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Help and advice for HALIFAX: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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HALIFAX: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"HALIFAX, a parish and market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, in the wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 7 miles S.W. of Bradford, 16¼, from Leeds, and 194 N.N.W. of London by road, and 203 by rail. It has stations on the Lancashire and Yorkshire, and on the Leeds, Bradford, and Halifax Junction lines, thus communicating with the Great Northern, London and North Western, and Midland railways. The town is situated on the river Hebble, a tributary to the river Calder, and has a canal connected with the Aire and Calder navigation, which, together with the Rochdale canal, affords great facilities of water communication with most of the important manufacturing towns in the N. The parish contains 23 townships, the principal being Elland-cum-Greetland, Halifax, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse, Northowram, Ovenden, Rastrick, Skircoat, Southowram, Sowerby, Warley, Heptonstall, Rishworth, Stainland, &c. The town was formerly an insignificant place, having only thirteen houses in the 15th century, but the introduction of the manufacture of woollen goods has made this place now one of the most important towns in Yorkshire. It is supposed that the town derived its name from a chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist, whence some authors take Halifax to mean Holy Face, and others Holy Ways. In 1642, during the Civil War, the town was taken and garrisoned for a time by the royalist forces, but subsequently fell into the hands of the parliamentary forces, at which time it returned two members to parliament, but was subsequently disfranchised. It was again made a parliamentary borough under the Reform Act, and sends two members to parliament, the bounds including the township of Halifax, and parts of North and South Owram. It was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1848. The borough is governed by a mayor, 10 aldermen, and 30 councillors, under the style of the "mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Halifax, and is divided into six wards. The population of the borough in 1851 was 33,579, and in 1861, 37,015, showing an increase of 3,436. The district abounds with coal, iron, and gritstone. The manufactures of Halifax are extensive, the principal trade being in woollen cloths, worsted, damasks, camlets, cotton, cards for cotton spinning, dyeing, carpets and rugs, and silk weaving. A large number of the inhabitants are employed in the coal mines, iron works, stone quarries, chemical works, and several other branches of industry. The town has a pleasant and clean appearance, being built on the slope of a hill. It has some fine streets, and is well paved and lighted with gas. It contains a Piece Hall, or market-house, built in 1799 at a cost of 112,000; it is in the form of an oblong square, occupying a space of 10,000 square yards, and is three stories high on the E. side, and two on the others, each story having a colonnade in front. There are 312 separate rooms for warehousing goods. It was formerly a place of great business, but under the factory system has been almost superseded as a market-place. In the centre is a lawn, where galas, public fetes and entertainments take place. During the borough elections, the hustings are erected in this place. Saturday is the day of sale, and merchants and manufacturers from all parts of the country meet to transact business. In commemoration of the peace of 1856, two oxen were roasted whole in this place. The mechanics' institute contains a large hall, capable of accommodating 1,300 persons, suitable for concerts, lectures, &c. It was erected in 1856. It has an extensive library, and the news-rooms are well supplied with newspapers and periodicals. In the same building is the Halifax school of art and a penny savings-bank, now in connection with the institution. The Halifax infirmary, erected on a better site in 1834, and enlarged in 1864, is a very extensive building. The Odd Fellows' Hall, situated in St. James's-road, is a stone edifice, containing several rooms, which are let out for concerts, &c. Attached to it is a commodious inn. A new market has been erected, which is abundantly supplied with butcher's meat, fish, vegetables, &c. There are also three banks, three savings-banks, subscription and circulating library, theatre, museum, assembly and concert rooms. Petty sessions for the borough are held every Tuesday and Friday in the townhall, at which the mayor presides. The new townhall is situated in Crossley-street, and was erected in 1863 from the designs of the late Sir Charles Barry. It was opened by the Prince of Wales on the 4th of August, 1863. Halifax is the seat of a Poor-law Union, and the head of County Court and superintendent registry districts. The union poorhouse is situated in Gibbet-lane. