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Help and advice for ABERFORD: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

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ABERFORD: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

"ABERFORD, a parish and formerly a market-town in the lower division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, West riding of the county of YORK, comprising the greater part of the township of Aberford (two portions of which are detached from the parish, one being in the liberty of ST-PETER-OF-YORK, and the other in the parish of Sherburn, upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash), and the townships of Parlington and Sturton-Grange, and containing 900 inhabitants, of which number, 579 are in that part of the township of Aberford which is in this parish, 16 miles S.W. from York, and 186 N.N.W. from London, on the road to Carlisle. The town is built on the gentle acclivity of a rock of limestone, near the small river Cock, a stream abounding with trout and eels, over which is a handsome stone bridge. It consists principally of one long street: the houses are in general built of stone, and many of them are handsome; the air is pure and salubrious, and the environs, which furnish agreeable promenades, are thickly studded with elegant villas and thriving plantations. There are extensive strata of limestone, and a productive coal mine, in the neighbourhood. The market, formerly on Wednesday, has been discontinued: fairs are held on the last Monday in April and May, the first Monday in October, the first Monday after the 18th of that month, and the first Monday after the 1st of November. Constables and other officers are appointed at the court leet of the lord of the manor. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the archdeaconry and diocese of York, rated in the king's books at £6. 1. 8., endowed with £400 private benefaction, and £400 royal bounty, and in the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of Oriel College, Oxford. The church, dedicated to St. Richard, is an ancient structure, exhibiting portions in the early, decorated, and later styles of English architecture. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. A National school has been erected on the site of one formerly endowed by Lady Elizabeth Hastings. At the distance of a mile north of the town are vestiges of Castle-Cary, an ancient Norman fortification."


"PARLINGTON, a township in the parish of ABERFORD, lower division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, West riding of the county of YORK, 7 miles S.W. from Tadcaster, containing 229 inhabitants."


"STURTON GRANGE, a township in the parish of ABERFORD, lower division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, West riding of the county of YORK, 7 miles from Leeds, containing 92 inhabitants."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]