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Ingestre

"Ingestre, four miles ENE of Stafford, is a fertile and picturesque parish, containing 118 inhabitants, and about 1100 acres of land, the whole of which belongs to, and is in the occupation of Earl Talbot, the lord of the manor, who resides at Ingestre Hall, a large ancient mansion standing in the midst of a verdant park of 300 acres, and surrounded by 200 acres of thriving plantations, and 600 acres of lawns and meadows, stretching eastwards to the River Trent, and southwards to the Tixall estate, which was purchased by the late Earl Talbot, and added to the Ingestre estate, now one of the largest and finest in the county, comprising about 12,000 acres.
The manor of Ingestre anciently belonged to the family of Mutton, whose heiress carried it in marriage, in the reign of Edward III, to Sir John Chetwynd, whose descendents became Barons Talbot, and in the year 1784, John Chetwynd Talbot, who had succeeded his uncle (William, Earl Talbot) in the barony, was created Viscount Ingestre, county of Stafford, and Earl Talbot, of Hensol, county of Glamorgan. He was succeeded, in 1793, by his son, the Right Hon Charles Chetwynd, Earl and Baron Talbot, Viscount Ingestre, Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire, who, in 1819, held the high office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. His son, the present Earl Talbot was born in 1803, and his son, Viscount Ingestre, was born in 1830.
The small village of Ingestre lies a little to the SE of the church, and consists of a few neat cottages. At a short distance is Hoo Mill, employed by Messrs Davenport, of Longport, in grinding flint. Little Ingestre is the residence of the Earl's land agent, and Birch Hall, a neat Swiss cottage, is occupied by his farming bailiff. "
[From History, Gazetteer and Directory of Staffordshire, William White, Sheffield, 1851]

Bibliography

'Ingestre Hall. The Historic Home of the Earl & Countess of Shrewsbury'
by Anon
Published 1956, by English Life Publications, Derby.

'The Chetwynds of Ingestre. Being a History of that Family from a very early date'
by Henry Edward Chetwynd Stapylton
Published 1892, Longmans & Co, London.

'The Chetwynd Chartulary, printed from the original MS at Ingestre'
by Hon George Wrottesley
Published 1891.

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Census

The population of Ingestre parish was as follows:
1801 -- 115
1831 -- 116
1841 -- 118

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Church History

"The Parish Church, St Mary, near the SE corner of the Hall, is a small handsome fabric in the Grecian style, built in 1676, by Walter Chetwynd, Esq, at a short distance from the old one, which was taken down, after the bones and memorials of the dead had been removed from it to the new edifice. The rectory is in the patronage of Earl Talbot, and incumbency of the Hon & Rev Arthur Chetwynd Talbot, who is also rural dean of Penkridge, and rector of Church Eaton, where he resides."
[From History, Gazetteer and Directory of Staffordshire, William White, Sheffield, 1851]

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Church Records

Church of England Registers
The surviving parish register of the church of St Mary commences in 1691. The original registers for the period 1691-1948 (Bapt), 1691-1841 (Mar) & 1691-1812 (Bur) are deposited at Staffordshire Record Office.
Bishops Transcripts, 1676-1838 are deposited at Lichfield Record Office.

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Poorhouses, Poor Law etc

Ingestre parish became part of Stafford Union following the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834.

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[Last updated: 3rd December 2009, Mike Harbach.  ©1998 - 2009 ]