GENUKI Home page    Great Ayton Parish Great Ayton
Parish

In 1822, the following places were in


the Parish of Great Ayton:


"ANGROVE HALL, a single house in the township and parish of Great-Ayton; 2 miles from Stokesley."


"LANGBARGH, 2 farm houses in the parish of Great Ayton, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; ½ mile N. of Great Ayton, 3 miles NE. of Stokesley, a ridge of rocks, where it is supposed the wapentake courts were anciently held, and whence this wapentake is denominated."


"LITTLE AYTON, in the parish of Great Ayton, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; ¾ mile ESE. of Great Ayton, 3 miles NE. of Stokesley. Pop. 68."


"NUNTHORPE, in the parish of Great Ayton, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 1¾ miles NW. of Great Ayton, 3½ miles NE. of Stokesley. Nunthorpe Hall was formerly a seat of the Constables, whose arms still remain over a door at the south end of one of the out-buildings. The Chapel of Ease, dedicated to St. Mary, is a small dilapidated structure, which is at present condemned to be pulled down, and replaced with a new one: the living was formerly only a stipendary payment of 10. per annum, but it has lately been augmented by Queen Ann's bounty, and established a perpetual curacy; the present incumbent is the Rev. John Thompson, and the patrons, are Thomas Simpson, Esq., and Thomas Masterman.

In this chapel, situated within a few yards of the manor house, there was a chantry founded in the time of king Edward III. It appears to have been-originally private, built and endowed by the lord of the manor, for the convenience of his tenants and domestics; the patronage of which is still appendant to the manor. It does not enjoy rights of baptisms, marriages, or burials. -Graves.

A small Cistercian nunnery was founded here in the latter part of the reign of Henry II. by Ralph de Nevile; but afterwards removed to Basedale. After the suppression of the priory, 27th Henry VIII. the premises called Nunhouse Grange, were leased by the king to William Snowball, for 21 years, at the yearly rental of 6 13s. 4d. and afterwards granted by king Henry VIII. in estate tail, to Kings college, Cambridge. -Burton.

It appears from Domesday book and other authentic records, that this place was anciently written Thorp, from the Saxon Doppe, which simply signifies a village; and that it received its present distinguishing name from the Nunnery, Pop. 110."


"SUNNY CROSS, in the parish of Great Ayton, wapentake & liberty of Langbargh; 2½ miles WNW. of Great Ayton, 2 miles N. of Stokesley."


"TUNSTALL, a hamlet in the township of Nunthorpe, and parish of Great Ayton, wapentake & liberty of Langbargh; 2 miles WNW. of Great Ayton."

[Description(s) edited mainly from various 19th century sources by Colin Hinson. 2010]


This page is copyright. Do not copy any part of this page or website other than for personal use or as given in the conditions of use.
Web-page generated by "DB2html" data-base extraction software ©Colin Hinson 2014