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Ripon, value £1,678, in the patronage of the crown. The parish church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is a stone structure, situated at the E. end of the town, with a tower containing a clock and thirteen bells**. The date of its erection is uncertain; but it is supposed to be about the 11th century. Eleven stained-glass windows have been lately inserted in different parts of the church. A carved screen divides the chancel from the body of the church. There is an ancient stone font with a carved cover, near to which is the figure of an old man holding the poor box. Beneath the chancel is a crypt. There were formerly in the church several monuments and brasses to the Rokeby, Saville, and Waterhouse families. The church has a carved and panelled ceiling, bearing the arms and emblems of all the vicars and the principal laity of Halifax. In the churchyard are some gravestones bearing date 1566. The small tithes were commuted by Act of Parliament in 1829 to a vicar's rate. In addition to the parish church there are the following district churches-viz: Trinity, situated in Harrison-lane, the living of which is a perpetual curacy, value £190, in the patronage of the vicar. St. James's, situated in North Parade, is a perpetual curacy, value £250, also in the gift of the vicar. All Souls', built and endowed at the expense of Edward Akroyd, Esq., is situated on Haley Hill. It is a costly edifice, the noblest work of its kind designed by G. G. Scott. Granite, serpentine, marbles, mural paintings and stained glass, and elaborate sculpture, are lavished on every part; and its fine spire may be seen for many miles round. It contains a peal of eight bells. There are places of worship for Roman Catholics, Baptists; Independents, Wesleyans, Methodist New Connexion, Primitive Methodists, Unitarians, and Quakers. One of the Independent chapels is a Gothic edifice, said to be the finest used by this religious body in the kingdom. It has a tower and spire, and cost upwards of £10,000. The charities of Halifax are very numerous, including Queen Elizabeth's free grammar school, with an endowment of £189, and three scholarships at Magdalene College, Cambridge; Smith's school, endowed with £19 per annum; Hopkinson's and Crowther's' almshouses and schools; the almshouses and schools founded by Nathaniel Waterhouse, who in 1642 bequeathed certain lands for the maintenance of 12 poor persons, and for the education and maintenance of 10 boys and 10 girls, to be chosen from certain townships of Halifax. The income of the charity amounted at the foundation to about £130 per annum, but owing to the enhanced value of the property, it had risen in 1807 to £1,380. In consequence of this great increase of the funds, the governors obtained an Act of Parliament empowering them to extend this charity. They erected a commodious edifice containing three sides of a square. On each wing are 12 almswomen, and the centre is occupied by schools for 30 boys and 30 girls, with residences for the governor and schoolmaster. The cost of erection was £10,000. In 1855 Mr. Frank Crossley, now Sir Francis Crossley, Bart., one of the carpet manufacturing firm of Messrs. John Crossley and Sons, and M.P. for the West Riding of York, erected and endowed 22 almshouses near his own residence. Each house has a separate entrance, and contains a living room, bed-chamber, and cellars. The houses at each end and the one in the centre have an extra story, which gives them the appearance of towers. Over the second floor window of the second one is a panel bearing the arms of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Crossley, and a quotation from 1 Chronicles xxix. 14, "Of thine own have we given thee." The alms-people are chosen irrespective of sex, either married or single, but they must have been members of some Protestant Trinitarian denomination for at least two years, and each applicant must be incapacitated for labour. The allowance to each married almsman is 8s. 6d. per week, and each almswoman 6s. per week, paid every Friday. The People's Park, covering an area of 12½ acres, laid out under the superintendence of Sir J. Paxton and Mr. Milner of the Crystal Palace, in walks, shrubberies, ornamental lakes, flower gardens, and embankments, cost upwards of £50,000, the whole of which was defrayed by the same gentleman. In the grounds are two immense vases, and eight life-size marble statues, representing Apollo, Sophocles, Venus, Hercules, Telemachus, Diana, and an Italian dancing and music girl. In token of the esteem in which he is held by his fellow-townsmen, they have erected a life-size marble statue, bearing the following inscription:- "This statue of Frank Crossley, Esq., M.P. for the West Riding of York, donor of the People's Park, was erected 1860 by the inhabitants of Halifax, his native town, as a tribute of gratitude and respect to one whose public benefactions and private virtues deserved to be remembered." The borough is bound to expend 300 guineas per annum in the maintenance of this park. Mr. Joseph Cressley, his brother, has since erected a similar row of almshouses on the S. side of the People's Park. And their elder brother, Mr. John Crossley, is now completing a more extensive pile of building on an adjacent moor, which is designed to be an orphanage for the maintenance and education of a considerable number of children. A fine equestrian bronze statue of Prince Albert has just been erected in the town. A few British coins have been found in the neighbourhood. The Rev. -- Briggs, who calculated the first table of logarithms, and bishops Ferrar (martyr) and Carr, were natives of this parish. Archbishop Tillotson was born at Sowerby, and Sir B. Saville at Bradley, in this parish. Watson, author of the "History of Halifax," was curate, and Sir W. Herschell the organist, of the parish church. It was here that Defoe wrote his "Robinson Crusoe."-Two newspapers are published in the town, called the Halifax Guardian and the Halifax Courier, both on Saturday. Saturday is market day. Fairs are held on the 24th June and first Saturday in November for cattle.

