Transcriptions of East Suffolk Gazette and Beccles and Bungay Weekly News

September 1867 East Suffolk Gazette

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 3 September 1867 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

On the 11th March, at Stephen's Church, London, by the Rev J. W. REYNOLDS, Frederic, fourth son of Mr James READ, Flixton, to Caroline, second daughter of Mr Charles CAPON, Bungay.

On the 27th August, at Bungay, by the Rev G. F. MATTHEWS, M.A., Mr Frank CRISP, of London, to Catherine, only daughter of the late Mr G.D. HOWE, of this county.

On the 31st August, at St Michael's Church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, George SHARMAN to Amelia HINSLEY, both of this parish.

On the same day, at St Michael's Church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, Hubert Henry GILL to Rachel SMITH, both of this parish.

DEATH

On the 28th August, at Beccles, Mr John NORMAN, in his 94th year.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 3 September 1867 Page 8, column 1

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF SUFFOLK NEWS Successful Courage.---On Thursday morning, as a man named ROUSE, in the employ of Mr W. FLORY, Brook-street, Ipswich, was driving a four-wheeler along the Butter Market, one of the two traces broke and caused the horse to start off at a furious rate. It turned over the Cornhill, down Tavern-street. When passing Mr R. SMITH's, woollen draper, Mr Richard GRAYSTON, observing that the horse was uncontrollable, gallantly seized the bridle, which he firmly held till he succeeded in stopping the horse at the bottom of Tower-street. There was a hand-cart standing opposite Messrs BACON's Bank, and Mr GRAYSTON seeing he would be dashed against it, vaulted over it without losing his hold of the runaway. Great credit is due to Mr GRAYSTON for the courageous manner in which he came to the rescue, for had not the horse been stopped when it was in all probability some serious accident would have occurred there being two children in the vehicle.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 10 September 1867 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

On the 3rd September, at St John's, Paddington, by the Rev A. LAURIE, Mr John King GARROD, the Grove, Beccles, to Sarah Anne, widow of the late Mr Charles William SHICKLE, of Norwich.

On the 5th September, at Herringfleet, by the Rev A.B. WEBB, John B. PEARCE, architect, of Norwich, to Emma, daughter of the late Mr W.H. MADDSION, of the above place.

On the 5th September, by the Rev G. HALLS, vicar of Clent, Worcestershire, assisted by the Rev E.W.WARREN, curate of Diss, Mr Henry James HALL, Coney Weston, in this county, to Katherine, second daughter of Mr C. FARROW, brewer, Diss.

DEATHS

On the 3rd September, at Holton Terrace, Halesworth, Fanny, daughter of James and Edith CHAPPELL, after a few hours' illness, aged four years.

On the 1st September, at Great Yarmouth, in the 31st year of his age, William Postle DOWSON, youngest son of the late B. DOWSON, Esq.

On the 30th August, at Harleston, after a short illness, in the 56th year of his age, Mr Thomas ADAMS, County-court bailiff.

On the 9th September, at Beccles, Mr James BARNBY, Farmer, aged 82 years.

In addition to the above: -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 10 September 1867 Page 5, columns 2 & 3

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

YARMOUTH Abandonment of a Ship.---The Board of Trade have received the following report from Her Majesty's Consul at New York: - "New York, August 15.--Sir, - The ship S.L. TILLEY, of Yarmouth, left Savannah on the 27th July with a cargo of pine timber, bound for London, and a crew of 21 men all told. Nothing of importance occurred until the afternoon of August 1, when in lat. 35 7, long. 73, the wind increased to a strong gale. At 8 pm laid the ship to under lower maintopsail, the gale still increasing to midnight, when it blew a hurricane, with heavy rain, at which time the pinnace was washed off the skids and the deck load started, the fore and maintopgallant masts went over the side, and the lower maintopsail blew out of the bolt ropes - the sea making a clean sweep over her. I called all hands into the poop to prevent them from being washed overboard. At 12.45 am a heavy sea struck the ship on the weather quarter, twisting the rudder off between the rudder post and the upper band; the ship began to pay off when the following sea took the ship under the counter and threw her on her beam ends, washing overboard the second mate and six men. Cut away the mizzen rigging, when the ship lay about ten minutes and partly righted, the mainmast going by the deck. The remainder of the crew were saved by lashing themselves to the mizzen rigging dead-eyes, the wind blowing with greater violence than ever, accompanied with torrents of rain and a fearful sea. About 7 am on the morning of the 2nd the rain abated, and the mist cleared away sufficiently to see distinctly the outline of the ship, but the sea still making a complete breach over her. Found foremast and foretopmast still standing, but the sail blown to pieces; port side of main rail, quarter deck rail, and all the beams abaft the mizzenmast washed away; rudder completely gone; the fore and after cabins cleared of everything; provisions and water all gone; the gale and sea decreasing, but we were still obliged to keep ourselves lashed to the dead-eyes of the mizzen-rigging, where we remained until the morning of the 4th , when we were taken off the wreck by the whaling bark Union, and were landed on the evening of the 10th, Captain ROGERS having treated us with every kindness, and done all in his power to relieve our destitute condition, nothing having been saved but the clothes the crew stood in. The names of the men lost are John MAYNE, second mate, aged 27; James DENAHAY, steward, aged 28; Charles DAMP, cook, aged 45; Edward JOHNSON, seaman, aged 33; William CHALMER, seaman, aged 45; William CHALMER, aged 17; and John WHITE, boy, aged 17.---Signed Robert CROWELL, late master of the ship S.L.TILLEY.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 17 September 1867 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

On the 12th September, at the Independent Chapel, Beccles, by the Rev John FLOWER, Mr James MOBBS, of Norwich, third son of Mr Aaron MOBBS, of Beccles, to Rebecca Phoebe, only daughter of the late Mr George KNIGHTS, jun., of the same place.

