GENUKI Home page
Kilkenny Contents Parishes and Towns

 

CLONAMERY

"Clonamery", also Cloneamery, Cloneamera, or Clowen, a parish, in the barony of Ida, county of Kilkenny, and province of Leinster, 1 miles (S. E.) from Innistiogue, containing 777 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the left bank of the river Nore, and on the mail coach road from Dublin to New Ross, by way of Thomastown, comprises 3277 statute acres, of which 170 are woodland, 648 mountain and waste, 129 bog, and the remainder arable and pasture land. It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Ossory, forming the corps of the prebend of Cloneamery in the cathedral of St. Canice, Kilkenny, and part of the union of Innistiogue, in the patronage of the Bishop. In the R. C. divisions also it forms part of the union or district of Innistiogue; the chapel is at Clediagh. Here is a private school, in which about 60 boys abd 30 girls are educated. Bishop Pococke bequethed 116 planatation acres of mountain land, called Bishop's Hill, for the instruction of children, which is held by the Incorporated School Society. On a steep mound near the river stand the ruins of Clowen castle, belonging to the Fitzgeralds, and singularly divided into two parts. In a romantic creek up the Nore is Clodagh waterfall; it is a cascade of great beauty falling down a rugged precipice of about 60 feet.
[From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837)]

Church Records

Civil Parish: Clonamery. RC Parish: Inistioge.
Earliest Records: b. Dec 1810; m. Jan 1827.

Cross reference to Family History Library microfilm (double-check with the Library)

Civil 		Roman Catholic		Time 		FHLC
parish		parish			period		number
Clonamery	Inistiogue		not available

Historical Geography

Townlands (1851)
Parish		Townland		Acres	Diocese
Clonamery	Ballygub New		1553	Ossory    
Clonamery	Ballygub Old		252	Ossory    
Clonamery	Bishopsland       	190	Ossory    
Clonamery	Clonamery    		554	Ossory    
Clonamery	Coolnamuck     		493	Ossory    
Clonamery	Oldcourt      		345	Ossory    
Edited by Dennis Walsh, last updated 10 Apr 1999

Return to top of page