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HOWDEN:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"HOWDEN, a parish, post and market town, in the wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 17 miles S.E. of York, and 180 from London. It is a station on the Hull and Selby railway, and is situated near Howden Dyke, at the ferry over the river Ouse. The parish contains Barmby and Laxton, with 12 other townships. Howden, originally called Hovendene, was formerly noted for its secular college, founded in 1266 by Bishop Robert of Durham. There were originally five prebends, to which a sixth was subsequently added. Its revenue at the Dissolution was 101 18s. The town is situated about a mile from the N. bank of the river Ouse. Tho streets are roughly paved, and the houses in general built of brick. It contains the union poorhouse, three banks, a savings-bank, and the townhall: the latter is a stone building opposite the church, in which the county courts are held; also a mechanics' institute, &c. The town is a polling place for the East Riding. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of York, value 178. There are also two district churches at Laxton and Barmby-on-the-Marsh, the livings of which are perpetual curacies, value 70 the former, and the latter 30. The parish church, dedicated to St. Peter, is a cruciform structure with a tower 135 feet in height, containing eight bells. The exterior of the church is decorated, the W. point forming four compartments crowned with spires. On the S. side is the chapter-house, an octagonal building, erected by Bishop Skirlow, and inferior only in dimensions to the chapterhouse at York. The E. side is entirely in ruins, having been destroyed by the army of Oliver Cromwell when on their way to Wressal Castle. A part of the E. window still remains, also effigies of two Knights Templars, and a brass to P. Dolman, bearing date 1500. There is a stone font. The interior of the church was restored and re-pewed in 1850. The parochial charities produce about 40 per annum. There is a grammar school adjoining the church, the vicar acting as head master, also a National school for both sexes. The Roman Catholics, Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans, have each a chapel, and the last mentioned a school. In 1803 Robert Jefferson, Esq., endowed the grammar school with an annuity of 20 for the education of 12 poor boys of Howden, and in 1772 Thomas Cutts bequeathed an annuity of 2 8s. for the benefit of the same school. The Poorlaw Union of Howden comprises 40 parishes. Market day is Saturday. Fairs are held every fortnight on Tuesdays for horses, cattle, and sheep; also two annual horse fairs, the first commencing on the 15th April, and lasting three days, the second commencing on the 25th September, and lasting fourteen days, this being one of the largest horse fairs in England."


"ASSELBY, a township in the parish of Howden, and wapentake of Howdenshire, in the East Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the W. of Howden. It lies on the north side of the river Ouse, not far from the Hull railway."


"BALKOLME, a township in the parish of Howden, Howdenshire wapentake, in the East Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the E. of Howden. The Hull and Selby railway passes through it."


"BARMBY ON THE MARSH, a chapelry in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, in the East Riding of the county of York, 4 miles to the W. of Howden, its post town. It lies on the east bank of the river Ouse, a little below the junction of the Derwent with that river. Some of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of sacking. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, value 30, in the patronage of the Vicar of Howden. The chapel is dedicated to St. Helen. The Wesleyans have a chapel here. The charitable endowments, which include a small school, are of the yearly value of 106. Barmby has two mineral springs, named St. Peter's and St. Helen's Wells."


"BELBY, a township in the parish of Howden, and wapentake of Howdenshire, in the East Riding of the county of York, 1 mile from Howden. The Hull and Selby railway passes near the township, with a station at Howden."


"BOOTH, a hamlet in the township of Knedlington, and parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire in the East Riding of the county of York, not far from Howden. It is seated on the river Ouse, near the ferry named after the village."


"COTNESS, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, in the East Riding of the county of York, 4 miles S.E. of Howden. It is situated on the river Humber."


"EAST LINTON, (and West Linton) a hamlet in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 2 miles E. of Howden. It is situated near Howden Dyke, at the ferry on the river Ouse, and near the line of the Hull and Selby railway."


"KILPIN, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 2 miles S.E. of Howden. It is situated on the river Ouse. The inhabitants are engaged in lime burning, also in the coal trade. The soil is sandy and the subsoil clay."


"KNEDLINGTON, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, half a mile S.W. of Howden. It is situated near the river Ouse, and contains the hamlet of Booth. At the latter place the river is crossed by a ferry. The laud is chiefly arable and highly cultivated. Thomas Clarke, Esq., the lord of the manor, resides at New Hall."


"LAXTON, a chapelry in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 4 miles S.E. of Howden, its post town. The village, which is small, is situated near the river Humber. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in agriculture. The soils consist of, sand and clay. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value 70. The church is a brick edifice, with a square tower. There is a place of worship for the Wesleyans. Philip Saltmarsh, Esq., J.P., is lord of the manor, and principal landowner."


"METHAM, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 5 miles E. by S. of Howden. At a short distance from the line of the ancient Roman way which passes through this township a Roman pottery was discovered, including fragments of urns and other vessels."


"SALTMARSH, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 4 miles S.E. of Howden, its post town. The village is situated on the river Humber. The inhabitants are chiefly agricultural. There is a ferry across the river Ouse. The soil is of a light character, upon a subsoil of sand and clay. Saltmarsh Hall is the principal residence, and has been held by the Saltmarsh family from the Conquest."


"SKELTON, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 2 miles S.E. of Howden, its post town. The village, which is of small extent, is situated on the river Ouse, and is chiefly agricultural. A portion of the land is in pasture. The soil is sandy, with a subsoil of clay. Steam-packets plying between Hull and York pass daily. There is a school for both sexes. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. R. Schofield, Esq., of Sand Hall, is lord of the manor."


"THORPE, a township in the parish of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, East Riding county York, 1 mile N.E. of Howden, on the Hull and Selby railway."


"YOKEFLEET, a township in the parish of Howden, East Riding county York, 4 miles N.E. of Saddlethorpe, on the bank of the river Ouse. The Rev. J. Empson is lord of the manor."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson 2003


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