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Help and advice for WHORLTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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WHORLTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"WHORLTON, a parish in the W. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 5½ miles S.W. of Stokesley, and 3 from Carleton. It is situated at the base of the Cleveland hills, and contains the chapelry of Faceby, the townships of Potto, Swainby, and Whorlton, and one hamlet The principal village is at Swainby, on the road leading to Thirsk and Northallerton, Whorlton itself being a mere hamlet. There are quarries of good building stone, and in the bills above Swainby vast quantities of ironstone have been discovered, for the transit of which a line of railway has recently been constructed. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, value £90. The church of the Holy Cross contains a canopied monument with the effigy of a Knight Templar carved in oak, and an ivy-tree in full vigour. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have chapels at Swainby, and there are several schools. At Scarth are traces of a house of Augustine canons, founded in the reign of Henry I. as a cell to the priory of Guisboro', and in the parish is the gateway tower of a castle built in the reign of Richard II., and bearing the arms of the D'Arcy, Meynell, and Gray families, its ancient possessors, near which silver coins were lately discovered. The castle and manor passed in the reign of Charles I. to Thomas Bruce, Earl of Elgin, ancestor of the present lord, the Marquis of Ailesbury."


"FACEBY, a chapelry in the parish of Whorlton, Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Stokesley. Northallerton is its post town. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, value £52. The church is dedicated St. Mary Magdalene. The charities produce about £5 per annum. The Primitive Methodists have a chapel. Faceby Hall is the principal residence."


"HEATHWAITE, a hamlet in the parish of Whorlton, North Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Stokesley."


"POTTO, a township in the parish of Whorlton, W. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 5 miles S.W. of Stokesley. It is a station on the North Yorkshire and Cleveland branch of the North-Eastern railway. The village, which is of small extent, is wholly agricultural. There is a school founded in 1736 by Isabella Harker."


"SCUGDALE, a hamlet in the township and parish of Whorlton, liberty of West Langbaurgh, North Riding county York, 5 miles S. of Stokesley, on the coast near Scugdale Head."


"SWAINBY, a village in the township and parish of Whorlton, North Riding county York, 6 miles S.W. of Stokesley."


"TRENHOLME, a hamlet in the township and parish of Whorlton, in the W. division of Langbaurgh liberty, North Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Stokesley."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013


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