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Mells

"MELLS, a parish in the hundred of Frome, county Somerset, 3½ miles N.W. of Frome, its railway' station and post town, and 14 from Bath. The village, which is large, is situated in a valley, and on a stream which takes its rise in Emborrow pond, on Mendip, and joins the river Frome. There are traces of several camps in the neighbourhood. The yield of coal is very productive on the western part of the parish, and is worked on a large scale by the Vobster Coal Company. Brick-making and lime-burning are carried on. There are manufactories for agricultural edge-tools of a first-class quality. The soil is various. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £600. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Bath and Wells, value £630. The parish church, dedicated to St. Andrew, is an ancient stone structure, with an embattled tower, surmounted by four crocketed pinnacles, and containing eight bells, with a set of chimes. The church is adorned with numerous painted windows on various Scripture subjects. There is a district church at Vobster, the living of which is a perpetual curacy* with the curacy of Leigh-upon-Mendip annexed, value £60. The register dates from Queen Elizabeth's time. The parochial charities produce about £70 per annum, which goes to the repair of the church. There are two Church schools for both sexes, and a Sunday-school, held at the boys' school. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. Mells Park is the principal residence, situated in a finely-wooded park. It is the seat of the ancient family of the Horners. The Rev. J. S. H. Horner is lord of the manor and principal landowner." From The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868) Transcribed by Colin Hinson © 2003

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