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Parish

In 1822, the following places were in


the Parish of Lythe:


"ACRE INGS, a farm house in the township of Newton-Mulgrave in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 8 miles WNW. of Whitby."


"BORROWBY, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 5 miles WNW. of Lythe, 7 miles NW. of Whitby. Pop. 64."


"BRISCOE, a farm house in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 2¾ miles SW. of Lythe, 6 miles W. of Whitby."


"DALEHOUSE, a farm house in the township of Borrowby, and parish of Lythe; 5 miles NW. of Lythe, 13 miles from Whitby and Guisborough."


"DUN BOGS, a farm house in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 3 miles SSW. of Lythe, 6 miles W. of Whitby."


"EAST BARNBY, (and West Barnby) in the parish of Lythe, east-division of Langbarugh; 1 mile WSW. of Lythe, 6 miles from Whitby, 16 from Guisborough. Population 270."


"ELLERBY, a small village in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 3 miles WNW. of Lythe, 7 miles NW. of Whitby. Population, 80."


"FAWCETTS, a farm house in the township of Mickleby, and parish of Lythe; 7½ miles from Whitby."


"GOLDSBROUGH, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 1¼ miles NNW. of Lythe, 6 miles WNW. of Whitby."


"GOLDSBROUGH FIELD HOUSE, (later Cliff House Farm), a single house in the parish of Lythe; 1¾ miles NNW. of Lythe, 2 miles NE. of Lythe, 6 miles from Whitby."


"HUTTON MULGRAVE, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 2 miles SSW. of Lythe, 6 miles W. of Whitby. Pop. 90."


"KETTLENESS, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 1¾ miles NNW. of Lythe, 6 miles NW. of Whitby. Here are very extensive alum works, belonging to Lord Mulgrave. The coast at this place is steep and rocky, and in the rocks are several large excavations, which may be entered at low water, and afford curious and romantic retreats. In the rocks here, and at Sands end, (another establishment of alum works, belonging to the same proprietor) is frequently found Black Amber, or Jet, by some naturalists called Gagates, which, according to Camden, was classed by the ancients among the rarest jewels."


"LIMBER HILL, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 6 miles SW. of Lythe, 7 miles WSW. of Whitby."


"MICKLEBY, a small village in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 2¾ miles W. of Lythe, 7 miles WNW. of Whitby. The only place of worship here is a neat Independent chapel. Population, 147."


"MULGRAVE CASTLE, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; ¼ mile S. of Lythe, 4 miles NW. of Whitby. Here was a castle, 200 years before the Norman conquest, which then belonged to Wade, a Saxon duke, who died about the year 800, and whose remains were interred on a high hill in the neighbourhood, between two large blocks of stone, each about seven feet high, and whom tradition represents as a giant. After passing through various families, it became the property of Edward Lord Sheffield, who was by Charles I. created Earl of Mulgrave: and of which family it is recorded, that Sir John Sheffield, Knight, and Edmund and Philip, his brothers, were drowned, in crossing the Ouse, at Whitgift ferry, in December, 1614; William was drowned in France, and George broke his neck, in a new riding-house which his father had made of an old consecrated chapel. (see Dugdale's Bar. Vol. 2. p. 387) This family became extinct in 1735; but the title was revived in the person of Constantine Phipps, a captain in the Royal Navy, and a descendent of the Anglesey family, who was created Baron Mulgrave in Ireland, in 1767, and in the year 1774, a lease of the Mulgrave estate was confirmed to him, for the sum of 30,000. and a quit rent of 1200. per annum. His son, Constantine John, was created a peer of Great Britain in the year 1790. By his wife, Eliza Anne, daughter of Nathaniel Cholmley, Esq. he had a daughter, but dying without male issue, in 1792, his English title became extinct, but was revived, in 1794, in the person of his brother Henry, the present Lord, who was created Earl in 1812. The ancient Castle of Mulgrave having been garrisoned by the King's forces in the reign of Charles I. was afterwards dismantled by order of the Parliament; and there is now nothing left from which we can form any just idea of its ancient magnificence. The present seat of Lord Mulgrave, which is also known by the name of Mulgrave Castle, is in a commanding situation on the coast, at a small distance from the ancient castle. The views from the house are romantic and varied. The ground, declining to the south east, opens a fine prospect of the sea; Whitby pier, with the ships coming out of the harbour, the venerable ruins of the Abbey appearing high above the horizon, and the black Promontory of Saltwick, contrasted with the white foaming billows at its foot, compose, altogether, a scene equally picturesque and interesting."


"NEWTON MULGRAVE, a small hamlet, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 4 miles WNW. of Lythe, 8 miles NW. of Whitby. Population, 134."


"PLUM TREE HUOUSE, a farm house in the township of Borrowby, and parish of Lythe; 4¾ miles WNW. of Lythe, 10 miles from Whitby."


"SANDSEND, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 1 mile E. of Lythe, 3 miles NW. of Whitby, situated on the face of a rocky cliff near the sea. Here is an extensive establishment for making of alum, the property of Lord Mulgrave. There is also an abundance of terrace-stone, which is burnt and used for cement; the soil abounds lime stone. In the rocks here, and other places along the coast, black amber or jett frequently found, of which Solinus says :in Britain there is a great store of Gagetes or Jett, a very fine stone; if you ask the colour, it is black and shining; if the quality, it is exceedingly light; if the nature, it burns in water, and is quenched with oil; if the virtue, it has an attractive power, when heated with rubbing."."


"SAVY GREEN, a farm house in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 10 miles W. of Whitby."


"THACKBER HOUSE, a farm house in the township of Borrowby, and parish of Lythe; 10 miles from Whitby."


"TRANMIRE, in the parish of Lythe, and wapentake of Langbargh; 5 miles WSW. of Lythe, 10 miles W. of Whitby; consists of a few scattered farm houses."


"UGTHORPE, in the parish of Lythe, wapentake and liberty of Langbargh; 3¼ miles WSW. of Lythe, 7 miles WNW. of Whitby. There is here a Catholic chapel, built about the year 1812. Pop. 275."


"UGTHORPE LODGE, a farm house, in the township of Ugthorpe, and parish of Lythe; 4 miles WSW. of Lythe, 8 miles from Whitby."


"UGTHORPE RAILS, (later High Park Farm), a farm houses in the township of Ugthorpe, and parish of Lythe; 4¼ miles WSW. of Lythe, 8 miles from Whitby."


"WOODHILL HOUSE, a farm house in the township of Ugthorpe, and parish of Lythe, wapentake & liberty of Langbargh; 4¾ miles WSW. of Lythe, 5 miles SW. of Lythe, 9 miles W. of Whitby."

[Description(s) edited mainly from various 19th century sources by Colin Hinson. 2010]


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