**a futher bell was added in 2005 to the existing thirteen [James Holdsworth Feb. 2008]. "


"BARKISLAND, a chapelry and township in the parish of Halifax, and wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 5 miles to the S.W. of Halifax, its post town. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the woollen and worsted manufacture. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £40, in the patronage of the vicar. A free school was founded and endowed in 1657, by Sarah Gledhill, the income of which is now £32. There is an almshouse and some other charities. Near Barkisland Hall, now a farmhouse, is a Druidical circle called Wolf Fold."


"BOLTON BROW, a hamlet in the township of Skircoat, and parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile from Halifax. It is near the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway."


"BOOTH TOWN, a hamlet in the township of North Owram, and parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile from Halifax."


"BRADSHAW, a village in the township of Ovenden, and parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile to the N.W. of Halifax, its post town. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax."


"BRIERS, a village in the parish of Halifax, and wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the E. of Halifax. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, of the value of £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church is dedicated to St. Ann in the Grove."


"BRIGHOUSE, a hamlet in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the S.E. of Halifax. It is situated on the banks of the river Calder, and is a station on the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway. The cotton, woollen, and worsted manufactures form the principal employment of the inhabitants. Good stone is quarried near the village. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, of the value of £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. There is a chapel belonging to the Wesleyan Methodists."


"CATHERINE SLACK, a village in the township of North Owram, and parish of Halifax, in the wapentake of Morley, West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the N.E. of Halifax."


"CHARLESTOWN, a village in the township and parish of Halifax, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax."


"COLEYS, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax."


"COTE, a hamlet in the parish of Halifax, in the West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles S.E. of Halifax."


"CROSTON, (or Crosstone), a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile W. of Halifax, its post town, and 6 from Huddersfield. The living is a curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax."


"ELLAND WITH GREETLAND, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding of county York, 3 miles S. of Halifax, its post town. It is situated on the river Calder, over which is a handsome stone bridge. It is a railway station on the Lancashire and Yorkshire line. This was formerly a market town, and had a cloth-hall of its own. The manor was held by the Ealand family, who procured various privileges from Edward II. The town is well paved, clean, and lighted with gas. There are collieries, and quarries of a superior kind of stone for building purposes, in the immediate vicinity. Cotton and woollen goods are extensively manufactured, also machinery for carding. Large quantities of tiles, bricks, and black earthenware are made, and there are some copperas works. To the W. is the hamlet of Greetland, the greater part of which was moorland previous to 1803, when an Act was procured for its enclosure. On the N. side of the river Calder is the Calder and Hebble navigation, and near this point the railway passes through a tunnel 410 yards in length. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £200, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church is an ancient stone structure with a tower containing a peal of eight bells. It has a very handsome E. window with the arms of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and is dedicated to St. Mary. The register commences in 1559. The Independents, Wesleyans, New Connection Methodists, Baptists, and Unitarians, have each a chapel. There is a National school for boys and girls, also an endowed school for ten girls, founded in 1734 by Grace Ramsden. The Church Missionary Society has a college here. The trustees of the Saville estates are the lords of the manor. Near the village is the "Spa Well," the water of which holds in solution sulphuretted hydrogen and a free alkali, and at Greetland is a similar spring. A fair is held on the first Monday after 12th August."


"ERRINGDEN, a township in the parish of Halifax, in the West Riding county York, 7 miles N.W. of Halifax. Manchester is its post town. It is situated in a hilly and scattered district, and includes the villages of Hebden Bridge, where there is a railway station on the Lancashire and Yorkshire line, and Mytholmroyd. Cotton spinning is carried on here. There is no place of worship in the township, but there are churches and chapels in the adjoining districts, which are attended by the inhabitants of Erringden."


