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Help and advice for RIPLEY: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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RIPLEY: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"RIPLEY, a parish and post town in the wapentake of Claro, West Riding county York, 3½ miles from High Harrogate, 5 W. of Knaresborough, and 22 N.W. of York. It is situated on the Leeds and Thirsk railway, and near the river Nidd. The parish comprises the townships of Clint and Killinghall, besides the village of Ripley, which was formerly a market town. The town occupies rising ground, about half a mile N. from the river, and consists chiefly of one broad street. All the old houses have been taken down, and replaced by others constructed of stone. The townhall, designated the Hotel de Ville, was erected at the expense of Lady Amcotts Ingilby, in 1841. The surface is varied by hill and dale, and the higher grounds command some good views. The soil is rich and fertile, with a subsoil of clay. It is chiefly famed for its production of liquorice. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Ripon, value £640. The church, dedicated to All Saints, is an ancient cruciform structure, with a square embattled tower containing three bells. The interior of the church contains monuments of the Ingilby family, including one of Sir Thomas Ingilby, Justice of the Common Pleas in the reign of Edward III. In the churchyard is the stump of an ancient cross, with eight niches, apparently intended for kneeling. The parochial charities produce about £298 per annum, of which £206 goes to Admiral Long's free school, and £40 to Ingilby's school. There is an infant school, in which a Sunday-school is also held. Ripley Castle, originally built in 1555, but recently enlarged, is a castellated mansion, situated in a park. It was here Oliver Cromwell lodged the night before the battle of Marston-Moor. Ripley was the birth-place of Ripley, the alchemist, and of Archbishop Pullen. The Rev. H. J. Ingilby, M.A., is lord of the manor and principal landowner. Fairs are held on Easter Monday and Tuesday, and on the 25th and 26th of August for cattle."


"BURNT YATES, a hamlet in the township of Clint, and parish of Ripley, wapentake of Clare, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile from Ripley."


"CLINT, a township in the parish of Ripley, in the lower division of the wapentake of Clare, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1 mile W. of Ripley station. There is a free school endowed by Rear-Admiral Long in 1760. The charities include the Winsley Hall estate and a legacy of £140. The Duke of Devonshire is lord of the manor."


"KILLINGHALL, a township in the parish of Ripley, lower division of the wapentake of Claro, West Riding county York, 1 mile S. of Ripley. It is situated on the S. side of the river Nidd, and on the road between Ripley and Harrogate. It has a station on the Nidd Valley branch of the North-Eastern railway. The village is considerable, and neatly built. It formerly belonged to the Chomleys, from whom it passed to the Lawsons. The soil is light. The Wesleyans have a chapel, and there is a Church school for both sexes. The Duke of Devonshire is lord of the manor."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013