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Help and advice for THORNE: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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THORNE: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"THORNE, a parish, post and market town, in the S. division of Strafforth wapentake, West Riding county York, 7 miles S.E. of Snaith, 11 N.E. of Doncaster, and 28 S.E. of York. It is a station on the South Yorkshire and Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincoln railways. It is situated on the verge of the moors, and near the centre of Hatfield chase, the enclosure of which was completed in 1824. The parish, which is intersected by the Stainforth and Keadby canal and the river Don, includes the hamlets of Bradholme, Ditchmarsh, Waterside, Levels, Moor Ends, and Hangman Hill Quay. The land formerly consisted of flat moor and marsh, but was drained by Sir Cornelius Vermuyden in the reign of Charles I., and is now converted into good arable and pasture land. Many of the inhabitants are employed in rope-making, barge-building, malting, brewing, sacking-weaving, and in the carrying trade. The Union poorhouse is situated near the lock. In Leland's time Thorne was only a small village, with a castle near it-the foundations of which are still visible-but has since become a flourishing town. The streets are paved and lighted with gas, and many of the houses are well built. The population of the parish in 1861 was 3,381, and of the town 2,591. The moor is covered with heather, and is remarkable for insects, mosses, etc., and for a fern named Lustrea cristata, which is found in only two other places in England. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value £117. The church, dedicated to St. Nicholas, is of the time of Edward III., with a tower and five bells. The parochial charities produce about £240 per annum. The great tithes realise £1,600. There are a mechanics' institute, Union poorhouse, &c. The Independents, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, New Connexion Methodists, Unitarians, and Society of Friends have chapels. Market day is on Wednesday. Fairs are held on the Monday and Tuesday following 11th June and 11th October, chiefly for horses, cattle, and pedlary."


"BRADHOLME, a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, not far from Thorne."


"DITCHMARSH, a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, in the West Riding of the county of York, 25 miles S.S.E. of York."


"HANGMAN HILL, a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, West Riding county York, 2 miles from Thorne."


"LEVELS, a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, West Riding county York, 2 miles S.W. of Thorne."


"MOOR ENDS, a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, wapentake of South Strafforth, West Riding county York, 25 miles S. by E. of York. It is situated near the river Don, and in the vicinity of Hatfield Chase. The surface is flat and moory and marshy, but fertile."


"WATERSIDE, (or Quay), a hamlet in the parish of Thorne, West Riding county York."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013