"FIXBY, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles N. of Huddersfield, and 4 S.E. of Halifax. Coal and stone are found in this neighbourhood in large quantities. C. C. Thornhill, Esq., is lord of the manor. Fixby Hall is the principal residence."


"FRIEND LEY, a hamlet in the township of Warley and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Halifax."


"GREETLAND, a township united with Elland, in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles S.W. of Halifax, its post town. The Leeds and Manchester railway passes through the township The people are mostly employed in the cotton and worsted mills, in the manufacture of woollen cloth, and in the stone quarries. The village, which is very populous, forms a suburb of Halifax. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to the vicarage* of Halifax, in the diocese of Ripon. The church is a modern structure dedicated to St. Thomas. The Wesleyan, Reformed, and Primitive Methodists, and Bible Christians have places of worship, and there is a day school for both sexes belonging to the Wesleyans. A Roman altar dedicated by Titus Aurelius Aurelianus to the god of the city of the Brigantes, and other remains, have been found in the neighbourhood."


"HALEY HILL, a village in the township of Northowram and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax."


"HEATH, a hamlet in the township of Skircote and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles from Halifax."


"HEBBLE BRIDGE, a village in the township of Ovenden and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.W. of Halifax."


"HEBDEN BRIDGE, a village and post town in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 8 miles W. of Halifax, and 23½ from Manchester by the Eastern section of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway, on which it is a station. The village is situated in the vale of Todmorden, and is divided into two parts by the river Hebden, a small branch of the Calder. The cotton manufacture is extensively carried on, for which several factories have been erected, affording employment to the greater part of the population. There are also some silk mills of comparatively recent establishment. A mechanics' institution was established in 1838, and the Calder Vale Agricultural Society hold their meetings here for the distribution of prizes. The township is intersected by the Rochdale canal and the Manchester and Leeds section of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway. Ashlar stone of excellent quality for bridges, &c., is extensively quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £230, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church is modern. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans."


"HEPTONSTALL, a township and chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 8 miles W. of Halifax, its post town, 4½ N.E. of Todmorden, and 1½ mile N. of the Hebden Bridge railway station. This chapelry, which extends to the confines of Lancashire, is bounded on the S. by the river Calder. The village is situated on rising ground, on the Leeds and Manchester railway, near the canal. The inhabitants are employed in the cotton and worsted mills. Stone is quarried. The land is marshy, and the soils light and sandy. A very considerable portion is uncultivated, and the lands, which are enclosed, are chiefly meadow and pasture. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £150. The church, which was erected in 1854 near the site of the old one, is a stone edifice with a square tower containing a clock and six bells*. It is dedicated to St. Thomas-a-Becket, and the interior contains several stained windows. There are some charities of small amount. Here is a boys' school, founded in 1643 by the Rev. Charles Greenwood, also a Sunday-school. The Baptists and Wesleyans have each a chapel. The lords of the manor are the trustees of the Savile estates. An annual cattle fair is held on Easter Tuesday.

* Since 1911, the tower has contained eight bells (James Holdsworth, 2004)."


"HIPPERHOLME, a township in the parish of Halifax, lower division of the wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax, its post town, 2 N.W. of Brighouse, and 4 W. of Low-Moor. It is a station on the branch line of the Manchester and Leeds railway, which passes along the S. bank of the river Calder. Facilities for water-carriage are afforded by the Calder and Hebble navigation. The village, which is very considerable, is situated on the old London road between Leeds and Halifax. This place takes its name from its elevated situation, overlooking the fertile valley of the Calder. The township comprises the hamlets of Lightcliffe and Coleys. The cotton and silk manufactures are extensively carried on. There are also stone quarries, collieries, and a tannery. The land is principally in pasture. The soils are light and sandy, with a substratum abounding in coal and freestone. The township is comprised within the manor of Wakefield, for which a court leet and baron is held half-yearly. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £150, in the patronage of the vicar. The church, dedicated to St. John, which was rebuilt in 1800, has a square tower containing one bell. The parochial charities produce about £155 per annum, of which £119 goes to Broadley's free grammar school. The Wesleyans and Independents have each a place of worship. There is a National school, also a Sunday-school."


"HOLDSWORTH, a village in the township of Ovenden, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.W. of Halifax."


"HOLLINS, a hamlet in the township of Upper Warley and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Halifax."


