEON --- On the 13th July, at Gressenhall, in this county, Astley Cooper SPURGEON, J.P., aged 63 years.

HAWKINS --- On the 13th July, at Broad-row, Great Yarmouth, Jane, wife of Mr George W. HAWKINS, ironmonger, aged 40 years.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 20 July 1869 Page 5, column 4

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS ......Drowned Whilst Bathing.---A sad accident occurred on Wolcott [sic - Walcott] Beach on Sunday, the 11th July, to two young bathers, terminating fatally to one. A young man named LOADS, son of Mr LOADS, of North Walsham, and John BARNEY, of Happisburgh, son of Mr Benjamin BARNEY, of Walcott, having waded into the water breast high, were returning, when LOADS felt it impossible to retain his footing in consequence of the rapidity of the current, the flood tide running very strong at the time. He called lustily upon his companion, who was few yards in advance, to rescue him, and BARNEY, like a noble fellow, attempted to do so, when he also became similarly embarrassed from the same cause. A man named John READ, of Ostend, thereupon rushed to the rescue, and was happily instrumental in saving the life of LOADS; but alas! John BARNEY was drowned in attempting to rescue his friend. His body was found on Tuesday, the 13th. Had he lived until that day, he would have been 21 years of age. He was universally loved and respected. ......The Cornelius BRIGHAM Fund.---This fund (promoted by certain employes [sic] of the Great Eastern Railway, assisted by numerous contributions from the public) was raised, as will be remembered, for the benefit of Mrs Anna BRIGHAM, who with seven young children was left unprovided for through the death of her husband, Cornelius BRIGHAM, railway guard, from the effects of an accident at the Wymondham station on the 20th February last. The total amount received is 103 Pounds 2 Shillings and 8 Pence.

And also: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 20 July 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

LONDON COURT OF BANKRUPTCY ......Friday, July 9th. (Before Mr Registrar HAZLITT) In Re R. and R.D. BUCKE. This was the first sitting under the failure of Robert BUCKE and Robert Dickens BUCKE, who came to the Court on their own petition, dated the 24th June, and describing themselves as both of Cretingham, Suffolk, carpenters, wheelwrights, and co-partners, the said Robert BUCKE residing at Earl Soham, Suffolk, being also a carpenter and builder, late a farmer. The separate debts of Robert BUCKE are 365 Pounds 2 Shillings and 3 Pence, unsecured; and he thus sets out the causes of his failure: "badness of trade, illness of self and wife, and pressure by creditors." The following names appear in the list: - Henry BLOOMFIELD, grocer and draper, Earl Soham, 15 Pounds 13 Shillings and 6 Pence; William BAKER, timber merchant, Eke, 7 Pounds 6 Shillings 1 Penny; Julia Rebecca BUCKE, spinster, Earl Soham, 151 Pounds; George MASON, timber merchant, Ipswich, 18 Pounds 3 Shillings and 6 Pence; Mr John NEWSON, Martlesham, 33 Pounds 10 Shillings; S.T. SCRIVENER, ironmonger, Ipswich, 7 Pounds 10 Shillings; and the signees of William WELLS, ironmonger, Saxmundham, 14 Pounds 3 Shillings 11 Pence. Mr Edmund CAVELL, solicitor, Saxmundham, as security for 90 Pounds, principal and interest, holds a charge on the bankrupt's interest under his father's will, valued at about the same sum; and the Saxmundham Permanent Loan Society creditors for 118 Pounds 12 Shillings, hold mortgage upon three freehold cottages and a shop at Earl Soham, with [sic - worth?] about 140 Pounds. Robert Dickens BUCKE states that he has only one separate creditor, Mr Edmund CAVELL, of Saxmundham, for 90 Pounds, who is secured as above stated. The joint debts are 45 Pounds, due to the following three creditors: - HARPHAM and Son, iron merchants, Ipswich, 10 Pounds; William JUBY, blacksmith, Cretingham, 30 Pounds; and BROWN, timber merchant, Ipswich, 5 Pounds. It appears that property valued at about 18 Pounds has been sold since the petition by order of the Court. Mr John WARD, of Old Jewry Chambers, attended as solicitor to the petition. Only one creditor proved, Mr H.W. BUCKE, of 7, Union St, Pimlico, for 73 Pounds 10 Shillings against the separate estate of Robert BUCKE, and no appointment of a creditor's assignee was made. The 7th October, at one, was fixed for last examination and discharge, the sitting to be held before Mr Commissioner BACON.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 July 1869 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGE

COWIE --- WEBBER. On the 20th July, at St Mary's, Heston, by the Rev Thornhill WEBBER, incumbent of St John the Evangelist, Holborn, brother of the bride, the Right Rev William Garden COWIE, D.D., rector of Stafford, Bishop of Auckland, to Eliza Jane, eldest daughter of William WEBBER, Esq., of Edmundsbury, Spring-grove, and grand-daughter of the late Sir Thomas PRESTON, Bart., of Boston Hall, Norfolk.

DEATHS

GODBOLD --- On the 23rd July, at Beccles, Mr William GODBOLD, farmer late of Mendham, aged 82 years.

LOVE --- On the 19th July, at Beccles, William, son of Samuel LOVE, bricklayer, aged 2 years and 6 months.

WHITE --- On the 20th July, at Bungay, aged 67 years, Miss Frances Sarah WHITE, sister of the late Mr Robert WHITE, grocer, of that town.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 July 1869 Page 5, column 3

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF SUFFOLK NEWS ......Burglary And Chase.---On Monday morning, about three o'clock, the house of Mr Charles COOK, the Old Times Tavern, California, Ipswich, was entered and robbed of tea, sugar, etc. The thief was first heard by Mrs COOK, who thought the sound issued from the bar. She immediately woke her husband, who very quietly got to the landing of the staircase, and there listening heard the "pop" of a bottle of ginger beer, and upon descending to the third stair he saw a man's head appear from the bar slip window. The fellow immediately made for the window, which he had contrived to open for his escape. Mr COOK, having nothing but his night-shirt on, followed him, and a sharp chase took place. The thief made first for the garden of Mr WILLIAMS, stone mason, where he scaled the gate which was covered with spikes. Mr COOK stood at great disadvantage as he had no boots on, but nothing daunted he followed still garden over garden until he reached the main road, where Mr COOK gained considerably upon him. Seeing this, the fellow rushed a pair of gates over six feet high, at a garden in the occupation of Mr MEADOWS, bursting the lock. Mr COOK followed him twice round the ground, which is about two acres in extent, planted with trees and bushes, but eventually lost sight of him. On reaching home he found two pounds of tobacco and a piece of cooked beef already packed for removal, the would-be thief having also regaled himself with black currant pudding.

And also: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 27 July 1869 Page 5, column 4

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS A Manly Act Of Rescue From Drowning.---On Sunday evening, a boy named HOWARD, of St Edmund's, Ipswich, fell into the river, and was soon drawn into deep water. An attempt was made, without success, to put a wherry off to effect his rescue. Fortunately, at this crisis, Henry HUNT, of Badding's-lane, Quay-side, appeared, and at once, in the most gallant manner, plunged in and saved him from impending death. This makes the fifth life, including a woman's, thus saved by HUNT. As HUNT is a poor working man, with a family, it is proposed to raise a subscription for presentation to him, to mark in some substantial manner the public sense of his repeated acts of heroism. Mr HUGHES, printer at Messrs. FLETCHER's, who resides upon the Quay side, will receive subscriptions.

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