On the 15th September, at Beccles church, by the Rev J.J.S BIRD, B.A., curate, William MANNING, labourer, to Esther CASTON, both of Beccles.

DEATH

On the 11th September, at Yarmouth, in his 53rd year, Mr Isaac PIPER, coach painter, eldest son of the late Mr Isaac PIPER, of Beccles.

In addition to the above : -

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 17 September 1867 Page 8, column 2

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

EPITOME OF NORFOLK NEWS Sudden Death At Walsingham.---On Thursday morning (5th September), about 6.30 a.m., an old woman named Hannah WILLIAMSON died suddenly in this parish. An inquest was held upon the body at the Black Lion Inn, on the Saturday morning following, before Charles WRIGHT, Esq., the coroner, when from certain circumstances coming to his knowledge, coupled with the fact that deceased was a member of a Burial Society in the parish, that gentleman deemed it necessary that the strictest inquiry into the cause of the death should be instituted, and ordered an additional juror to be summoned on the inquest. Mary Ann FRARY, the wife of James FRARY, of Little Walsingham, Labo urer, stated that the deceased was a widow, and had lived with her for the past five years. She was 71 years of age, and was allowed 3 Shillings and 6 Pence a-week from the parish, of which sum 1 Shilling per week was paid to witness for attending her. The deceased had lost the use of her right side, but could walk about. She was cheerful and as well as usual on the day preceding her death. She got up about five o'clock on the Thursday morning, offering to take care of the two children and get breakfast ready, whilst witness went gleaning. When returning home at 7.30, after having been sent for, the old lady was dead. She had not taken any medicine for the past month, and was in a burial club, 10 Pounds being payable at death. Her son Henry paid the levies, and expected to receive the 10 Pounds. Neither witness nor her husband claimed it. Deceased always wished the money to be spent on her funeral. She had lived with her sons William and Henry, but the wife of the former turned her out, when witness's husband took her in. She went occasionally to see her sons, and was there the chief part of the day before her death.---Uri MANN, a married woman, living next door to the deceased, deposed that about 6.20 a.m., on the Thursday morning she hear deceased groaning and went to her. She was in violent pain, and said, "I've got the cramp in my stomach." She had her arms across her body. Witness fetched deceased's sister. She saw a basin outside the door with what appeared to be vomit in it. She did not see or hear deceased vomit. About five minutes after, she fell down, and died shortly afterwards.---Ann WILLIAMSON, sister of deceased, saw her sister about 6.15 a.m. She was in great pain and tried to vomit. Shortly afterwards, she fell down, and died in the chair they lifted her into.---Frances WILLIAMSON, wife of William WILLIAMSON, stated that the deceased came to her house on Wednesday last about 7.30 a.m, and remained there till between five and six in the evening. Witness's husband was at home all day. They all had their meals together. Deceased appeared as well as usual. She said she had suffered from sick headache on the previous Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. She ate her food as usual on Wednesday, and had bread-and-butter and tea for breakfast, and potatoes, herring, and a cup of tea for dinner. They all dined off the same food. Deceased did not complain of anything, and left the house as cheerful and as well as usual. Witness knew there was 10 Pounds to be paid at death, and expected her husband was to have it, as he was the eldest son. The younger son Henry ordered the coffin. Witness did not know who was to pay for it.---The Coroner thought that there was no clear evidence as to the cause of death; it might arise from natural causes, or it might be otherwise; he deemed a post mortem examination necessary to all parties. In these remarks the jury concurred, and the inquest was adjourned for a week, each juryman being bound in 10 Pounds on his own recognizances.

East Suffolk Gazette And Beccles And Bungay Weekly News 24 September 1867 Page 5, column 5

>From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library

MARRIAGES

On the 15th September, at the parish church, Lowestoft, by the Rev A. HANHAM, Mr William GAGE, of Lowestoft, to Louisa HELLEN, of Kirkley.

On the 22nd September, at the parish church, Beccles, by the Rev J.T. JOHNSTON, rector, Henry CALVER, maltster, to Elizabeth Rebecca ADAMS, both of Beccles.

DEATHS

On the 13th September, at Harleston, after a lingering illness, Mr Jonathan HART, aged 75.

On the 10th September, at Bungay, in her 82nd year, Ann, widow of Mr James Taverner READ, late of Marshhouse, Wells, Norfolk, formerly of Bishop's Court, Lincoln's Inn, London.

On the 17th September, in his 72nd year, Mr Francis DRAPER, baker, Bungay.


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