"HOLYWELL GREEN, a village in the township of Stainland, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 3 miles S. of Halifax. It is a large manufacturing village, the inhabitants being chiefly engaged in the cotton and woollen mills."


"ILLINGWORTH, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Mosley, West Riding county York, 2½ miles N.W. of Halifax. The village, which is considerable, may be considered a suburb of Halifax. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value £140, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church is dedicated to St. Mary. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. There is a National school."


"KING CROSS, a village in the townships of Shircoat and South Owram, parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile E. of Halifax. It is situated near the river Aire. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £180, in the patronage of the crown and bishop alternately. The church is dedicated to St. Paul."


"KNOWLS, a hamlet in the township of Fixby and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.E. of Halifax, and 2 N. of Huddersfield."


"LANGFIELD, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 9 miles W. of Halifax. It is situated in the vale of Todmorden, on the Rochford canal and Manchester and Leeds railway. It contains part of the town of Todmorden, and the hamlets of Stoodley and Mankinholes. On a hill in the hamlet of Stoodley is a column to the Duke of Wellington, erected in 1814. A portion of the inhabitants are employed in the woollen manufacture. The land is chiefly moorland or common, belonging to the freeholders, who departure it in lots proportioned to the extent of their freeholds. On the moors are two capacious reservoirs for the supply of the canal and the various mills in the neighbourhood. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A sheep fair is held at Lamberts on the 11th September."


"LEE BRIDGE, a village in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3 miles from Halifax. It is situated near the river Calder and Rochdale canal. Part of the inhabitants are engaged in the coal and iron mines."


"LIGHTCLIFFE, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3 miles E. of Halifax. It is a station on the Leeds, Bradford, and Halifax Junction railway. The village is situated in the fertile valley of the Calder, and on the road from Halifax to Lees. In the village are several modern mansions. There are quarries of building stone. The living is a perpetual curacy, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Matthew, has a campanile turret. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans."


"LUDDENDEN, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, about 3 miles N.W. of Halifax. The villages of Luddenden and Luddenden Foot are situated partly in the township of Midgley, and partly in that of Warley. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the various cotton, woollen, worsted, paper, and corn mills. It is watered by Luddenden Brook, a tributary of the river Aire. The surface is boldly varied, rising into hills of lofty elevation, and commanding some mountain scenery. At Luddenden Foot is a station on the Lancashire and Yorkshire line of railway. The Manchester canal passes through the neighbourhood. Stone of excellent quality is extensively quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £170, in the patronage of the vicar of the parish. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, was rebuilt in 1821 at an expense of £3,000, and has a square embattled tower, crowned with pinnacles. The Wesleyans have a chapel at Luddenden, and the Independents one at Luddenden Foot."


"MIDGLEY, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 5½ miles W. of Halifax, its post town, and three quarters of a mile from the railway station at Luddenden-foot. The township, which is straggling, is situated on the Manchester canal and railway, and includes parts of the villages of Mythomroyd, Luddenden, and Luddenden-foot. The township of Midgley forms a portion of the N. side of the vale of Calder. A great part of it, being mountainous moorland, is uncultivated. There are some cotton and worsted mills, also a paper mill. At Charlesworth is a thick seam of plate coal, but from its depth and the want of sufficient drainage, it is difficult to work. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £170, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a stone edifice, with a square tower con taming one bell. The parochial charities produce about £40 per annum, which is distributed in bread among the poor widows weekly. The Independents, Wesleyans, and New Connexion Methodists have places of worship at Midgley. Thomas Riley, Esq., of Ewood Hall, is lord of the manor."


"MIXENDEN, a village in the township of Ovenden and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, near Halifax."


"MYTHOLD, a hamlet in the township of Stansfield, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile E. of Hebden-Bridge. It is situated in the secluded vale of Todmorden. The surrounding country is hilly moor land. In the vicinity are extensive quarries of gritstone, also collieries and iron-works. The living is a perpetual curacy in the dioc, of Ripon, and in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. James, was erected here in 1835, at an expense of £2,700, defrayed by the parliamentary commissioners, exclusive of the site given by the Rev. J. Armytage Rhodes."


