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National Gazetteer (1868) - Wrington

"WRINGTON, a parish in the hundred of Brent-with-Wrington, county Somerset, 7 miles N.E. of Axbridge, 10 S.W. of Bristol, and 4 S.E. of Yatton railway station. The parish, which includes the chapelries of Broadfield and Burrington, is situated in a country watered by the river Yeo, and sheltered by the Mendip Hills. The village, formerly a market town under charter of Edward II., is built on the slope of a hill on the road from Bristol to Bridgwater, and consists chiefly of two streets intersecting obliquely, and a number of detached houses. Petty sessions are held on the first Monday in each month. There are a literary institution with reading-room and library, and a savings-bank. Mill puff and flock are manufactured here. About three-quarters of a mile to the E. of the village is Barley Wood, where is the thatched cottage-ornee built by the late Mrs. Hannah More and her sister, and in which she resided for twenty-five years. John Locke was born here in 1632 at a thatched house on the N. side of the churchyard, now partly occupied as a school. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Bath and Wells. The church is dedicated to All Saints. There is also a chapel-of-ease called Christ Church at Red Hill, built in 1844. The Independents and Wesleyans have chapels. The National schools were erected in 1857 at a cost of £1,500; there are besides infant and Sunday schools. The charities produce about £30 per annum, including a small endowment for the schools. A fair formerly held on the 9th September is now discontinued."

"BROADFIELD, a tything in the parish of Wrington, hundred of Brent-with-Wrington, in the county of Somerset, 7 miles to the S.W. of Bristol. It is near Broadfield Down, on the north side of the Mendip Hills."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]