Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted
Page 1 of 4

Help and advice for BRAMHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it. We have a number of people each maintaining different sections of the web site, so it is important to submit information via a link on the relevant page otherwise it is likely to go to the wrong person and may not be acted upon.

BRAMHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

"BRAMHAM, a parish partly in the liberty of ST-PETER-of-YORK, East riding, but chiefly in the upper division of the wapentake of BARKSTONEASH, West riding, of the county of YORK, comprising the townships of Bramham and Clifford, and containing 1987 inhabitants, of which number, 970 are in the township of Bramham, 4 miles S.S.E. from Wetherby. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of York, rated in the king's books at £6. 7. 6., endowed with £400 private benefaction, £400 royal bounty, and £600 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Dean and Canons of Christ Church, Oxford. The church is dedicated to All Saints. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. A battle was fought here, in 1408, between Sir Thomas Rokeby, sheriff of Yorkshire, and the earl of Northumberland, in which the earl was defeated and slain, and by which the possession of the crown was secured to Henry IV. There are visible remains of the ancient Watling-street on Bramham moor, a mile north of the village: from the middle of this moor is an extensive prospect of a well-cultivated district, which abounds also with freestone, limestone, and coal. A fund of £ 11 per annum, arising from land purchased by various charitable bequests, is appropriated for the instruction of six children, four from the township of Bramham, and two from that of Clifford."


"BOSTON, a township, joint with Clifford, in the parish of BRAMHAM, wapentake of BARKSTONE-ASH, West riding of the county of YORK, 4 miles W. from Tadcaster. The population is returned with Clifford. This village is of recent origin, the first house having been built in 1753. Owing to the discovery, in 1744, of a saline spring in the vicinity, it has now become a place of fashionable resort. A pump-room, with hot and cold baths, has been erected: the air is pure, and the situation being in a vale, on the southern side of the river "Wharfe, is extremely picturesque. An episcopal chapel, built on land given by Mr. Samuel Tate, was consecrated in 1814. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. A charity school was founded by Lady Elizabeth Hastings."


"CLIFFORD, a township in the parish of BRAMHAM, upper division of the wapentake of BARKSTONE-ASH, West riding of the county of YORK, 3 miles S.S.E. from' Wetherby, containing 1017 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]