"MYTHOLMROYD, a village in the townships of Wadsworth and Midgley, parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 4 miles W. of Halifax. It is a station on the eastern section of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway. It is situated in the valley of the Calder, and on the road from Halifax to Todmorden. The Rochdale canal and the line of the Leeds and Manchester railway pass near the village. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the cotton and worsted mills in the vicinity. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £156, in the patronage of the crown and bishop alternately. The church is a convenient modern edifice, with schoolhouse attached, the gift of W. Sutcliffe, Esq."


"NEW BANK, a hamlet in the township of North Owram and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax."


"NEWTOWN, a village in the township of North Owram, parish of Halifax, and wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax. It is situated near the river Calder and Rochdale canal."


"NORLAND, a township in the chapelry of Sowerby Bridge, and parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2½ miles S.W. of Halifax, and 10 E. of Todmorden. The village is inconsiderable, but there are numerous small hamlets and detached houses scattered over the southern slope of Calder Vale, near the Manchester and Leeds railway, which passes through the N. part of the township. The substratum is principally millstone grit, which is extensively quarried near North Dean. The Lad-stone on Norland Moor is in this neighbourhood. Within a short distance of the village are Fielding's chemical works. A portion of the inhabitants are engaged in the woollen trade. There is a place of worship for the New Connexion Methodists. The Earl of Scarborough is lord of the manor. Edward Warnhouse bequeathed in 1686 some land and cottages, now producing £20 per annum, for the poor."


"NORTHOWRAM, (or North Owram), a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Halifax, its post town. The village, which is of large extent, is situated on the Halifax and Bradford high road. The township includes. Booth-Town, Shibden, Queen's Head, and five other villages, There are extensive collieries, stone quarries, and silk, worsted, and card manufactories, giving employment to a large number of the inhabitants. The land is principally in pasture. There is a mineral spring in the neighbourhood of Shibden-Dale. The soil is loamy, with a subsoil of clay upon stone. A church, dedicated to St. Thomas, with a spired tower, was erected at Hill-Top in 1861. At Booth-Town are some almshouses, which were founded in 1647 by Jeremiah Hall, M.D., also a school for children of both sexes. The Independents, Wesleyans, Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and New Connexion Methodists have each a place of worship."


"OLD LANE, a village in the township of Northowram and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile N.E. of Halifax."


"OLD LINDLEY, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3 miles S. of Halifax. It is in conjunction with Stainland."


"OLD TOWN, a village in the township of Wadsworth, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 6 miles N.W. of Halifax."


"OVENDEN, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 1½ mile N.W. of Halifax, its post town, and 7 miles S.W. of Bradford. The town, which is of large extent, but of straggling form, is situated on the road to Keighley and Craven, between the river Hebble and the Ovenden Brook. It chiefly consists of detached houses and scattered hamlets irregularly built. The township, which is of large extent, containing about 6,295 acres, comprises the chapelry of Illingworth, the ecclesiastical district of Bradshaw, and the hamlets of Leebank, Mixenden, Nursery Lane, Hebble Bridge, Wheatley, Holdsworth, and Moorside. A large portion of the inhabitants are employed in the woollen, worsted, and cotton mills, which are numerous and extensive, and a few in the weaving of damasks and lastings. The surface is varied, and at the commencement of the present century one-third was open common, but is now enclosed under an Act of Parliament passed in 1814. The tithes were commuted for land in 1814. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £130, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, which is situated at Illingworth, is dedicated to St. Mary, and has a square tower containing one bell. At Popples are almshouses for widows and spinsters upwards of fifty years of age. There is a free school, with an annuity of £25, for the instruction of thirty children, also a Church school and an infant school. There are several places of worship for the Dissenters in the neighbouring villages. The Earl of Scarborough is lord of the manor and principal landowner."


"PELLON, (and Mount Pellon), villages in the townships of Ovenden and Halifax, parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, near Halifax."


"RASTRICK, a township and chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3½ miles N. of Huddersfield, and 5 S.E. of Halifax. Normanton is its post town. This chapelry is bounded on the N.E. by the river Calder, and is skirted by the Calder and Hebble navigation. The village, which is of large extent, is situated on the road from Huddersfield to Bradford, and near the Manchester and Leeds railway, which latter passes through part of the township, and has a station at Brighouse. There are silk and woollen mills, which employ a large number of the inhabitants. The substratum abounds in building-stone of excellent quality, and which is largely quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £135, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Matthew, was rebuilt at the commencement of the present century, and is a Grecian edifice with a cupola. The parochial charities produce about £16 per annum, exclusive of a small clothing charity. There is a Church school for the free education of 20 children, endowed with an annuity of £56. There is also a British and Foreign school, erected and endowed by the late John Clay, Esq. The Independents have a chapel, and there is a meeting-house belonging to the Society of Friends. C. C. Thornhill, Esq., is lord of the manor and principal landowner."


