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MARSKE BY THE SEA:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

"MARSKE BY THE SEA, a parish in the eastern division of the liberty of LANGBAURGH, North riding of the county of YORK, comprising the townships of Marsk and Redcar, and containing 1249 inhabitants, of which number, 576 are in the township of Marsk, 5 miles N.N.E. from Guilsbrough. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the archdeaconry of Cleveland, and diocese of York, rated in the king's books at 10. 11. 10., endowed with 200 private benefaction, 200 royal bounty, and 800 parliamentary grant. Lord Dundas was patron in 1799. The church, dedicated to St. German, stands near the edge of the cliff, its spire serving as an excellent land-mark. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. Marsk hall was built by Sir William Pennyman, Bart., in the style which prevailed in the time of Charles I."


"REDCAR, a chapelry in the parish of MARSKE BY THE SEA, eastern division of the liberty of LANGBAURGH, North riding of the county of YORK, 6 miles N. from Guilsbrough, containing 673 inhabitants. The chapel, which has been recently erected, contains seven hundred sittings, of which three hundred and fifty are free, the Incorporated Society for promoting the building of additional churches, &c., having granted 500 towards defraying the expense. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. Redcar is bounded on the northeast by the North sea, the'coast of which is extremely rocky and dangerous to mariners, but the number of lives lost by shipwreck has greatly diminished since the establishment of a life-boat here in 1802. Formerly the place contained only a few fishermen's huts, but of late years it has become the resort of many genteel families, for the purpose of sea-bathing, and the fisheries are now prosecuted with ardour and success. The village contains some excellent inns, and good private lodging-houses, for the accommodation of visitors during the summer months, but in winter it exhibits a somewhat dreary aspect, from the vast quantity of sand which the wind drifts from the beach into the streets."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]


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