Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted

Help and advice for ADDINGHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it.

We are in the process of upgrading the site to implement a content management system.

ADDINGHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

"ADDINGHAM, a parish comprising the township of Addingham, in the eastern division of the wapentake of STAINCLIFPE and EWCROSS, and part of the township of Beamsley, in the upper division of the wapentake of CLARO, West riding of the county of YORK, and containing 1650 inhabitants, of which number, 1570 are in the township of Addingham, 6 miles S.E. from Skipton. The living is a discharged rectory, in the archdeaconry and diocese of York, rated in the king's books at £9. 7. 8., endowed with £600 private benefaction, and £ 1100 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of Mrs. Mary Cunliffe, The church, dedicated to St. Peter, is an ancient structure, pleasantly situated on an eminence near the river Wharf. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists, and, in the vicinity, one for the Society of Friends. A considerable quantity of cotton goods is made here. At the distance of a mile are vestiges of a Roman encampment."


"BEAMSLEY, a township in the parishes of ADDINGHAM and SKIPTON, which are in the upper division of the wapentake of CLARO, West riding of the county of YORK, 6 miles N.E. from Skipton, containing 312 inhabitants. An hospital for thirteen poor women was founded here by Margaret, Countess of Cumberland, under letters patent granted in the 35th of Elizabeth, and endowed with property which, in 1820, produced £357. 9. 4. per annum, from which sum, twelve of the alms-women receive annuities of £16 each, and the thirteenth, one of £18: they have separate apartments, and there is a chapel in which prayers are read daily."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]