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GUISELEY:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"GUISELEY, a parish in the upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, West Riding county York, 2 miles S. of Otley, and 9 N.W. of Leeds, its post town. The Horsforth station on the North-Eastern line is about 4 miles from the village. The townships of Carlton and Guiseley are included in this parish The village, which is still very considerable, was once a market town. Woollen goods are manufactured, and there are mills on the several streams in the neighbourhood. The greater portion of the commons were enclosed in 1796. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Ripon, value 751, in the patronage of G. L. Fox, Esq., for two turns, and of Trinity College for one. The church, dedicated to St. Oswald, is an ancient structure with square embattled tower and porch. It contains several monuments. The register commences in the year 1556. In addition to the parish church, there are four district churches at Horsforth, Rawden, Woodside, and Yeadon, the livings of all which are perpetual curacies,* varying in value from 108 to 163. The parochial charities consist of 52 yearly for the poor, and an endowment of 59 for Moore's free school. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel, and there is a parochial school for boys aid girls. There is an ancient market cross, and some stone coffins have been found in the neighbourhood. Fairs are held on the Mondays after the 11th April and 11th October, chiefly for live stock."


"CARLTON, a township in the parish of Guiseley, wapentake of Skyrack, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the S.E. of Otley."


"HENSHAW, a hamlet in the township of Yeadon, and parish of Guiseley, West Riding county York, 3 miles S. of Otley, and 6 N.E. of Bradford."


"HORSFORTH, a chapelry in the parish of Guiseley, upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, West Riding county York, 6 miles N.W. of Leeds, its post town. It is a station on the Leeds, Harrogate, Thirsk, and Stockton section of the North-Eastern railway. The village, which is considerable, is situated on the river Aire, which is crossed by an iron bridge, erected in 1819, at the expense of 1,500, by J. Pollard, Esq. The inhabitants are principally employed in the cloth trade. Here is a mechanics' institute, also several stone-quarries. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value 158. The church is a stone structure, and has one bell. There are places of worship for Independents, Baptists, Wesleyans, Primitive and Reformed Methodists. There are two Church schools for both sexes, also Sunday-schools. Horsforth Hall is the principal residence. John Spencer Stanhope, Esq., is lord of the manor."


"NEWLAY, a hamlet partly in the parish of Guiseley, upper division of Skyrack wapentake, and partly in the chapelry of Bramley and parish of Leeds, West Riding county York, 5 miles W. by N. of Leeds. It is situated in the valley of the river Aire, here crossed by a cast-iron bridge constructed in 1819. There are woollen-mills and dye-houses, affording employment to most of the inhabitants."


"RAWDEN, a township and chapelry in the parish of Guiseley, upper division of Skyrack wapentake, West Riding county York, 7 miles N.W. of Leeds, its post town, and 5 S. of Otley. It has a station at Apperley Bridge, on the Midland Counties railway. The village is situated near the road from Leeds to Otley, on the brow of an eminence in the valley of Airedale. A portion of the inhabitants are engaged in the cloth trade. The soil consists of sand, loam, and gravel. The substratum contains coal of inferior quality, which is wrought to a moderate extent, and there are quarries of excellent building-stone, from which the materials for St. Katherine's docks in London were partly supplied. The land is chiefly in pasture and meadow, with a small proportion of arable and woodland. The neighbourhood is studded with numerous gentlemen's seats. Rawdon Hall, the ancient seat of the-Rawdon, Earls of Moira in Ireland, is now in a dilapidated state, and Layton Hall, for many centuries the seat of the Layton family, has been converted into cottages. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value 108. The church is an ancient stone edifice with a square tower containing a clock and one bell. It was thoroughly repaired in 1825. The parochial charities produce about 50 per annum, of which 10 goes to the free school. There are also a British and a Sunday school. The Independents, Wesleyans, Society of Friends, and Baptists have each a place of worship. The Baptist college, founded by the Northern Baptists, was erected at an outlay of 10,000, and opened in 1859. There is a training school for both sexes belonging to the Society of Friends. This place gives the title of earl and baron to the Marquis of Hastings."


"WOODSIDE, a hamlet and ecclesiastical district in the parish of Guiseley, wapentake of Skyrack, West Riding of York, 5 miles N.W. of Leeds, and 1 mile from the Carrbridge station of the North-Eastern railway. The district in 1861 contained a population of 2,815. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value 150, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is dedicated to St. James. There are several Dissenting chapels, and National and Sunday schools. John Spencer Stanhope, Esq., is lord of the manor and principal landowner."


"YEADON, a township, town, and ecclesiastical district in the parish of Guiseley, upper division of Skyrack wapentake, West Riding county York, 6 miles N.E. of Leeds, 8 N.W. of Bradford, and 3 S. of Otley. At Apperley Bridge, about 2 miles distant from the town of Yeadon, but within the township, is a station on the Midland, and at Horsforth, about 3 miles distant, is a station on the North-Eastern railway. The town is situated on the N. side of Airedale, in the midst of a thriving manufacturing district. Its population in 1861 was 4,109, but that of the township and ecclesiastical district of St. John, which are co-extensive, contained 4,259 inhabitants. The township is divided into Upper and Lower Yeadon, and contains the hamlets of Henshaw and Apperley Lane. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the woollen manufacture, which is extensively carried on both by firms and private individuals, and there are several bleach works. The streets and houses are lighted with gas from works established in 1844. The surface, which is watered by copious springs, is chiefly high moorland, affording good pasture. The soil is various, but rich in parts, upon a subsoil of gravel and rock. Lane Head House and Low Hall are the principal residences. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value 163, in the patronage of the Rector of Guiseley. The church, dedicated to St. John, was erected in 1842. The Wesleyans, Reformed Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists have chapels. There are National and Sunday schools, the latter held at the church."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson 2003


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