"RIPPONDEN, a village and chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 5½ miles S. W. of Halifax. It includes an extensive district comprising the townships of Barkisland and Soyland. The village is situated on the Rochdale road in a valley watered by a branch of the river Calder, under Blackstone Edge. It suffered greatly from a flood in May, 1722, when the waters in the valley suddenly rose 21 feet above their ordinary level, bearing down in their course the mills and bridges on the river, and destroying many houses in the village. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £175, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, was rebuilt in 1737, the former one having been partly destroyed by the flood. It has a square tower, and the cemetery is enclosed by a yew-tree hedge cut into semicircular arches. The living was once held by the Rev. J. Watson, author of the "History of Halifax.""


"RISHWORTH, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 6 miles S.W. of Halifax, its post town. The township is of large extent, comprising above 6,000 acres, nearly two-thirds of which are uncultivated moor, bordering on the Blackstone and Booth Dean range of hills. The village, which is situated on the old Manchester road, is straggling. A portion of the inhabitants are employed in the cotton and paper mills. The free grammar school, founded by John Wheelwright, of North Shields, in 1727, is situated in this township. The trustees of the Savile estates are lords of the manor. Near the Rockingstone is a mineral spring, called the Booth Dean Spring. On the summits of some of the hills are Druidical remains, and on others traces of ancient encampments."


"SALTER HEBBLE, a village and ecclesiastical district in the township of Skircoat, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile S. of Halifax, of which it may be considered a suburb. It is a populous place, containing in 1861 4,258 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £160, in the patronage of the crown and bishop alternately. The church is modern. See Halifax."


"SALTONSALL, a hamlet in the township of Warley and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Halifax."


"SHAW HILL, a hamlet in the township of Skircoat, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile S. of Halifax, near the Leeds canal and the river Calder."


"SHELF, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3½ miles N.E. of Halifax, its post town, and 4 from Bradford. The village, which is large, is situated on the New Bradford road. A large portion of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of worsted and damask, and others in agriculture. The district is productive of good coal, ironstone, and freestone, all of which are extensively worked. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £200, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is dedicated to St. Michael. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists, also National and Lancastrian schools."


"SKIRCOAT, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, half a mile S.W. of Halifax, its post town. It is situated on the line of the Manchester and Leeds railway, near the junction of the rivers Calder and Hebble. The township includes the hamlets of Skircoat Green, Heath, Shaw Hill, Woodhouse, Salter Hebble, and King Cross. A portion of the inhabitants are employed in the cotton and woollen mills, and there are several dyeing works and flour-mills. Skircoat-Moor is a heath of 150 acres, commanding views of Halifax and the surrounding country. On the banks of the Calder and Hebble navigation are spacious wharves and warehouses. The living is a donative curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £15. An episcopal proprietary chapel was erected on Skircoat-Moor in 1826. There are National schools for both sexes, and infant schools. The Wesleyans, Independents, and Methodists of the New Connexion have places of worship."


"SOUTHOWRAM, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 2 miles S. of North Owram, and 1½ mile S.E. of Halifax. It is situated near the river Aire and the line of the Manchester and Leeds railway. There are extensive slate and stone quarries at Cromwell Bottom. Two beds of coal lie below the stone, and are worked at several places in this township. The village, which is large, is situated on an eminence rising precipitously from the river Hebble, opposite to the town of Halifax. The principal seats are Ashday Hall and Ashgrove. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Ann, was founded in the reign of Henry VIII. by John Lacey, but was rebuilt in 1819 at an expense of £2,200. It has a square embattled tower crowned with pinnacles. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. There is a National school, and a school founded in 1787 by Sir William Staines."


