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TICKHILL: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

"TICKHILL, a parish in the southern division of the wapentake of STRAFFORTH-and-TICKHILL, West riding of the county of YORK, comprising the town of Tickhill, the township of Stancill with Wellingley and Wilsick, and containing 1884 inhabitants, of which number 1830 are in the town of Tickhill, 45 miles S. from York, and 157 N.W. from London. This manor having been given by William the Conqueror to Roger de Busli, he erected or rebuilt a castle, which was given by King Stephen to the Count of Eu, in Normandy; but it afterwards reverted to the crown, and was granted, by Richard I., to his brother, Prince John. In the reign of Henry III., it was restored to the Count of Eu, but, after several changes, became again vested in the crown, in the reign of Henry IV. At the commencement of the great civil war, the castle, then considered a very strong fortress, was garrisoned for the king; and, after a siege of two days, was surrendered to the assailants, and soon after dismantled by order of parliament. The town is situated in a fertile valley, on the border of the county of Nottingham: the streets, which are arranged in the form of a cross, are neat and spacious the houses are in general of respectable appearance, but built in a straggling manner, and the inhabitants are well supplied with water. The trade in malt was formerly extensive, but at present there are not more than three kilns; a small paper manufactory affords employment to a few persons. The market, formerly held on Friday, is entirely disused. A fair is held on August filst, for cattle and various articles of merchandise. The market cross is a circular building of stone, erected in 1776, and situated in the centre of the town. Manorial courts leet and baron are held annually. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the archdeaconry and diocese of York, rated in the king's books at £7- 2. 6., endowed with £200 royal bounty, and in the patronage, of G. S. Foljambe, Esq. The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a handsome structure in the later style of English architecture, having a fine tower with pinnacles; it was greatly injured by lightning in 1825, but has recently undergone an entire repair, at an expense of £1950. In the chancel is an altar-tomb, ornamented at the sides with large quatrefoils, to the memory of William Estfield, seneschal of the lordship of Holderness, and of the honour of Tickhill, who died in 1386; at the east end of the south aisle is an alabaster monument, with the effigies of a knight' and his lady. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyan Methodists. A National school for children of both sexes is supported by voluntary contributions, aided by an annuity of £4. 8. 8. from the duchy of Lancaster; sixty boys and forty girls are educated. Near the church is a Maison de Dieu, comprising fourteen almshouses for poor widows, of uncertain foundation. The remains of the castle, on the south-east side of the town, consist of the mound, on which the foundations of the keep are visible; the ditch, with part of the external walls, and a dilapidated Norman gateway. The northern part, by considerable repairs and additions, has been changed into a modern residence, and the ground within the walls is formed into gardens and shrubberies. The ruins of an ancient Augustine priory, founded in the reign of Henry III, and situated in an adjacent vale, have been converted into a farmhouse. John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, resided at Tickhill castle."


"STANCILL, a township, joint with Wellingley and Wilsick, in the parish of TICKHILL, southern division of the wapentake of STRAFFORTH-and-TICKHILL, West riding of the county of YORK, 3 miles N.N.E. from Tickhill, containing, with Wellingley and Wilsick, 54 inhabitants."


"WELLINGLEY, a township, joint with Stancill and Wilsick, in the parish of TICKHILL, southern division of the wapentake of STRAFFORTH-and-TICKHILL, West riding of the county of YORK, 2 miles N.W. from Tickhill. The population is returned with Stancill."


"WILSICK, a township, joint with Stancill and Wellingley, in the parish of TICKHILL, southern division of the wapentake of STRAFFORTH-and-TICKHILL, West riding of the county of YORK, 6 miles S.W. from Doncaster. The population is returned with Stancill."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]