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ORMESBY:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"ORMESBY, a parish in the liberty of Langbaurgh, North Riding county York, 5 miles from Middlesborough, its post town, and 1 mile from the Ormsby station on the Stockton and Darlington line of railway. The village, which is considerable, is situated on the main road from Stockton to Redcar, and is-chiefly agricultural. The parish includes he townships of Eaton, Morton, Normanby, Upsall, and Ormsby, and is bounded on the N. by the river Tees. At Cleveland port, about 2 miles to the N. of the village, a considerable traffic is still carried on in timber, lime, coal, and agricultural produce, by means of lighters, though part, of the trade has been diverted by the improvement of the navigation to Stockton, and the extension of the Stockton and Darlington railway. The living is a vicarage* with the perpetual curacy of Eaton annexed, in the diocese of York, value 167, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church, dedicated to St. Cuthbert, is a small ancient stone edifice, with a turret containing two bells. The church was repaired in 1820, at an expense of 700. The parochial charities produce about 12 per annum, of which 3 goes towards Pennyman's school. There is a small library and reading room. Ormsby Hall, the principal residence, is a stone mansion, situated in a small park. Captain J. H. Pennyman, R.E., is lord of the manor."


"CLEVELAND PORT, a hamlet in the parish of Ormesby, in the North Riding, county of York, 7 miles N.W. of Guisborough, at the mouth of the river Tees. It is a subport to Stockton, and is situated near the Stockton and Darlington railway. The line of coast to which it gives name extends from Whitby to the river Tees, abounding in fossils. The Cleveland hounds hunt here. It gives name to an archdeaconry and deanery in the diocese of York."


"ESTON, a chapelry in the parish of Ormesby, E. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 4 miles N.W. of Guisborough. It is a station on the Stockton and Darlington railway. Middlesbrough is its post town, from which it is distant nearly 2 miles. Eston Nab beacon is a short distance from the village. Ironstone is very abundant, and, being extensively worked, has contributed much to the increase and prosperity of the place. In the neighbourhood there are blast furnaces and foundries. The village lies at the foot of a detached hill of considerable elevation called Barnaby or Eston Moor. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to the vicarage* of Ormsby, in the diocese of York, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church is a small ancient structure. On the summit of the promontory called Eston Nab is an ancient Saxon encampment contemporary with the battle of Baden Hill, which was fought in the neighbourhood."


"MORTON, a township in the parish of Ormesby, E. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 4 miles N.E. of Stokesley."


"NORMANBY, a township in the parish of Ormesby, eastern division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 2 miles from the Ormsby station on the Stockton and Darlington line of railway, and 5 N.W. of Guisborough. It is an increasing village. The chief portion of the inhabitants are employed in the iron-stone quarries, and in the brick and tile works. There is a National school for children of both sexes. Normanby Hall, the principal residence, is situated in a spacious park, watered by a rivulet which rises at Eston-Nab. The tithes were commuted in 1839."


"UPSALL, a township in the parish of Ormesby, E. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Guisborough. The Rev. W. W. Jackson is lord of the manor and sole landowner."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson 2003


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