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WEST ROUNTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890.

Wapentake and Petty Sessional Division of Allertonshire - Poor Law Union and County Court District of Northallerton - Rural Deanery of Northallerton - Archdeaconry of Cleveland - Diocese of York.

This is a small parish, containing 1,500 acres and 219 inhabitants. It is valued for rating purposes at £3,997, of which the sum of £2,318 is assessed on the North Eastern Railway Co. for that portion of their line (two miles 54 yards) which lies within this parish. The other landowners are Charles Henry Wailes, Esq. (lord of the manor), West Rounton; Mr. Isaac Scarth, West Bounton; Ralph Mewburn, Leeds; exors. of Richard Lumley, Ripon; George Milner, Esq., Darlington; and Sheriton Holmes, Esq., Newcastle. The surface is generally level, the soil a strong clay, and the principal crops oats, wheat, and beans.

The village is pleasantly situated on rising ground near the river Wiske, eight miles N.N.E. of Northallerton, and 1½ miles from Welbury station, on the Leeds and Stockton branch of the North Eastern railway. The name has been variously written at different times Roughton, Wroughton, Rungeton, Rouncton, and Rounton as at present, and may possibly have some connection with the Saxon Rinc, a prince, though there are no traditions of its having been at any time a royal residence.

The church is an ancient stone structure originally dedicated to St. Oswald, but changed in later times to St. James'. It dates from the Norman era, and consists of nave, chancel, porch, and open bell turret, The chancel arch, with its deep zig-zag moulding, is a portion of the early edifice, and still in good preservation. Another interesting feature is the old font, which is supposed to be Saxon work. The church was restored in 1860, at a cost of £650. The living is a rectory, in the gilt of the Lord Chancellor, and held by the Rev. Edmund Gray, M.A. The tithe rent-charge is £290, in addition to which there are 82 acres of glebe, making the gross value of the living £358. The list of rectors is nearly complete from A.D. 1300.

There is a Wesleyan Chapel in the village, built in 1855.

For school purposes this parish is united with East Rounton, where the school is situated.

[Description(s) from Bulmer's History and Directory of North Yorkshire (1890)]

Directories

  • Transcript of the entry for the Post Office, professions and trades in Bulmer's Directory of 1890.


Scan, OCR and html by Colin Hinson. Checking and correction by Peter Nelson.