"SOWERBY, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3½ miles S.W. of Halifax, its post town, and 9½ N.W. of Huddersfield. The village, which is extensive, is situated on the river Calder. The parish contains part of the villages of Sowerby Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the cotton and woollen mills, foundries, and stone quarries. There is a large portion of moorland, and the substratum is productive of coal. Several Roman coins were discovered here in 1678. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £160, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, has a square tower containing eight bells. The interior of the church contains a statue of Archbishop Tillotson, who was born here in 1630, and died 1694, also a tablet to ten soldiers who fell in the Crimean war. In addition to the parish church are the following district churches, viz:, St. Mary's, St. George's, Sowerby-bridge, and Stainland, the livings of which are all perpetual curacies, varying in value from £230 to £150. The parochial charities produce about £127, of which £16 go to Bairstow's school, and £10 to Horton's almshouses. There is a National school for both sexes, also places of worship for Dissenters. Lead-stone Rock, formerly a very perfect Druidical remain, with an altar and seat round it, was broken up in 1830, and used in building a church."


"SOWERBY BRIDGE, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 1½ mile S.W. of Halifax, of which it is an extensive suburb. It includes the townships of Norland, Skircoat, Sowerby, and Warley. See Sowerby and Halifax."


"SOYLAND, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 4½ miles S.W. of Halifax, its post town. The mountain ridge of Blackstone Edge separates this place from Lancashire. The township is extensive, and contains the villages of Ripponden and Soyland, besides several scattered hamlets A large portion of the inhabitants are employed in the cotton and woollen mills. There is a mineral spring called the Swift Cross Spa. [See Halifax.]"


"STAINLAND, (with Old Lindley), a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Halifax, its post town, and 1½ mile from North Dean railway station. The village, which is extensive, is situated on an eminence above the vale of Dean Head, near the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway, and the Roman way from Slack to Manchester. The township includes the hamlet of Holywell Green. A large portion of the inhabitants are employed in the cotton, worsted, and paper mills. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £150, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax. The Wesleyans, Independents, and Methodists of the New Connexion have chapels."


"STANSFIELD, a township in the chapelry of Heptonstall, parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York. It is an extensive and populous township, bounded on the N. and N.W. by the county of Lancaster, on the E. by the rivulet Coldenbrook, and on the S. by the river Calder. It comprises near 6,000 acres, chiefly the property of the Earl of Scarborough, who is lord of the manor, and in 1861 had a population of 8,174, many of whom are employed in the cotton, woollen, worsted, and silk manufactures, besides a considerable number in agriculture. There is no village of the name properly so called, but numerous scattered hamlets and detached houses, included in the ecclesiastical district of Crosstone, and the adjoining town of Todmorden, of which a considerable portion is within this township."


"STONE, a hamlet in the parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.W. of Huddersfield."


"STOODLEY, a hamlet in the township of Langfield, parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 9 miles W. of Halifax."


"WADSWORTH, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 6 miles N.W. of Halifax. It is situated on the confluence of the rivers Calder and Hebden, near the Rochdale canal. It is the largest township in the parish, including the hamlets of Old Town, Hebden Bridge, and Mytholmroyd. The surface is uneven, and the chief part of the land is in moor and unenclosed sheep walks, affording tolerable pasture. The Baptists have chapels at Birchcliffe and Wainsgate, the Peculiar Baptists at Nutclough, and the Wesleyans at Crimsworth. The Earl of Scarborough is lord of the manor."


"WARLEY, a township in the parish of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Halifax, its post town, and 3 E. of Hebden Bridge railway station. It is situated on the Manchester railway and canal, near the logan stone, and is divided into Upper and Lower Warley. The township includes the hamlets of Coathill, Friendley, Denholme, Hollins, Saltonstall, and parts of Sowerby and Luddenden. The inhabitants are principally employed in the numerous worsted and woollen mills, iron foundries, chemical works, and stone quarries. There is no church, the inhabitants frequenting those of Sowerby Bridge and Midgley. There is an endowed National school in connexion with Midgley, and Sunday-schools at Luddenham and Warley Town. The Methodists have a chapel at Luddenden, the Independents one at Luddenden Foot, the Calvinists at Butts Green, Independents at Warley Town, and the Primitive Methodists at Cotehill. S. W. L. Fox, Esq., is lord of the manor."


"WHEATLEY, a village in the township of Ovenden and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.W. of Halifax."


"WOODHOUSE, a hamlet in the township of Skircoat, and parish of Halifax, West Riding county York, 1 mile S. of Halifax."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013