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This page contains the Extra-Parochial places for the North Riding in 1890.

HUTTON CONYERS (EXTRA-PAROCHIAL). Electoral Division of Wath - Petty Sessional Division of Hallikeld - Poor Law Union and County Court District of Ripon.

Hutton Conyers is an extra parochial district comprising an area of 8,212 acres, situated on the north bank of the Yore, and was formerly a detached member of the liberty and wapentake of Allertonshire. The gross estimated rental is £5,790, and the rateable value £5,357. The Leeds and Stockton branch of the North Eastern railway passes through the township. The soil varies from a mixture of light sand to clay, and is suitable for potatoes, turnips, barley, &c. The population in 1881 was 136.

This place was formerly the property of a branch of the Conyers family of Sockburn, Durham, "whose hall," says Allen, "appears to have been on the north side of the village, in a field now called the Hall-garth, the foundations of which show themselves in every direction; it appears to have been moated round." It afterwards came by marriage into the possession of the Mallories of Studley, from whom it passed to the Aislabies. On the demise of the late Mrs. E. S. Lawrence, in 1845, the estate came into the possession of Earl de Grey, uncle of the present owner, the Marquis of Ripon.

The village stands on the north bank of the Yore, about 1½ miles N. of Ripon. Opposite Hutton Hall, it is said, there formerly stood a cross, known as King Athelstan's Cross, and near is a field, still called Athelstan's Close. On the highland immediately above this are the vestiges of a Roman out-post, or watchtower; and here, on the moor, embedded at a depth of two feet in the solid clay, have been found several Roman horseshoes, four of which are now in the Ripon Museum, and 15 are in the possession of Messrs. W. & F. E. C. Spence, brick and tile manufacturers, by whom they were discovered in 1876.

Hutton Moor was enclosed in 1811.

[Description(s) from Bulmer's History and Directory of North Yorkshire (1890)]

Directories

  • Transcript of the entry for the Post Office, professions and trades in Bulmer's Directory of 1890.


Scan, OCR and html by Colin Hinson. Checking and correction by Peter Nelson.